Category Archives: Diversity

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Dr. Guili Zhang: Expert Panelist for AERA Annual conference

At the 2016 American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Conference held in Washington D. C, April 8-12, Dr. Guili Zhang presented as an expert panelist at the invited speaker session on teacher evaluation. The session was co-sponsored by Division D – Measurement and Research Methodology and Division K – Teaching and Teacher Education.

Pictured above, Dr. Linda Darling-Hammond, Past President of AERA, and Professor of Education at Stanford University; Dr. Guili Zhang

 

Vasti

Vasti Rodriguez nominated for Diane Kent-Parker First Year Teacher Award

Vasti Rodriquez, a 2015 MAT graduate in Special Education, is one of five new teachers across Wake County Schools who have been nominated for the First Year Teacher Award.

The Wake County Public School System Diane Kent-Parker First Year Teacher Award recognizes outstanding first year beginning teachers in elementary, middle, high school and special education. Principals and schools nominate  teachers for demonstrating excellent professional teaching success throughout their initial year. The award is named in honor of Diane Kent-Parker who served in WCPSS Human Resources as Senior Director for Recruitment and Retention.

 

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Collaboration between College of Allied Health and College of Education

In an interdisciplinary collaboration for research and community service, Drs. Lucía I. Méndez and Ken Luterbach have developed an iPad app to assist with bilingual vocabulary assessment.

Dr. Méndez, Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders (College of Allied Health Sciences) is researching culturally and linguistically responsive approaches to academic vocabulary and literacy development in preschool Dual Language Learners.  As a Faculty scholar in ECU’s Engagement and Outreach Scholars Academy, Dr. Méndez has partnered with local Head Start preschools to conduct her research with Latino children.

Dr. Ken Luterbach is an Associate Professor in the Department of Mathematics, Science, and Instructional Technology Education (College of Education). Dr. Luterbach’s research and development efforts have two primary goals: (1) to enhance resource sharing, particularly of effective, efficient, and inspiring instruction; and (2) to advance software tutoring by implementing effective conversational agents.

The bilingual vocabulary assessment app presents 30 sets of four images, from which learners select one in response to an audible prompt in either Spanish or English embedded in the app. This app streamlines the administration process and scores the children’s responses.  The results are used for formative evaluation and research purposes.

Crystal Chambers

Drs. Chambers and Ransom co-author article on “Teaching Ethics in Higher Education”

In “Teaching Ethics in Higher Education Using the Values – Issues – Action (VIA) Model,” LEED Professor Dr. Crystal Chambers, along with co-author Hellen Ransom present a model through which higher education leaders can consider the values they have and whether their actions align with those values as they deal with issues. Dr. Chambers currently teaches courses on law and ethics for students in the higher education concentration of the doctoral program in educational leadership. For the past two years, Dr. Chambers has presented on the topic of teaching ethics in higher education to new faculty through an invited session by the Council for the Advancement Higher Education Programs (CAHEP) during the Association for the Study of Higher Education’s (ASHE) annual conferences. Dr. Ransom is an associate professor of bioethics. The two met through the university’s new faculty mentorship program offered through the office for faculty excellent, where Dr. Chambers serves as a faculty mentor.

A link to the article, published by the Journal for the Advancement of Postsecondary and Tertiary Edcuation is available here http://www.informingscience.org/Publications/2336

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LEED alumna, LaTonya Afolayan, named Associate Vice President for Advancement at Lamar University

ECU alumna LaTanya Afolayan has joined the advancement division at Lamar University as associate vice president for university advancement after a national search.

“We are very pleased to have LaTanya at Lamar University,” said Juan Zabala, vice president for university advancement. “Her fund raising and donor relations experience complements our staff well. She will be a tremendous asset to our role of making LU an ever stronger university through philanthropy.”

The 15-year career development professional comes to LU from Appalachian State University in North Carolina where she served as major gifts officer and director of development since 2011.

Previously, Afolayan served as vice chancellor of institutional advancement at North Carolina Central University from 2009 to 2010. There she managed the day-to-day operations of the alumni relations, annual fund, major gifts, and foundation and stewardship staff.

Her career also includes service as the first director of major and planned gifts at Elizabeth City State University, 2002-2005, as associate vice chancellor, 2005-2008, then vice chancellor, 2008-2009.

She began her advancement career at Emory University in Atlanta where she served as program associate, assistant director of corporate relations, 1994-1998.

Afolayan served as news director and senior producer for WPRL-FM, Alcorn State University in Lorman, Miss., 1988-1992.  She was a reporter, producer and instructor for KOMU-TB, Columbia, Mo., 1986-1987.

She holds a Ed.D., from East Carolina University, Greenville, N.C., a M.A., from the University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo., and a bachelor’s from Indiana State University, Terre Haute, Ind.

She holds certification in fundraising management and is a member of the Association of Fundraising Professionals and the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education.


(January 2016). Afolayan joins LU advancement staff
, Beaumont Business Journal. Retrieved from http://beaumontbusinessjournal.com/article/higher-education/afolayan-joins-lu-advancement-staff

Crystal Chambers

Dr. Chambers named Faculty Coach for the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity

Dr. Crystal Renee Chambers was selected to be a Faculty Coach for the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity (NCFDD). NCFDD is a profesisonal development organization for faculty, graduate students, post-docs, and administrators with programming designed to support academics at each stage of their career. As a Faculty Coach, Dr. Chambers will support small groups of faculty at institutions nationwide as they embark towards developing habits of practice to boost productivity and work-life balance.

Dr. Freddie Williamson

ECU graduate named a National Superintendent of the Year Finalist

Dr. Freddie Williamson, Superintendent of Hoke County Schools and graduate of East Carolina University, has been named a finalist for the 2016 National Superintendent of the Year by AASA, The School Superintendents Association. Other finalists include Dr. Thomas Tucker from Ohio, Dr. Pam Moran from Virginia, and Dr. Steven Webb from Washington. This marks the 29th anniversary of the program, which honors school system leaders throughout the country.

Dr. Williamson has more than 30 years of service in public education, with the past nine years as superintendent of Hoke County Schools. He is known for his transformational leadership style, no-excuses philosophy and innovative approach to addressing challenges. Williamson began his journey in public education as a classroom teacher. His experiences have included school administration for more than 25 years in various capacities, including vocational education, curriculum and human resources. In the summer of 2006, he was named superintendent of Hoke County Schools. Williamson has also served in several leadership roles for organizations such as the North Carolina School Superintendents Executive Board, North Carolina Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development Board of Directors, Sandhills Regional Education Superintendents Council, FirstHealth of the Carolinas Advisory Board and Fayetteville State University Educational Leadership Advisory Board. He also serves as an adjunct professor in the Department of Educational Leadership at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington.

Williamson graduated with his bachelor’s degree in Agriculture Education from North Carolina A&T University in 1978, master’s degree in Educational Leadership from North Carolina A&T University in 1986, education specialist degree in Educational Leadership from East Carolina University in 1995, and doctorate in Educational Leadership from Fayetteville State University in 2004.

“The four finalists for the 2016 AASA National Superintendent of the Year have demonstrated a steadfast commitment to excellence in the work they do,” said Daniel A. Domenech, executive director, AASA. “As a former superintendent, I know that the demands of a superintendent are incredibly high, which is why we look forward to honoring these outstanding superintendents as well as all of the 2016 State Superintendents of the Year at our National Conference on Education in February.”

The finalists for AASA’s 2016 National Superintendent of the Year will have an opportunity to meet the national education community during a press conference in January 2016 at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.

The applicants were measured against the following criteria:

  • Leadership for learning – creativity in successfully meeting the needs of students in the school system.
  • Communication – strength in both personal and organizational communication.
  • Professionalism – constant improvement of administrative knowledge and skills, while providing professional development opportunities and motivation to others on the education team.
  • Community involvement – active participation in local community activities and an understanding of regional, national and international issues.
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Andrea Blackwood Presents at Conference On Exceptional Children

Andrea Blackwood, Technical Assistance Coordinator for the ECU Teacher Support Program for Learners with Deaf-Blindness and Julie Brickhouse, Special Educator at Eastern Elementary School in Greenville, NC presented at the 2015: 65th Conference on Exceptional Children held in Greensboro, NC November 18th to November 20th. The training addressed instruction designed to facilitate communication and math development for learners with deaf-blindness. Practical methods and examples for connecting communication and math were offered. The Communication Matrix, an assessment tool designed by Charity Rowland for individuals at the earliest stages of communication, was used as a guide to focus on specific communicative behaviors to target for learners with deaf-blindness. Examples of the various levels of communication behaviors within the Communication Matrix were examined in detailed.
Specific ideas for embedding communication and math instruction throughout the school day were presented by Julie Brickhouse. Julie shared examples for planning instruction around math concepts using the principles of the Universal Design for Learning. Participants created a lesson plan around a math topic using the Universal Design for Learning principles that was shared with the group.

The ECU Teacher Support Program for students with deaf-blindness provides technical assistance and support to teachers and other professionals who serve students that qualify for the deaf-blind registry. The Teacher Support Program also provides professional development and training. Please use the link below for more information on the ECU Teacher Support Program for students with deaf-blindness.

http://www.ecu.edu/cs-educ/sefr/sped/dbproject.cfm

Dr. Caitlin Ryan and co-presenter/co-author, Jill Hermann-Wilmarth of Western Michigan University

LEHE Faculty attend National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) Annual Convention

NCTE Annual Convention 2015The National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) held its annual convention November 19-22, 2015 in Minneapolis, MN.  With a membership of over 30,000, NCTE represents the entire range of individuals involved in fostering literacy skills of students from pre-school through doctoral programs.  Convention attendees mirrored the diversity of the membership and included PK-12 classroom teachers, administrators, teacher educators, researchers, and other policy makers. This year’s convention featured over 600 concurrent sessions that focused on timely topics critical to effective instruction and the future of English Language Arts (ELA).   Hundreds of vendors provided access to the most recent ELA publications and authors of children and young adult literature were present to discuss and sign their works.

English Education Associate Professor, Dr. Sharilyn Steadman, presented “Effectively Developing Expertise: Using Video to Hone Teacher Candidates’ Classroom Observation Skills.”  The session focused on the use of classroom videos in ENED 2123 and the observation skills that English Education teacher candidates develop as they observe, analyze, and discuss these videos before observing “live” classrooms. The teacher candidates’ abilities to transfer those observation skills from videos to classroom interactions was the highlight of the presentation.

Literacy Studies faculty member, Dr. Christy Howard presented “Strategies for Engaging Students in Content Area Literacy: A Look at Reading/Writing Connections in Social Studies.” This session focused on the role of content area literacy in classrooms. Specifically, Dr. Howard discussed how middle school teachers participating in the study used a variety of texts and strategies to engage students in social studies content with literacy activities. Strategies presented in the session represented an integration of literacy, history and technology across a range of topics.

Dr. Caitlin Ryan, also from the Literacy Studies program presented “Reading Jacqueline Woodson in Upper Elementary and Middle Grades Classrooms: Exploring LGBTQ Topics Through Her Novels and Picture Books”. This session considered the books of award-winning author Jacqueline Woodson as one way to make classrooms more inclusive of LGBTQ topics. Using lesson examples and student work samples from two 5th grade teachers’ classrooms, one of whom was a co-presenter of the session; presenters discussed ways to teach Woodson’s LGBT-inclusive books and ways to approach LGBT experiences indirectly through her books that address difference more generally.  They also explored how Woodson’s diverse characters can help readers understand ideas of intersectionality, or how characters have race AND class AND gender and other identities all at the same time.

Dr. Ryan also met with the LGBT Advisory Council, where she serves as a representative, and wrapped up her final term as NCTE’s GSEA (Gay/Straight Educators’ Alliance) chair. Dr. Ryan stepped down after leading that group for the past 5 years.

Image Caption: Dr. Caitlin Ryan and co-presenter/co-author, Jill Hermann-Wilmarth of Western Michigan University, at the GSEA table where they advertised GSEA-related sessions, displayed LGBTQ-inclusive literature, and encouraged people to become GSEA members

Tierini Hodges

LEED Student to Intern with The U.S. Department of Education and The Hunt Institute

Ms. Tierini Hodges was recently offered an internship position with the Department of Education, Office of Postsecondary Education, Higher Education Programs (HEP) under the direction of Deputy Assistant Secretary for Education Dr. James T. Minor.