Category Archives: Community Outreach

Wayne Staton

Wayne Staton Honors Mother with Education Scholarship

EC Alumni Magazine

This story courtesy of EC Alumni magazine, which is available in full to members of the East Carolina Alumni Association at PirateAlumni.com/ECAlumni.

Wayne Staton’s late mother Ellen B. Staton was a graduate of East Carolina Teachers College in the late 1930s, going on to teach home economics and elementary school until he and his brother Allyn were born. His father William Staton, a graduate of Wake Forest College and Law School, was a practicing attorney, who later became a World War II veteran and Purple Heart recipient, and eventually served in the North Carolina State Senate for 24 years. After their parents passed away, Wayne and his late brother, Allyn Staton, wanted to do something to honor their mother, who had been such a great support to their father and his career. They decided it would only be fitting to endow a scholarship in her name in the College of Education for undergraduate students majoring in elementary education.

Like his father, Wayne has had a successful career. A graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, he has held careers in manufacturing, banking, and information technology. Currently, he is the owner of Staton Group LLC, a forestry, agricultural, and commercial investment property business. He has also followed in his mother’s footsteps, teaching business and government classes at Central Carolina Community College for over 10 years. Not only that, Wayne has kept himself busy hosting a weekly television program in Sanford for more than 20 years.

Throughout the years, Wayne has been able to witness firsthand how the university has grown. “My father served in the North Carolina Senate during the time that Dr. Leo Jenkins was working so hard to expand East Carolina University. I was extremely impressed with the medical school that was established, and also the good reputations of the College of Business, the College of Education, and the Theater Arts Department.”

He was especially surprised by the administration, staff, and faculty’s dedication to making East Carolina a major regional university and serving the surrounding communities. “I believe that ECU is ably serving Eastern North Carolina with its medical school and related medical practices and services,” he said.

Whenever he isn’t working or volunteering, Wayne is traveling, working out, or pursuing his passion: history. Those who know Wayne will know he is an avid history buff. “I am particularly interested in U.S. history from pre-World War II through the 1960s. I am also interested in North Carolina history from the late 40s through the 1990s.” Another passion of his is art. Wayne enjoys visiting art exhibits, galleries, and shows.

Since beginning his work with the university, Wayne has made many great memories. Wayne has enjoyed several escorted tours of the ECU Medical Complex and The Heart Center. Of one particular tour, Wayne recalls, “My tour guide was Dr. Wily Nifong, a respected heart surgeon. He was wonderful! It was a very exciting experience to me to be able to go behind the scenes to see how doctors are trained and patients are treated and hopefully cured.”

Wayne describes his decision to give to the university as a gratifying one. “My association has been a great and extremely rewarding experience. I have become so very impressed with the administrators, faculty, and staff at the university. The gift officers are the ultimate professionals, and the students I have met have all been highly motivated to succeed in school and in their careers. I urge anyone and everyone to make gifts in some shape or form to the university, and then get involved personally. It has certainly been rewarding to me.”

This story courtesy of EC Alumni magazine, which is available in full to members of the East Carolina Alumni Association at PirateAlumni.com/ECAlumni.

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Epsilon Sigma Alpha

ESA Scholarships Available for Special Education Majors

The North Carolina Council of Epsilon Sigma Alpha Scholarship Board will continue to offer their Scholarship for students and teachers who are pursuing a degree or certification in Special Education in 2015.

The scholarship has been available since 1956 and is targeted to individuals training for work with exceptional children and has ranged from $500 to $2,500 per year. Current North Carolina teachers seeking additional training are also eligible. Applications must be post marked by April 1, 2015 and awards will be made by May 2, 2015.

Applicants should note the agreement to teacher in the North Carolina Public School System for a minimum of 1 year. Copies of both applications are available for downloading on the North Carolina Council of Epsilon Sigma Alpha website.

Dr. Christy Rhodes

Dr. Christy Rhodes Receives Promoting Diversity and Inclusion Mini-Grant

Drs. Christy Rhodes and Sheresa Blanchard are recipients of the “Promoting Diversity and Inclusion in the Curriculum” Mini-Grants. The selected proposals are going to tackle different aspects of diversity in the classrooms of ECU and in eastern North Carolina.

Dr. Christy Rhodes, assistant professor in the Department of Interdisciplinary Professions, submitted a proposal with Drs. Kathy Lohr and Phyllis Broughton to facilitate a workshop for eastern North Carolina’s community college faculty and staff members.

Rhodes said they came to the decision to focus on community colleges because the department’s graduate students are preparing to become instructors at the community college level and because “they (community colleges) are the entry point for so many non-traditional learners.” She added, “they are experiencing diversity much more than universities are and other higher education (institutions).”

This proposal aims to work on institution-wide diversity by hosting a workshop for faculty and staff members currently at community colleges as well as the future educators enrolled in the departments graduate programs. The workshop will cover difficult conversations in the classroom and present participants with a toolkit of information to continue the important conversation. “Three hours isn’t enough,” said Rhodes.

“We’re excited that the grant allows us to put things in the toolkit that are helpful. During our workshop, we’re going to focus on the tips in the book that focuses on the difficult conversations,” said Rhodes. The toolkit is provided at the workshop to supply participants with resources to keep close.

Both program proposals are currently in progress and working to increase the diversity in our classrooms. The next Diversity Seminar will be on April 8, 2015 and attendees will be eligible for the two mini-grants to be awarded.

This article is an excerpt from the March 2015 Discovering Equity and Diversity newsletter.

Science Olympiad

Despite the Ice and Snow, Science Olympiad Ignites Young Minds for STEM Careers

On Saturday, February 21st, 2015, the Center for STEM Education hosted the annual Science Olympiad Tournament for northeastern North Carolina middle and high school students. North Carolina Science Olympiad is a nonprofit organization with the mission to attract and retain the pool of K-12 students entering science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) degrees and careers in North Carolina. These tournaments are rigorous academic interscholastic competitions that consist of a series of different hands-on, interactive, challenging and inquiry-based events that are well balanced between the various disciplines of biology, earth science, environmental science, chemistry, physics, engineering and technology. Notwithstanding the icy weather, this year we hosted 426 students (209 middle school & 217 high school) from 25 schools in the northeast region. There were also over 150 volunteers involved in the day’s activities from overseeing events/competitions, to managing registration. Faculty and students of the MSITE Department were well represented. Drs. Carmen Woodhall and Liz Doster were event leaders for Simple and Compound Machines,  while Ms. Tammy Lee and a plethora of her Elementary Science students created and ran the competition for Experimental Design. Ms. Bonnie Glass was the event leader for It Matters, where students display their knowledge of the properties and behaviors of different states of matter. Dr. Rhea Miles represented the MSITE Department by promoting program and certificate opportunities to the in-service teachers/team coaches and future MSITE students. The staff of the Center for STEM Education was the backbone of the tournament: Nancy Evans and Cheryl Miller, Allison Everett (photographer) and all the student workers at the Center! AWESOME job everyone!!!  It was truly a remarkable day for STEM!

COE ECU Excels

College of Education Students Honored for Academic Excellence

On February 20, 2015, fifty-two East Carolina University freshmen and full time transfer students with an intended Teacher Education major were honored during the College of Education ECU EXCELS event. This event was a part of the annual ECU EXCELS program that recognizes students who are first time, full-time freshman or transfer students who earned a 3.0 GPA or higher during the fall semester.

There were a total of one hundred and sixty-three guests were in attendance which included both honored students and their guests. Dr. Vivian Martin Covington, Executive Director of Teacher Education, brought words of recognition to the award recipients. Students received a Certificate of Academic Achievement, had an opportunity to interact with College of Education faculty, and were served light refreshments at the event.

The College of Education is delighted to congratulate the following students who attended the ceremony:

  • Ashley Algard
  • Cody Allen
  • Tionne Allen
  • Sarah Ayer
  • Jennifer Barkus
  • Christina Bianco
  • Sarah Bonin
  • Brooke Hill
  • Ryanne Hilliard
  • Bridget Boone
  • Caroline Bousman
  • Jacob Bowlus
  • Kelly Brady
  • Sawyer Brown
  • Meredith Campbell
  • Brittney Carter
  • Caitlyn Carter
  • Maurice Carter
  • Alecia Castellano
  • Alexis Corso
  • Melissa Creekmore
  • Airelle De Leon
  • Rachel Deans
  • Morgan Gerdes
  • Caitlyn Hannah
  • Christa Harris
  • Lauren Heath
  • Kathleen Henderson
  • Lillian Howie
  • Sarah Jackson
  • Cierra Jacoby
  • Michelle Kellett
  • Carly Levey
  • Amanda Lewis
  • Margaret Lombardo
  • Alexandra Marinello
  • Alyssa Mason
  • Kista May
  • Aaliyah McMillian
  • Erin Mullen
  • Kiana Owens
  • Megan Pickering
  • Alicia Ramos
  • Casey Shevlin
  • Emily Smith
  • Mariem Souissi
  • Kaylee Thomas
  • Samaria Trimble
  • Cherelle Vann
  • Jannie Walker
  • Reba Warren
  • Stephanie Whitehurst

Pictures from the event are available at online on the COE Excels Photo Album. Any questions regarding the ECU Excels event for the College of Education should contact Dr. Amy Shannon, Lead Coordinator of Academic Advising, at 252-328-0067 or shannona@ecu.edu.

asynchronous

Week 7 – Collaboration in Blackboard – 2/23/15

This week’s blog is a continuation of the discussion last week on collaboration tools. As discussed previously, it can be difficult to build the same kind of community in an online class as typically occurs naturally in a traditional, seated course. The collaboration tools that are either provided in Blackboard or are available by third parties, can help provide the tools necessary to make this community easier to build.

Last week, we discussed some synchronous tools that are available to faculty to use. As a reminder, synchronous tools, are tools that require everyone to be online at the same time. There will be an online follow-up professional development session coming soon for faculty to learn more about Saba Meeting. Please keep an eye on the COE PD page for details. Now, without further adieu, asynchronous tools!

Asynchronous Tools

Asynchronous tools are tools that do not require collaborators to be online at the same time. This blog could represent an asynchronous activity if you, the readers, decided to later participate by commenting below and contributing to the article. In fact there is a Blog tool in Blackboard, but its purpose is a bit different. One thing to note before starting is all of the asynchronous tools that will be mentioned here are native to Blackboard and can be set as gradable items. Each can also be set to grade with a Blackboard rubric (discussed in Week 8).

Blog - Essentially a blog is a shared online diary for use in a class. It can be used by an instructor to let students know what was or will be done in class to save the instructor from answering individual questions repeatedly. It can open up online discussions about related topics or a place to provide evidence of class participation. It is organized strictly by date. Blogs can be set up for each individual student or by course. Blogs are much less formal than discussion boards, which will be discussed later.

Discussion Board – Even a Blackboard newbie has probably heard of the discussion board. It is the most commonly used method of communicating in an online course. Essentially the instructor creates a discussion topic and the students then respond and discuss the topic. They are organized hierarchically with forums, threads, and replies. Discussion boards are easily collapsed, expanded and searched. Users can subscribe to a forum or thread to receive an email each time someone contributes to it. One of the newer features is students can be required to participate before they are able to see other student entries.

Journal – A journal does a bit less to build communication with the class, but potentially more with the instructor, as it provides a personal writing space for self-reflection and private communication with the instructor. It can be used to reflect on personal growth, assignments, personal experiences, etc. Be advised that if you choose “Permit Course Users to View Journal” in the settings all class participants will be able to see each others journals, removing the privacy feature, essentially creating a non-commentable blog.

Wiki – A wiki is a collaborative space where students can view, contribute and edit content. It can be used if students are collaborating on a paper, study guide, etc. The biggest difference between a wiki and any of the other tools is that everyone essentially works in the same space. What this means is there is one text box and each student can contribute, but the particular contribution of one student over another is not necessarily identified, besides look at the history.  Multiple pages can be created to make essentially a website for a project.

So that pretty much does it for the collaboration tools within Blackboard that are designed to potentially work with the entire class or groups. In addition to these tools, you can also divide your class up into groups and then assign group projects. When groups are created, there is another world that opens up for students in Blackboard that provides a place for Group assignments, file exchange, discussions, tasks, and more.

In addition to the tools we’ve looked at this week and last there are lots of third party tools that are also available that may meet your needs, and new ones become available every day. In face Google provides a wide range of free tools that are certainly worth looking into.

Once you start looking at the possibilities, you’ll find there really are ways to do the things you’ve been doing in your traditional classes all these years. It might take a bit of time and training to master it, as it has in your classroom, but once you do, you and your students will be quite satisfied with the results.

Throughout the semester, the OAA-Instructional Technology Team will be offering Professional Development opportunities. For more information on these opportunities, please visit the COE Professional Development website. To register for any professional development sessions, please use Cornerstone.

Captain Arrrgh Headshot

From the TRC: Award Winning Author, Duncun Tonatiuh

It’s Thursday, and another edition of From the TRC is published to highlight another service or resource the Teaching Resources Center in Joyner Library has to support the College of Education’s faculty and students. This week, it’s a reminder that award winning author Duncan Tonatiuh will be visiting campus this Saturday, February 21st.

Duncan Tonatiuh

Duncan Tonatiuh

This event is free and open to the public.

Duncan Tonatiuh
“Contemporary Codex: Using the Past to Address the Present”
Saturday, February 21, 2015
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Joyner East, Room 201

The TRC is sponsoring a presentation featuring award-winning children’s author and illustrator Duncan Tonatiuh (toh-nah-tyou) as he discusses how ancient art of the Americas influences his artwork. In addition, Mr. Tonatiuh will share how he looks at the past to address issues that affect children today, especially Latino children. Immigration and segregation are two crucial issues addressed in his works.

Born in Mexico City and raised in San Miguel de Allende, Duncan Tonatiuh graduated from Parsons The New School for Design and Eugene Lang College in New York City. His children’s books have won Tomás Rivera Mexican American Children’s Book AwardsPura Belpré Awards, and the Orbis Pictus Award.

Award-winning book, Separate is Never Equal

Award-winning book, Separate is Never Equal

Mr. Tonatiuh’s books will be available for purchase in the lobby of Joyner Library from 10:00am – 4:30pm, and he will be autographing books in the same location from 10:30am – 1:00pm and 3:30pm – 4:30pm.

His latest work, Separate is Never Equal, was named an Honor Book by the Pura Belpré Illustrator Awards and received the same award from the Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Medal and the Orbis Pictus Award for Outstanding Nonfiction for Children. This book, along with his other works, are available in the TRC.

You can learn more about Duncan Tonatiuh and his books on his official website, www.duncantonatiuh.com, and access interviews with and book readings by the author on TeachingBooks.net. Tonatiuh

 

Dr. Robin Hamilton

LEED Alumna and Current Principal has Article Published

2014 LEED Graduate Dr. Robin Hamilton had an article published on February 16, 2015 in ASCD Express entitled, “Transformative Kindergarten Transition Practices.” The article discusses the impact the transition into kindergarten can make on their future academic and social success. It also discusses different transition practices that are currently used.

Dr. Hamilton is currently the principal at Parsley Elementary School in Wilmington, NC, where some of the practices are being used. In 2014, Dr. Hamilton was the recipient of LEED’s 2014 Glatthorn Distinguished Dissertation award.

Ms. Ayla Allen (center) received a scholarship from NC Council for Exceptional Children. She is pictured here with NCCEC president Dr. Rose Matuszny (left) and president- elect Dr. Jessica Wery (right), at the state NCCEC Conference on Thursday, January 29, 2015.

NC Council for Exceptional Children Award Scholarship to ECU Student

Ayla Allen, a sophomore pursuing a bachelor’s degree in special education, adapted curriculum, recently was awarded a scholarship from the North Carolina Council for Exceptional Children (NCCEC).

Allen received this award for her dedicated service to students with disabilities through her work with the Student Council for Exceptional Children (SCEC) here at East Carolina University. She has served as Social Chair of the SCEC and helped to organize a variety of fundraising and social events. Through SCEC, she has volunteered in area schools with students with disabilities and been an active member of several community organizations.

Allen supports current and future educators through her work as an Apple Ambassador for ECU where she speaks to and recruits high school students for careers in education and as Vice President for the Student North Carolina Association of Educators.

Photo Caption: Ms. Ayla Allen (center) received a scholarship from NC Council for Exceptional Children. She is pictured here with NCCEC president Dr. Rose Matuszny (left) and president- elect Dr. Jessica Wery (right), at the state NCCEC Conference on Thursday, January 29, 2015.

Dr. William Sugar
Associate Professor of Mathematics, Science,
and Instructional Technology Education
College of Education

Dr. Sugar Selected for COE 2015 Scholar-Teacher Award

Dr. Bill Sugar of the Department of Mathematics, Science and Instructional Technology Education (MSITE) has been selected to represent the College of Education for the 2015 Scholar-Teacher Award.

The ECU Scholar-Teacher Award recognizes outstanding faculty members who integrate scholarship and teaching. Each year the colleges in Academic Affairs and colleges and schools in Health Sciences recognize one or more scholar-teacher(s), based on the number of faculty in the unit.

During the symposium, each scholar-teacher provides a succinct presentation (approximately 15 minutes) concerning his/her integration of scholarship in teaching. Each recipient also develops a poster presentation or display for viewing during the symposium. This year the symposium will be held during the Annual Research & Creative Achievement Week: March 23 – 27, 2015.

Dr. Sugar will be presenting in on March 26th in Mendenhall 244 at 2:50 p.m. on the topic of “Studies of Instructional Design Practices: Recent Research and Takeways.” Faculty, staff, students, and community friends are encouraged to attend all or parts of the afternoon symposium and to enjoy another wonderful celebration of scholarship and teaching at ECU!