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ECU to Participate in Global Day of Giving

image‘Tis the season for giving! In honor of #GivingTuesday, East Carolina University is inviting alumni, friends, parents, students, faculty, and staff to join the movement by giving a charitable gift* on Tuesday, December 2, to the university that is near and dear to our hearts.

Founded in 2012 to inspire a new tradition of generosity, #GivingTuesday focuses on celebrating kindness and giving back. Support a culture of philanthropy at ECU by making a gift on December 2nd and becoming a partner in securing the university’s future for current students and future generations of Pirates.

Your gifts provide scholarships, enrich teaching resources and libraries, offer hands-on learning lessons, support research and the arts, deliver classroom enhancements, and afford study abroad living/learning opportunities – all of which help ECU attract and retain the best and brightest students and faculty.

Help spread the word! Mark you calendar to #GiveTueECU on December 2, tell your friends, and post on social media using the hashtags #GivingTuesdayECU and #GiveTueECU. “I Gave” badges will be available through ECU’s University Advancement and East Carolina Alumni Association’s social media accounts on December 2.

Learn more about the #GivingTuesdayECU movement. Thank you for your support!

Contact us at (252) ECU-GIVE (252-328-4483) or give2ecu@ecu.edu.

*Your gift is tax-deductible to the extent the law allows.

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How the COE is Using Video in its Innovations

The implementation of video has taken a prominent role in the COE PIRATE Code, from Video Grand Rounds (VGR) to ISLES to EDTPA.

Students start by observing the video pertaining to the innovations in the VGR component. The instructors show video clips of actual preK-12 classes in place of observation visits by the students. The videos demonstrate strategies the candidates are to look for when they physically go to classrooms to observe. These videos provide an accurate comprehensive visual picture of the strategies in practice. Then in class, students debrief to ensures they comprehend what they are seeing. For more information, check out the VGR blog post .

The students begin to create their own videos when they participate in ISLES. The final component is showing conditional knowledge of the effective instructional practices when they submit a video demonstrating it. For more information, check out the ISLES blog post.

edTPA is a big aspect of the teacher education program and video takes a prominent role in its completion. Students must submit a video of them teaching to be evaluated. These videos allow the faculty to make sure that students are prepared to move on from the COE and have their own classrooms. For more information, check out the edTPA blog post.

The usage of video and the innovations have gone hand in hand to better prepare ECU COE candidates for their future as teachers

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Abby Colley – A Pirate Who Does Us Proud

On November 6, 2014  at the NCSTA conference in Winston-Salem Abby Colley received the Outstanding Student Teacher Award.  Abby is a well-deserving graduate from the Elementary Science Concentration and is currently teaching 4th grade at Ayden Elementary in Pitt County. When she was a student at ECU her clinical teacher stated,  “She excelled in the classroom with her passion, creativity, and willingness to collaborate with other teachers…  I have seen her dedication for this field in her lesson planning, success of implementation of goals taught, and her responses to questions asked by her students…She is deserving of this award.”  Congratulations, Abby.  We are proud to have you as one of our pirates!

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CAEP Prep: What is the ECU Provost’s Council?

First established in 2006, the ECU Provost’s Council on Teacher Education unites educator preparation efforts at the University. Coming out of the Teachers for New Era movement, the original focus of the Council was developing collaboration between teacher education and the arts and sciences. Today, the Provost’s Council’s focus has broadened to include all educator preparation programs at ECU, yet still centers on collaboration across the campus to prepare candidates.

The Provost’s Council on Teacher Education includes the Provost, the deans of the colleges which house Educator Preparation Provider (EPP) programs, the dean of the ECU Graduate School, and key faculty and administrators in the College of Education, including the Executive Director of Teacher Education and the Director of Assessment and Accreditation.

Educator preparation programs at ECU reside in the following colleges:

  • College of Allied Health Sciences
  • College of Fine Arts and Communication
  • College of Human Ecology
  • College of Education
  • College of Health and Human Performance
  • Harriot College of Arts and Sciences

The Provost’s Council meets quarterly to address EPP issues related to accreditation, enrollment, funding, and planning. More information is available on the Provost’s Council and EPP Leadership and Authority webpage.

The Provost’s Council is evidence of how the EPP at ECU meets NCATE Standard 6: Unit Governance and Resources.

#ECU_CAEPisComing

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Junior 2 Teaching Interns and Principal Fellows MSA Students Collaborate

Junior 2 Teaching Interns and Principal Fellows MSA Students Collaborate
Something new and exciting is happening this semester in the COE that you might miss if you are not currently a Junior 2 intern or a Principal Fellow. The two programs are collaborating for the benefit of both student sets, and the process has been extremely promising. First, the interns and Fellows meet and discuss lesson plans and teaching strategies. Next, the Jr 2’s teach a class, while the Fellows observe either in person or by watching a video of the lesson uploaded to Taskstream. The Fellows then evaluate the lesson and provide constructive feedback. This process is repeated across three lessons the interns teach.
The process is valuable to the interns because they get another set of eyes from experienced classroom teachers. The MSA students get the valuable experience of observing and evaluating teachers with a rubric, which will be a fundamental part of their future jobs as administrators, as they must observe their teaching staff and evaluate according to The Rubric for Evaluating North Carolina Teachers:

North Carolina Teacher Evaluation Process

As a Principal Fellow, this experience has been valuable and has taught me some practical lessons. I spent hours watching my intern’s lesson videos, brainstorming constructive advice and writing helpful comments. And this was for an intern who had well-prepared lessons and did a fantastic job. Yet I realize as an administrator I will not have hours to spend on each individual teacher. I can reflect with empathy now on some of my past evaluations, which may have seemed rushed and minimal. A principal with 80 staff members must schedule 80 pre-conferences, observe 80 lessons, and schedule 80 post-conferences. Each teacher should be observed a minimum of three times per year, and ILT’s require even more. Hundreds of hours are required to meet the minimum standards for evaluating and assessing teachers, and to truly help teachers improve, more time will be needed than just the minimum. But for the moment, my responsibility is to one intern and I have the luxury of time. I hope that my feedback will help her to ease into her future as an NC teacher. This experience has definitely been worthwhile for me in my preparation in becoming an NC school administrator.
Elbert Maynard
Principal Fellow

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Supporting Teacher Interns through Instructional Coaching

As part of the Teacher Quality Partnership, the College of Education recently worked with two local school districts to provide additional support for teacher interns.  In Pitt and Greene Counties, Instructional Coaches were hired to help interns make the transition from student to teacher.  These coaches worked with interns during both semesters of the internship, conducting in-class observations and providing targeted professional development.

A variety of instructional practices were developed with the assistance of the Instructional Coaches, including but not limited to:

  • Facilitating activities individually, in small groups and whole groups
  • Incorporating all levels of the Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy
  • Utilizing technology to engage students with content
  • Increasing the complexity of student engagement
  • Using more effective teaching practices and research-based strategies
  • Monitoring student learning outcomes

Multiple research measures indicate that the instructional coaching model has yielded statistically significant gains in teacher candidate edTPA performance assessment results, and increases in the use of best instructional practices.  This increases the potential to change the effectiveness trajectory of first year teachers while leading to positive gains in teacher candidate performance and K-12 student achievement.

Funding for the Instructional Coaches ended at the conclusion of the 2013-2014 school year; however, the benefits of coaching are compelling teacher educators to reconsider the traditional student teaching triad of intern, clinical teacher and university supervisor in order to include more elements of instructional coaching.  In tomorrow’s blog post, you will learn how candidates in the school principal preparation program are providing coaching to elementary education undergraduates as part of their junior year practicum.

Teachers and interns have positive reflections on the instructional coaching model in practice.  To hear their testimony, please refer to;

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EPP Dashboards – Faculty (Standard 5)

The faculty at ECU is united by the University’s motto, Servire, which means “To Serve.” Faculty at ECU desire that service to be of the highest quality by setting and maintaining high standards for themselves, in alignment with NCATE/CAEP.  Standard 5 states:

Data includes the number of university supervisors and cooperating teachers who have been assigned to an initial licensure candidate for the final semester of internship, and the percentage holding a license and/or additional training in their supervision area.

Data includes the number of university supervisors and cooperating teachers who have been assigned to an initial licensure candidate for the final semester of internship, and the percentage holding a license and/or additional training in their supervision area.

“Faculty are qualified and model best professional practices in scholarship, service, and teaching, including the assessment of their own effectiveness as related to candidate performance; they also collaborate with colleagues in the disciplines and schools. The unit systematically evaluates faculty performance and facilitates professional development.”

To provide the highest quality service, ECU first demands that their faculty be highly qualified.  All instructors must meet the ECU credentialing requirements outlined prior to teaching at the institution. All course instructors have prior work experience in educational settings (P-12 experience preferred).  In addition, EPP faculty members are highly qualified to teach within the content area with an earned doctorate degree or equivalent alternate credential (e.g., master’s degree or demonstrated expertise).

High quality service also demands that ECU faculty model best-professional practice in teaching. Student feedback is utilized by faculty to improve teaching practice. The institution is committed to improving the quality of the instrument used to gather student feedback. SPOTS, the Student Perceptions of Teaching survey, data are available to EPP faculty and program leadership to use as one of multiple assessments of faculty teaching.

High quality service also requires contributions to future innovations in teaching.  All teacher education faculty maintain robust research agendas and actively contribute to knowledge generation in their areas of expertise. Data compiled from faculty scholarship entries in Sedona, ECU’s documentation system for faculty activity, indicate that ITP faculty are active in research (see 5.4.e – Samples of faculty scholarly activities).

To ensure the continuation of high quality service of its faculty, the EPP conducts systematic and comprehensive evaluations of faculty performance on an annual basis (summarized by the OFE Evaluation Web page). Multiple measures are used to evaluate faculty teaching, research, and service. The University administers a student feedback survey for each course section taught at the institution, and data is shared with individual faculty and department chairs for use in annual evaluations. The ECU OFE provides guidance to all units in the EPP for institutional policies for tenured or tenure track faculty including reappointment, promotion, tenure, and post-tenure review.

For more information and examples related to Standard 5, please visit the NCATE/CAEP Exhibit Rooms on the COE Office of Assessment and Accreditation’s website.

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The Swivl is here.

What is the Swivl?  Swivl is a camera dock with a twist.  Instead of holding your camera still, the Swivl will follow you around the room, tracking you as you move around on stage or in front of an audience.  This device follows the paired mic wherever it goes.  It is compatible with Android and IOS devices.

So who is using it in COE?  Students have begun to use it to record class sessions for edTPA and ISLES.  OAA has been using it to interview faculty and students about Pirate Code innovations.  Why use this instead of a video camera?  It’s ease of set up and video download capabilities.  The device can connect to any Android or IOS device that has the Swivl app.  You place it in the dock, hook up the mic cable, sync the mic, turn on app and you are ready to go.  The Swivl zeros in on the mic and follows it.  You can use it for one speaker or pass the mic for a group.  The quality of the recording ability lets you place it in the middle of a table to record a small group.  If you want to know more or are interested in trying out the Swivl, feel free to contact OAA IT for more information.

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East Carolina University Principal Fellows Program

According to the North Carolina Principal Fellows Program website, The Principal Fellows Program provides a competitive, merit-based scholarship loan to individuals of exceptional academic ability who have teaching or relevant experience and who desire to enter school administration in a North Carolina public school. Through this scholarship loan, fellows have the opportunity to pursue their studies full-time and earn a Master of School Administration (MSA) degree in two years. The program consists of one year of full-time academic study at one of eleven designated colleges in the UNC system, followed by one year of a full-time internship in a North Carolina public school while attending school part-time. Fellows are provided with and must participate in regularly scheduled enrichment experiences to augment their learning opportunities as they prepare for the challenges of being a principal or assistant principal. Fellows must agree to practice as full-time administrators for four years within six years following the completion of their degree as repayment for their scholarship loan.

The opportunity to become a school administrator is an exciting one to be sure. Personally, I am extremely excited to be pursuing a MSA degree because it will give me the opportunity to serve staff, students, parents, and the community in which I will be working to a greater degree than was possible in my role as a classroom teacher. Elbert Maynard, current MSA Principal Fellow, explains this best in his perspective on becoming a school administrator. He stated, “Students are in desperate need of good teachers-those who will challenge them with high expectations in a caring and respectful way, in order to prepare them for the challenges their futures hold. Therefore, why would a teacher leave the classroom to become an administrator? An administrator can do the same thing for a staff of teachers that a teacher does for his/her students. By being a support for teachers, an administrator can influence an entire school. If an administrator can positively influence two teachers, then that administrator doubled the number of students positively affected. If an administrator can positively influence 50 teachers, 100 teachers…the positive effects on students’ lives grow exponentially.”

The program design clearly addresses the idea that individuals would be best served by being able to focus solely on their studies during the first year. According to Elbert Maynard, “Dividing time between a full-time job and studies in an MSA program takes away from both. I would be taking away from my students by dividing my attention between them and pursuing an advanced degree; the reverse is also true as I would be taking away from my potential as a future administrator by not focusing solely on my studies while pursuing the MSA. The Principal Fellows Program is a blessing that allows individuals to focus solely on becoming the best administrator they can be, without taking away from the students those teachers have a responsibility to. Not only that, the Principal Fellows Program has a prestigious reputation of excellence that any MSA candidate would be honored to be a part of.”

East Carolina University has had the largest cohort of fellows among the eleven universities for at least the last four years. This speaks to the attractiveness and success of the university. The MSA program at East Carolina University prides itself on being grounded in service to our surrounding school region. With a focus on servant-leadership, students in the MSA program at East Carolina University are required to complete six Service Leadership Projects where they go into schools within our region to serve as problem-solvers, collaborators, and change agents. The authentic learning received by fellows provides them with the knowledge and confidence they need to further prepare them for the role of principal and assistant principal. We are actually given the opportunity to go into schools and provide assistance and support to staff and students in the role of principal or assistant principal. Elbert Maynard stated he chose East Carolina University because, “ECU is known statewide-even nationwide-as having excellent teacher and administrator programs. Having enrolled in the programs here at ECU, I can report that this reputation is not exaggerated–if anything, it is understated. My courses taken, and my experiences as a GA working with the Office of Accreditation and Assessment, have been more valuable to me than I could possibly quantify with words. Success as an administrator hinges on, in large part, the preparation gained through an MSA program. I can predict confidently that I will be successful as a future administrator due to the excellence of the program here at ECU.” I concur with Elbert’s view about East Carolina University.

Kelvin Shackleford
MSA Principal Fellow
East Carolina University

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IT Faculty and Alums Present at International Conference

The ECU Instructional Technology program was well represented at this year’s AECT (Association for Educational Communication and Technology) International Convention held in Jacksonville, FL, November 4-8. Members of the ECU faculty and masters program alumni shared their current research and participated in a variety of AECT organizational activities.

jesse_daveProfessor Abbie Brown expressed great pride in ECU’s representation at the event, “It was deeply gratifying, and just plain fun, to see our alums engaging with the international community of instructional design/technology.”

sugar_bookHighlights of the convention included a prominent display of Dr. Sugar’s most recent book, Studies of ID Practices: A Review and Synthesis of the Research on ID Current Practices (published by Springer); Dr. Abbie Brown’s receipt of an Immersive Learning immersive_learning_awardAward for the podcast series, Trends & Issues in Instructional Design, Educational Technology, & Learning Sciences; Dr. Slagter Van Tryon’s management in organizing the PacifiCorp instructional design competition; Dr. Strycker’s leadership in the Teacher Education Division; and Dr. Luterbach’s research presentations, one of which was a collaborative endeavor with alumnus Ken Hubbell.