Monthly Archives: April 2014

NC Council of Teachers of Mathematics Elections

The North Carolina Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCCTM) is the professional organization in North Carolina of all persons responsible for the teaching of mathematics. Its membership includes teachers from all levels, kindergarten through graduate school, and other professionals who work with curriculum and materials for the teaching of mathematics. You’ll find out more about NCCTM through the website, including state and regional conferences, publications, grants and awards, and other professional activities.

The NCCTM Executive Committee met Saturday, April 1 were given the official results for new presidential elections. Two are College of Education faculty members in the Department of Mathematics, Science, and Instructional Technology Education: Drs. Ron Preston and Lynnly Martin.

PrestonRonald_prestonr

Dr. Ron Preston was elected NCCTM president.

Dr. Ron Preston, who earned his Ph.D. from Indiana University, was elected President of the organization. Preston has been at ECU since 1995 and has served in a variety of roles during his time at the university including professor, department chair and director of students.

Lynnly Martin ’06, who received a MAT in mathematics education and is an adjust faculty member, was elected to serve as Eastern Region President. Martin is a mathematics teacher at Hope Middle School and has served as co-director of the Eastern Region Math Fair for many years.

FacebookTwitterLinkedInGoogle+

Spring 2014 College of Education Open House

2014 Open House1The College of Education welcomed prospective teacher education students and their parents at the 2014 ECU Open House and the COE Extended Open House on Saturday, April 5.

The future Pirates met with faculty and staff to learn about general requirements for the college, and with current students to learn more about what to expect as an education major.

Morning event Faculty/Staff Representatives: Ron Preston, Bonnie Glass, Kwaku Adu-Gyamfi, Allen Guidry, Kathy Misulis, Marsha Craft-Tri2014 Open House2pp, Lisa Rogerson, Ivan Wallace, Karen Gammon, Annette Everett, Gerald Baldwin, Caroline Hill, Christa Monroe, and Vivian Covington

Morning event Student Representatives: Taylor Waters, Taylor Bjerke, Ashley Knox, Alex Dennis, Cornelius Stover, Euniqua Harris, Brooke Hill, and Jeremiah2014 Open House5

Afternoon event Faculty/Staff Representatives: Allen Guidry, Kathy Misulis, Lisa Rogerson, Annette Everett, Gerald Baldwin, Caroline Hill, and Christa Monroe

Afternoon event Student Representatives: Alex Dennis, Taylor Waters, Jeanann Woodard, Brianna Garbacik, Lyndsie Harrell, and Emily Curtin

A video photo gallery from the event is also available.

Teach Like a Pirate Author Speaks to Students

The New York Times best-selling author of Teach Like a PIRATE entertained almost 120 teacher education students, first year teachers and ECU faculty members at an event sponsored by East Carolina University’s College of Education on March 26.

Dave Burgess shared presentational “hooks” and strategies for increasing student engagement and creativity. Participants discovered their inner pirate with tales and tips for the classroom during the event. He enthralled the audience with magic tricks, participatory tasks, and humor.

Burgess is a U.S. History teacher at West Hills High School in San Diego, California. HeTLAP2 was the 2001 and 2012 Golden Apple Award recipient in the Grossmont Union High School District and the 2007-2008 Teacher of the Year at West Hills High School. Burgess has been voted a faculty standout for 17 consecutive years in categories such as Most Entertaining, Most Energetic, and Most Dramatic. He specializes in teaching hard to reach, hard to motivate students with techniques that incorporate showmanship and creativity.

“That was amazing,” said a participant at the event. “ECU needs to bring him back every year. I can’t wait to use these strategies.”

Invitations were issued to ECU’s teacher education students and faculty members. In addition, first year teachers from the 38 partnering counties in the Latham Clinical Schools Network were invited. The event was hosted as a part of the activities related to the East Carolina University Campus-Wide Teacher Recruitment Plan. Providing opportunities for pre-service and first year teachers to be supported are interwoven within the plan. Each participant at the event was given a copy of Burgess’ book to use in their current or future classroom. Burgess also served as the keynote speaker at the Latham Clinical Schools Network Clinical Teacher Conference on March 27.

A photo slide show of the event is available.

For more information about recruitment efforts for the College of Education at East Carolina University, please contact Dr. Laura Bilbro-Berry, Assistant Director of Teacher Education, at bilbroberryl@ecu.edu. For information about upcoming professional development and outreach events, please contact Ms. Christa Monroe, Lead Coordinator, Office of Professional Development and Student Outreach, at monroec@ecu.edu .

Ryan Earns AERA Recognition for Article

Dr. Caitlin L. Ryan, assistant professor in the Department of Literacy Studies, English Education, and History Education at East Carolina University and her co-author Dr. Jill M. Hermann-Wilmarth of Western Michigan University were honored to receive the Article of the Year Award from the American Educational Research Association’s Queer Studies Special Interest Group at AERA’s annual meeting this past weekend in Philadelphia, PA. They received this honor for their 2013 article in the Journal of Literacy Research entitled “Already on the Shelf: Queer Readings of Award-Winning Children’s Literature.”  The article was nominated for the award by a diverse team of scholars, several of whom reported already using it as the basis for further research and/or as reading material for their teacher education classes.

Dr. Caitlin Ryan

Dr. Caitlin Ryan

In their essay, Ryan and Hermann-Wilmarth ask what it might mean to read children’s literature in elementary school classrooms through a queer lens. They argue that because queer theory has a history as a literary theory that destabilizes normative associations among gender, sexuality, bodies, and desire, it provides a set of analytical tools classroom communities can draw on to create alternative readings of a wide range of familiar texts. Such readings of books already on the shelves of elementary school libraries and classrooms can highlight experiences and subjectivities of nonnormative sexualities and gender identities in the hopes of making classrooms more inclusive.

Specifically, they argue that four high-quality, award-winning children’s books already included in many schools and classrooms—Sendak’s (1963) Where the Wild Things Are, Woodson’s (2001) The Other Side, DiCamillo’s (2003) Tale of Despereaux, and Patterson’s (1977) Bridge to Terabithia—can be fruitful sites for opening up these more inclusive readings and conversations. Their article offers possible queer readings of these texts as well as suggestions for how to encourage elementary-aged students to think about both books and the socially constructed norms of real life through a queered lens.

jill-herman-willmarth

Dr. Jill Herman-Willmarth

By first queering on-the-shelf texts and then asking students to think about how that queering connects to larger social issues, elementary classrooms, they argue, can become places where strict identity categories—categories that can marginalize queer students and families—are made visible, questioned, and stretched to provide more effective and more equitable spaces of learning for all students.  In this way, the article chosen for this award contributes to Ryan and Hermann-Wilmarth’s ongoing body of both single- and co-authored research exploring ways to make classrooms more inclusive for a wide range of diverse students.

This is not the first honor that Ryan and Hermann-Wilmarth’s article has received. Prior to the AERA award, their article was also included in Research in the Teaching of English’s ”Annotated Bibliography of Research” for 2013.  Included in this list were “studies that held significant implications for teaching English language arts, as well as research that might lead to new insights into the paradigms or methodological practices within a given field in the coming years.”

The Queer Studies SIG of the American Educational Research Association, the organization who sponsored the award, was formed for the specific purpose of encouraging empirical, interpretive, and critical educational research in education that considers an interdisciplinary discourse including queer theory, queer students and educators, curriculum and sexuality, issues of intersectionality, and other vital issues.  More information about the SIG, the award, and an interview with Ryan and Hermann-Wilmarth can be found at the SIG’s website, https://sites.google.com/site/queersig/.

Ryan and Hermann-Wilmarth’s respective departments / colleges at ECU and WMU supported their trip to Philadelphia to receive this award.

Manner Joins Oxford/London Symposia Board

MannerJane_mannerjDr. Jane Manner, associate professor of elementary education, was asked to join the Advisory Board of the Oxford/ London Symposia. The Oxford Education Research Symposium is a forum for presentation of papers and discourse by scholars who have an interest in the theory and practice of universal education.

Manner has previously attended the Oxford Education Research Symposium in 2013, where the participants were highly complementary of her presentation and the discussions in which she engaged.

Get Ready for Education Summer Camps!

ECU/PSC AIG Camp AIG camp

East Carolina University and Pitt County Schools’ AIG camp is an annual summer camp for Pitt County gifted students who are identified as academically/intellectually gifted that also provides a summer experience for ECU teachers pursuing AIG licensure through ECU coursework.

The theme for 2014 is INTERACTIONS, allowing students to learn about photojournalism, robotics, cryptography, and more, as they investigate numerous aspects of interaction sin the world. Students attending the camp will be able to select topics that match their interests and all topics will include hands-on activities and interactive use of technology. 2013 ECU/PCS AIG Camp video

AIG Camp Quick Facts

  • 105 participants attend camp: 60 elementary students and 45 middle school students from Pitt County Schools participate at Ridgewood Elementary School, our host site.AIG camp2
  • 92 East Carolina University AIG licensure students, under the guidance of ECU faculty, gain experience to prepare to teach and advise gifted students.
  • Camp master teachers are Pitt County AIG (Academically and Intellectually Gifted) teachers, who begin each camp day with a large group session and model teaching for the ECU students.
  • ECU teachers present academically rigorous units in small group learning stations. Four to ten children are in each station at a given time. All units incorporate this year’s theme “Interactions.” Small groups of campers move through two learning stations each day.
  • Campers filled out an online interest survey to choose two stations of interest prior to the first day of camp. Station topics and room locations are listed below.

For more information about the camp, visit www.ecugifted.com and for more information about the registration process, contact Carmen Webb, camp director, at webbc@pitt.k12.nc.us.

Summer Ventures in Science and Mathematics

East Carolina University (ECU) is one of four UNC system campuses hosting Summer Ventures in Science and Mathematics. Administered through the College of Education, the ECU Summer Ventures program invites academically talented high school students with demonstrated interest in science and mathematics to four weeks of research and intensive study in a living-learning environment on ECU’s campus. Camp participants are North Carolina residents with aspirations to have a career in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics).

MooreShawn_mooresha

Contact the Summer Ventures Camp Director, Shawn Moore, at mooresha@ecu.edu for more information.

The camp curriculum will focus on experimental design, laboratory skills, mathematical modeling, exploratory data analysis, and more. Program topics include biological, physical, and earth sciences, archaeology and anthropology, computer science, engineering, mathematics, applied mathematics, and statistics. In addition to the rigorous academic experience, Summer Ventures students engage in co-curricular and extra-curricular activities, arranged by institute directors.

Summer Ventures is a state funded program that is cost-free for participants. ECU expects to host 60 students for Summer Ventures in June and July of 2014. For more information, contact Shawn Moore, director, at mooresha@ecu.edu or Cheryl Miller, program assistant, at millerche@ecu.edu. Also, visit www.ecu.edu/cs-educ/smventures/Index.cfm.

ECU Summer Science Camp

East Carolina University is partnering with Go-Science for the eighth year to offer a range of summer day camps that engage, entertain and educate children about the wonders of science. The camps offer small group experiences for children preparing to enter 2nd through 8th grades and feature experienced teachers from Pitt County.

LeeTammy_leeta

Contact Tammy Lee, ECU Summer Science Camp director, at leeta@ecu.edu for additional information about this camp.

Current ECU students serve as camp counselors and guide children through the discovery of science principles while having FUN! With creative sessions including “Lego Explorers” and “Getting Buggy” elementary and middle grades children have an opportunity to engage their minds while enjoying a summer day camp experience. For more information, visit www.ecu.edu/educ/msite/summersciencecamp/ or contact Tammy D. Lee, Summer Science Camp Director, at leeta@ecu.edu. Online registration for 2014 ECU Summer Science Camp is now active!

Becky Taylor ’76, ’80 Featured in EC Alumni Magazine

Becky Taylor“The Early Bird Gets the Worm”—After graduating early from ECU, Becky Taylor ’76, ’80 is successfully impacting education 

Becky Taylor is no stranger to East Carolina University. Having multiple family members as ECU graduates, Taylor knew that it was where she wanted to attend.

“I knew from the beginning that I wanted to go to ECU. My aunt and grandma both graduated from ECU. It was very easy for me to make that decision. I wanted to major in special education, and I knew ECU had a really good special education department.”

After graduating in three years from the College of Education with a degree in special education, Taylor has spent the last 35 years in the education field. She is now the Sylvan Learning Center franchise owner, as well as a member on the North Carolina State Board of Education.

To learn more about Taylor’s impressive past and her goals to improve the lives of thousands of children in North Carolina, read the Full EC Alumni magazine article: Early_Bird_Gets_the_Worm.

Spread the Word to End the Word

Spread the WordThe ECU chapter of Student-Council for Exceptional Children (S-CEC) held a Spread the Word to End the Word campus awareness event on March 5th in front of Dowdy Student Stores. S-CEC members, who are mostly special education majors, shared information with students and faculty about this national campaign to end the use of the “r-word,” referring to the words retard and retarded, and to raise awareness of its hurtfulness. They encouraged people to stop by, gain information, and sign the pledge poster. They handed out more than 100 Awareness ribbons and received more than 250 signatures on the poster. The event was a huge success! To learn more about Spread the Word, go to http://r-word.org/.

ECU Library Science Program Receives $490k Grant

IMLS_Logo_2cThe Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) announced that the Library Science degree program in the College of Education at East Carolina University is the recipient of a 2014 Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian (LB21) grant for the project “North Carolina Economically Disadvantaged and Diversity Scholarships.”

The IMLS awarded ECU $492,324 in funding that will support library science recruitment efforts and full-tuition scholarships at ECU for 30 incoming master of library science (MLS) students with the first cohort starting fall 2014. The grant has a matching requirement using non-federal funds for all recipients, bringing the grand total to $657,369.

In addition to tuition costs, the grant will cover university fees and offer a book stipend for the entire degree program until spring 2017. Membership to the North Carolina School Library Media Association is included as well as a travel stipend to attend one of their conferences.

ECU’s location and mission to support eastern NC aligned with the IMLS’s charge to prepare librarians who will work in high-need districts.

“Rural public schools in the economically depressed communities of eastern North Carolina face daunting challenges in recruiting and retaining school librarians,” according to the IMLS’s website with descriptions for each institution receiving the 2014 grant. “East Carolina University and its partner, the North Carolina School Library Media Association, will recruit and educate 30 MLS school librarians from economically disadvantaged and historically underrepresented backgrounds and place them in school library media centers. The project will use the ‘grow your own’ model, focusing on individuals who want to stay and work in eastern North Carolina by completing their degrees in an all-online degree program.”

Reviewers of submission proposals identified ECU’s LS program as one that has the potential to grow the number of enrolled LS students, conduct the necessary research that will support successful recruitment efforts and the education of the next generation of librarians, and enhance curricula within graduate schools of library and information science, as well as programs of continuing education for librarians and library staff, according to the acceptance letter from Maura Marx, deputy director for library science at the IMLS.

“This projHarerJohn_harerject will increase the number of trained, professional media specialists that reflect the diversity of their communities and increase the ability to connect with those diverse populations,” said Dr. John Harer, MLS degree program coordinator in the College of Education at ECU.

IMLS accepted 82 grant proposals from libraries requesting more than $24 million. In total, the organization granted $7.5 million to 23 institutions across the country and the recipients are matching these awards with $3.6 million in non-federal funds. IMLS received 82 applications for the program this year.

“Librarians and staff from all types of libraries, from school media centers to rare book collections to archives, need to be prepared to meet the changing informational and educational needs of their customers and constituents,” said IMLS Director Susan H. Hildreth. “The Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program helps them meet those needs with projects for continuing education, training, professional development, and early career research.”

About the Library Science Program at ECU
The master of library science (MLS) graduate degree program is the largest producer of school-library media-coordinator graduates in the state and is the largest program in the College of Education at ECU. The library science program at ECU has prepared library professionals since 1939 with a high-tech and hands-on emphasis, providing a web-based course of study using new and emerging technologies.

Our online program is especially attuned to the needs of nontraditional students and is designed for students seeking employment as librarians and information professionals in pre-K–12 schools, universities, community colleges, and public libraries.

The program’s mission statement: The master of library science program, reflecting the missions of East Carolina University and the College of Education, prepares library professionals to serve, lead, and partner in their communities.

About the Institute of Museum and Library Services
The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 123,000 libraries and 17,500 museums. Our mission is to inspire libraries and museums to advance innovation, lifelong learning, and cultural and civic engagement. Our grant making, policy development, and research help libraries and museums deliver valuable services that make it possible for communities and individuals to thrive. To learn more, visit www.imls.gov and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

IMLS News Release: Grant Awards Announcement: FY 14 Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program

Click here to view the list of funded projects.

NCAGT Recognizes ECU AIG Faculty

 2014 Conference Logo FINALTwo College of Education faculty members were recognized in the North Carolina Association for Gifted & Talented (NCAGT) 40 Years, 40 Faces celebration marking the 40th anniversary of NCAGT at the organization’s 2014 conference that was held on February 27-28, 2014.

Dr. Liz FogFogartyElizabeth_fogartyearty, associate professor in the College of Education, was selected for her involvement in NCAGT and their collaboration with NCAGT that resulted in significant contributions to gifted education in N.C. Fogarty served as the NCAGT 2009 conference co-chair and secretary from 2011-2013. Fogarty is also a lifetime member of NCAGT.

Also recognized was Dr. Brian Housand, assistant professor in the College of Education, as one of the 40 Faces of the Future. Housand served as a signature series speaker in addition to presenting several breakout sessions. For more information on the NCAGT 2014 conference and 40 Years, 40 Faces anniversary, visit www.ncagt.org.

4yBWm6m341Dn_Yi9k36dcHiyAZT3vKLyQAYMXDjqjZM=w273-h180-p-no

Dr. Brian Housand at the 2014 NCAGT Conference in Greensboro, NC. Housand was named one of 40 Faces of the Future.

About ECU’s AIG Add-on Licensure
As with all AIG licenses in the state of North Carolina, the program entails completing four courses. At ECU, our courses run in a four course sequence which begins in the summer and concludes the following summer. All of the courses required by the AIG Licensure Program at ECU are taught online, with the exception of two face-to-face weeks (one the first summer and one the second summer) involving a camp for gifted children.

About ECU/PCS AIG Camp
The ECU/PCS AIG camp is an annual summer camp for Pitt County AIG students.  This camp began in 2005 and has grown each year.  We will host 120 gifted students this summer.  Along with PCS master teachers, ECU faculty and students will offer a week of rigorous enrichment for your child.

This summer’s curriculum theme is INTERACTIONS. Whether the students are learning about photojournalism, robotics, cryptography, or other exciting topics they will investigate numerous aspects of interactions in our world. Following an opening morning session, students will participate in interactions-themed sessions. Students will be able to select topics that match their interests and all topics will include hands-on activities and interactive use of technology.  Snacks will be served daily.

For more information, visit the AIG Add-On Licensure website or the ECU Gifted Online Resource. To learn more about AIG camp, visit the ECU/PCS 2014 AIG Camp website.