Medical Anthropology – ANTH 3252 – Fieldwork Projects Topics

During Spring 2009, I taught another semester of my Medical Anthropology, ANTH 3252 course for undergraduate students in the Department of Anthropology and at other local universities. Since I had also transitioned this course from the face-to-face traditional format to online, I used the online blackboard tools and software. I strongly felt that this Medical Anthropology needed to be online for a couple of years since my arrival in the department because it could capture a larger undergraduate audience than we I first taught it here at ECU. This is another course that I developed years ago (actually 1989) and now became even more excited in its new online format.

For those who are interested in this course, here are the major course objectives:
1. To provide a comprehensive introduction to the subspecialty of Medical Anthropology — its fundamental principles and key concepts.
2. To encourage awareness of cultural health perspectives and issues.
3. To apply principles and strategies derived from medical anthropology toward planning, implementing and evaluating health intervention programs.

During the spring semester, students receive their lectures via podcast and webcam format. The podcast and webcam lectures highlights the major key points from the designated readings from each week. Students also receive a set of discussion board questions each week along with the opportunity to participate in our weekly chat sessions usually in the early evening. The advantages of this online technology allows many students to engage in all types of interaction whether in the structured format of the discussion board session or the free-flowing semi-structured format of the chat room sessions. In either case, students really get into the specific medical anthropological topics of the week!

Along with the weekly activities, students are also required to complete a fieldwork project or a proposed fieldwork project. I know that these fieldwork projects allow students to take this course further and get truly involved into a specific health topic that they are interested. Although many students are a bit hesitant as to what type of practical topic that they can do, but once I show them how to do an applied medical anthropological fieldwork project, they realize that most any health-related topic can be conducted for their project. By the end, these applied medical anthropological fieldwork projects and/or proposals are outstanding.

Here is a list of some of the projects completed by students this past spring 2009 semester:

Fieldwork in Pitt County Memorial Hospital

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

Prevalence of Addictive Behaviors in Asian/Pacific Islander Populations

Doctors vs Doulas: Examining Reasons Women Choose Alternative Birthing Methods

Ethnic Variations in Breastfeeding

Cultural Beliefs and Individual Health Care Decisions

Autism and ABA Therapy Training

The New Hanover County Health Department and Health Promotion

Hypertension in the African American Community

Autism, Is There a Connection Between the Disability and Vaccinations?

Maori Health Care

Western Health Care

Again, these student medical anthropological fieldwork projects were amazing and they helped to uncover the cultural health component related to each topic. That’s really the major goal of this class.

African American Health – MPH 6005 – Fieldwork Projects Topics

During this summer 1 session of 2009, I taught another semester of my African American Health: MPH 6005 course for graduate students in the Department of Public Health at ECU and at other universities in the state. Since I transitioned this course to online last year, I have enjoyed another avenue in teaching this course. Using the online blackboard tools and software, I have found that teaching this African American course within the 5 1/2 weeks not only challenging but also far more engaging, interacting and practical than ever before.

For those who are interested in this course, here are the major course objectives:
1. Describe African American health care issues, including its unique and important features.
2. Apply principles derived from ethnic health and health disparity planning, implementation, and evaluation.
3. Critique and evaluate African American public health intervention programs.

During this 5 1/2 weeks, students receive their lectures via podcast and webcam format. The podcast and webcam lectures highlights the major key points from the designated readings during each week. Students also receive a set of discussion questions each week along with the opportunity to participate in a weekly chat session in the early evenings. This online technology and format allows for constant engagement and interaction of practical African American health issues to be discussed, debated and resolved.

Along with the weekly activities, students are also required to complete a fieldwork project or a proposed fieldwork project. I think that these fieldwork projects captures the practical and cultural health focus of this course. Students investigate and solve the African American issues that they want to do — not what I want to. Thus this course (like all of my courses) is student driven and focused. By the end, if the student is truly motivated, interested and passionate about their topic, it shows in their final fieldwork project or proposal.

Interestingly, I have been teaching this course for 10 years (traditional format) and I still get surprised and excited to read the excellent African American health fieldwork projects submitted.

Here is a list of some of the projects completed by students this summer 1 2009 session:

African American Female Undergraduate Students’ Perceptions of Sexual Health

A School and Church Medical Anthropology Fieldwork Proposal on Childhood Obesity in Wilson, NC

Heart Disease and Stress among African American Women

A Perspective on Recommendations for Policy Change and Interventions for Reduction/Elimination of HIV/AIDS in the African American Male

Spirituality and Health Care Seeking in Maysville

Reasons for Physical Inactivity in African American Women in Onslow County

The Life Expectancy of the African American Black Male

As you can see, these fieldwork projects/proposals were fantastic, investigative, practical and addressed a number of “real” health issues in the local African American communities in a culturally competent approach. That’s the major goal and outcome of this course each and every time that I teach it.

Professor Eric Bailey

eric-bailey1

Greetings and Welcome,

I am a Professor of Anthropology and Public Health and Director of the new Online Certificate Program in Ethnic and Rural Health Disparities at East Carolina University (beginning fall 09). I have had a joint appointment in two departments since starting here at ECU in 2005. I have also served as a Health Scientist Administrator at the National Institutes of Health, National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities, and the National Cancer Institute. I completed a Post-Doctoral Fellowship at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health. In earlier roles, I served as Program Director for the Masters of Public Health Program in Urban Public Health at Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science and as Assistant and Associate Professor at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Indiana University at Indianapolis and the University of Houston.

Continue to check back at my Course Happenings blog as I feature some of the innovative, practical, unique, outstanding, and cutting-edge projects from my students in all of my classes. I am sure you will be impressed by the course activities and the student projects!

Professional Development Anthropology – ANTH 4501 – Projects

Hey Everyone,

One of the courses that I want to feature on my Course Happenings Blog is my course entitled, “Professional Development Anthropology: ANTH 4501.”  This is an undergraduate course offered to all undergraduates (freshman to seniors).

The major course objectives of this course are:

  1. To recognize what type of practical skills that you have acquired through your coursework.
  2. To recognize how these practical skills whether specializing in archaeology, cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, medical anthropology or other anthropology subspecialties can assist you in obtaining jobs that are based in the field of anthropology or not necessarily anthropologically-related.
  3. To research and learn about specific job opportunities and internships related to your area of interest.
  4. To provide an opportunity for various organizations at ECU to present information on pratical skill building strategies to you.
  5. To provide a forum for you to learn from other students about the practical skills that yu have acquired through your anthropological training.

Basically, what you get out of this course are real life discussions and real life practical skills that you can use to get a job or get ready for graduate school when you complete this course!

Here are a couple of pictures from the course.

Tabatha Kimbal's Final Powerpoint Presentation

Tabatha Kimbal's Final Powerpoint Presentation

 

Professional Development Class

Professional Development Class

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