Category Archives: Counselor Education

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From the TRC: Reluctant Readers

It’s the third Thursday of the month and a new edition of From the TRC is published to highlight another service or resource Joyner Library’s Teaching Resources Center (TRC) has to support the College of Education’s faculty and students. Today we’ll cover one of our newest bibliographies, Reluctant Readers.

The TRC has created, and constantly updates, an extensive list of bibliographies and guides available to help students, faculty and staff easily navigate our collections. Print copies for select topics are available in the TRC while our entire catalog of bibliographies and guides are available on the TRC’s website. The reluctant readers bibliography is currently only available online, and is based on titles from the Young Adult Library Association’s (YALSA) Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers List.

But, we need to define who a reluctant reader. The umbrella term, reluctant reader, is used to describe a few different groups of students. Reluctant readers generally fall into one of three categories, those who can’t, don’t or won’t read. Students may not read because they lack the literacy and comprehension skills needed to do so which can lead to self-doubt and a fear of their secret being “found out.” The latter two categories encompass students able to read, but either dislike reading itself or their personal interests lead them to other activities they find more attractive.

So, what to do? A simple Internet search will overwhelm you. There is no shortage of parenting websites, non-profit and for-profit companies willing to share tips, tricks, and books. The Lexile Framework for Reading also offers tips and links to additional resources.

One theme you will find over and over again as you sift through all these resources is student choice. Allow your reluctant readers to choose reading material (e.g., comic book, graphic novel, popular magazine, etc.) about topics they are interested in. Of course, if a teacher knows their students’ interests, and happens to know a few books that may pique their interest, it’s a win-win. That’s why the TRC created our bibliography for reluctant readers.

Joyner Library’s subscription to Novelist Plus will also come in handy at times like this. Novelist Plus allows users to search for “Title Read-alikes” and “Author Read-alikes”. For example, if a student liked Kwame Alexander’s novel, The Crossover” A Basketball Novel, you can use that feature to find a list of similar reads:

Figure 1: The Crossover: A Basketball Novel’s entry in Novelist Plus. Read-alikes are found just above the “Find It!” button.

Figure 1: The Crossover: A Basketball Novel’s entry in Novelist Plus. Read-alikes are found just above the “Find It!” button.

Figure 2: Clicking on the “Title Read-alikes” will show a list of novels with similar themes.

Figure 2: Clicking on the “Title Read-alikes” will show a list of novels with similar themes.

Why is it important to become familiar with Novelist Plus? All K-12 educators in North Carolina have free access to either Novelist K-8 or Novelist Plus through NC WiseOwlJoyner Library’s subscription to Novelist Plus is the only way pre-service teachers can access this resource until you have your own classroom.

We hope to hear from you soon!

Until next time…Dan Z. in the TRC

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From the TRC: Instruction & Consultation Services

It’s the third Thursday of the month and a new edition of From the TRC is published to highlight another service or resource Joyner Library’s Teaching Resources Center (TRC) has to support the College of Education’s faculty and students. Today we’ll review a few changes to how students and faculty schedule the TRC’s instruction and consultation services.

These changes are meant to accomplish two things. First, students, faculty and staff will be able to schedule a library instruction session for their classes or a research consultation in less time. Second, these new forms will provide TRC librarians with all pertinent information at the beginning of the scheduling process. This will eliminate extra time used to email questions back and forth after a request is first submitted.

All links below can be found on the left hand side of the TRC’s web page.

Library Instruction for Classes

The Instruction Session Request Form is for professors seeking to schedule a TRC librarian to teach their students not only about Joyner Library’s resources and services, but also how the TRC specifically supports the College of Education and its faculty and students. This form can also be used to schedule whole class SMART Board workshops, and general orientations and tours of the TRC.

The semester may be half over, but there is still time to schedule a library instruction session for your class today!

Consultation Services

Research Consultations – This form will offer students and faculty a direct link to TRC librarians who would like to schedule research consultations. Until now, Joyner Library’s Book a Librarian portal acted as the middle man, but this change will streamline the scheduling process..

SMART Board Consultations – Students and faculty can schedule one-on-one or small group consultations with the TRC’s SMART Certified Education Trainer. Each consultation is specifically tailored to meet your needs.

3D Printing Consultations – The TRC’s newest service! 3D printing consultations are one-on-one sessions that can range from a simple introduction to 3D printing to specific design needs for an academic project and everything in between. It is not necessary to have a finished product in mind when scheduling a consultation.

We hope to hear from you soon!

Until next time…Dan Z. in the TRC


Upcoming Professional Development Offering: Instructional Design for Online Student Success

The NEW Instructional Design for Online Student Success professional development series will focus on motivating and retaining online learners by developing a course that incorporates interactive tools, student collaboration and a variety of assessment activities. Topics will also include strategies for creating and fostering a sense of community in online or blended courses.

The first session, Collaborative Tools in Blackboard, will focus on using the collaboration tools that are readily available within Blackboard and many other learning management software suites including groups, discussions, wikis and blogs. Both novice and experienced online instructors are encouraged to attend the session, as it will focus on sharing collaborative ideas among faculty in addition to showing how to use these tools.

Collaborative Tools in Blackboard-Part I will be offered face to face on Thursday, September 17th at 1:00 in Speight 239. Participants are encouraged to bring their own device to participate in the interactive session. The session will also be offered online Thursday, September 24th at 2:00 via Saba Meeting.

Part 2 of Collaborative Tools in Blackboard will provide a more focused look at one or more of the collaborative tools discussed in Part 1 based on participant interest and feedback provided during the sessions.

Faculty and staff can register for these sessions via Cornerstone. For more information contact Holly Fales at

View all detailed descriptions of all COE Faculty/Staff Professional Development opportunities at

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Professional Development Opportunities for 2015-2016

The Office of Assessment and Accreditation’s professional development for the 2015-16 academic school year will have two different overarching themes for participants. The workshops will be presented in two different formats to better fit the schedules and preferred learning styles of those interested in attending.  Participants will have the opportunity to attend either a face-to-face or an online session.

Google Apps for Education – A Progressive Workshop Series

Google Apps for Education are becoming a powerful tool in the Pk-12 education world.  Google has created a cost-effective way to bring collaboration tools to the classroom.  This has led to greater integration and implementation of this tool in the classroom with many of our LCSN partners using them.  If you have any questions contact Jason Whited at

Instructional Design for Online Student Success

This professional development series will focus on motivating and retaining online learners by developing a course that incorporates interactive tools, student collaboration, and a variety of assessment activities. In addition, these sessions will include strategies for creating and fostering a sense of community in online or blended courses.  If you have any questions about this workshop contact Holly Fales at

For detailed descriptions of each of the sessions, please visit College of Education Professional Development for Faculty and Staff.

ECU faculty and staff can register for these session via Cornerstone.

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From the TRC: NoveList Plus

It’s Thursday, and a new edition of From the TRC is published to highlight another service or resource Joyner Library’s Teaching Resources Center has to support the College of Education’s faculty and students. This week, it’s NoveList Plus.

This week’s post builds on a previous post we wrote about While focuses on bringing the author to your students so students can experience how their favorite authors create and read their own works, NoveList Plus can help educators match readers with the right books to expand students’ literary world beyond the familiar.

NoveList_PlusNoveList Plus bills itself as a comprehensive online readers’ advisory (RA) tool used to search hundreds of thousands of popular fiction and nonfiction titles, which includes categories such as author read-alikes, book lists, and book discussion guides. It includes genre outlines and online training materials for librarians to familiarize staff with appeal factors, the RA interview, and other aspects of readers’ advisory.

Sounds like a resource for school librarians, right? Of course it is, but my experience as a teacher and school librarian has taught me that students won’t always turn to their librarian for book recommendations. Students will reach out to the teacher they feel most comfortable with for reading advice.  At the high school where I worked in Arizona, the English Department and I constructed and continuously updated a bulletin board highlighting the most recent books the staff had read. Students paid attention to which staff member’s interests matched their own, and turned to them for recommendations. I think it is a safe bet to say the English Department used NoveList Plus more than I did!

The teachers I’ve worked with loved the fact that NoveList Plus includes Lexile measures, book reviews, and lists the awards a book has won. Take a look at  “The Crossover”  which was awarded the 2015 Newbery Medal.

Here are other tools and resources NoveList Plus offers educators at all levels:

  • Professional Toolbox
  • Read-alikes
    • Love an author, but have already read all of their books? Finished a series and disappointed there aren’t more to read? Each book and author in NoveList Plus is paired with other books and authors that are similar to your favorites. Here is an example from George R. R. Martin’s A Game of Thrones, and Sherman Alexie’s author page.
  • Genre Overviews
    • Keeping Up…Genres covers “core genre essentials, links to key awards, lots of lists and on-point articles to help readers find the perfect genre match.”

NoveList Plus also offers a robust Support Center complete with an archive of training sessions, tutorials and additional materials such as “Help Sheets” and PowerPoint presentations to help you maximize NoveList’s resources.  Finally, watch their “News and Events” page for professional development webinars, press releases and new product demonstrations.

Until next time…Dan Z. in the TRC

Click here to view the archive of all From the TRC posts.

Dan Zuberbier

Meet Dan Zuberbier: A Great Resource for Students, Faculty, and Educators in Eastern NC

Recently, the Joyner Library made a new addition specifically to benefit the College of Education. Dan Zuberbier was hired as the Education and Instructional Technologies Librarian in the Teaching Resource Center.

Like many academic librarians, Dan Zuberbier didn’t follow a straight path to the profession. While finishing his B.A. in History at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, he was an assistant baseball coach at Edgewood College, a small private college down the street from the UW. “Baseball had been the center of my life for as long as I could remember,” he said. “Since I wasn’t playing ball any more it made sense to try and break into the coaching ranks.” Unfortunately being an assistant coach at an NCAA Division III school wasn’t enough to pay the bills, and he picked up odd jobs to make ends meet.

Eventually, Dan decided he needed a more stable career path. “Working the equivalent of two full-time jobs to pay the bills took the fun out of coaching baseball,” and reflected on what he wanted to get out of a career. “I needed a career that fulfilled my intellectual curiosities, and, at the same time, provided opportunities to develop meaningful relationships with young adults as I had been able to do with my baseball players. Teaching seemed like a natural fit.”

Setting his sights on becoming a high school history teacher, he enrolled in Pima Community College’s online Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Education Program, moved to Arizona to complete his student teaching, and earned his teaching license. Yet, four years later, his career took another unexpected turn. “I was having a hard time building up my students’ research skills, so I reached out to who I thought was our school librarian,” he said. “She kindly informed me she was the library clerk and had no experience teaching students research skills.”

Saying he was surprised his high school, the largest school in the district, didn’t have a certified library media specialist on staff is putting it mildly. To make matters worse, soon after their initial conversation, the library clerk broke her foot and was out of work for a week. Zuberbier stated, “Because she wasn’t a certified teacher-librarian, the school was under no obligation to hire a substitute to keep the library open in her absence. I was speechless.” After being shut out of their library for an entire week, Zuberbier wondered what else his students were missing out on because the school did not have a certified teacher-librarian.

He dove head-first into researching the role a library media specialist should play on a high school campus and petitioned the school board to fund the position. His request was denied. The Superintendent argued that because the school was only four years old, its collection was ‘still so new’ and students had access to so many online resources the school didn’t need a certified librarian. It took another year for Zuberbier’s efforts to succeed, and, in the meantime, he began earning his Master in Library and Information Science (MLIS) through UW-Milwaukee. He was also able to earn his library media specialist endorsement, and became his school’s first certified teacher-librarian.

“Soon after I started my MLIS program, I knew I couldn’t stop being a teacher. But, I also realized I wanted to give myself the opportunity to have an impact on the profession as an advocate for school libraries and through my work as an education librarian,” Zuberbier said. Which is why he considers himself fortunate to be working in East Carolina University’s Teaching Resources Center. “This is my dream job. To not only work with pre-service teachers by teaching them about instructional technologies and what they should expect out of their school library when they enter the workforce, but also serve educators throughout eastern North Carolina is an awesome responsibility.”

Zuberbier is currently working on developing workshops for students and faculty around the basic functions and lesson planning around the use of SMART Boards. He is also looking to collaborate with COE faculty to develop a series of workshops for students that will cover current and emerging K12 instructional technologies that will take place during the Fall semester. He currently resides in the TRC, room 2504, and can be reached through email,, or by phone, 328-0406.


ECU to Participate in Global Day of Giving

image‘Tis the season for giving! In honor of #GivingTuesday, East Carolina University is inviting alumni, friends, parents, students, faculty, and staff to join the movement by giving a charitable gift* on Tuesday, December 2, to the university that is near and dear to our hearts.

Founded in 2012 to inspire a new tradition of generosity, #GivingTuesday focuses on celebrating kindness and giving back. Support a culture of philanthropy at ECU by making a gift on December 2nd and becoming a partner in securing the university’s future for current students and future generations of Pirates.

Your gifts provide scholarships, enrich teaching resources and libraries, offer hands-on learning lessons, support research and the arts, deliver classroom enhancements, and afford study abroad living/learning opportunities – all of which help ECU attract and retain the best and brightest students and faculty.

Help spread the word! Mark you calendar to #GiveTueECU on December 2, tell your friends, and post on social media using the hashtags #GivingTuesdayECU and #GiveTueECU. “I Gave” badges will be available through ECU’s University Advancement and East Carolina Alumni Association’s social media accounts on December 2.

Learn more about the #GivingTuesdayECU movement. Thank you for your support!

Contact us at (252) ECU-GIVE (252-328-4483) or

*Your gift is tax-deductible to the extent the law allows.


Counselor Education Students to Participate in Mental Health Emergency Training

On Oct. 3, graduate students in the counselor education program in the ECU College of Education will participate in an all-day, intensive training session on mental health, first aid and other emergencies.

Upon completion, participants will receive a three-year certification to help people in mental health emergencies.

Students enrolled in ECU’s program are preparing to work in clinical mental health, college and school settings as professional counselors after graduation.

It’s the first time the specialized training has been offered to ECU counselor education students. While crisis, mental illness and mental health emergency information is available in several courses, organizers said students will benefit from the additional focus. ECU social work and rehabilitation students also will participate in the training, which is hosted by the Counselor Education Association.

“It’s important to think about these issues as they relate to college campuses, and hosting this sort of workshop may help raise awareness for those here at ECU who might be struggling,” said Allison Crowe, assistant professor for counselor education in the College of Education.

ECU counselor education students to participate in mental health emergency training. by Joy Holster.


College of Education Recognizes Academic Excellence with Scholarships

The College of Education presented approximately $406,800 in scholarship awards to 73 East Carolina University students for the 2014-2015 school year. Recipients were honored at the College of Education Scholarship Recipient and Donor Recognition Ceremony that was held on Friday, August 22, 2014 at Rock Springs Center in Greenville, NC.

The scholarships and awards ranged from $250 to $20,000. Private donations fund the scholarships that were created to honor and memorialize outstanding educators and the education profession in order to support the academic pursuits of future education professionals.

Chancellor Steve Ballard and Vice Chancellor for University Advancement Christopher Dyba assisted Dean Linda Patriarca in recognizing the college’s generous donors and accomplished students. Approximately 280 people attended the ceremony and reception, including scholarship recipients, their guests, scholarship donors, board members, and faculty and staff.

Please find scholarship and award recipients listed below. Please visit ECU’s University Scholarships page for more information about each scholarship (

Alston W. Burke Scholarship:
Kathryn Camilleri of Novi, MI, Kayla Carr of Dunn, NC, Margaret-Ellen Edwards of Kinston, NC,Sarah Marsh of Newark, DE, Kristin Messina of Saint James, NY
Andy Roos Memorial Scholarship:
Avery Spey of Cary, NC
Angel Boberg-Webb Memorial Scholarship:
Meredith Rose Clark of Greenville, NC
Audrey V. Dempsey Pi Omega Pi Junior Award:
John Castello of Monroe, NC
Becky Keith Ledford Scholarship:
Amy Lambe of Wilmington, NC
Benjamin Scott Denton Scholarship in Special Education:
Angela Ball of Cary, NC
Betty S. Abernathy Memorial Scholarship:
Cody Allen of Pine Level, NC
Boyette/Batton Memorial Scholarship:
Takeiya Hudson of Elizabeth City, NC
Burney & Judy Warren Scholarship:
Elizabeth Garreau of Atlanta, GA, Arthur P. Nava of Winterville, NC
Carol Smith Gardner Education Leadership Fellowship:
Dawn Hester of Greenville, NC
Carolyn C. Matthews Jones Scholarship:
Sarah Marsh of Newark, DE
Charles and Beth Ward Scholarship in Elementary Education:
Kathryn Camilleri of Novi, MI
Craig W. and Ruth T. Joyner Family Scholarship:
Brett T. Congleton of Winterville, NC
Daisy Carson Latham Memorial Scholarship:
Donna Williams of Angier, NC, Misty Yost of Pensacola, FL
David and B.J. Fisher Scholarship:
Philip David Ellis of Winterville, NC
Diane Kester Innovator Award:
Katherine Collins of Jacksonville, NC
Dianne and Chip Linville Doctoral Fellowship Endowment Fund:
Chena Cayton of Grimesland, NC
Don and Linda Lassiter Scholarship:
Mackinsay Howe of Smithfield, NC, Tina Venturella of Clayton, NC
Doris Burnette Scholarship:
Molly Elizabeth Wells of Boone, NC
Dr. Betty M. Long Memorial Scholarship:
Mackinsay Howe of Smithfield, NC
Dr. Charles R. Coble Scholarship Fund:
Elizabeth Oakley of Durham, NC
Dr. James W. Batten Research Fellow Scholarship:
Haley Pierson of Matthews, NC
Dr. John T. Richards Scholarship:
Callie Parker of Marshville, NC
Dr. Moses M. Sheppard Scholarship Fund:
Carey Anne Henry of Cary, NC
Dr. Sunday Ajose Memorial Scholarship:
Taunya Stevens-Johnson of Barberton, OH
Dr. Suzanne Wester, M.D. Scholarship:
Vasti Rodriguez of Greenville, NC
Educators Hall of Fame Scholarship:
Jessica Balance of Fremont, NC
Ellen Boone Staton Memorial Scholarship:
Bethany Wantz of Holly Springs, NC
Eloise Faison Teacher Scholarship:
Katherine Freer of Wendell, NC, Caroline Frey of Charlotte, NC,Mykellah Jarvis of Knightdale, NC, Bethany Wantz of Holly Springs, NC
Emily S. Boyce Fellowship:
Lorraine Schneider of Hope Mills, NC
Faye Marie Creegan Scholarship Endowment Fund:
Stephen Marquart of Morrisville, NC
Frank G. Fuller Scholarship:
Laura B. Barnes of Ahoskie, NC
Gina Gaillard Locklear Scholarship:
Maggie Jarrell of Mount Airy, NC, Roberta  J. Lattin of Concord, NC
Glatthorn Dissertation Award:
Dr. Robin Hamilton of Wilmington, NC
H. Frances Daniels Scholarship:
Michelle K. Gianvito of North Brunswick, NJ
Hattie M. Strong Foundation Scholarship Fund:
Lindsey Miller of Delway, NC
Hazel Roberts Donnell Scholarship:
Tonya Darroch Jordan of Fuquay Varina, NC
Helen Armfield Crowder Scholarship:
Michelle Nendza of Long Island, NY
Helen Massey Harrell Memorial Scholarship:
Kristen Vecchia of Wilmington, NC
J. Worth Carter Scholarship:
Melanie N. Koerber of Elizabeth City, NC
James Bryant Kirkland, Jr. and Evelyn Johnson Kirkland Middle Grades Scholarship:
Leila Davies of Jacksonville, NC
James H. and Connie M. Maynard Scholarship:
Douglas Ange of Jamesville, NC, Amberlynn Bishop of Jacksonville, NC, Summer Nicole Briley of Stokes, NC,Jamie Goecke of New Bern, NC, Samantha Johnson of Grandy, NC, Lauren Lewis of Middlesex, NC,Rebecca Moore of New Bern, NC, Michael Anthony Norman Jr. of Gates, NC,

Carey Stancil of Elizabeth City, NC, Hannah Vermillion of Kinston, NC

James H. and Virginia J. Tucker Scholarship:
Takeiya Hudson of Elizabeth City, NC
Jane B. Reel Scholarship: Tonya Ward of Cameron, NC
Kallam/Moore Scholarship: Elizabeth Garreau of Atlanta, GAKara Lynn Corey Fennell: Tonya Darroch Jordan of Fuquay Varina, NC
Kathy A. Taft Memorial Scholarship: Amy Lambe of Wilmington, NC
Katie Earle Owen Morgan Scholarship Endowed Fund: Kayla Carr of Dunn, NC
Kay Hall Chesson Scholarship: Michelle K. Gianvito of North Brunswick, NJ
Lena Ellis Pi Omega Pi Sophomore Award: Michelle K. Gianvito of North Brunswick, NJ
Library Science Outstanding Graduate: Tamantha J. Cabe of Sylva, NC
Linda Haddock McRae Memorial Scholarship: Cynthia G. Hammonds of Lumberton, NC, Lorraine Schneider of Hope Mills, NC
Lula and Billy Whitley Scholarship: Carey Anne Henry of Cary, NC
Mack and Margaret Coble Doctoral Fellowship: Chena Cayton of Grimesland, NC
Marjorie Harrison Pi Omega Pi Freshman Award: Scott P. Haddock of Greenville, NC
Mary Elizabeth Austin Yancey Scholarship Fund: Grant Samuel Hairston of Henderson, NC
Mary Lois Staton Scholarship: Taylor Downey of Goldsboro, NC, Kristen Puckett of Belews Creek, NC
Mildred Daniels Southwick Scholarship: Breanna Long of Rockingham, NC
Mona Jarvis and Callaree Jarvis Horton Elementary Education Scholarship: Taylor Dozier of Currituck, NC
Osmond Mitchell Endowment Fund: Laura B. Barnes of Ahoskie, NC, Chelsea Taylor of Gates, NC
Pat and Lynn Lane Education Scholarship:   Meredith Rose Clark of Greenville, NC, Jordan Lewis-Outlaw of Washington, NC,Michaela Nobles of Vanceboro, NC, Casey Preddy of Franklinton, NC
Russell-Smith Fellowship in Adult Education: James Edward Coda, Jr. of Fayette City, PA
Sally Ruth Hinton Klingenschmitt Scholarship: Casey Preddy of Franklinton, NC
Sheltering Home Circle of the King’s Daughters and Sons Scholarship: Katherine Freer of Wendell, NC
Teer-Mihalyi Academic Enrichment Endowed Fund: Angela Ball of Cary, NC
Thadys J. Dewar Scholarship: Michelle K. Gianvito of North Brunswick, NJ
Thomas Clay Williams Memorial Scholarship: Abby Strickland of Spring Hope, NC
Tony R. Banks Scholarship in Special Education: Arthur P. Nava of Winterville, NC

View Photos from the Ceremony and Reception.

Read the story on the ECU News Blog here.


Diversity in Education Event 10/15/14

You are cordially invited to attend a Dynamic Dialogue about Diversity event, “Diversity in Education”  sponsored by the Office of Professional Development and Student Outreach in the College of Education, the Office of Equity and Diversity and the Ledonia Wright Cultural Center.

This event will feature a roundtable discussion between the NC Teacher of the Year, James Ford, and two local educators, Juan Castillo from Greene County Schools and Joey Crutchfield from Pitt County Schools, assessing diversity within the teaching profession. They will share from the African American, Latino American, and Native American perspectives their thoughts on the lack of representation of male educators from these subgroups in the classroom.   We will examine, the challenges faced in the higher education setting, the need for focused recruitment and retention in teacher education programs, the impact of the presence of these subgroups in the classroom as teachers, and the support found in the schools and school systems that encourage retention in the profession.  Additionally, current students and faculty will discuss what East Carolina University is doing as an institution that is committed to the recruitment and retention of these students.

Join us for this dynamic opportunity to dialogue about diversity and share your thoughts.  You won’t want to miss it – it’s sure to be an engaging conversation!

 Wednesday, October 15, 2014
Speight Auditorium – Jenkins Fine Arts Center
6:30 pm (doors open at 6:15 pm)

A small reception will follow discussion
Click Here to Register.

 For additional information, contact:

Christa W. Monroe,  MAEd, MSA
Lead Coordinator, Office of Professional Development and Student Outreach
132 Rivers Building, (252) 328-5985 – office,