Category Archives: Center for STEM Education

Instructor Jose Gregory of Dunwoody, GA, leads the AP US History session during the 2016 APSI.

2016 AP Summer Institute a huge success!

The College of Education’s Center for STEM Education hosted the 2016 AP Summer Institute (APSI) at South Central High School in Greenville June 27 – June 30.   More than 120 educators from across the state and country attended this year’s APSI, which is more than double the amount of participation from last year.

“This is the fourteenth year that ECU’s College of Education has hosted the AP Summer Institute,” said APSI Director, Dr. Lori Flint. “Our goal is to train highly qualified teachers to bring more rigor to their classrooms and expose more students in rural areas to AP courses.”

Flint attributed the increase in participation to the addition four new AP sessions: AP US History, AP Psychology, AP English Language and AP English Literature. Previous APSI’s offered only STEM AP sessions including: AP Biology, AP Calculus AB, AP Chemistry, AP Environmental Science, AP Physics 1 and AP Statistics.087A1418

“AP courses enhance student skills and better prepare them for college-level work,” added APSI Coordinator Ann McClung. “First-year college students who have taken these classes are much better writers than students who were never exposed to AP coursework.”

Each session is four-days long and is taught by a certified College Board consultant who has taught the AP course, served as an exam reader for several years and received additional training from the College Board.

Participants pay $575 for 30 hours of intensive training over four days. The fee for the non-residential institute covers training materials, snacks and lunch. The ECU APSI is a College Board endorsed non-residential summer institute.087A1392

“Our consultants have been unbelievable,” said Flint. “The sessions have been so engaging our participants hardly take time for snacks or lunch. They are not only getting expert advice on how to prepare students for AP exams they are also networking and learning about best practices from their peers.”

ECU College of Education CSTEM AP Summer Institute

  • AP Biology – Instructor, Tom Willis of Saint Simons Island, GA
  • AP Calculus AB – Instructor, Deb Castello of Orlando, FL
  • AP Chemistry – Instructor, Linda Kruegel of Hertfort, NC
  • AP Environmental Science – Instructor, Gordon Chenery of Nashville, TN
  • AP Physics 1 – Instructor, Jiang Yu of Fitchburg, MA
  • AP Statistics – Instructor, Gloria Barrett of Pittsboro, NC
    NEW for 2016
  • AP US History – Instructor, Jose Gregory of Dunwoody, GA
  • AP English LanguageInstructor, Terry W. Filippo of Clemson, SC
  • AP English Literature Instructor, Patricia Whyte of Bluffton, SC
  • AP Psychology Instructor, Nancy Fenton of Trevor, WI

Above –  Instructor Jose Gregory of Dunwoody, GA, leads the AP US History session during the 2016 APSI.

Levy Brown

Class of 2016 ECU 40 under 40 – 3 named in College of Education

Dr. Kylie Dotson-Blake, Levy Brown and Shawn Moore, were recently named as members of the Class of 2016 ECU 40 Under 40.

Dotson-Blake is an Associate Professor in the College of Education and Counselor Education Program Coordinator.  She received her BS in Health and Human Performance from East Carolina University in 2000 and her Masters of Arts in Education in 2002.

Brown is the Dean of Arts & Sciences at Lenoir Community College.  He received his undergraduate degree from East Carolina University in 2002.  He will receive his EDD in Educational Leadership on May 6, 2016.

Moore earned his BS in General Biology from ECU in 2001 and his Masters in Cell Biology in 2004.  He is currently pursuing his EDD in Educational Leadership while serving as the Interim Director of the College of education’s STEM Center.

In April of 2015, the Division of Student Affairs of East Carolina University premiered the 40 Under 40 Leadership Awards. This award was created in an effort to recognize emerging leaders that received their start at East Carolina University, as well as those who have used their ECU experience to make an impact in their respective professions, local communities and on the world.

The Class of 2016 40 Under 40 was honored at the 2nd Annual Division of Student Affairs Corporate & Leadership Awards Banquet on April 16, 2016.

http://www.ecu.edu/sadevelopment/40under40/2016Class.cfm.

Daniel Dickerson

Dr. Daniel Dickerson Represents ECU on Fulbright Commission Panel Addressing STEM Study Abroad Partnerships with the Czech Republic

Dr. Daniel Dickerson, associate professor in the Department of Mathematics, Science, and Instructional Technology Education and ECU STEM CoRE (Collaborative for Research in Education) Co-Director, is among a small group of scholars from across the United States selected to sit on a Fulbright Commission sponsored STEM Expert Panel to address university faculty from across the Czech Republic regarding STEM study abroad possibilities. He will join faculty from MIT, Purdue, Michigan, Georgia Tech, and other STEM intensive institutions.

The STEM Expert Panel is part of a capacity building workshop, “Bringing More U.S. Students in STEM to Czech Universities,” sponsored by the Department of State, Office of Global Educational Program, the Fulbright Commission in the Czech Republic in cooperation with Czech universities that offer education in STEM. The workshop will take place in Prague, Czech Republic on April 19-20, 2016 and will be followed by campus visits on April 21-22.

While there, Dickerson will speak to participants during meeting sessions regarding STEM education program development and explore ways to build collaborative efforts with the Czech Republic. Additionally, the US delegation will tour eight Czech universities, attend a reception at the residence of the US Ambassador, and explore innovative ways to enhance global partnerships.

Dr. Dickerson has more than 70 publications, 130 conference presentations, and has been involved in grants as PI, Co-PI, Senior Personnel, or Evaluator totaling over $10 million.

Jennifer Mabe

ECU alumna named WITN Teacher of the Week

Jennifer Mabe, a teacher at Pitt County Schools Early College, was recently named WITN Teacher of the Week. Mabe graduated from East Carolina University in 2004 with a B.A. in Communication/ Public Relations. She received her B.S. in Secondary Math Education from ECU in 2010.

Please follow the link to learn more about Jennifer.

http://www.witn.com/home/headlines/WITNs-Teacher-of-the-Week-371509371.html?device=tablet&c=y

Rob Lucas

People Need to Know: Confronting History in the Heartland — New book by Dr. Robert M. Lucas

The book,  People Need to Know: Confronting History in the Heartland by Dr. Robert M. Lucas, Assistant Professor in the Department of Elementary & Middle Grades Education, has just been published by Lang Publishing Company. This book chronicles Dr. Lucas’ engaged research with students and their teacher “as they study the defining event in their community’s history.”  Dr. Lucas presents an approach to teaching and learning in social studies that fully engages students to not only learn about the history of their community, but to contribute something of value to their communities and beyond.

Through his start-up research grant, a Library of Congress grant, and his teaching in the Elementary Education program, Dr. Lucas continues to provide teachers and teacher candidates with a meaningful and dynamic evidence-based approach to teaching history and social studies that enables students to “better understand the complex ethical ramifications of historical work and appreciate why learning matters.” (Note: quotations in both paragraphs are from Vendor’s website, below). To learn more about or secure a copy of the book, go to: http://www.amazon.com/People-Need-Know-Confronting-Counterpoints/dp/1433129787.

Go to the College of Education Research Website to engage in a Blog discussion about Engaged Scholarship and Research

ECU student judges Cody Allen and Amanda Lewis evaluate a student's science project during the First Annual SEADAP Science Fair.

SEADAP Grant Program Holds First Annual Science Fair

The Science Education Against Drug Abuse Partnership (SEADAP) program held its First Annual Science Fair on January 21st, 2016 on the campus of East Carolina University. The goals of the NIH/NIDA grant-funded project are to increase student knowledge about drug addiction and to increase student interest in biomedical research and careers.

Pitt County high school students Shinjini Misra and Kyra Miles receive feedback on their project from ECU student judges.

Pitt County high school students Shinjini Misra and Kyra Miles receive feedback on their project from ECU student judges.

SEADAP students began conducting scientific research under the direction of Dr. Miles and Dr. Rawls in August 2015, and have designed their own science projects to examine the effects of addictive substances, alcohol, nicotine, sucrose, or caffeine on planarians. Presenting students from Pitt and Greene counties were able to receive feedback and suggestions on how to improve their science projects from Dr. Rawls and Dr. Miles.  The High school students participating in the SEADAP program are Nate Davis, Lucas Mebane, Shinjini Misra, Kyra Miles, and Justin Woolard.

Science educators in North Carolina, Virginia, and Pennsylvania are also successfully incorporating SEADAP related lessons into their science curricula.

ECU College of Education secondary science majors served as student judges for the SEADAP Science Fair.  These students included: Cody Allen; Hazelle Sandoval; Amanda Lewis; and Kayla Watterson.  Tonya Little, a Martin County Schools administrator, also served as a judge.

Applications are currently being accepted for teacher participation in the professional development sessions for teachers on June 28, 29 and June 30, 2016 at East Carolina University.

For more information about SEADAP, contact Dr. Rhea Miles by phone at 252-328-9366 or via email at milesr@ecu.edu.

Featured image above:

ECU student judges Cody Allen and Amanda Lewis evaluate a student’s science project during the First Annual SEADAP Science Fair.

 

PowerPoint Presentation

SPIN Workshop

Find funding for your research with the world’s largest web-based database of sponsored program opportunities. In this hands-on workshop, conducted by Dr. Joseph Thomas, you will establish an account and learn to use SPIN to search for grant funding opportunities.  The SPIN database will also send alerts to users when funding that fits your research interests and goals becomes available.  Workshop participants will receive Distance Education Professional Development credit.

Wednesday, December 2, 2015
1:00 — 2:00 p.m.
Speight 242

Montague Franklin with Jennifer Stalls

Education Graduate Leads Middle Schoolers in Conducting Nature Research

Jamaya Heath, Precious Wallace

(L to R): Jamaya Heath, Precious Wallace

By Crystal Baity
ECU News Services

Eighth-graders at C.M. Eppes Middle School hope to find out if a backyard weed actually contains some beneficial ingredients.

Their teacher, Jennifer Stalls, an East Carolina University alumna and graduate student in the College of Education, brought the real-world research question to her science classes as a participant in the Kenan Fellows Program for Curriculum and Leadership Development.

Frank Marr, Luke Daigle

(L to R): Frank Marr, Luke Daigle

Stalls is one of 42 educators from across North Carolina who completed a five-week summer research experience and two weeks of professional development as part of the annual program.

Stalls worked in the genomics and microbiology lab at the N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences with mentor Dr. Julia Stevens, who is studying the symbiotic relationship between invasive plants and bacteria in nitrogen fixing. The process is needed to convert gaseous nitrogen into forms that can be used by living organisms.

Stalls created a curriculum for her students to contribute to Stevens’ research by studying regional invasive species that could potentially replenish bacteria in crop fields.

Among the discoveries students are making is the notion that they like science.

Jason Harrell, Landen Congleton, Chad Langley

(L to R): Jason Harrell, Landen Congleton, Chad Langley

“I like that you can make so many things, so many discoveries with science. I like the medicine part of science,” said student Virginia Rahilly.

Stalls is one of six ECU alumni in the 2015-16 class of Kenan Fellows. Others and the schools where they teach are: Christopher Clark ’13, Chicod School in Pitt County; Taylar Flythe ’12, Ligon Magnet Middle School in Wake County; Denise Humphries ’93, Chinquapin Elementary School in Duplin County; Amy Kennedy ’07, Beulaville Elementary School in Duplin County; Julianna Martinez-Schultz ’10, Moore Square Magnet Middle School in Wake County.

Chloe Manning-Moore, Juliana Chaires

(L to R): Chloe Manning-Moore, Juliana Chaires

The Kenan Fellows Program was established in 2000 as the signature K-12 STEM education initiative of the Kenan Institute for Engineering, Technology & Science at N.C. State University.

Kenan Fellows are given opportunities for networking, professional growth and leadership development. For more information, visit www.kenanfellows.org.

For the full article, please visit the ECU News Services Article Backyard Botantists

PirateScience3

PIRATES Educators Work to Improve K-6 Science Education

GREENVILLE, N.C. (10/15/15) — On Saturday, October 10th fifteen College of Education alumni returned to East Carolina University to attend a workshop, “Systemic Science. It’s Elementary!” These teachers were among the first graduates of the newly developed Elementary Science Concentration at East Carolina University that focuses on the scientific content and knowledge needed for teaching science to K-6 students. Students enrolled in the concentration receive instructional strategies and specialized content knowledge within all domains of science.

The workshop was funded by a research start-up grant entitled PIRATES (Preparing and Inspiring Achieving Teaching Excellence in Science). The grant was awarded to Assistant Professor, Dr. Tammy D. Lee who spearheaded the development of this program in response to the need to improve STEM education in the early grades. PIRATES is designed to support the fifteen newly specialized science teachers over the course of three years. These beginning teachers will work with ECU science education faculty, ECU scientists, and North Carolina Museum of Natural Science staff to strengthen their knowledge and skills in systemic science education. The goal of the PIRATES program is to return these teachers to their classrooms and schools across North Carolina as elementary science education leaders.

Participant Ashley Barfield a teacher at Abbotts Creek Elementary School in Raleigh said, “The PIRATE grant will not only benefit me as a teacher but my teammates, students, and my school.”

“This grant will be a huge impact in my classroom because it will help my students to think critically about science in the real world by learning about systems,” added Amber Ellington a teacher at Falkland Elementary in Greenville.

Since the launch of the Elementary Science Concentration in the fall of 2012, enrollment has grown from seven students to over one hundred.

“This increased enrollment indicates the overwhelming interest of elementary pre-service teachers to become science teacher specialists,” said Lee.

For more information about East Carolina University’s Elementary Science Concentration or the PIRATES grant please contact Dr. Tammy D. Lee at leeta@ecu.edu

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PIRATES teachers participating in the “Systemic Science. It’s Elementary!” event on October 10. Pictured above from left to right: Kayla Sager, Christina Baik, Amber Ellington, Abby Wilkinson, Katherine Hart (red shirt), Ashley Barfield, Beth Wantz Kara Rouse, Danielle Alford, Rachel Fendrick Amanda Etheridge and Dail Berry. Kneeling: Bonnie Glass and Dr. Tammy Lee

COE Seal - Feature Image

Graduate Program in Mathematics Education Launches 2015-2017 High School Cohort

With a vision of achieving 21st Century skills and productive, meaningful mathematics learning for all students of eastern North Carolina, the College of Education’s Department of Mathematics, Science and Instructional Technology Education’s are of Mathematics Education launched its first ever graduate school cohort of high school mathematics teachers. The vision for the program is that great mathematics learning can be accomplished when faculty, teacher candidates, and eastern North Carolina teachers of mathematics work together in rich mathematics teaching communities.

This fall, teachers and ECU faculty Dr. Maureen Grady and Dr. Charity Cayton are engaged in the study of the research literature, policies, and best practices for high school mathematics instruction. During the past summer, the teachers completed two graduate courses in mathematics with Dr. Chris Jantzen and Dr. Zach Robinson. Committing to the study of mathematics and mathematics education while engaged in the current challenges of teaching high school mathematics is demanding. The College of Education and the area of Mathematics Education are very proud of the 30 teachers who are building their careers and expanding their options with the Master of Arts of Education (MAEd) in Mathematics Education.