Category Archives: Community Outreach

Graduate Students Hold Book Drive for Belvoir Elementary School

Boxes of books from the book drive

Boxes of books from the book drive

By Erica Anderson, Digital Journalist

East Carolina University graduate students are helping a local elementary school promote literacy.

As part of a community service project, four Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) students held a book drive for Belvoir Elementary School on Monday.

“The students there are so eager to learn; but, it’s a really rural area and they may not have very many opportunities. The teachers there do so much to help them so we wanted to provide as many resources [as] we can too,” said ECU graduate student Adam Johnson.

ECU Master of Arts in Teaching students collecting books outside of Domino's Pizza

ECU Master of Arts in Teaching students collecting books outside of Domino’s Pizza

The book drive began 10 days ago and concluded with a six-hour donations drive outside the Domino’s Pizza on Charles Boulevard.

So far the group of four MAT students collected more than 1200 books.

“If you can put books in the hands of young readers and promote literacy early on, they’ll love learning and they’ll love books their entire life,” said Johnson.

As part of the book drive, the students have also set up a fundraising website on www.gofundme.com. All the money raised on the website will go directly to Belvoir Elementary School.

If you would like to donate to Belvoir Elementary School click here.

To view the news segment about the book drive, click here.

Story and photos courtesy of WNCT.

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Advanced Placement Summer Institute Prepares Teachers to Give Their Best to the Brightest

Honors students in high school are anxious to take as many Advanced Placement courses as their schools offer so teachers go to school in the summer preparing to teach these courses.  ECU hosts  a College Board endorsed Advanced Placement Summer Institute. Each session is 4-days long and is taught by a certified College Board consultant. This summer, during the week of June 23-26, courses are being taught in

  • AP Biology
  • AP Calculus AB
  • AP Chemistry
  • AP Environmental Science
  • AP Physics 1 &2
  • AP Statistics

Classes have begun and teachers are involved in many hands-on activities around campus.

APchemistryAP Chemistry teachers are working hard at their lab stations to determine the equilibrium constants for a various chemical reactions here at South Central High School, this year’s hosting site for College Board’s Advanced Placement conference. Teachers will perform these same
labs later on with their AP chemistry students.

COE Faculty Member Receives $472,000 NC Quest Award

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Dr. Ann Bullock, chair of the Department of Elementary and Middle Grades Education, is partnering with NC Quest to expand the NC New Teacher Support Program.

Dr. Ann Bullock, Chair of the Department of Elementary and Middle Grades Education, received an NC-QUEST award of $472,394 titled Integrating Neuroscience into Mathematics Instruction (INMI). INMI continues the partnership with UNC-GA New Teacher Support Program (NTSP) and extends it to the Harriott College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Mathematics.

The INMI pilot project consists of an intensive scientifically-based professional development program designed to assist beginning teachers to become highly knowledgeable and pedagogically skilled in leading students to mastery of the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics. The INMI pilot project will target elementary schools in Edgecombe County and Hertford County that have been identified as among the lowest performing in the state.

The project will recruit thirty beginning teachers to participate in a year-long professional development program designed to increase their knowledge of the Common Core Standards for Mathematical practice, brain-compatible elements of mathematics instruction, brain-compatible instructional strategies, and whole-brain teaching techniques.

The INMI extends the professional development offerings currently provided by the NC NTSP, which include an institute/boot camp, six days of professional development, and ongoing instructional coaching. INMI teachers will attend an extended summer session at the beginning of the academic year, Saturday sessions and site-based sessions at their schools during the academic year, and a summer session at the conclusion of the academic year.

In addition, participating teachers will receive weekly on-site support from NC NTSP Instructional Coaches and monthly consultations from an ECU mathematics content expert. Through the integration of neuroscience in mathematics instruction, beginning teachers will be better equipped to engage diverse learners, offer effective feedback that leads to deeper understanding, create a rich learning environment that attends to students’ social and emotional needs, and ensure that students’ mathematical achievement is reflective of their true abilities.

Swaggerty Posts on NC Reading Association Blog

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Terry Atkinson, member of Tar River Reading Council and professor of reading education, reads to two students at the Earth Day Expo at East Carolina University on April 8, 2014.

Dr. Elizabeth Swaggerty wrote a post about the Tar River Reading Council’s participation in the ECU Earth Day Expo that was just published on the North Carolina Reading Association blog. “It was a great outreach activity that connected ECU faculty, area teachers, the Tar River Reading Council (local affiliate of the International Reading Association), and ECU’s Center for Biodiversity and Biology Department with local children,” said Swaggerty of the event.

 

Institute Features ECU Assistive Technology Students

The Irene Howell Assistive Technology (IHAT) Center presented on assistive technology at the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) New Special Education Directors Institute on April 9, 2014 in New Bern, NC.

Led by the Director of the IHAT Center, Dr. Laura King, undergraduate student members of the IHAT staff, including Ayla Allen, André Anglin, Bridget Corrigan, Sara Farwell, Rob Hicks, Chloe Morgan, and Murphy Newton, presented to 40 new Special Education Directors through engaging and interactive breakout sessions, allowing the new directors to learn about a variety of AT hardware and software, as well as implementation strategies through a universal design for learning approach.

The format and venue allowed the IHAT Center to share snapshot views of the professional development sessions currently offered to all ECU students and is moving towards offering the sessions for continuing education credits for teachers currently in the field.

“The growth of the professional development sessions in the two years they have been offered has been amazing to see. It has become something with momentum of its own, causing us to strive to keep up— what a wonderful challenge to have,” said King.

The feedback from the state presentation shared by Cynthia Debreaux, NCDPI EC Consultant for Regions 1 & 2, was overwhelmingly positive. The participants in the session shared that they enjoyed learning new information and technologies in the AT field, and they were particularly impressed by the professionalism and level of engagement that the undergraduate students demonstrated. King shared that one participant commented that “having future teachers present was powerful!”

For more information about the IHAT Center, please contact the center at atcenter@ecu.edu.

Bridget and Rob group Murphy and Chloe Andre Sara and Ayla

 

Get Ready for Education Summer Camps!

ECU/PSC AIG Camp AIG camp

East Carolina University and Pitt County Schools’ AIG camp is an annual summer camp for Pitt County gifted students who are identified as academically/intellectually gifted that also provides a summer experience for ECU teachers pursuing AIG licensure through ECU coursework.

The theme for 2014 is INTERACTIONS, allowing students to learn about photojournalism, robotics, cryptography, and more, as they investigate numerous aspects of interaction sin the world. Students attending the camp will be able to select topics that match their interests and all topics will include hands-on activities and interactive use of technology. 2013 ECU/PCS AIG Camp video

AIG Camp Quick Facts

  • 105 participants attend camp: 60 elementary students and 45 middle school students from Pitt County Schools participate at Ridgewood Elementary School, our host site.AIG camp2
  • 92 East Carolina University AIG licensure students, under the guidance of ECU faculty, gain experience to prepare to teach and advise gifted students.
  • Camp master teachers are Pitt County AIG (Academically and Intellectually Gifted) teachers, who begin each camp day with a large group session and model teaching for the ECU students.
  • ECU teachers present academically rigorous units in small group learning stations. Four to ten children are in each station at a given time. All units incorporate this year’s theme “Interactions.” Small groups of campers move through two learning stations each day.
  • Campers filled out an online interest survey to choose two stations of interest prior to the first day of camp. Station topics and room locations are listed below.

For more information about the camp, visit www.ecugifted.com and for more information about the registration process, contact Carmen Webb, camp director, at webbc@pitt.k12.nc.us.

Summer Ventures in Science and Mathematics

East Carolina University (ECU) is one of four UNC system campuses hosting Summer Ventures in Science and Mathematics. Administered through the College of Education, the ECU Summer Ventures program invites academically talented high school students with demonstrated interest in science and mathematics to four weeks of research and intensive study in a living-learning environment on ECU’s campus. Camp participants are North Carolina residents with aspirations to have a career in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics).

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Contact the Summer Ventures Camp Director, Shawn Moore, at mooresha@ecu.edu for more information.

The camp curriculum will focus on experimental design, laboratory skills, mathematical modeling, exploratory data analysis, and more. Program topics include biological, physical, and earth sciences, archaeology and anthropology, computer science, engineering, mathematics, applied mathematics, and statistics. In addition to the rigorous academic experience, Summer Ventures students engage in co-curricular and extra-curricular activities, arranged by institute directors.

Summer Ventures is a state funded program that is cost-free for participants. ECU expects to host 60 students for Summer Ventures in June and July of 2014. For more information, contact Shawn Moore, director, at mooresha@ecu.edu or Cheryl Miller, program assistant, at millerche@ecu.edu. Also, visit www.ecu.edu/cs-educ/smventures/Index.cfm.

ECU Summer Science Camp

East Carolina University is partnering with Go-Science for the eighth year to offer a range of summer day camps that engage, entertain and educate children about the wonders of science. The camps offer small group experiences for children preparing to enter 2nd through 8th grades and feature experienced teachers from Pitt County.

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Contact Tammy Lee, ECU Summer Science Camp director, at leeta@ecu.edu for additional information about this camp.

Current ECU students serve as camp counselors and guide children through the discovery of science principles while having FUN! With creative sessions including “Lego Explorers” and “Getting Buggy” elementary and middle grades children have an opportunity to engage their minds while enjoying a summer day camp experience. For more information, visit www.ecu.edu/educ/msite/summersciencecamp/ or contact Tammy D. Lee, Summer Science Camp Director, at leeta@ecu.edu. Online registration for 2014 ECU Summer Science Camp is now active!

$2.2 Million Gift to Fund Teacher Education in Rural Communities

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ECU graduate Judy Oglesby took part in the Partnership East program, which helped her earn a teaching degree without having to move out of her hometown. She is pictured above with her children, 12-year-old Melanie at left and 14-year-old Trace, in front of the school where she teaches. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

The first time Judy Oglesby considered going to college, she was 36-years-old “staring divorce in the face” and trying to figure out how she would support her two children moving forward.

A simple act got her interested in teaching – her son’s kindergarten teacher noticed the skill she exhibited as a volunteer at the school. A year of encouragement led her to enroll at Halifax Community College and, two years later, at East Carolina University.

Oglesby was part of the College of Education’s Partnership East program, which allows students to complete the first two years of an education degree at one of 20 participating community colleges in eastern and central North Carolina before transferring to ECU. All ECU teacher preparation classes can then be taken online and part-time.

The aim is to provide students with access to high-quality degree programs close to home, so that they might remain in those communities to teach after graduation. And that’s what Oglesby has done – graduating in 2010 and now teaching second grade at Belmont Elementary in her hometown, Roanoke Rapids.

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Oglesby said the Partnership East program was a benefit for the entire family.

“It was a saving grace,” Oglesby said of the program. “It turned things around for my family.”

A generous gift from the State Employees’ Credit Union Foundation ensures more non-traditional students like Oglesby will get that same chance. The Foundation awarded East Carolina University’s College of Education $2.28 million July 17 to continue educating aspiring teachers in rural areas.

The donation funds scholarships for Partnership East students in their senior year, during which they cannot work because they are completing full-time internships in the classroom. More than 225 students are currently enrolled at ECU through Partnership East. The $2.28 million gift will be distributed to students over the next five years.

Partnership East students earn a bachelor of science in elementary education, middle grades education or special education. More than 75 percent of program graduates are teaching in North Carolina and 94 percent of those are in eastern North Carolina.

“This serves the dire need we have for teachers in poor, eastern rural communities,” said ECU Provost Dr. Marilyn Sheerer, who is also a member of the SECU Foundation board. “It’s really exciting that the State Employees’ Credit Union is willing to do this.”

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Oglesby graduated from ECU in 2010 and now teaches second grade at Belmont Elementary School in her hometown of Roanoke Rapids.

Sheerer recused herself from the foundation’s Partnership East vote, but was on hand to answer last-minute questions. Kendra Alexander, major gifts officer for the College of Education, also played a key role in connecting the university and the foundation.

“State Employees’ Credit Union has a huge footprint in eastern North Carolina, and serving people in that area has always been an aim,” said Mark Twisdale, executive director of the Foundation. “It is difficult to find a project that spreads a net as wide in that area as Partnership East. This connects us with the community college system, public schools and East Carolina University.

“It’s not just sending money,” he added, “but giving people an opportunity they wouldn’t have had otherwise.”

Oglesby said it’s given her children new opportunities, too. They don’t doubt that they’ll go to college because they watched her do it, she said.

“We are all so indebted to the State Employees’ Credit Union for its support of our Partnership East Pipeline Teacher Preparation Program,” agreed Dr. Linda Patriarca, dean of the College of Education. “The gift helps us to fulfill our mission and commitment to prepare high quality teachers for the region – especially for those rural communities.”

The SECU Foundation promotes local and community development by primarily funding high impact projects in the areas of housing, education, health care and human services.

For more information about Partnership East, contact program coordinator Laura Bilbro-Berry at 252-328-1123 or bilbroberryl@ecu.edu or visit http://www.ecu.edu/cs-educ/partner_east/.

By Kathryn Kennedy
ECU News Services

Wells Fargo supports ECU Partnership East program

Wells Fargo has given $75,000 to East Carolina University’s College of Education to support the Wells Fargo Partnership East Program. The gift will support 47 students and provide five stipends of $750 based on a competitive application process.

Partnership East works with community colleges and public schools in eastern North Carolina with a focus on preparing well-trained professional teachers. The program has graduated 343 students, with 78 percent teaching in North Carolina.

Since 2002, Wells Fargo (and formerly known Wachovia Foundation) has given the College of Education $1,525,000 in support.

For more information about the Wells Fargo Partnership East program, contact Laura Bilbro-Berry, assistant director of Teacher Education and lead coordinator for the Wells Fargo Partnership East program, at bilbroberryl@ecu.edu.

from ECU News Service

Second Century Campaign

The College of Education, in partnership with East Carolina University, launched the largest campaign in its history– the COE Second Century Campaign.  The College of Education set campaign priorities specific to our projected needs for improved 21st century education.  Our priorities are identified by the following four categories:

  • Scholarships and Student Support
  • Endowed Professorships
  • Faculty Research, Outreach and Professional Development
  • Strategic Initiatives to Support Programs

Your gift will enable the College of Education to offer cutting edge technology, top notch educational programs and support to students to enhance their education.  Gifts will enhance instruction, provide students with diverse, real-world experiences for their prospective careers, and enable the College of Education to attract the strongest candidates possible for our programs.

The College of Education also houses six departments and the Office of Teacher Education.  Each of these departments identified their top priorities based on the categories set by the College.  Please click on the links below to view more specific needs listed by department.

The Department of Business and Information Technologies Education
Department of Counselor and Adult Education
Department of Curriculum and Instruction
Department of Educational Leadership
Department of Library Science
Department of Mathematics, Science and Instructional Technology Education
Office of Teacher Education

Adult Learners Help East Carolina Solve the Teacher Shortage Crisis

undefinedFor 16 years Kathy Jones ’06 worked as a teacher’s aide at schools in rural Pamlico County and drove a school bus every day, as aides are required to do. But this fall she will walk into the classroom not as an aide but, finally, as the teacher. It will be a moment of deep pride for her and another validation of East Carolina’s groundbreaking approach to solving the state’s chronic shortage of classroom teachers.

For the full story, see “Look Who’s Teaching Now” in the Fall 2006 edition of East Magazine.