Current Research

Cognitive and Language Abilities in Alzheimer’s disease

The purpose of this research project is to determine how declines in semantic memory impact language abilities. The results of this research will inform theories of discourse, as well as possibly improve the screening methods for neurocognitive impairments, such as Alzheimer’s disease.

Click here to participate in the research project, Cognitive and Language Abilities in Alzheimer’s disease.

Reading and Language Study for Older Adults

The purpose of this research is to understand how reading changes across the lifespan. The results of this study will inform theories on aging and reading.

Click here to participate in the research project, Reading and Language Abilities in Older Adults.

Discourse Abilities in Adults Across the Lifespan

The purpose of this research project is to determine whether age-related changes in discourse processes correspond to age-related changes in cognitive processes, such as attention and memory. The results of this research will inform theories of discourse and cognitive aging as well as provide a normative database for clinical application to individuals with communication disorders associated with aging disorders and acquired neurogenic communication disorders.

Click here to participate in the research project, Discourse Abilities in Adults Across the Lifespan.

Cognitive and Language Abilities in Adults with Aphasia

Adults with aphasia have communication difficulties that span across both their ability to speak as well as understand language. The purpose of this research project is to identify how cognitive processes, such as attention and memory, interact with language in adults with aphasia. The results of this research will inform our understanding of how cognitive attention and memory impact communication abilities in adults with aphasia and may contribute to advances in treatment strategies for aphasia.

Click here to participate in the research project, Cognitive and Language Abilities in Adults with Aphasia.