Category Archives: Development Report

The Maynard Scholarship

Donors like James and Connie Maynard are making a difference in recruiting and retaining quality teachers in eastern North Carolina. The Maynard Scholars program awards the top 10 incoming freshmen who plan to teach in eastern NC a four year $20,000 scholarship. Not only do these students get a $20,000 scholarship, they also live in an education housing community and have unique enrichment activities that will help them be a successful teacher.  If you are interesting in providing scholarships to future educators, please contact Development Officer, Kendra Alexander, at alexanderk@ecu.edu. If you are interested in applying for the Maynard Scholarship, please contact  Program Director, Dionna Manning, at manningd@ecu.edu.

 

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ECU Library Science Program Receives $490k Grant

IMLS_Logo_2cThe Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) announced that the Library Science degree program in the College of Education at East Carolina University is the recipient of a 2014 Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian (LB21) grant for the project “North Carolina Economically Disadvantaged and Diversity Scholarships.”

The IMLS awarded ECU $492,324 in funding that will support library science recruitment efforts and full-tuition scholarships at ECU for 30 incoming master of library science (MLS) students with the first cohort starting fall 2014. The grant has a matching requirement using non-federal funds for all recipients, bringing the grand total to $657,369.

In addition to tuition costs, the grant will cover university fees and offer a book stipend for the entire degree program until spring 2017. Membership to the North Carolina School Library Media Association is included as well as a travel stipend to attend one of their conferences.

ECU’s location and mission to support eastern NC aligned with the IMLS’s charge to prepare librarians who will work in high-need districts.

“Rural public schools in the economically depressed communities of eastern North Carolina face daunting challenges in recruiting and retaining school librarians,” according to the IMLS’s website with descriptions for each institution receiving the 2014 grant. “East Carolina University and its partner, the North Carolina School Library Media Association, will recruit and educate 30 MLS school librarians from economically disadvantaged and historically underrepresented backgrounds and place them in school library media centers. The project will use the ‘grow your own’ model, focusing on individuals who want to stay and work in eastern North Carolina by completing their degrees in an all-online degree program.”

Reviewers of submission proposals identified ECU’s LS program as one that has the potential to grow the number of enrolled LS students, conduct the necessary research that will support successful recruitment efforts and the education of the next generation of librarians, and enhance curricula within graduate schools of library and information science, as well as programs of continuing education for librarians and library staff, according to the acceptance letter from Maura Marx, deputy director for library science at the IMLS.

“This projHarerJohn_harerject will increase the number of trained, professional media specialists that reflect the diversity of their communities and increase the ability to connect with those diverse populations,” said Dr. John Harer, MLS degree program coordinator in the College of Education at ECU.

IMLS accepted 82 grant proposals from libraries requesting more than $24 million. In total, the organization granted $7.5 million to 23 institutions across the country and the recipients are matching these awards with $3.6 million in non-federal funds. IMLS received 82 applications for the program this year.

“Librarians and staff from all types of libraries, from school media centers to rare book collections to archives, need to be prepared to meet the changing informational and educational needs of their customers and constituents,” said IMLS Director Susan H. Hildreth. “The Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program helps them meet those needs with projects for continuing education, training, professional development, and early career research.”

About the Library Science Program at ECU
The master of library science (MLS) graduate degree program is the largest producer of school-library media-coordinator graduates in the state and is the largest program in the College of Education at ECU. The library science program at ECU has prepared library professionals since 1939 with a high-tech and hands-on emphasis, providing a web-based course of study using new and emerging technologies.

Our online program is especially attuned to the needs of nontraditional students and is designed for students seeking employment as librarians and information professionals in pre-K–12 schools, universities, community colleges, and public libraries.

The program’s mission statement: The master of library science program, reflecting the missions of East Carolina University and the College of Education, prepares library professionals to serve, lead, and partner in their communities.

About the Institute of Museum and Library Services
The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 123,000 libraries and 17,500 museums. Our mission is to inspire libraries and museums to advance innovation, lifelong learning, and cultural and civic engagement. Our grant making, policy development, and research help libraries and museums deliver valuable services that make it possible for communities and individuals to thrive. To learn more, visit www.imls.gov and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

IMLS News Release: Grant Awards Announcement: FY 14 Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program

Click here to view the list of funded projects.

ECU Receives Grant for New Math Teachers in Eastern NC

With $70,000 in funding from the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, East Carolina University (ECU) has developed a program that trains new elementary school teachers to teach math more effectively. This cohort of new teachers hails from school districts across eastern North Carolina, many of which are experiencing some of the highest teacher turnover rates in the state. The program aims to ensure that the math performance of students who are taught by beginning teachers more closely aligns with the performance of students who are taught by veteran teachers.

New elementary teachers often find teaching math particularly challenging. ECU’s induction program helps these teachers implement the Common Core Math Standards more successfully and provides continued support for them through teacher mentors. At the same time, participants gain the added benefit of a sense of “connectedness” within their peer group of new teachers, which research shows is a major factor in teacher retention.

Catherine Schwartz

Dr. Catherine Schwartz, assistant professor of math education in the College of Education, received a grant that will support beginning math teachers in eastern North Carolina.

“Beginning teachers have a lot to manage,” says Catherine Stein Schwartz, Assistant Professor in ECU’s Department of Mathematics, Science, and Instructional Technology Education. “Giving them the time and space to focus on mathematics teaching and learning beyond the day-to-day challenges of the classroom is important in helping them focus on their practice and their students’ understanding.”

The math-focused training program supports new teachers over the course of two years. At the start of each year, the group participates in an intensive, three-day overnight training where teachers develop a year-long vision for their math instruction, while also considering the context-specific environment of their classrooms and schools.

After the initial intensive training, beginning teachers work with a master teacher mentor specifically selected for his or her expertise in mathematics instruction. Mentors work with these teachers virtually, via phone and Skype, over the course of two years, providing guidance and advice on general classroom instruction and management as well as content-specific math support. Each year, both the three-day training and the mentor coaching are individually tailored to meet the needs of each beginning teacher.

“While it is still early in the process, the program is already seeing impacts in participant teachers’ practice and confidence in teaching mathematics,” says Schwartz. “The community and networking that has developed as a result of the professional development and mentoring is encouraging.”

The project’s first year of data is expected to be available during the 2014-2015 school year.

View original story: Supporting Beginning Teachers: ECU’s work with new math teachers in Eastern NC.

Second Century Campaign

The College of Education, in partnership with East Carolina University, launched the largest campaign in its history– the COE Second Century Campaign.  The College of Education set campaign priorities specific to our projected needs for improved 21st century education.  Our priorities are identified by the following four categories:

  • Scholarships and Student Support
  • Endowed Professorships
  • Faculty Research, Outreach and Professional Development
  • Strategic Initiatives to Support Programs

Your gift will enable the College of Education to offer cutting edge technology, top notch educational programs and support to students to enhance their education.  Gifts will enhance instruction, provide students with diverse, real-world experiences for their prospective careers, and enable the College of Education to attract the strongest candidates possible for our programs.

The College of Education also houses six departments and the Office of Teacher Education.  Each of these departments identified their top priorities based on the categories set by the College.  Please click on the links below to view more specific needs listed by department.

The Department of Business and Information Technologies Education
Department of Counselor and Adult Education
Department of Curriculum and Instruction
Department of Educational Leadership
Department of Library Science
Department of Mathematics, Science and Instructional Technology Education
Office of Teacher Education