Monthly Archives: April 2013

4th Annual ECU Anthropology Alumni Lectures – Dr. Cynthia Bellacero

Anthro Alumni Lecture Award

Anthro Alumni Lecture Award

The Audience

The Audience

Dr. Bellacero

Dr. Bellacero

On April 24th, the 4th Annual ECU Alumni Lectures celebrated our fifth and FINAL speaker – Dr. Cynthia Bellacero! Dr. Bellacero is a 2004 (M.A) and 2001 (B.A.) graduate who received her masters and undergraduate degrees from East Carolina University. She later received her doctorate from Florida State University. Dr. Bellacero’s concentration in anthropology is Prehistoric Archaeology. Currently, Dr. Bellacero is the Department Chair for Social Sciences at Craven Community College. The title of her talk was, “From Archaeology to Administration: It Can Happen to You.”

As a reminder, the purpose of ECU Anthropology Alumni Lecture series is designed for former ECU anthropology students to share their expertise and experiences to current anthropology students who are preparing to graduate or who are anticipating to graduate in the next few years. We hope this lecture series creates more of a constructive, practical dialogue between recent ECU anthropology graduates with current ECU anthropology majors.

Dr. Bellacero’s lecture was informative, indepth, and enlightening as she shared her experiences in becoming a top administrator at a local community college in North Carolina. Yet before she became the Chairperson of Social Sciences at Craven Community College, Dr. Bellacero stated that when she graduated from ECU with her bachelor’s degree, there were a number of business companies interested in her because of her skills as an anthropology major. Those skills are communication skills, organization skills and the ability to work with diverse audiences. Nonetheless, Dr. Bellacero completed her masters work at ECU and then completed her doctorate work at Florida State University.

With her doctorate completed, Dr. Bellacero taught anthropology classes for several years. After these years of teaching anthropology classes, Dr. Bellacero decided to apply for the Chairperson position at Craven Community College and was selected to be the Chair.

Now as Chairperson for Social Sciences, Dr. Bellacero stated she has numerous responsiblilities and activities which include assessment of faculty, working with all types of student issues, writing grants for the college, developing collaborative initiatives with other academic institutions, coordinating yearly student abroad trips (Peru, Ireland), and planning all types of global initiatives for the college.

Finally, one of the key skills that Dr. Bellacero emphasized as her role as Chair was “Learning to Create Order.”. Creating order is a skill and strategy that all administrators and leaders must do well if they decide to make it their career. After questions from the audience (students and faculty), it was obvious that Dr. Bellacero is an outstanding administrator and leader who just so happens has an anthropological training. Thus, the title of her talk, “From Archaeology to Administration: It Can Happen to You,” was most fitting to our Anthropology Alumni lecture series and the final lecture for the year!

4th Annual ECU Anthropology Alumni Lectures – Kyle McCandless

Receiving Award

Receiving Award

Audience

Audience

Kyle McCandless

Kyle McCandless

On April 17th, the 4th Annual ECU Alumni Lectures celebrated our fourth speaker – Kyle McCandless! Kyle McCandless is a 2012 graduate who received his masters in Anthropology. Currently, Kyle is an instructor and in a faculty training program at Gilford Technical Community College in Jamestown, NC – near Greensboro. The title of his talk was, “Education and the Real World: Integration and Transitions.”

As a reminder, the purpose of ECU Anthropology Alumni Lecture series is designed for former ECU anthropology students to share their expertise and experiences to current anthropology students who are preparing to graduate or who are anticipating to graduate in the next few years. We hope this lecture series creates more of a constructive, practical dialogue between recent ECU anthropology graduates with current ECU anthropology majors.

Kyle’s lecture was very personable, insightful and down-right practical with all of his entertaining words of wisdom. Kyle began his talk by admitting that he was a high-school drop out at the age of 16! He said he wanted to experience the real world so he began working all types of jobs particularly retail and sales jobs. After a few years of the real world, Kyle eventually got his high school degree and enrolled in community college at Gilford Technical Community College. Kyle received his biology degree and later achieved his bachelor’s degree in the fields of Classics and Archaeology. In the meantime, Kyle continued to work in all types of jobs including working at the airport and laboratory work in the medical library.

What was so fascinating about Kyle’s talk was that he STRONGLY emphasized that it was his REAL WORLD job experiences that provided him the real SKILLS to be an instructor today at Gilford Technical Community College. The SKILLS that Kyle learned from his jobs were teamwork, time management, computer knowledge, typing, and communicate effectively.

Along with emphasizing the skills that he has acquired through his life experiences, Kyle had a number of WORDS OF WISDOM or “sayings” that made his talk captivating. Here are a few of them:

“If you are not ahead, you are behind.”
“Build people up from their knowledge base.”
“Pay attention to your interaction with others.”
“Expect to use your universal skill sets.”
“Procrastinating is the dumbest way to be lazy.”
“My attitude determined my outlook.”
“Turn your obstacles into opportunities.”
“Commit to the process.”

Finally, Kyle completed his talk with the following themes: Act on your skills; Ninety-nine (99%) percent of what you will do as a professional will not be related to your discipline; and Use obstacles as opportunities. Kyle’s major themes from his talk and all of his comments were EXACTLY what the students needed to hear. Thus, the title of his talk, “Education and the Real World” Integration and Transitions,” also connected to the major themes of our ECU Anthropology Alumni Lecture series.

4th Annual ECU Anthropology Alumni Lectures – Daryl Armour

The audience

The audience

Daryl receiving Alumni Award

Daryl receiving Alumni Award

Daryl Armour

Daryl Armour

On April 10th, the 4th Annual ECU Alumni Lectures celebrated our third speaker – Daryl Armour! Daryl Armour is a 2012 graduate who received his masters in anthropology and concentration in archaeology. Currently, Daryl is an archeologist, research fellow working for Fort Bragg, NC. The title of his talk was, “My Experiences within Cultural Resource Management.”

As a reminder, the purpose of ECU Anthropology Alumni Lecture series is designed for former ECU anthropology students to share their experise and experiences to current anthropology students who are preparing to graduate or who are anticipating to graduate in the next few years. We hope this lecture series creates more of a constructive, practical dialogue between recent ECU anthropology graduates with current ECU anthropology majors.

Daryl’s lecture was well organized, informative and entertaining and truly highlighted the differences between CRM archaeology versus Public Archaeology. In general, Daryl talked about the field of Cultural Resource Management, CRM – The Industry, What you can expect from working in CRM, What you can expect to be paid in CRM, and his advice to students who are interested in the field of CRM.

In particular, Daryl’s advice for soon-to-be graduates was:
1. Network with Co-workers/professionals.
2. Always ask questions.
3. Always think about how to advance your skills and figure out how to bring out your talents to the table.
4. Remember your ethnics.

Finally, Daryl suggested that individuals interested in CRM should get additional training and skill development in G.I.S., Database Management; and Writing Skills. In addition, interested graduates can get information on jobs at various websites, blogs and new podcasts specifically on how to start your own CRM company. It was quite apparent that Daryl had learn alot in just a few years being in the field and that’s why his talk was an excellent opportunity for students to learn about his experience. Just as the title of his talk stated – “My Experiences within CRM.”

4th Annual ECU Anthropology Alumni Lectures – Christine Andresen

Christine Andresen and Dr. Eric Bailey

Christine Andresen and Dr. Eric Bailey


Christine Andresen and the audience

Christine Andresen and the audience

Christine Andresen

Christine Andresen

On April 3rd, the 4th Annual ECU Anthropology Alumni Lectures celebrated our second speaker – Christine Andresen! Christine is a 2007 graduate who received her bachelors in anthropology and a MA in Library science in 2010. Currently, Christine works for ECU’s Laupus library as an Instructional Design Librarian. The title of her talk was, “Anthropologist in the Library: An Unexpected Adventure.”

As a reminder, the purpose of ECU Anthropology Alumni Lecture series is designed for former ECU anthropology students to share their expertise and experiences to current anthropology students who are preparing to graduate or who are anticipating to graduate in the next few years. We hope this lecture series creates more of a constructive, practical dialogue between recent ECU anthrpology graduates with current ECU anthropology majors.

Christine’s lecture was precisely what the students needed to hear because Christine said that she didn’t have a specific plan to follow after graduation – it just happened. In fact, although Christine specialized in cultural anthropology (and took my Medical Anthropolgoy class a few years ago) and had hoped to travel the world using her cultural anthropology expertise, she realized that immediate opportunities with her bachelor’s degree in anthropology did not occur. She therefore had to resort to her back-up plan and take the advice from her grandmother. Her grandmother suggested that she volunteer at ECU’s library. Well, it just so happened that eventually ECU hired Christine as a liaison and instructional design librarian.

Christine’s talk was casual and informal in which she shared many of the pratical, real-life issues that many graduates face. Although her plans did not go as planned initially, she found ways to create new opportunities and skills simply by working hard in the jobs that became available to her. One thing lead to another and now she is the liasion for the Dental School and instructional design librarian. Christine is also enrolled in another graduate program to receive her second Masters. This one will be in Instructional Design Technology. With this second masters degree, Christine indicated that it will make her more of an expert in several areas and marketable because every library needs an expert to teach faculty and students about how to use the latest research data bases for their individual needs.

Ironically, I can attest to Christine’s outstanding expertise because a couple of hours after her talk to students, I was involved in a research database training session for faculty in the Belk building and guess who was the instructor — Christine along with her colleague from ECU library! What a small world and what a great outcome for our outstanding anthropology major who is working for ECU as an Instructional Design Librarian! Indeed, the title of Christine’s talk is fitting to where she is now in her career — “Anthropologist in the Library: An Unexpected Adventure.”

Check out a few photos from her talk!