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From the TRC: NoveList Plus

It’s Thursday, and a new edition of From the TRC is published to highlight another service or resource Joyner Library’s Teaching Resources Center has to support the College of Education’s faculty and students. This week, it’s NoveList Plus.

This week’s post builds on a previous post we wrote about TeachingBooks.net. While TeachingBooks.net focuses on bringing the author to your students so students can experience how their favorite authors create and read their own works, NoveList Plus can help educators match readers with the right books to expand students’ literary world beyond the familiar.

NoveList_PlusNoveList Plus bills itself as a comprehensive online readers’ advisory (RA) tool used to search hundreds of thousands of popular fiction and nonfiction titles, which includes categories such as author read-alikes, book lists, and book discussion guides. It includes genre outlines and online training materials for librarians to familiarize staff with appeal factors, the RA interview, and other aspects of readers’ advisory.

Sounds like a resource for school librarians, right? Of course it is, but my experience as a teacher and school librarian has taught me that students won’t always turn to their librarian for book recommendations. Students will reach out to the teacher they feel most comfortable with for reading advice.  At the high school where I worked in Arizona, the English Department and I constructed and continuously updated a bulletin board highlighting the most recent books the staff had read. Students paid attention to which staff member’s interests matched their own, and turned to them for recommendations. I think it is a safe bet to say the English Department used NoveList Plus more than I did!

The teachers I’ve worked with loved the fact that NoveList Plus includes Lexile measures, book reviews, and lists the awards a book has won. Take a look at  “The Crossover”  which was awarded the 2015 Newbery Medal.

Here are other tools and resources NoveList Plus offers educators at all levels:

  • Professional Toolbox
  • Read-alikes
    • Love an author, but have already read all of their books? Finished a series and disappointed there aren’t more to read? Each book and author in NoveList Plus is paired with other books and authors that are similar to your favorites. Here is an example from George R. R. Martin’s A Game of Thrones, and Sherman Alexie’s author page.
  • Genre Overviews
    • Keeping Up…Genres covers “core genre essentials, links to key awards, lots of lists and on-point articles to help readers find the perfect genre match.”

NoveList Plus also offers a robust Support Center complete with an archive of training sessions, tutorials and additional materials such as “Help Sheets” and PowerPoint presentations to help you maximize NoveList’s resources.  Finally, watch their “News and Events” page for professional development webinars, press releases and new product demonstrations.

Until next time…Dan Z. in the TRC

Click here to view the archive of all From the TRC posts.

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Wayne Staton

Wayne Staton Honors Mother with Education Scholarship

EC Alumni Magazine

This story courtesy of EC Alumni magazine, which is available in full to members of the East Carolina Alumni Association at PirateAlumni.com/ECAlumni.

Wayne Staton’s late mother Ellen B. Staton was a graduate of East Carolina Teachers College in the late 1930s, going on to teach home economics and elementary school until he and his brother Allyn were born. His father William Staton, a graduate of Wake Forest College and Law School, was a practicing attorney, who later became a World War II veteran and Purple Heart recipient, and eventually served in the North Carolina State Senate for 24 years. After their parents passed away, Wayne and his late brother, Allyn Staton, wanted to do something to honor their mother, who had been such a great support to their father and his career. They decided it would only be fitting to endow a scholarship in her name in the College of Education for undergraduate students majoring in elementary education.

Like his father, Wayne has had a successful career. A graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, he has held careers in manufacturing, banking, and information technology. Currently, he is the owner of Staton Group LLC, a forestry, agricultural, and commercial investment property business. He has also followed in his mother’s footsteps, teaching business and government classes at Central Carolina Community College for over 10 years. Not only that, Wayne has kept himself busy hosting a weekly television program in Sanford for more than 20 years.

Throughout the years, Wayne has been able to witness firsthand how the university has grown. “My father served in the North Carolina Senate during the time that Dr. Leo Jenkins was working so hard to expand East Carolina University. I was extremely impressed with the medical school that was established, and also the good reputations of the College of Business, the College of Education, and the Theater Arts Department.”

He was especially surprised by the administration, staff, and faculty’s dedication to making East Carolina a major regional university and serving the surrounding communities. “I believe that ECU is ably serving Eastern North Carolina with its medical school and related medical practices and services,” he said.

Whenever he isn’t working or volunteering, Wayne is traveling, working out, or pursuing his passion: history. Those who know Wayne will know he is an avid history buff. “I am particularly interested in U.S. history from pre-World War II through the 1960s. I am also interested in North Carolina history from the late 40s through the 1990s.” Another passion of his is art. Wayne enjoys visiting art exhibits, galleries, and shows.

Since beginning his work with the university, Wayne has made many great memories. Wayne has enjoyed several escorted tours of the ECU Medical Complex and The Heart Center. Of one particular tour, Wayne recalls, “My tour guide was Dr. Wily Nifong, a respected heart surgeon. He was wonderful! It was a very exciting experience to me to be able to go behind the scenes to see how doctors are trained and patients are treated and hopefully cured.”

Wayne describes his decision to give to the university as a gratifying one. “My association has been a great and extremely rewarding experience. I have become so very impressed with the administrators, faculty, and staff at the university. The gift officers are the ultimate professionals, and the students I have met have all been highly motivated to succeed in school and in their careers. I urge anyone and everyone to make gifts in some shape or form to the university, and then get involved personally. It has certainly been rewarding to me.”

This story courtesy of EC Alumni magazine, which is available in full to members of the East Carolina Alumni Association at PirateAlumni.com/ECAlumni.

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College of Education Seeks Chair for Department of Interdisciplinary Professions

Chairperson
Department of Interdisciplinary Professions
College of Education

Vacancy 944231

INTERNAL POSTING: Open only to applicants currently employed by East Carolina University. 

The College of Education at East Carolina University invites applications and nominations for the position of Chairperson of the Department of Interdisciplinary Professions. This is a full-time, tenured, 12-month position.

Responsibilities include facilitating the development and attainment of departmental goals with a clear vision for the Department’s future; decision-making; negotiating teaching assignments, research, and service loads for faculty; evaluating faculty, staff, and student workers; managing budgets and other resources; and advocating for the Department in college and university issues/context.

East Carolina University, the third largest university in the UNC system, is located in North Carolina’s coastal plain midway between Raleigh and the coast. An institution of over 26,000 students, ECU is a research-intensive university which offers more than 104 bachelor’s degree programs, 73 master’s degree programs, 4 intermediate degree programs, 17 doctoral programs, and 2 first professional degree programs (MD, DDS). Additional information is available at: www.coe.ecu.edu

We are seeking a dynamic and innovative leader with exemplary administrative, personnel management and supervisory skills. The ideal candidate will have demonstrated effectiveness in: (1) teaching and overseeing undergraduate and master’s degree programs in one or more of the program areas housed in the department (i.e., adult education, business education, counseling, information technology, or library science); (2) experience in university collaborative efforts with the community; (3) demonstrated capacity to secure external grants for research and program development, (4) effective integration of technology in the instructional process and (5) experience in and commitment to engaging in continuous program assessment and securing/maintaining national accreditation for the program areas housed in the department.

The candidate must possess a Ph.D. or Ed.D. degree in one of the department’s program areas or related field. Rank will be Associate or Full Professor with salary commensurate to qualifications. Rank will be commensurate with education and experience. Qualifying degrees must be received from appropriately accredited institutions and conferred by the time of hire.

Applications must be submitted online at jobs.ecu.edu. In addition to the submission of a candidate profile, (a) letter of application describing specific skills and experiences relevant to the position, (b) written statement describing your leadership philosophy and beliefs concerning the role of the chair in leading the department, (c) current curriculum vitae, and (d) full contact information for at least three professional references must be submitted online.

In addition, official copies of all transcripts as well as at least three sample publications should be sent to Dr. Alana Zambone, Department of Interdisciplinary Professions Search Chair, 154 Speight Building, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858. Screening will begin on April 6, 2015, and will continue until the position is filled.

View this job posting at: https://ecu.peopleadmin.com/applicants/jsp/shared/position/JobDetails_css.jsp

East Carolina University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer.

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2015 College of Education Faculty and Student Research Showcase

The COE Research Committee is proud to announce the 2015 College of Education Faculty and Student Research Showcase.  Please plan to attend and participate in this event on Wednesday, March 25 from 4:00-6:00PM in Mendenhall 244.

Date:  Wednesday, March 25, 2015
Time:  4:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Location:  Mendenhall room 244

Presenters and Research Studies:

Faculty invited paper presentation (4:15-5:00):

  • Dr. Benjamin Blaisdell (SEFR), Schools as Racial Spaces: Understanding and Resisting Structural Racism

Faculty invited round table presentation (5:00-5:45):

  • Dr. Abbie Brown (MSITE), 3D Printing in Instructional Settings: Identifying A Curricular Hierarchy of Activities
  • Drs. Christina Tschida, Judy Smith, & Liz Fogarty (ELMID), “It Just Works Better”: Introducing the 2:1 Model of Co-Teaching in Teacher Preparation

Graduate student poster presentations (5:00-5:45):

  • Kristin Justice (ELEM), Thinking Maps and Latin Instruction
  • Kathy Robertson (ELEM), Tutoring to Improve Language and Grammar Skills
  • Kathryn V. Cayco (ELEM), Explicit Instruction vs. Student led Learning Experiences
  • Ashley Lynn (ELEM), Literature Based Instruction vs. Phonics in Isolation
  • Audrey Dexter (ELEM), The Effects of Music in the Elementary Classroom
  • Melinda Harrell (ELEM), Math Notebooks: Should They be Structured for 6th Grade?
  • Kelsey Shue (ELEM), Determining If the Use of Technology Has a Positive Effect on Math Fact Fluency and Automaticity
  • Kelly Hylton (ELEM), Project Based Learning: Does it Make Science Education Better?
  • Lisa Howell Langley (ELEM), Multiplication Fact Fluency:  Traditional Instructional Practices versus iPad/Web Based Applications
  • Catherine Bademian (ELEM), The Effects of Background Music on Student Work
  • Lauren Griffin (ELEM), Best Small Group Reading Instruction Method for Upper Elementary: Guided Reading or Literature Circles?
  • Jessica Stroud (ELEM), Will K-2 Students Produce Higher Scores on their DIBELS Reading Assessment if Tested in the Morning versus in the Afternoon?
  • Samantha Dinner (ELEM), Stability Balls in the Classroom- Does Usage Increase Student Achievement?
  • Blythe McGowan (ELEM), Reading Comprehension Strategies
  • Tracy Lynn McIntyre (ELEM), Singapore Math: The Modeling of Word Problems
  • Heather Marshall (ELEM), Does Integrating the Arts, Specifically Music, into the Math Class, Increase Student Performance?
  • Jennifer Burleson (ELEM), The Effectiveness of Technology on Reading in the Classroom

For more information, contact the COE Research Committee:

Epsilon Sigma Alpha

ESA Scholarships Available for Special Education Majors

The North Carolina Council of Epsilon Sigma Alpha Scholarship Board will continue to offer their Scholarship for students and teachers who are pursuing a degree or certification in Special Education in 2015.

The scholarship has been available since 1956 and is targeted to individuals training for work with exceptional children and has ranged from $500 to $2,500 per year. Current North Carolina teachers seeking additional training are also eligible. Applications must be post marked by April 1, 2015 and awards will be made by May 2, 2015.

Applicants should note the agreement to teacher in the North Carolina Public School System for a minimum of 1 year. Copies of both applications are available for downloading on the North Carolina Council of Epsilon Sigma Alpha website.

Allie Smith

ELMID Student, Allie Smith, to Present Honors Thesis

One of the middle grades math and science students, Allie Smith, will be presenting her honors thesis Incorporating Reading and Writing in the Middle Grades Math Classroom at the Honors College Research Poster Showcase and Reception on March 24 from 6:30 to 8:30 in the Mendenhall Student Center. She will also be presenting for Research and Creativity Award Week on March 25 from 12:30 to 2:30 in the Mendenhall Student Center Social Room.

Allie became interested in using reading and writing in math after learning about the importance of background knowledge in learning and reading in a course taught by Dr. Jamin Carson. Allie’s research uses reading and writing as a way to understand math on a deeper level. As part of her research project she has created several lessons plans that she has classified into four different categories. She is currently completing her internship at C.M. Eppes Middle School and her mentor is Dr. Jamin Carson.

Dr. Christy Rhodes

Dr. Christy Rhodes Receives Promoting Diversity and Inclusion Mini-Grant

Drs. Christy Rhodes and Sheresa Blanchard are recipients of the “Promoting Diversity and Inclusion in the Curriculum” Mini-Grants. The selected proposals are going to tackle different aspects of diversity in the classrooms of ECU and in eastern North Carolina.

Dr. Christy Rhodes, assistant professor in the Department of Interdisciplinary Professions, submitted a proposal with Drs. Kathy Lohr and Phyllis Broughton to facilitate a workshop for eastern North Carolina’s community college faculty and staff members.

Rhodes said they came to the decision to focus on community colleges because the department’s graduate students are preparing to become instructors at the community college level and because “they (community colleges) are the entry point for so many non-traditional learners.” She added, “they are experiencing diversity much more than universities are and other higher education (institutions).”

This proposal aims to work on institution-wide diversity by hosting a workshop for faculty and staff members currently at community colleges as well as the future educators enrolled in the departments graduate programs. The workshop will cover difficult conversations in the classroom and present participants with a toolkit of information to continue the important conversation. “Three hours isn’t enough,” said Rhodes.

“We’re excited that the grant allows us to put things in the toolkit that are helpful. During our workshop, we’re going to focus on the tips in the book that focuses on the difficult conversations,” said Rhodes. The toolkit is provided at the workshop to supply participants with resources to keep close.

Both program proposals are currently in progress and working to increase the diversity in our classrooms. The next Diversity Seminar will be on April 8, 2015 and attendees will be eligible for the two mini-grants to be awarded.

This article is an excerpt from the March 2015 Discovering Equity and Diversity newsletter.

Dr. Christopher J. Rivera

Publications/Presentations by Dr. Rivera of the Department of Special Education, Foundations, and Research

Dr. Christopher J. Rivera, of the Department of Special Education, Foundations, and Research (SEFR), has had three journal publications and three paper/poster presentations this academic year:

Publications

Hicks, S. C., Rivera, C. J., & Patterson, D. R. (Accepted). Simple steps for teaching prepositions to students with autism and developmental disability. Intervention in School and Clinic.

Ahlgrim-Delzell, L., & Rivera, C. J. (Accepted). Changing the course of literacy instruction: Examining literacy lessons for students with severe intellectual disabilities. Exceptionality, A Special Education Journal.

Rivera, C. J., Mason, L. L., Moser, J., & Ahlgrim-Delzell, L. (2014). The effects of an iPad multimedia shared story intervention on vocabulary acquisition for an English language learner. Journal of Special Education Technology, 29, 31-48.

Presentations

Rivera, C. J. (February, 2015). A single case study: Using a multi-component simultaneous prompting intervention to teach vocabulary to young students with intellectual disability. American Association of Behavioral and Social Sciences. Las Vegas, NA.

Kelley, K. R., Jimenez, B., Pavlu, L. L., Rivera, C. J., & Root, J. (January, 2015). How I can make a difference for individuals with disabilities in NC. North Carolina CEC: Pinehurst, NC.

Rivera, C. J., Weiss, S., & Ferrell, G. (January, 2015). Learning science vocabulary through multimedia shared stories. North Carolina CEC: Pinehurst, NC.

Science Olympiad

Despite the Ice and Snow, Science Olympiad Ignites Young Minds for STEM Careers

On Saturday, February 21st, 2015, the Center for STEM Education hosted the annual Science Olympiad Tournament for northeastern North Carolina middle and high school students. North Carolina Science Olympiad is a nonprofit organization with the mission to attract and retain the pool of K-12 students entering science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) degrees and careers in North Carolina. These tournaments are rigorous academic interscholastic competitions that consist of a series of different hands-on, interactive, challenging and inquiry-based events that are well balanced between the various disciplines of biology, earth science, environmental science, chemistry, physics, engineering and technology. Notwithstanding the icy weather, this year we hosted 426 students (209 middle school & 217 high school) from 25 schools in the northeast region. There were also over 150 volunteers involved in the day’s activities from overseeing events/competitions, to managing registration. Faculty and students of the MSITE Department were well represented. Drs. Carmen Woodhall and Liz Doster were event leaders for Simple and Compound Machines,  while Ms. Tammy Lee and a plethora of her Elementary Science students created and ran the competition for Experimental Design. Ms. Bonnie Glass was the event leader for It Matters, where students display their knowledge of the properties and behaviors of different states of matter. Dr. Rhea Miles represented the MSITE Department by promoting program and certificate opportunities to the in-service teachers/team coaches and future MSITE students. The staff of the Center for STEM Education was the backbone of the tournament: Nancy Evans and Cheryl Miller, Allison Everett (photographer) and all the student workers at the Center! AWESOME job everyone!!!  It was truly a remarkable day for STEM!

Rubric

Week 8 – Blackboard Rubrics – 3/2/15

As educators, particularly as educators teaching future educators, we understand the value of feedback when grading assignments. In fact, perhaps there is even more value in the feedback than in the actual grading. This is why so much time is spent meticulously going through a submitted paper marking and putting comments in the margins, all to help the student better understand where he/she went off the mark. Students certainly appreciate the extra time that is taken and learn from this information, but wouldn’t it be nice if Blackboard could give us a little help with this? Perhaps by showing the students what criteria an assignment will be graded based on and then allowing us to use those criteria to grade the assignment and add comments and deduct points directly based on those criteria? Well, we are all in luck, because it does!

Blackboard has provided a Rubric tool that allows the instructor to create rubric for any gradable item in Blackboard that they can choose to let the student see before an item is submitted, and then once submitted, the instructor can just check the boxes as to the level of competency for each category and add comments as necessary that the student can review. Pretty nice. The rubrics can be used in conjunction with the new inline grading system that allows the instructor to mark and comment on a submitted paper directly in Blackboard, again giving better feedback to the students that is easier for the instructor to give.  The following video will demonstrate how to set up rubrics in your Blackboard class:

A rubric can be used for multiple assignments in a class, but cannot be edited once it has been used. So, for example, you can set up a Discussion Board Rubric once, and then use it as a standard for all of the Discussion Boards without having to recreate it. Want to try one out without going through the trouble? Blackboard is compiling some shared Rubrics where you can download some rubrics that have been contributed by other educators and import them into your course at http://www.blackboard.com/Platforms/Learn/Products/Blackboard-Learn/Features/Sharing-Rubrics.aspx Once you get the hang of it, perhaps you may want to share one of the rubrics you have created there. To use one of the rubrics that are listed there, just download the rubric, then in your course, go to Course Tools, choose Rubrics and Import. It will then appear as one of your rubrics and you can then use it as you would any other rubric.

If you haven’t used Blackboard Rubrics before, I encourage you to take at least one of your assignments this semester and try it out. If you need help setting it up, I’m happy to help answer any questions, but in the long run, I think you will find it will help save you a lot of time, and your students will benefit much more from the assignments that use them.

Throughout the semester, the OAA-Instructional Technology Team will be offering Professional Development opportunities. For more information on these opportunities, please visit the COE Professional Development website. To register for any professional development sessions, please use Cornerstone.