Category Archives: COE in the News

Congratulations

Congratulations to COE MSITE Faculty Dr. Katherine Schwartz and Dr. Rose Sinicrope on Math-Science Partnership Grant Awards

Dr. Katie Schwarz and Lenoir County Schools (LCS) have been awarded a 3-year, $483,000 Math/Science Partnership (MSP) Grant, Lenoir County STEM Learning Community. The project will provide teachers integrated content and pedagogical professional development in K-8 Mathematics and opportunities for teachers to work in Professional Learning Communities (PLC) to increase use of mathematical practices, implement cognitively demanding tasks, use data to make instructional decisions, and connect to real-world applications of mathematics, all with the goal of increasing student performance.

Other key ECU faculty who will be working with Dr. Schwartz, who is from the COE Department of Mathematics, Science, and Instructional Technology Education (MSITE) include Dr. Ron Preston and Dr. Kay Middleton from MSITE, Dr Heather Ries and Dr. Njina Randriampiry from the Department of Mathematics, Dr. Ricky Castle from Engineering. STEM Partnership East and various industries also contributed to the project’s development and play key roles in its implementation. Dr. Guili Zhang of the COE Department of Special Education, Foundations, and Research will serve as project evaluator.

Dr. Rose Sinicrope also of MSITE, will serve as Evaluator for Randolph County Schools’  newly awarded MSP grant, Deepening High School Mathematics Knowledge and Leadership.

Congratulations to Dr. Sinicrope and Dr. Schwartz and her team of collaborators!

For more details, see the story on the WNCT website: http://www.wnct.com/story/26028066/lcps-teachers-learning-how-to-use-stem-curriculum-in-the-real-world

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MSA Student Featured in Regional Local News for Her “Spirited” Idea

Below is an article from The Wake Forest Weekly featuring current ECU College of Education Master of School Administration (MSA) student Amy Light. The MSA degree program prepares individuals to become school leaders and encourages them to serve as problem-solvers, communicators, innovators, collaborators and change agents in their respective schools and school districts. Ms. Light’s spirit rock idea utilizes educational leadership skills taught in the program.

Heritage Middle School gets in the spirit

By David Allen

Amy Poovey Light – who will be the interim assistant principal next year – looks forward to the spirit rock being repainted to showcase what is going on with the school and community each week.

Amy Poovey Light – who will be the interim assistant principal next year – looks forward to the spirit rock being repainted to showcase what is going on with the school and community each week.

WAKE FOREST — Showing off their school spirit, Heritage Middle School recently added a new fixture to their front lawn – a giant rock that can be painted with various messages or just to pump up students.
Amy Poovey Light, who will be the Interim Assistant Principal next year, has volunteered her time, since December, to work in unison with the PTA at the school to bring more character and spirit to the school.
The PTA was overwhelmingly supportive of the idea, and helped move things forward for the project.
“I saw this idea of a spirit rock, and I thought ‘Oh wow! This is great!’” Light explained. “We promote so much of a positive culture at this school, we are a Positive Behavior Intervention Support school, and we try to encourage that kind of culture in everything we do.”
Light, the PTA and the school wanted to show the community that they care about what is going on with each student.
They worked with Hanson Aggregates who was more than happy to donate the rock, and they quickly were able to get the rock picked out and moved into place.
Light said the PTA would be able to use it as a fundraiser by renting the rock out by the week so it could be repainted and be the voice of the community at Heritage,
“This area is where the children gather while waiting to be picked up,” Light said as she pointed to the grass surrounding the spirit rock. “We want what is put on the rock to spark conversation and to give recognition that a student or group that is doing something in the school.”

Article and photo courtesy of David Allen and The Wake Forest Weekly.

ECU COE Faculty Members seen as Leaders at Stanford University

Pictured from left to right Drs. Diana Lys, Kristen Cuthrell, Sherilyn Steadman, and Ellen Dobson.

Pictured from left to right Drs. Diana Lys, Kristen Cuthrell, Sharilyn Steadman, and Ellen Dobson.

On August 11-13, four ECU COE faculty members participated in an invitation-only forum at Stanford University. The American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education (AACTE) and the Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning and Equity (SCALE) endorsed the event that focused on the development of Embedded Signature Assessments (ESAs). Drs. Diana Lys, Kristen Cuthrell, Ellen Dobson, and Sharilyn Steadman formed one of seven invited teams of teacher educators who are considered to be leaders in the field. Other teams represented individual university, state-level, and national teams.

The goal of the forum was to develop or refine an ESA and to align the ESA with InTASC and state-level standards. Products from the event will be presented as exemplars at the national CAEP Conference in September 2014. Additionally, invited attendees are micro-credentialed as ESA developers.

Mott and Lohr Published in Curriculum and Program Development Book

Dr. Vivian W. Mott and Dr. Dr. Kathy Lohr (Department of Interdisciplinary Professions) have a chapter entitled “Co-Constructed Curricula: An Adult Education Perspective” in the newly published book Andragogical and Pedagogical Methods for Curriculum and Program Development (IGI Global, Hershey, PA, ISBN: 9781466658721). The editors Victor C. X. Wang and Valerie C. Bryan suggest the book is a valuable reference “for both faculty and students, as well as program designers, instructional program developers, trainers, and librarians.”   Mott and Lohr’s chapter describes co-constructed curricula, via an adult education perspective, with both detailed theoretical constructs and practical examples of such initiatives.

Dr. William B. Martin Awarded Kappa Delta Pi Honors

Dr. William B. Martin

Dr. William B. Martin

Dr. William B. Martin, College of Education Professor Emeritus, was honored this past year for two awards through Kappa Delta Pi International. He was inducted as one of the charter members into the Eleanor Roosevelt Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi (KDP). Membership in this chapter is a lifetime honor and is limited to only 100 people. Dr. Martin has also been awarded one of only four KDP Founders Awards that are given out every two years at the KDP Convocation. He received the Dr. Thomas E. Musselman Award for Service Excellence, which is given to members who have inspired others through their volunteer efforts with education-focused service programs and who have made a difference in their local, regional, and global communities.

Dr. Martin’s teaching career reached across a number of states and education levels, including elementary school in Phoenix, AZ, junior high in Nashville, TN and graduate school at the University of Nevada in Reno, NV. He retired in 1990 after 31 years with the College of Education, Department of Secondary Education at East Carolina University. He was awarded the position of Professor Emeritus at ECU in 1990.

He is a lifetime member of KDP and served 26 years as a counselor for the Eta Chi Chapter at ECU. Dr. Martin also created an endowed scholarship through KDP for two education majors at ECU: one special education and one middle grades education.

Dr. Martin is from Duquesne and McKeesport, Pennsylvania and served as the Quarter Master in The Navigation Division on board a troop-ship of the U.S. Navy during World War II. He received a Bachelor of Science degree from Clarion University in Clarion, PA, a Master’s degree from Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona, and a doctorate degree from George Peabody College, Vanderbilt University in Nashville, TN.

Dr. Martin has spent a great deal of time working with The Arc of the United States, a community-based organization advocating for and serving people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families. He has worked with the United States chapter as well as the North Carolina and Pitt County chapters. During his time with The Arc, he held several leadership positions, such as the state president of the North Carolina chapter and the Vice President of the Southeast Region – ARC/US.

Locally, he has worked with the Pitt County Mental Health Association, including serving as president (1989-90), vice president (1988) and treasurer (1986-87). He is currently the chairman of The Arc of North Carolina’s Life Guardianship Program for the Eastern North Carolina region.

Dr. Robin Hamilton Receives the 2014 Glatthorn Distinguished Dissertation Award

2013 Glatthorn Award Recipient Dr. Robin Hamilton, Mrs. Barbara Glatthorn, and Chair of the Department of Educational Leadership Dr. Art Rouse

2014 Glatthorn Award Recipient Dr. Robin Hamilton, Mrs. Barbara Glatthorn, and Chair of the Department of Educational Leadership Dr. Art Rouse

The Glatthorn Dissertation Award is awarded to the student who has the most outstanding dissertation in the Department of Educational Leadership, as selected by a committee of faculty from the department. The award was established by and is now given in memory of Dr. Allan Glatthorn.

On Tuesday, July 29, 2014 Dr. Robin Hamilton was recognized for her dissertation, “A Comparative Case Study of Kindergarten Transition Practices and The Impact on Children’s Kindergarten Readiness” under the direction of Dr. William Rouse, Jr. which she completed in fall 2013. Mrs. Barbara Glatthorn was in attendance to congratulate and present the award to Dr. Hamilton. Other attendees included faculty and staff from the Department of Educational Leadership and the College of Education and family members of Dr. Hamilton and Mrs. Glatthorn.

Library Science Alumnus Book Signing

Alan R. Bailey with his newly published book, Building a Core Print Collection for Preschoolers

Alan R. Bailey with his newly published book, Building a Core Print Collection for Preschoolers

Joyner Library will host a reception and book signing for Alan R. Bailey, head of services at the Teaching Resources Center. Bailey, who received his Bachelor of Science in Education in 1984 and Master of Library Science in 1993 from East Carolina University’’s College of Education, published his book Building a Core Print Collection for Preschoolers this year.

The book explores how reading aloud is one of the most important steps that librarians, teachers, parents and caregivers can take to encourage literacy skills in preschoolers. The book showcases more than 300 birth-kindergarten titles and focuses on books that help to develop skills such as an expanded vocabulary, narrative skills, alphabetic knowledge and awareness of story structure, among other skills.  A full bibliographic record, short summary and journal reviews are included with each title.

The reception and signing will take place August 15, 2014 in the J. H. Faulkner Gallery on the second floor of Joyner Library from 4:00-6:00 p.m. Copies of the book will be available for purchase. If you would like to attend, RSVP to Dawn Wainwright (wainwrightd@ecu.edu) by August 11.

ECU partners in Operation LINK mentoring program

ECU News Services

Tyrrek Grizzle poses with a robot he constructed during the robotics summer camp. The camp is part of an ECU partnership that supports elemementary and middle grades students from military families in eastern North Carolina. (Photos by Jay Clark)

Tyrrek Grizzle poses with a robot he constructed during the robotics summer camp. The camp is part of an ECU partnership that supports elemementary and middle grades students from military families in eastern North Carolina. (Photos by Jay Clark)

Ten-year-old Tyrrek Grizzle took control of his paddle, maneuvering his miniature land mover with ease.

He and a teammate moved his robot across a grid and past an opponent to pick up as many green-colored blocks as possible and dump them in a coordinating green basket. The team that filled the basket with the most blocks in the three-minute competition won.

Grizzle attended an inaugural weeklong robotics summer camp through Operation LINK, an AmeriCorps school-based science, technology, engineering and mathematics mentoring program for elementary and middle grades students in eastern North Carolina. The STEM program, with a special emphasis on students from military families, will transition from an afterschool program to part of the regular school day this fall.

Offered this spring in Wayne County, the program aims to promote positive behaviors and success in school while keeping military youth connected to family. It’s a partnership between East Carolina University, AmeriCorps, military family support networks, veterans groups, community colleges and public schools.

The summer camp, held at Greenwood Middle School in Goldsboro, allowed students to make real robots from designs they developed in their afterschool program.

Amy Perry, left, watches as her daughter, Kayla Perry, works at the Operation LINK afterschool program held this spring in Goldsboro. Amy Perry is a technical sergeant in the U.S. Air Force, where she inspects aircraft for defects at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base.

Amy Perry, left, watches as her daughter, Kayla Perry, works at the Operation LINK afterschool program held this spring in Goldsboro. Amy Perry is a technical sergeant in the U.S. Air Force, where she inspects aircraft for defects at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base.

Counselors and campers used a box kit to construct a robot with up to 650 pieces. A software program developed at Carnegie Mellon Robotics Academy gave the students the ability to control movements.

“We had fourth-graders writing code,” said Michael “Mike” Dermody, associate professor of cinematic arts and media production in the ECU School of Art. Dermody, who grew up in a military family, said “It’s amazing how quickly they adapt. It’s a very tactile and hands-on experience. They go in and test and modify it. There’s lots of activity between the computer itself and the robot.”

For Grizzle, a rising fifth-grader at Tommy’s Road Elementary School, taking his work from the computer lab to create a functioning robot is exciting. “Robots help you in a lot of ways,” said Grizzle. “They help us do things we can’t normally do ourselves.” Grizzle has cousins who serve in the military.

The pilot program will become part of the curriculum this fall at three Wayne County schools with a higher population of children from military families, said Lou U. Rose, Operation LINK coordinator in the ECU College of Education, which has facilitated the program.

“We will be able to impact more kids that way.”

Area teachers observed some of the program activities. “Some will do it as an elective in science and math classes,” Rose said.

“The beauty of this is they can tailor it and run with it and be creative. It brings relevancy in the real world, and maybe will get students interested in science.”

Michael Giddens, an AmeriCorps camp mentor who earned a teaching certificate in middle grades science and math from ECU in May, said students learned to collaborate and work as a team at the camp.

“The energy has been electrifying,” Giddens said. “Keeping them (students) engaged is a challenge in the classroom in the 21st century.”

USAF airman first class Eagan Nadeau pilots one of the student robots.

USAF airman first class Eagan Nadeau pilots one of the student robots.

One old-fashioned value students have learned has been patience, Giddens said, such as when broken robots have had to be re-assembled. Now poised to reach more students, the initial idea for the Operation LINK program was to create a way for military parents to interact with their children – via the web – while the parents were away from home. “It’s (been) a way to keep the child connected,” Dermody said.

Amy Perry’s nine-year-old daughter Kayla and 10-year-old daughter, Alexis, participated in the afterschool program. Perry, a technical sergeant in the U.S. Air Force, inspects aircraft for defects at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base. The Perry family doesn’t have a computer, internet or cable in their home. So the program has helped support her girls’ interests in science and technology. “It works for us,” she said.

Perry said the counselors encouraged her daughters’ unique personalities. “It’s allowing them to have the space to be who they are,” she said. “Respecting others is important.”

Kayla Perry said she enjoyed the computer lab and making a virtual robot. “I like the teachers. All the time they think of cool things for us to do,” she said. “They always come up with these amazing ideas.”

Program activities have helped build relationships between mentors and students, and among students, said Virginia Harris, a retired teacher and military spouse who taught 23 years in several states and overseas.

 Logan Chase, 10, works on programming after a practice session with his robot.

Logan Chase, 10, works on programming after a practice session with his robot.

“I’ve seen changes in the students, being able to work together and learning to follow rules better,” Harris said. “One of the main things they learn is you’re not an island. You have to get along with people in life. I think it’s difficult for little people to work together as a team sometimes.”

To learn more, visit www.ecu.edu/operationlink.

Story courtesy of ECU News Service and Crystal Baity. Photos courtesy of ECU News Service and Jay Clark. The original article can be found here.

Dr. Rhea Miles and Dr. Scott Rawls awarded National Institute of Health Grant

Dr. Rhea Miles

Dr. Rhea Miles, Associate Professor -Science Education, Department of Mathematics, Science and Instructional Technology Education and Dr. Scott Rawls, ECU Alumnus and Associate Professor of Pharmacology in the Center for Substance Abuse Research at Temple University have been awarded a four-year, $1,012,071.00 grant entitled Planarians and the Pharmacology of Addiction: An In Vivo Model for K-12 Education.

The project engages K-12 teachers and  students together with health care professionals, pharmacists, and scientists in the study of the pharmacological effects of addictive drugs and the behavior patterns that emerge during recreational and addictive drug use, using curricula and laboratory activities designed to meet the National Science Education Standards. Congratulations Dr. Miles and Dr. Rawls.

Graduate Students Hold Book Drive for Belvoir Elementary School

Boxes of books from the book drive

Boxes of books from the book drive

By Erica Anderson, Digital Journalist

East Carolina University graduate students are helping a local elementary school promote literacy.

As part of a community service project, four Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) students held a book drive for Belvoir Elementary School on Monday.

“The students there are so eager to learn; but, it’s a really rural area and they may not have very many opportunities. The teachers there do so much to help them so we wanted to provide as many resources [as] we can too,” said ECU graduate student Adam Johnson.

ECU Master of Arts in Teaching students collecting books outside of Domino's Pizza

ECU Master of Arts in Teaching students collecting books outside of Domino’s Pizza

The book drive began 10 days ago and concluded with a six-hour donations drive outside the Domino’s Pizza on Charles Boulevard.

So far the group of four MAT students collected more than 1200 books.

“If you can put books in the hands of young readers and promote literacy early on, they’ll love learning and they’ll love books their entire life,” said Johnson.

As part of the book drive, the students have also set up a fundraising website on www.gofundme.com. All the money raised on the website will go directly to Belvoir Elementary School.

If you would like to donate to Belvoir Elementary School click here.

To view the news segment about the book drive, click here.

Story and photos courtesy of WNCT.