Category Archives: Community Outreach

CAEP Prep: Call for Third Party Comments

caepThe Educator Preparation Provider (EPP) Unit at East Carolina University is hosting an accreditation visit by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) on February 8-10, 2015.

The EPP is inviting interested parties to submit comments addressing substantive matters related to the quality of the professional education programs offered.  When commenting, please be sure to specify the party’s relationship to the EPP (graduate, present or former faculty member, employer of graduates, etc.).

Please use the form located at http://www.ecu.edu/epp as a convenient way to submit comments.

Comments must be submitted no later than November 5 to ensure they are uploaded to NCATE’s Accreditation Information Management System (AIMS) by November 8, 2014. Anonymous comments will not be accepted by NCATE, and therefore cannot be submitted using the form.

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2015 CAEP Visit Preparations Commence

caepThe Educator Preparation Provider (EPP) unit at East Carolina University will host its next CAEP accreditation visit February 8-10, 2015. In preparation for the on-site visit, the College of Education’s Office of Assessment and Accreditation established this section to share information, reminders, and updates with EPP faculty, staff, and administrators.

#ECU_CAEPiscoming

Below is the PowerPoint presentation from the COE’s Opening Day Faculty and Staff Meeting.

CAEP Presentation – Opening Faculty Meeting

MSA Student Featured in Regional Local News for Her “Spirited” Idea

Below is an article from The Wake Forest Weekly featuring current ECU College of Education Master of School Administration (MSA) student Amy Light. The MSA degree program prepares individuals to become school leaders and encourages them to serve as problem-solvers, communicators, innovators, collaborators and change agents in their respective schools and school districts. Ms. Light’s spirit rock idea utilizes educational leadership skills taught in the program.

Heritage Middle School gets in the spirit

By David Allen

Amy Poovey Light – who will be the interim assistant principal next year – looks forward to the spirit rock being repainted to showcase what is going on with the school and community each week.

Amy Poovey Light – who will be the interim assistant principal next year – looks forward to the spirit rock being repainted to showcase what is going on with the school and community each week.

WAKE FOREST — Showing off their school spirit, Heritage Middle School recently added a new fixture to their front lawn – a giant rock that can be painted with various messages or just to pump up students.
Amy Poovey Light, who will be the Interim Assistant Principal next year, has volunteered her time, since December, to work in unison with the PTA at the school to bring more character and spirit to the school.
The PTA was overwhelmingly supportive of the idea, and helped move things forward for the project.
“I saw this idea of a spirit rock, and I thought ‘Oh wow! This is great!’” Light explained. “We promote so much of a positive culture at this school, we are a Positive Behavior Intervention Support school, and we try to encourage that kind of culture in everything we do.”
Light, the PTA and the school wanted to show the community that they care about what is going on with each student.
They worked with Hanson Aggregates who was more than happy to donate the rock, and they quickly were able to get the rock picked out and moved into place.
Light said the PTA would be able to use it as a fundraiser by renting the rock out by the week so it could be repainted and be the voice of the community at Heritage,
“This area is where the children gather while waiting to be picked up,” Light said as she pointed to the grass surrounding the spirit rock. “We want what is put on the rock to spark conversation and to give recognition that a student or group that is doing something in the school.”

Article and photo courtesy of David Allen and The Wake Forest Weekly.

ECU partners in Operation LINK mentoring program

ECU News Services

Tyrrek Grizzle poses with a robot he constructed during the robotics summer camp. The camp is part of an ECU partnership that supports elemementary and middle grades students from military families in eastern North Carolina. (Photos by Jay Clark)

Tyrrek Grizzle poses with a robot he constructed during the robotics summer camp. The camp is part of an ECU partnership that supports elemementary and middle grades students from military families in eastern North Carolina. (Photos by Jay Clark)

Ten-year-old Tyrrek Grizzle took control of his paddle, maneuvering his miniature land mover with ease.

He and a teammate moved his robot across a grid and past an opponent to pick up as many green-colored blocks as possible and dump them in a coordinating green basket. The team that filled the basket with the most blocks in the three-minute competition won.

Grizzle attended an inaugural weeklong robotics summer camp through Operation LINK, an AmeriCorps school-based science, technology, engineering and mathematics mentoring program for elementary and middle grades students in eastern North Carolina. The STEM program, with a special emphasis on students from military families, will transition from an afterschool program to part of the regular school day this fall.

Offered this spring in Wayne County, the program aims to promote positive behaviors and success in school while keeping military youth connected to family. It’s a partnership between East Carolina University, AmeriCorps, military family support networks, veterans groups, community colleges and public schools.

The summer camp, held at Greenwood Middle School in Goldsboro, allowed students to make real robots from designs they developed in their afterschool program.

Amy Perry, left, watches as her daughter, Kayla Perry, works at the Operation LINK afterschool program held this spring in Goldsboro. Amy Perry is a technical sergeant in the U.S. Air Force, where she inspects aircraft for defects at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base.

Amy Perry, left, watches as her daughter, Kayla Perry, works at the Operation LINK afterschool program held this spring in Goldsboro. Amy Perry is a technical sergeant in the U.S. Air Force, where she inspects aircraft for defects at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base.

Counselors and campers used a box kit to construct a robot with up to 650 pieces. A software program developed at Carnegie Mellon Robotics Academy gave the students the ability to control movements.

“We had fourth-graders writing code,” said Michael “Mike” Dermody, associate professor of cinematic arts and media production in the ECU School of Art. Dermody, who grew up in a military family, said “It’s amazing how quickly they adapt. It’s a very tactile and hands-on experience. They go in and test and modify it. There’s lots of activity between the computer itself and the robot.”

For Grizzle, a rising fifth-grader at Tommy’s Road Elementary School, taking his work from the computer lab to create a functioning robot is exciting. “Robots help you in a lot of ways,” said Grizzle. “They help us do things we can’t normally do ourselves.” Grizzle has cousins who serve in the military.

The pilot program will become part of the curriculum this fall at three Wayne County schools with a higher population of children from military families, said Lou U. Rose, Operation LINK coordinator in the ECU College of Education, which has facilitated the program.

“We will be able to impact more kids that way.”

Area teachers observed some of the program activities. “Some will do it as an elective in science and math classes,” Rose said.

“The beauty of this is they can tailor it and run with it and be creative. It brings relevancy in the real world, and maybe will get students interested in science.”

Michael Giddens, an AmeriCorps camp mentor who earned a teaching certificate in middle grades science and math from ECU in May, said students learned to collaborate and work as a team at the camp.

“The energy has been electrifying,” Giddens said. “Keeping them (students) engaged is a challenge in the classroom in the 21st century.”

USAF airman first class Eagan Nadeau pilots one of the student robots.

USAF airman first class Eagan Nadeau pilots one of the student robots.

One old-fashioned value students have learned has been patience, Giddens said, such as when broken robots have had to be re-assembled. Now poised to reach more students, the initial idea for the Operation LINK program was to create a way for military parents to interact with their children – via the web – while the parents were away from home. “It’s (been) a way to keep the child connected,” Dermody said.

Amy Perry’s nine-year-old daughter Kayla and 10-year-old daughter, Alexis, participated in the afterschool program. Perry, a technical sergeant in the U.S. Air Force, inspects aircraft for defects at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base. The Perry family doesn’t have a computer, internet or cable in their home. So the program has helped support her girls’ interests in science and technology. “It works for us,” she said.

Perry said the counselors encouraged her daughters’ unique personalities. “It’s allowing them to have the space to be who they are,” she said. “Respecting others is important.”

Kayla Perry said she enjoyed the computer lab and making a virtual robot. “I like the teachers. All the time they think of cool things for us to do,” she said. “They always come up with these amazing ideas.”

Program activities have helped build relationships between mentors and students, and among students, said Virginia Harris, a retired teacher and military spouse who taught 23 years in several states and overseas.

 Logan Chase, 10, works on programming after a practice session with his robot.

Logan Chase, 10, works on programming after a practice session with his robot.

“I’ve seen changes in the students, being able to work together and learning to follow rules better,” Harris said. “One of the main things they learn is you’re not an island. You have to get along with people in life. I think it’s difficult for little people to work together as a team sometimes.”

To learn more, visit www.ecu.edu/operationlink.

Story courtesy of ECU News Service and Crystal Baity. Photos courtesy of ECU News Service and Jay Clark. The original article can be found here.

Graduate Students Hold Book Drive for Belvoir Elementary School

Boxes of books from the book drive

Boxes of books from the book drive

By Erica Anderson, Digital Journalist

East Carolina University graduate students are helping a local elementary school promote literacy.

As part of a community service project, four Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) students held a book drive for Belvoir Elementary School on Monday.

“The students there are so eager to learn; but, it’s a really rural area and they may not have very many opportunities. The teachers there do so much to help them so we wanted to provide as many resources [as] we can too,” said ECU graduate student Adam Johnson.

ECU Master of Arts in Teaching students collecting books outside of Domino's Pizza

ECU Master of Arts in Teaching students collecting books outside of Domino’s Pizza

The book drive began 10 days ago and concluded with a six-hour donations drive outside the Domino’s Pizza on Charles Boulevard.

So far the group of four MAT students collected more than 1200 books.

“If you can put books in the hands of young readers and promote literacy early on, they’ll love learning and they’ll love books their entire life,” said Johnson.

As part of the book drive, the students have also set up a fundraising website on www.gofundme.com. All the money raised on the website will go directly to Belvoir Elementary School.

If you would like to donate to Belvoir Elementary School click here.

To view the news segment about the book drive, click here.

Story and photos courtesy of WNCT.

Advanced Placement Summer Institute Prepares Teachers to Give Their Best to the Brightest

Honors students in high school are anxious to take as many Advanced Placement courses as their schools offer so teachers go to school in the summer preparing to teach these courses.  ECU hosts  a College Board endorsed Advanced Placement Summer Institute. Each session is 4-days long and is taught by a certified College Board consultant. This summer, during the week of June 23-26, courses are being taught in

  • AP Biology
  • AP Calculus AB
  • AP Chemistry
  • AP Environmental Science
  • AP Physics 1 &2
  • AP Statistics

Classes have begun and teachers are involved in many hands-on activities around campus.

APchemistryAP Chemistry teachers are working hard at their lab stations to determine the equilibrium constants for a various chemical reactions here at South Central High School, this year’s hosting site for College Board’s Advanced Placement conference. Teachers will perform these same
labs later on with their AP chemistry students.

COE Faculty Member Receives $472,000 NC Quest Award

bullock

Dr. Ann Bullock, chair of the Department of Elementary and Middle Grades Education, is partnering with NC Quest to expand the NC New Teacher Support Program.

Dr. Ann Bullock, Chair of the Department of Elementary and Middle Grades Education, received an NC-QUEST award of $472,394 titled Integrating Neuroscience into Mathematics Instruction (INMI). INMI continues the partnership with UNC-GA New Teacher Support Program (NTSP) and extends it to the Harriott College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Mathematics.

The INMI pilot project consists of an intensive scientifically-based professional development program designed to assist beginning teachers to become highly knowledgeable and pedagogically skilled in leading students to mastery of the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics. The INMI pilot project will target elementary schools in Edgecombe County and Hertford County that have been identified as among the lowest performing in the state.

The project will recruit thirty beginning teachers to participate in a year-long professional development program designed to increase their knowledge of the Common Core Standards for Mathematical practice, brain-compatible elements of mathematics instruction, brain-compatible instructional strategies, and whole-brain teaching techniques.

The INMI extends the professional development offerings currently provided by the NC NTSP, which include an institute/boot camp, six days of professional development, and ongoing instructional coaching. INMI teachers will attend an extended summer session at the beginning of the academic year, Saturday sessions and site-based sessions at their schools during the academic year, and a summer session at the conclusion of the academic year.

In addition, participating teachers will receive weekly on-site support from NC NTSP Instructional Coaches and monthly consultations from an ECU mathematics content expert. Through the integration of neuroscience in mathematics instruction, beginning teachers will be better equipped to engage diverse learners, offer effective feedback that leads to deeper understanding, create a rich learning environment that attends to students’ social and emotional needs, and ensure that students’ mathematical achievement is reflective of their true abilities.

Swaggerty Posts on NC Reading Association Blog

Earth-Day-Expo-News-Update-Post-300x225

Terry Atkinson, member of Tar River Reading Council and professor of reading education, reads to two students at the Earth Day Expo at East Carolina University on April 8, 2014.

Dr. Elizabeth Swaggerty wrote a post about the Tar River Reading Council’s participation in the ECU Earth Day Expo that was just published on the North Carolina Reading Association blog. “It was a great outreach activity that connected ECU faculty, area teachers, the Tar River Reading Council (local affiliate of the International Reading Association), and ECU’s Center for Biodiversity and Biology Department with local children,” said Swaggerty of the event.

 

Institute Features ECU Assistive Technology Students

The Irene Howell Assistive Technology (IHAT) Center presented on assistive technology at the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) New Special Education Directors Institute on April 9, 2014 in New Bern, NC.

Led by the Director of the IHAT Center, Dr. Laura King, undergraduate student members of the IHAT staff, including Ayla Allen, André Anglin, Bridget Corrigan, Sara Farwell, Rob Hicks, Chloe Morgan, and Murphy Newton, presented to 40 new Special Education Directors through engaging and interactive breakout sessions, allowing the new directors to learn about a variety of AT hardware and software, as well as implementation strategies through a universal design for learning approach.

The format and venue allowed the IHAT Center to share snapshot views of the professional development sessions currently offered to all ECU students and is moving towards offering the sessions for continuing education credits for teachers currently in the field.

“The growth of the professional development sessions in the two years they have been offered has been amazing to see. It has become something with momentum of its own, causing us to strive to keep up— what a wonderful challenge to have,” said King.

The feedback from the state presentation shared by Cynthia Debreaux, NCDPI EC Consultant for Regions 1 & 2, was overwhelmingly positive. The participants in the session shared that they enjoyed learning new information and technologies in the AT field, and they were particularly impressed by the professionalism and level of engagement that the undergraduate students demonstrated. King shared that one participant commented that “having future teachers present was powerful!”

For more information about the IHAT Center, please contact the center at atcenter@ecu.edu.

Bridget and Rob group Murphy and Chloe Andre Sara and Ayla

 

Get Ready for Education Summer Camps!

ECU/PSC AIG Camp AIG camp

East Carolina University and Pitt County Schools’ AIG camp is an annual summer camp for Pitt County gifted students who are identified as academically/intellectually gifted that also provides a summer experience for ECU teachers pursuing AIG licensure through ECU coursework.

The theme for 2014 is INTERACTIONS, allowing students to learn about photojournalism, robotics, cryptography, and more, as they investigate numerous aspects of interaction sin the world. Students attending the camp will be able to select topics that match their interests and all topics will include hands-on activities and interactive use of technology. 2013 ECU/PCS AIG Camp video

AIG Camp Quick Facts

  • 105 participants attend camp: 60 elementary students and 45 middle school students from Pitt County Schools participate at Ridgewood Elementary School, our host site.AIG camp2
  • 92 East Carolina University AIG licensure students, under the guidance of ECU faculty, gain experience to prepare to teach and advise gifted students.
  • Camp master teachers are Pitt County AIG (Academically and Intellectually Gifted) teachers, who begin each camp day with a large group session and model teaching for the ECU students.
  • ECU teachers present academically rigorous units in small group learning stations. Four to ten children are in each station at a given time. All units incorporate this year’s theme “Interactions.” Small groups of campers move through two learning stations each day.
  • Campers filled out an online interest survey to choose two stations of interest prior to the first day of camp. Station topics and room locations are listed below.

For more information about the camp, visit www.ecugifted.com and for more information about the registration process, contact Carmen Webb, camp director, at webbc@pitt.k12.nc.us.

Summer Ventures in Science and Mathematics

East Carolina University (ECU) is one of four UNC system campuses hosting Summer Ventures in Science and Mathematics. Administered through the College of Education, the ECU Summer Ventures program invites academically talented high school students with demonstrated interest in science and mathematics to four weeks of research and intensive study in a living-learning environment on ECU’s campus. Camp participants are North Carolina residents with aspirations to have a career in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics).

MooreShawn_mooresha

Contact the Summer Ventures Camp Director, Shawn Moore, at mooresha@ecu.edu for more information.

The camp curriculum will focus on experimental design, laboratory skills, mathematical modeling, exploratory data analysis, and more. Program topics include biological, physical, and earth sciences, archaeology and anthropology, computer science, engineering, mathematics, applied mathematics, and statistics. In addition to the rigorous academic experience, Summer Ventures students engage in co-curricular and extra-curricular activities, arranged by institute directors.

Summer Ventures is a state funded program that is cost-free for participants. ECU expects to host 60 students for Summer Ventures in June and July of 2014. For more information, contact Shawn Moore, director, at mooresha@ecu.edu or Cheryl Miller, program assistant, at millerche@ecu.edu. Also, visit www.ecu.edu/cs-educ/smventures/Index.cfm.

ECU Summer Science Camp

East Carolina University is partnering with Go-Science for the eighth year to offer a range of summer day camps that engage, entertain and educate children about the wonders of science. The camps offer small group experiences for children preparing to enter 2nd through 8th grades and feature experienced teachers from Pitt County.

LeeTammy_leeta

Contact Tammy Lee, ECU Summer Science Camp director, at leeta@ecu.edu for additional information about this camp.

Current ECU students serve as camp counselors and guide children through the discovery of science principles while having FUN! With creative sessions including “Lego Explorers” and “Getting Buggy” elementary and middle grades children have an opportunity to engage their minds while enjoying a summer day camp experience. For more information, visit www.ecu.edu/educ/msite/summersciencecamp/ or contact Tammy D. Lee, Summer Science Camp Director, at leeta@ecu.edu. Online registration for 2014 ECU Summer Science Camp is now active!