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Science Education Club on the Path to National Recognition

It’s official!  The Science Education Club has completed all the requirements and workshops to be officially registered as a student organization at East Carolina University.  This has been a two year project that was finalized by the work of graduate student Megan Garner, and undergraduate elementary science concentration students: Beth Wantz, KC Hart, Kayla Sager, and Lauren Brewington.  The club is under the direction of faculty adviser, Tammy D. Lee who speaks with pride of the student’s accomplishment, “We are very excited to have this recognition at the university level so we can now apply for national recognition at the National Science Teacher’s Association.  The students have been diligent in their work and pursuit of this recognition which demonstrates their dedication and desire to be a part of science education and to have others participate in a student organization of a collected interest, Science! I am honored to be a part of this journey with these students.”  For more information about the Science Education Club visit them at their website or contact Tammy D. Lee at leeta@ecu.edu.

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techtrends

Dr. Sugar Publishes Study in Tech Trends

Dr. William SugarDr. William Sugar has published an article in the current issue of Tech Trends.  The article, Development and formative evaluation of multimedia case studies for Instructional Design and Technology students describes the development of three case studies that included a combination of multimedia production and instructional design skills within a particular setting.  These case studies incorporated real-life incidents from 47 professional instructional designers. Download the full article.

Dynamic Dialogue about Diversity panelist

Event Discussed Difficulty Recruiting, Retaining Diverse Educators in Schools

On October 15, 2014, the Office of Professional Development and Student Outreach in the College of Education collaborated with the Office of Equity and Diversity and the Ledonia Wright Cultural Center to offer a Dynamic Dialogue about Diversity event entitled “Diversity in Education.

This event featured a roundtable discussion between the 2014 North Carolina Teacher of the Year, James Ford, and two local educators, Juan Castillo from Greene County Schools and Joey Crutchfield from Pitt County Schools. The discussion integrated the topic of assessment of diversity within the teaching profession. The distinguished panelists shared the African American, Latino American, and Native American perspectives as well as their thoughts on the lack of representation of male educators from these subgroups in the classroom.

The panelist and participants engaged in dialogue about the challenges facing higher education in meeting the need for focused recruitment and retention in teacher education programs of underrepresented populations. The impact of the presence of these subgroups in the classroom as teachers as well as the support found in the schools and school systems that encourage retention in the profession was also intertwined into the conversation.  Additionally, current students and faculty shared how East Carolina University is meeting the needs for the recruitment and retention of diverse populations of students.

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Why Does Accreditation Matter? A Student Perspective.

As a student, I can recall several times when professors have shared that the program I am in is “accredited.”  My mental response was “That’s nice.”  I didn’t care.  All I wanted to know was when the next assignment was due, and what I had to do in order to pass that assignment, the class, and then get my degree.  Sure, it is great that my program has been given a stamp of approval by some mystery third party, but all of that is outside my realm of experiences.
Then a friend of mine at another university shared that they had failed their bid at re-accreditation.  When she graduated, her degree would be from a non-accredited program.  I asked her what that meant for her.  She told me that it would be harder for her to find a job because employers would see her degree as having less value than one from an applicant who had graduated from an accredited program.  Some employers might not even consider her qualified, despite her degree.  She had always wanted to move to the New York-New Jersey area, and now she wasn’t sure she could find a job in that competitive market.  New Jersey actually has a law requiring applicants to notify employers if their degree is from a non-accredited institution.  At that moment, I became alarmed.  Does that mean that all of my hard work might come to mean nothing if the program I was in suddenly lost its accreditation?
All of a sudden my immediate focus of passing the current assignment and class seemed less relevant.  After all, my current assignment and class would mean nothing if I couldn’t find a job after receiving my degree.  I was upset for my friend, who had always studied hard to maintain a high GPA so that she could go anywhere once she graduated.  Now her options were limited.  Attending and graduating from an accredited program suddenly became important to me, and I realized how important it was all along.

In today’s world of online universities and degrees, employers are concerned about hiring quality individuals.  In today’s job market, it can be hard to find a job when there are few positions and many applicants.  Employers look to whittle down the applicants they consider, and one of the first filters they use is whether or not the applicant has attended an accredited program.

Don’t let all of your hard work be in vain.  Make sure your program is accredited, or you may have just gone to school for nothing.

Written by:
Elbert E. Maynard
MSA Principal Fellow
East Carolina University

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CAEP Prep: What is the LCSN?

The Latham Clinical Schools Network (LCSN) is a network of 38 public school systems located throughout eastern North Carolina, who collaborate with the EPP at ECU in order to form a school partnership among teacher candidates and faculty.  LCSN provides quality field placements for pre-service teachers with trained clinical teachers in diverse public school settings.

The LCSN is critical to the EPP successfully meeting the expectations of Standard 3, Field Experiences and Clinical Practice, Collaboration between the Unit and School Partners.  Collaboration with the LCSN allows the EPP to strategically and proactively address concerns.  One common issue collaboratively addressed through LCSN was the need for criminal background checks for field experiences (practicum) and clinical practice (internship).

The in-depth collaboration between ECU EPP and LCSN partners leads to synergistic gains for the partners.  For the COE, partnerships from the LCSN support the TQP grant, focused on the clinical practice component.  Instructional Coaching in LCSN member district (Pitt County Schools and Greene County Schools) was an original TQP clinical practice reform, and is also a Pirate CODE innovation.  For LCSN, professional development is provided annually for all clinical teachers who mentor an intern during clinical practice through the fall and spring Clinical Teacher Conference and through other annual conferences, themed workshops, and collaborative professional development opportunities.  These events unite EPP faculty and clinical partners in support of candidates.

Prior to the Site Visit, it is important for our public school partners in the LCSN to know about the EPP’s programs and Pirate CODE.  LCSN representatives serve on the Council for Teacher Education, and are the crucial communication conduit for the EPP to the public schools.

Once the Site Visit schedule is determined, individual faculty, candidates, clinical teachers, university supervisors and other EPP stakeholders may possibly be invited to meet with the Site Visit Team.

Learn more about the Latham Clinical Schools Network: http://www.ecu.edu/cs-educ/oce/Clinical_Schools.cfm

Latham_Clinical_Schools_Network_forPD

IOSSBR

Anderson, Ellis Win Award at IOSSBR Conference

Dr. Patricia Anderson of the Department of Elementary Education and Middle Grades Education and Dr. Maureen Ellis of the Department of Interdisciplinary Professions recently attended the 2014 Fall International Organization of Social Sciences and Behavioral Research Conference in Las Vegas. They presented the paper “Examination of Second Life Avatars’ Growth and Development,” and were in turn presented with the Best Paper Award for their efforts.

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Video Grand Rounds

Video Grand Rounds (VGR) provides teacher candidates with an introductory framework for classroom observations and subsequent faculty-guided discussions. This experience provides a conceptual foundation for their future study in teacher education.

Based on the medical grand rounds model, teacher candidates view video segments of typical classrooms, complete structured classroom observation protocols, and then debrief with faculty regarding the observations.

The common classroom observations provide teacher candidates with a common language to discuss quality teaching throughout their programs. These shared experiences lead to in-depth discussions of best practices.

VGR is currently integrated into the Early Experience course in the Elementary Education, Special Education, English Education, Birth-Kindergarten Education and Health Education programs.

Trends and Issues

Dr. Abbie Brown Continues to Collect Awards: His Latest, “Immersive Learning Award”

Abbie Brown, a Professor in the College of Education’s Instructional Technology program, is a recipient of an Immersive Learning Award for his podcast series, Trends & Issues in Instructional Design, Educational Technology,& Learning Sciences. The award is sponsored by the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT), and recognizes media production projects that contribute to the field of instructional technology and demonstrate significant increase in learning. The podcast is co-produced by Professor Brown and Professor Tim Green of California State University, Fullerton.

Using the app Flipboard to collect articles related to instructional technology from a wide variety of education, science, and design sources, Brown and Green publish, Trends & Issues in Instructional Design, Educational Technology, & Learning Science (http://flip.it/Iy0rD ). To synthesize the instructional technology trends and major issues reflected by the articles presented in their Flipboard magazine, Brown and Green produce a bi-weekly podcast, Trends & Issues in Instructional Design, Educational Technology, & Learning Sciences, available through iTunes, the audio-content site, Stitcher (http://www.stitcher.com ), and their own podcast website,  http://trendsandissues.com.

Brown says, “I’m gratified that the podcast series is popular. My colleague, Tim and I are a bit in awe of its reach. The Flipboard magazine has over 12,500 readers, and the podcasts have been downloaded to every continent except Antarctica.”

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EPP Dashboards – Candidate Knowledge, Skills, and Dispositions (Standard 1)

In the Professional Standards for the Accreditation of Teacher Preparation Institutions, Standard 1 states that, “candidates preparing to work in schools as teachers or other school professionals know and demonstrate the content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge and skills, pedagogical and professional knowledge and skills, and professional dispositions necessary to help all students learn. Assessments indicate that candidates meet professional, state, and institutional standards.”

In an effort to show that the EPP aligned with NCATE/CAEP Standard 1, the OAA focused attentions on evidences used for assessing candidate learning and dispositions, identified in the unit’s conceptual framework, regardless of location or method of delivery.  Dashboard summaries were created for the following exhibits and updates to the dashboards were scheduled to be completed by ITCS in October 2014.

Initial Teacher Preparation Programs:

Advanced Teacher Preparation Programs:

To learn more about key assessments aligning with Standard 1, please visit Exhibit 1.4.e located in the COE Office of Assessment and Accreditation’s NCATE/CAEP Exhibit Room.

*If dashboards fail to load properly, we recommend refreshing the link.
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College of Education’s Professional Development for using Educational Technology

The Office of Assessment and Accreditation(OAA) along with COE IT offers professional development geared toward the faculty and staff in the COE.  The workshops cover training on Blackboard, TEMS, social media and the use of video in courses.  Most sessions are offered on Tuesday afternoons under the theme of “Tech Training Tuesdays”.  The workshops are all offered through ECU’s employee training system called Cornerstone (http://www.ecu.edu/cs-itcs/cornerstone/).  This allows the faculty to track their professional development through out the year.  More information about professional development available to those in the College of Education is available on the COE Professional Development for Faculty/Staff webpage (http://www.ecu.edu/cs-educ/oaa/facultypd.cfm). COE requires that all faculty teaching distance education course have 6 hours of PD a year.

In designing training for faculty and staff The OAA gets feedback from faculty on what they want to see for training options.  One of the biggest complaints that the OAA heard from faculty is that they are tired of the “one and done” model of training workshops. In trying to find a solution to this dissatisfaction OAA has decided to run a professional learning community (PLC) pertaining to social media.  The PLC looks at how social media can be used both in the classroom setting and for developing a personal learning  network.  The PLC will meet multiple time during the fall semester and once during the spring.  The hope of running a PLC is that faculty will look to create their own PLC’s in the future on topics that they find relevant for PD.
Fall 2014 COE Professional Development Flier