Category Archives: Community Outreach

Science Olympiad

Despite the Ice and Snow, Science Olympiad Ignites Young Minds for STEM Careers

On Saturday, February 21st, 2015, the Center for STEM Education hosted the annual Science Olympiad Tournament for northeastern North Carolina middle and high school students. North Carolina Science Olympiad is a nonprofit organization with the mission to attract and retain the pool of K-12 students entering science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) degrees and careers in North Carolina. These tournaments are rigorous academic interscholastic competitions that consist of a series of different hands-on, interactive, challenging and inquiry-based events that are well balanced between the various disciplines of biology, earth science, environmental science, chemistry, physics, engineering and technology. Notwithstanding the icy weather, this year we hosted 426 students (209 middle school & 217 high school) from 25 schools in the northeast region. There were also over 150 volunteers involved in the day’s activities from overseeing events/competitions, to managing registration. Faculty and students of the MSITE Department were well represented. Drs. Carmen Woodhall and Liz Doster were event leaders for Simple and Compound Machines,  while Ms. Tammy Lee and a plethora of her Elementary Science students created and ran the competition for Experimental Design. Ms. Bonnie Glass was the event leader for It Matters, where students display their knowledge of the properties and behaviors of different states of matter. Dr. Rhea Miles represented the MSITE Department by promoting program and certificate opportunities to the in-service teachers/team coaches and future MSITE students. The staff of the Center for STEM Education was the backbone of the tournament: Nancy Evans and Cheryl Miller, Allison Everett (photographer) and all the student workers at the Center! AWESOME job everyone!!!  It was truly a remarkable day for STEM!

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COE ECU Excels

College of Education Students Honored for Academic Excellence

On February 20, 2015, fifty-two East Carolina University freshmen and full time transfer students with an intended Teacher Education major were honored during the College of Education ECU EXCELS event. This event was a part of the annual ECU EXCELS program that recognizes students who are first time, full-time freshman or transfer students who earned a 3.0 GPA or higher during the fall semester.

There were a total of one hundred and sixty-three guests were in attendance which included both honored students and their guests. Dr. Vivian Martin Covington, Executive Director of Teacher Education, brought words of recognition to the award recipients. Students received a Certificate of Academic Achievement, had an opportunity to interact with College of Education faculty, and were served light refreshments at the event.

The College of Education is delighted to congratulate the following students who attended the ceremony:

  • Ashley Algard
  • Cody Allen
  • Tionne Allen
  • Sarah Ayer
  • Jennifer Barkus
  • Christina Bianco
  • Sarah Bonin
  • Brooke Hill
  • Ryanne Hilliard
  • Bridget Boone
  • Caroline Bousman
  • Jacob Bowlus
  • Kelly Brady
  • Sawyer Brown
  • Meredith Campbell
  • Brittney Carter
  • Caitlyn Carter
  • Maurice Carter
  • Alecia Castellano
  • Alexis Corso
  • Melissa Creekmore
  • Airelle De Leon
  • Rachel Deans
  • Morgan Gerdes
  • Caitlyn Hannah
  • Christa Harris
  • Lauren Heath
  • Kathleen Henderson
  • Lillian Howie
  • Sarah Jackson
  • Cierra Jacoby
  • Michelle Kellett
  • Carly Levey
  • Amanda Lewis
  • Margaret Lombardo
  • Alexandra Marinello
  • Alyssa Mason
  • Kista May
  • Aaliyah McMillian
  • Erin Mullen
  • Kiana Owens
  • Megan Pickering
  • Alicia Ramos
  • Casey Shevlin
  • Emily Smith
  • Mariem Souissi
  • Kaylee Thomas
  • Samaria Trimble
  • Cherelle Vann
  • Jannie Walker
  • Reba Warren
  • Stephanie Whitehurst

Pictures from the event are available at online on the COE Excels Photo Album. Any questions regarding the ECU Excels event for the College of Education should contact Dr. Amy Shannon, Lead Coordinator of Academic Advising, at 252-328-0067 or shannona@ecu.edu.

asynchronous

Week 7 – Collaboration in Blackboard – 2/23/15

This week’s blog is a continuation of the discussion last week on collaboration tools. As discussed previously, it can be difficult to build the same kind of community in an online class as typically occurs naturally in a traditional, seated course. The collaboration tools that are either provided in Blackboard or are available by third parties, can help provide the tools necessary to make this community easier to build.

Last week, we discussed some synchronous tools that are available to faculty to use. As a reminder, synchronous tools, are tools that require everyone to be online at the same time. There will be an online follow-up professional development session coming soon for faculty to learn more about Saba Meeting. Please keep an eye on the COE PD page for details. Now, without further adieu, asynchronous tools!

Asynchronous Tools

Asynchronous tools are tools that do not require collaborators to be online at the same time. This blog could represent an asynchronous activity if you, the readers, decided to later participate by commenting below and contributing to the article. In fact there is a Blog tool in Blackboard, but its purpose is a bit different. One thing to note before starting is all of the asynchronous tools that will be mentioned here are native to Blackboard and can be set as gradable items. Each can also be set to grade with a Blackboard rubric (discussed in Week 8).

Blog - Essentially a blog is a shared online diary for use in a class. It can be used by an instructor to let students know what was or will be done in class to save the instructor from answering individual questions repeatedly. It can open up online discussions about related topics or a place to provide evidence of class participation. It is organized strictly by date. Blogs can be set up for each individual student or by course. Blogs are much less formal than discussion boards, which will be discussed later.

Discussion Board – Even a Blackboard newbie has probably heard of the discussion board. It is the most commonly used method of communicating in an online course. Essentially the instructor creates a discussion topic and the students then respond and discuss the topic. They are organized hierarchically with forums, threads, and replies. Discussion boards are easily collapsed, expanded and searched. Users can subscribe to a forum or thread to receive an email each time someone contributes to it. One of the newer features is students can be required to participate before they are able to see other student entries.

Journal – A journal does a bit less to build communication with the class, but potentially more with the instructor, as it provides a personal writing space for self-reflection and private communication with the instructor. It can be used to reflect on personal growth, assignments, personal experiences, etc. Be advised that if you choose “Permit Course Users to View Journal” in the settings all class participants will be able to see each others journals, removing the privacy feature, essentially creating a non-commentable blog.

Wiki – A wiki is a collaborative space where students can view, contribute and edit content. It can be used if students are collaborating on a paper, study guide, etc. The biggest difference between a wiki and any of the other tools is that everyone essentially works in the same space. What this means is there is one text box and each student can contribute, but the particular contribution of one student over another is not necessarily identified, besides look at the history.  Multiple pages can be created to make essentially a website for a project.

So that pretty much does it for the collaboration tools within Blackboard that are designed to potentially work with the entire class or groups. In addition to these tools, you can also divide your class up into groups and then assign group projects. When groups are created, there is another world that opens up for students in Blackboard that provides a place for Group assignments, file exchange, discussions, tasks, and more.

In addition to the tools we’ve looked at this week and last there are lots of third party tools that are also available that may meet your needs, and new ones become available every day. In face Google provides a wide range of free tools that are certainly worth looking into.

Once you start looking at the possibilities, you’ll find there really are ways to do the things you’ve been doing in your traditional classes all these years. It might take a bit of time and training to master it, as it has in your classroom, but once you do, you and your students will be quite satisfied with the results.

Throughout the semester, the OAA-Instructional Technology Team will be offering Professional Development opportunities. For more information on these opportunities, please visit the COE Professional Development website. To register for any professional development sessions, please use Cornerstone.

Captain Arrrgh Headshot

From the TRC: Award Winning Author, Duncun Tonatiuh

It’s Thursday, and another edition of From the TRC is published to highlight another service or resource the Teaching Resources Center in Joyner Library has to support the College of Education’s faculty and students. This week, it’s a reminder that award winning author Duncan Tonatiuh will be visiting campus this Saturday, February 21st.

Duncan Tonatiuh

Duncan Tonatiuh

This event is free and open to the public.

Duncan Tonatiuh
“Contemporary Codex: Using the Past to Address the Present”
Saturday, February 21, 2015
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Joyner East, Room 201

The TRC is sponsoring a presentation featuring award-winning children’s author and illustrator Duncan Tonatiuh (toh-nah-tyou) as he discusses how ancient art of the Americas influences his artwork. In addition, Mr. Tonatiuh will share how he looks at the past to address issues that affect children today, especially Latino children. Immigration and segregation are two crucial issues addressed in his works.

Born in Mexico City and raised in San Miguel de Allende, Duncan Tonatiuh graduated from Parsons The New School for Design and Eugene Lang College in New York City. His children’s books have won Tomás Rivera Mexican American Children’s Book AwardsPura Belpré Awards, and the Orbis Pictus Award.

Award-winning book, Separate is Never Equal

Award-winning book, Separate is Never Equal

Mr. Tonatiuh’s books will be available for purchase in the lobby of Joyner Library from 10:00am – 4:30pm, and he will be autographing books in the same location from 10:30am – 1:00pm and 3:30pm – 4:30pm.

His latest work, Separate is Never Equal, was named an Honor Book by the Pura Belpré Illustrator Awards and received the same award from the Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Medal and the Orbis Pictus Award for Outstanding Nonfiction for Children. This book, along with his other works, are available in the TRC.

You can learn more about Duncan Tonatiuh and his books on his official website, www.duncantonatiuh.com, and access interviews with and book readings by the author on TeachingBooks.net. Tonatiuh

 

Dr. Robin Hamilton

LEED Alumna and Current Principal has Article Published

2014 LEED Graduate Dr. Robin Hamilton had an article published on February 16, 2015 in ASCD Express entitled, “Transformative Kindergarten Transition Practices.” The article discusses the impact the transition into kindergarten can make on their future academic and social success. It also discusses different transition practices that are currently used.

Dr. Hamilton is currently the principal at Parsley Elementary School in Wilmington, NC, where some of the practices are being used. In 2014, Dr. Hamilton was the recipient of LEED’s 2014 Glatthorn Distinguished Dissertation award.

Ms. Ayla Allen (center) received a scholarship from NC Council for Exceptional Children. She is pictured here with NCCEC president Dr. Rose Matuszny (left) and president- elect Dr. Jessica Wery (right), at the state NCCEC Conference on Thursday, January 29, 2015.

NC Council for Exceptional Children Award Scholarship to ECU Student

Ayla Allen, a sophomore pursuing a bachelor’s degree in special education, adapted curriculum, recently was awarded a scholarship from the North Carolina Council for Exceptional Children (NCCEC).

Allen received this award for her dedicated service to students with disabilities through her work with the Student Council for Exceptional Children (SCEC) here at East Carolina University. She has served as Social Chair of the SCEC and helped to organize a variety of fundraising and social events. Through SCEC, she has volunteered in area schools with students with disabilities and been an active member of several community organizations.

Allen supports current and future educators through her work as an Apple Ambassador for ECU where she speaks to and recruits high school students for careers in education and as Vice President for the Student North Carolina Association of Educators.

Photo Caption: Ms. Ayla Allen (center) received a scholarship from NC Council for Exceptional Children. She is pictured here with NCCEC president Dr. Rose Matuszny (left) and president- elect Dr. Jessica Wery (right), at the state NCCEC Conference on Thursday, January 29, 2015.

Dr. William Sugar
Associate Professor of Mathematics, Science,
and Instructional Technology Education
College of Education

Dr. Sugar Selected for COE 2015 Scholar-Teacher Award

Dr. Bill Sugar of the Department of Mathematics, Science and Instructional Technology Education (MSITE) has been selected to represent the College of Education for the 2015 Scholar-Teacher Award.

The ECU Scholar-Teacher Award recognizes outstanding faculty members who integrate scholarship and teaching. Each year the colleges in Academic Affairs and colleges and schools in Health Sciences recognize one or more scholar-teacher(s), based on the number of faculty in the unit.

During the symposium, each scholar-teacher provides a succinct presentation (approximately 15 minutes) concerning his/her integration of scholarship in teaching. Each recipient also develops a poster presentation or display for viewing during the symposium. This year the symposium will be held during the Annual Research & Creative Achievement Week: March 23 – 27, 2015.

Dr. Sugar will be presenting in on March 26th in Mendenhall 244 at 2:50 p.m. on the topic of “Studies of Instructional Design Practices: Recent Research and Takeways.” Faculty, staff, students, and community friends are encouraged to attend all or parts of the afternoon symposium and to enjoy another wonderful celebration of scholarship and teaching at ECU!

Captain Arrrgh Headshot

From the TRC: Ronnie Barnes African-American Resource Collection

It’s Thursday, and another edition of From the TRC is published to highlight another service or resource the Teaching Resources Center in Joyner Library has to support the College of Education’s faculty and students. This week, it’s the Ronnie Barnes African-American Resource Collection.

Granted, it is Black History Month and that may be one reason why the Ronnie Barnes African-American Resource Collection is the subject of this week’s post. But, honestly, the main reason is to call attention to this valuable, yet underused resource in the Teaching Resources Center.

Allow me to back that statement up with numbers. So far this school year the Ronnie Barnes Collection has accounted for less than one (1) percent of the books circulated in the TRC. If that doesn’t sound small enough I’ll dig a little deeper into the statistics. Since July 2014, the TRC has accounted for 47%, on average, of Joyner Library’s monthly total circulation of books. What does that mean? Well, out of the 20,460 books that have been checked out from the TRC since July only 161 (0.7%) have come from the Ronnie Barnes Collection. Here’s why the collection is worth checking out any time of year:

Ronnie Barnes

Ronnie Barnes, ECU Class of ’75

Ronnie Barnes, an eastern North Carolina native, was the first graduate of ECU’s Sports Medicine program in 1975 and is the Senior Vice President of Medical Services and Head Athletic Trainer for the New York Giants of the National Football League. In 2002, he endowed a fund to develop and maintain a collection of materials written or illustrated by African-Americans, or about the African-American experience.

The children’s collection includes:

  • Coretta Scott King Award books
  • Caldecott Award books about African-Americans or by African-American authors or illustrators.
  • Newbery Award books about African-Americans or by African-American authors or illustrators.
  • Biographies of African-Americans for K12 students

Additionally, the adult collection contains all genres, from scholarly books  to general fiction. The adult collection is highlighted on an annual rotating basis. At the end of each year, these materials rotate out of the Ronnie Barnes Collection into Joyner Library’s general stacks.  The call numbers in the Ronnie Barnes Collection begin with “Barnes.”

For more resources to use in the classroom for Black History month click on these TRC and Joyner Library resources:

Not sure how to put these resources to use? Here are some lesson plan ideas for Black History Month from the National Education Association, Education World, Scholastic, Smithsonian Education, National Endowment for the Humanities, AfricanAmericanHistoryMonth.gov, African-American History Through the Arts, and PBS.

Until next time. – Dan Z. in the TRC

Captain Arrrgh Headshot

From the TRC: Distance Education & Award Winning Author, Duncan Tonatiuh

Distance Education

In this inaugural edition of From the TRC, the Teaching Resources Center would like to refresh the minds of the College of Education’s faculty, students and staff of our mission because it will also serve as the driving force behind this new weekly column:  The mission of the Teaching Resources Center is to facilitate teaching and learning initiatives by providing resources and services to educators at all levels.” [emphasis added]  It is my job to reach out to the College of Education and advertise the fact that the TRC’s collection and services does support educators at all levels.

With this in mind, it can be easy to forget about the needs of distance education students because they don’t physically walk through our doors on a regular basis, if ever. They may never even know the same resources and services we offer on-campus students are available to them. I earned my Master of Library and Information Science degree online, and experienced this exact scenario. Maybe it was because I was studying to become an academic librarian that the University felt I should already know these things or I would pick them up as I progressed through the program, but I never knew about document delivery, research consultations or even the research guides on the library’s website.

Here is a list of services and resources I hope all distance education students take advantage of:

Research Guides: We recently updated the Education Law and Educational Leadership guides and are working to update more.

Research Consultations: Something new! Students can contact me via FaceTime or Skype for a one-on-one session to help them with their specific research needs. Email Dan Zuberbier, to schedule an appointment.

Interlibrary Loan & Document Delivery: Need a book we don’t have? We can get it for you! Log into ILL with your PirateID and password to request a book. The same site will let you request document delivery where we will provide articles from our print and microform collections via email and will ship books and other media materials to you via UPS.

Cooperative Borrowing Agreements: As a DE student, you also have borrowing privileges at any UNC System library, plus a few others. Establish an account with Joyner Library to gain these privileges.  

Online Writing Lab: The Writing Center also provides assistance to DE students. Through consultations with a trained writing center consultant students can ask specific questions about their writing in any stage, from brainstorming to the final draft.


Duncan Tonatiuh

Duncan Tonatiuh

“Contemporary Codex:
Using the Past to Address the Present”

Saturday, February 21, 2015
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Joyner East, Room 201

The TRC is sponsoring a public presentation featuring award-winning children’s author and illustrator Duncan Tonatiuh (toh-nah-tyou) as he discusses how ancient art of the Americas influences his artwork. In addition, Mr. Tonatiuh will share how he looks at the past to address issues that affect children today, especially Latino children. Immigration and segregation are two crucial issues addressed in his works.

Born in Mexico City and raised in San Miguel de Allende, Duncan Tonatiuh graduated from Parsons The New School for Design and Eugene Lang College in New York City. His children’s books have won Tomás Rivera Mexican American Children’s Book Awards and Pura Belpré Awards.

Mr. Tonatiuh’s books will be available for purchase in the lobby of Joyner Library from 10:00am to 4:30pm, and he will be autographing books in the same location from 10:30am–1:00pm and 3:30pm – 4:30pm.

Award-winning book, Separate is Never Equal

Award-winning book, Separate is Never Equal

His latest work, Separate is Never Equal, was named an Honor Book by the Pura Belpré Illustrator Awards and received the same award from the Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Medal. This book, along with his other works, are available in the TRC.

You can learn more about Duncan Tonatiuh and his books on his official website, www.duncantonatiuh.com, and access interviews with and book readings by the author on TeachingBooks.net.

2015 Recruitment Day

College of Education Hosts Prospective Pirates

On Saturday, January 24, 2015, the East Carolina University College of Education hosted prospective teacher education students at their College Of Education Recruitment Day which was held in Mendenhall Student Center. The theme of the event was iTeach: What’s Your Superpower? and provided 46 junior and senior high school students and their families with information about teacher education degree programs offered at the institution as well as information about transitioning from high school to a four-year institution.

Invitations were issued to high schools within the Latham Clinical Schools Network which comprises 39 counties within eastern North Carolina. Dr. Linda Patriarca, Dean of the College of Education, welcomed the group with motivational comments about why becoming a teacher is crucial in today’s society. Prospective students and their families received information about admissions, financial aid, and housing. Teacher education faculty members provided participants with degree requirements and the unique features of ECU’s teacher education programs. In a student panel and throughout the day, teacher education students interacted with program participants and provided advice on successful transition from high school to college as well as engaged in conversations about what it’s like to be a Pirate at ECU. Prospective students and their families received information about the Education Living and Learning Community and the myriad of scholarships available for teacher education students. Tours of the campus led by current teacher education students rounded out the COE Recruitment Day.

Participants commented positively about the day by saying, “I loved the amazing ECU spirit…. There was excitement from everyone…. What a wise use of time…. The student panel was very helpful.” The teacher education programs represented at the event are hopeful that the day’s interactions will help prospective students solidify their choice to attend ECU in the future.

The College of Education was delighted to host this event to encourage high school students to choose East Carolina University as their home away from home. The unit extends its gratitude to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, Financial Aid, Campus Living, and teacher education faculty and staff across campus for making this a successful recruitment event.

A link to a photo album providing a pictorial account of the day is available at: Recruitment Day Photo Album – January 24, 2015.

For more information about recruitment efforts for the College of Education at East Carolina University, please contact Ms. Dionna Manning in the COE Academic Success Center, at manningd@ecu.edu or 252-328-5453 or Dr. Laura Bilbro-Berry, in the Office of Teacher Education, at bilbroberryl@ecu.edu or 252-328-1123. Interested individuals are encouraged to visit www.ecu.edu/becomeateacher for more information about teacher education programs offered at ECU.