Category Archives: Medical Anthropology

SPRING 2017 SEMESTER – TEACHING ANOTHER HONORS COLLEGE SEMINAR COURSE ON RACE RELATIONS AND MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND ETHNIC HEALTH and HEALTH DISPARITIES

Where has the time gone? It’s March already and I finally have the chance to update my Course Happenings Blog! As you can guess, it’s another busy semester yet just as enjoyable as last year because I have another set of outstanding students in my Honors Seminar course as well as excellent students in my undergraduate Medical Anthropology course and graduate¬†Ethnic Health & Health Disparities course.

As a reminder, here is the course description of my Honors Race Relations seminar:

Why is the United State still having major race relations problems in 2017? Do you want to continue to sit along the sidelines or help solve this issue in our country particularly here at ECU? This course aims to examine, discuss, and debate the major concepts and frameworks associated with race relations in America. Students will not only gather background information on this issue through traditional research methods but also gather data by listening to key administrators at ECU and other NC state universities. After students gather this data, they will present their own race relations solutions to the Chancellor’s Office at East Carolina University.

So here are the three courses that I am teaching this Spring 2017 semester:

HNRS 2013 Breaking the Boundaries of Race in America: Developing Race Relations Solutions for East Carolina University

ANTH 3252 Medical Anthropology

MPH 6008 Ethnic Health & Health Disparities

Interestingly, now that I am used to my other courses always being online – Medical Anthropology and Ethnic Health & Health Disparities — it allows me to lecture differently for the online students versus the face-to-face lectures for my Honors Seminar course.¬† In otherwords, I have to be very direct and concise for the online students as opposed to the face-to-face (traditional lecture setting at the university lecture room), I can take my time and elaborate more on specific concepts. Both have their ADVANTAGES and disadvantages. As for right now, I am “cool” with it.

So if you are interested in any of my Spring 2017 courses and have any follow-up questions, send me an email at: baileye@ecu.edu. That’s what’s HAPPENING in my “Course Happenings” course activities at East Carolina University for the Spring 2017!

SPRING 2016 Semester – Teaching an Honors College Seminar Course & 2 Other Courses

It’s hard to believe, but it’s February 2016 already and I haven’t had enough time to update this Course Happenings Blog until now! As you can guess, it has been another busy and amazing Spring semester in which I have very little time just to think about what I’m doing.

Fortunately, this Spring semester I have made the time to RE-ENERGIZE my thought processes and allocated QUALITY time to my courses. Well, this semester I am teaching my first Honors College seminar course and it has been fantastic and exhilarating! The title of my Honors course is:

Breaking the Boundaries of Race in America: Developing Race Relations Solutions for East Carolina University

This Honors seminar course has been a complete pleasure to teach and work with the seven honor students who are taking my class. All of my students have already challenged themselves and others on a number of culturally sensitive race relations issues and now we are in the stage of the class focusing upon SOLUTIONS for race relations issues!! Who would have figured that I would be teaching this type of class at ECU, but I finally am accomplishing this major objective of my teaching career. That is, teach meaningful and thought-provoking classes in which students can be the leaders and the change agents of society.

By the way, here is the course description of the class:

Why is the United States still having major race relations problems in 2016? Do you want to continue to sit along the sidelines or help solve this issue in our country particularly here at ECU? This course aims to examine, discuss, and debate the major concepts and frameworks associated with race relations in America. Students will not only gather background information on this issue through traditional research methods but also gather data by listening to key administrators at ECU and other NC state universities. After students gather this data, they will present their own race relations solutions to the Chancellor’s Office at East Carolina University.

So here are the three courses that I am teaching this Spring Semester:

HNRS 2013 Breaking the Boundaries of Race in America: Developing Race Relations Solutions for East Carolina University
ANTH 3252 Medical Anthropology
MPH 6008 Ethnic Health & Health Disparities

Of course, I enjoy teaching my undergraduate Medical Anthropology class and my graduate course – Ethnic Health & Health Disparities. Both of these courses are entirely online and students prefer both of them taught in this format as opposed to face-to-face in a lecture hall. In fact, both of my online courses continue to increase in enrollment each year that I teach them.

So if you are interested in any of my Spring 2016 courses and have any follow-up questions, send me an email at: baileye@ecu.edu. That’s what’s happening in my “Course Happenings” course activities at East Carolina University for the spring 2016!

Medical Anthropology Fieldwork Projects and Proposals – ANTH 3252 Course

My Medical Anthropology course – ANTH 3252 has three major objectives for students: (1) To provide a comprehensive introduction to the subspecialty of Medical Anthropology – its fundamental principles and key concepts; (2) To encourage awareness of cultural health perspectives and issues; and (3) Apply principles and strategies derived from medical anthropology toward planning, implementing and evaluating health intervention programs.

In particular, the third major objective — applying principles and strategies — gives students an opportunity to conduct their own an applied medical anthropological fieldwork project or develop a proposal. One of the major requirements for this course is for all students to do a medical anthropological fieldwork project or proposal. Quite naturally, students want to know what are the type of applied medical anthropological fielwork projects or proposals that have been completed in previous medical anthropology classes.

Well for those students who want to know SOME of the titles from previous Medical Anthropology classes, here are few titles from my 2013 and 2012 Medical Anthropology classes:

2013 Fieldwork Projects or Proposals

Dealing With Depression on College Campus

The Inequalities of the Healthcare System: A Dental Approach

Preventive Medicine: Wellness and the Treatment of Chronic Diseases

Differences in Health Perspectives and Behavior Between First & Second Generation Indian Americans

The Rising Cost of Healthcare

Childhood Obesity

Cervical Cancer Concerning HPV in College Women

UV Radiation and Skin Cancer among Hispanics

Concussion in College Athletics

Mental Health and Female Violent Offenders

HIV/AIDS among African Americans and Hispanics

Language Barriers: A Field Study of Russian Speaking Immigrants

2012 Fieldwork Projects or Proposals

Motivation for Healthy Lifestyles in Young Woman

Socioeconomic Status and Oral Health

Unprotected Sex on College Campuses

Sexual Health Dialogue Between Parents and Teens

Is Cigarette Smoking More Prevalent on College Campuses in Eastern North Carolina

Exploration of Birthing Options of Teenaged Mothers

The High Cost of Quality Health Care

The Exercise and Eating Routines of College Students

Healthcare Insurance in America

Osteoporosis Screening and Dairy Avoidance in African American Women: Applying Bio-Cultural Analysis to Healthcare Provision Strategies

Spring Semester 2013 – Teaching 3 Courses (2 Online and 1 Face-to-Face)

Well, the spring semester 2013 is in full effect now that it’s the first week of February. I am in my regular rotation of courses for the spring semester which consist of the following courses:

1. ANTH 3252 – Medical Anthropology (DE)
2. ANTH 4501 – Professional Development Anthropology (Face-to-Face)
3. MPH 6008 – Ethnic Health and Health Disparities (DE)

The two online courses (ANTH 3252 and MPH 6008) are always challenging to teach because one is an undergraduate course and the other is a graduate course yet both require me to organize the online structure of the courses similarly. That is, I record my podcast and webcast lectures for each course – one after another each and every week. Both are live lectures in which I try to present exactly like a face-to-face lecture in the classroom. Hopefully, once each student downloads the lecture from their blackboard system, it comes across fresh, creative and similar to a regular lecture in a classroom.

Along with the three courses that I teach this semester, I organize a special lecture series for the Anthropology Department entitled, “ECU Anthropology Alumni Lecture Series.” This semester will be the fourth one. The reason why I organized this special alumni lecture series (that’s associated with my Professional Development Anthropology class) is to give undergraduate students an opportunity to listen, connect and network with the department’s graduates. This lecture series has been very successful not only for the undergradate students but also for the alumni who return to the department and share their professional expertise. It also gives the Anthropology department a chance to celebrate the achievements of our graduates so that other scholars and administrators can see that we are graduating students who are making a difference in the professional world.

Stay tuned for updates from each class this semester.

Medical Anthropology Student Fieldwork Projects/Proposals – 2011

Now that a new year is upon us and a new semester in Medical Anthropology, I usually receive an inquiry from students in my latest class (ANTH 3252 – Medical Anthropology), what are the type of student fieldwork projects/proposals completed for this class? My response is usually — “Anything that is health related and an issue in which you can discover some new cultural health patterns among a specific group.” I also state, “Select a fieldwork project/proposal that is of interest to you.”

Thus from last year’s Medical Anthropology class (2011), here is a list of some of their fieldwork projects/proposals:


Obesity in America

Teen Pregnancy

Nursing and Stereotyping of Gender

Athritis Doesn’t Just Affect the Elderly

Cancer

Aphasia

What Makes People Motivate to Exercise

Electronics and Technology’s Indirect and Direct Detriments to the Health of Today’s Population

Eating Disorders

Combat-Related Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: Soldiers’ Unseen Scars

Working Women and Eating Habits

Why African American Men Delay Seeking Healthcare

Well, that’s it! Last year, students completed some outstanding fieldwork projects/proposals and I’m sure this Medical Anthropology 2012 class will surprise me again with some outstanding fieldwork projects/proposals. I can’t wait to read them all at the end of the semester!

Spring 2011 – Teaching Three Courses – 2 Undergraduate & 1 Graduate Course

We are officially back again! The Spring 2011 semester is underway and it looks like another very active and engaging set of classes. My three courses consist of:

1. Medical Anthropology: ANTH 3252 – DE format – Undergraduate
2. Professional Development Anthropology: ANTH 4501 – Face to Face – Undergraduate
3. Ethnic Health & Health Disparities: MPH 6008 – DE format – Graduate

All three courses presents their challenges because they require me to design the course material in an approach that appeals to three different student audiences. In particular, my two DE classes allow me to present my lecture material in podcasts and webcasts formats. Although it takes alot of extra prep time to get these podcasts and webcasts lectures together, once I begin recording each lecture that’s when the fun starts. By the end of each podcast and webcast lecture, I cover a majority of my key critical thinking points and also try to keep each lecture fresh and entertaintaining. Both of these DE courses (Medical Anthropology and Ethnic Health & Health Disparities) are very unique courses in which I can feel that students truly want to take what they learn from these classes and apply these concepts and issues to real life medical and health care issues.

As for my Professional Development Anthropology class, it is designed to give students practical real life skills and opportunities that will prepare them for the next stage in their academic or professional careers. Here I try to get all students to take that important step forward now by asking questions, listening to experts who visit the class, and visiting ECU programs that will give them special insight into professionalizing their anthropological training. Of course the overall goal of the class is to provide students with more of an organized and visual outlook of their future in the field of anthropology. Yet the real outcome of this class is to reduce the anxiety and uncertainty that many students feel when taking the next step forward in their professional careers. Something that all of us face at some point in our career. Matter of fact, I wish that I had a course like this when I was an undergraduate anthropology major at Miami University (Oxford, OH) back in the 70s!

That’s right, another semester is underway and I’m looking forward to learning something new again!

2010 Spring Course: Medical Anthropology: ANTH 3252

Greetings Everyone,

I am looking forward again to teaching my Medical Anthropology course in Distance Education (DE) mode for the Spring semester primarily because it offers students the flexibilty to take this upper level course as well an opportunity for me to incorporate the latest technology and course content material that address as many of the issues related to medical anthropology. This medical anthropology course is taught in a very applied approach — one in which we discuss and investigate “real life” health and medical issues from a very broad and holistic perspective.

The major objectives that students will receive from this course are:
1. A comprehensive introduction to the subspeciality of medical anthropology;
2. An awareness of cultural health perspective and issues; and
3. Apply principles and strategies derived from medical anthropology toward planning, implementing and evaluating health intervention programs.

In addition to completing the course objectives, students will conduct an applied medical anthropological fieldwork project/proposal. You can check out some of the outstanding projects from previous students earlier in this blog.

In general, I am very glad that I decided to transition this traditional face-to-face Medical Anthropology course to a distance education, online approach. Believe it or not, it allows students to engage in medical anthropology in whole new way!

Medical Anthropology – ANTH 3252 – Fieldwork Projects Topics

During Spring 2009, I taught another semester of my Medical Anthropology, ANTH 3252 course for undergraduate students in the Department of Anthropology and at other local universities. Since I had also transitioned this course from the face-to-face traditional format to online, I used the online blackboard tools and software. I strongly felt that this Medical Anthropology needed to be online for a couple of years since my arrival in the department because it could capture a larger undergraduate audience than we I first taught it here at ECU. This is another course that I developed years ago (actually 1989) and now became even more excited in its new online format.

For those who are interested in this course, here are the major course objectives:
1. To provide a comprehensive introduction to the subspecialty of Medical Anthropology — its fundamental principles and key concepts.
2. To encourage awareness of cultural health perspectives and issues.
3. To apply principles and strategies derived from medical anthropology toward planning, implementing and evaluating health intervention programs.

During the spring semester, students receive their lectures via podcast and webcam format. The podcast and webcam lectures highlights the major key points from the designated readings from each week. Students also receive a set of discussion board questions each week along with the opportunity to participate in our weekly chat sessions usually in the early evening. The advantages of this online technology allows many students to engage in all types of interaction whether in the structured format of the discussion board session or the free-flowing semi-structured format of the chat room sessions. In either case, students really get into the specific medical anthropological topics of the week!

Along with the weekly activities, students are also required to complete a fieldwork project or a proposed fieldwork project. I know that these fieldwork projects allow students to take this course further and get truly involved into a specific health topic that they are interested. Although many students are a bit hesitant as to what type of practical topic that they can do, but once I show them how to do an applied medical anthropological fieldwork project, they realize that most any health-related topic can be conducted for their project. By the end, these applied medical anthropological fieldwork projects and/or proposals are outstanding.

Here is a list of some of the projects completed by students this past spring 2009 semester:

Fieldwork in Pitt County Memorial Hospital

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

Prevalence of Addictive Behaviors in Asian/Pacific Islander Populations

Doctors vs Doulas: Examining Reasons Women Choose Alternative Birthing Methods

Ethnic Variations in Breastfeeding

Cultural Beliefs and Individual Health Care Decisions

Autism and ABA Therapy Training

The New Hanover County Health Department and Health Promotion

Hypertension in the African American Community

Autism, Is There a Connection Between the Disability and Vaccinations?

Maori Health Care

Western Health Care

Again, these student medical anthropological fieldwork projects were amazing and they helped to uncover the cultural health component related to each topic. That’s really the major goal of this class.