Category Archives: COE in the News

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What is the Senior Year Internship?

The Senior Year Internship is a required clinical experience for teacher education majors at East Carolina University.  It is a two-semester experience within a public school classroom, under the mentorship and coaching of a specially trained and licensed clinical teacher.  The Senior Year Internship is designed to provide students with opportunities to internalize and apply previous teaching and learning experience, as well as opportunities to teach and grow professionally through observation, planning, teaching, assessment, and reflective work with an effective classroom teacher.

In Senior I, a teaching intern’s first semester, students acclimate themselves to the public school environment by gaining an understanding of policies and procedures, multiple roles of classroom teachers, the diverse needs of the students, as well as the beginning stages of a range of experiences of curricular planning, delivery of instruction, and assessment.

The second semester, Senior II, is an emersion semester of involvement with clinical teachers providing constant feedback to the intern about the teaching and learning process.  In addition, the intern will complete a portfolio to document his or her growth and development as a classroom teacher with support from the clinical teacher and the university supervisor.

The Senior Year Internship is designed to allow students to gain practical experience and attain a level of competency needed for a high functioning novice beginning teacher.  There is a key focus on specific and timely feedback from clinical teachers and university supervisors which is meant to augment the intern’s growth.  The internship is invaluable in that it is practical learning combined with expert coaching from seasoned and trained teachers and supervisors.

Interns are generally able to make smooth transitions into their own classrooms once they are hired because of the depth of knowledge and experience they have acquired in this experience.

For more information regarding the Senior Year Internship, please see the Teacher Education Handbook.

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The Senior Year Internship is a central feature of the initial teacher preparation programs at ECU and aligns with NCATE Standard 3: Field Experiences and Clinical Practice

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SEADAP Begins with Outreach to Local Teachers

The Science Education Against Drug Abuse Partnership (SEADAP) Program recently invited educators  and administrators from Pitt and Martin county public schools to participate in four professional development sessions. The participants were provided information to implement lessons based on the research of Dr. Scott Rawls from Temple university related to drug addiction and withdrawal on planaria. Dr. Rhea Miles, SEADAP key personnel and guest speakers from the local community came to East Carolina University to educate and encourage these middle school teachers to implement a curriculum to affect student knowledge about biomedical research.

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ICYMI: Implementing edTPA in Small Teacher Prep Programs

In small teacher preparation programs, the issue of implementation and scale-up of using a standardized performance assessment, like edTPA, can be challenging.  Peck and McDonald (2013) found one of the most significant outcomes of implementing a standardized performance assessment was faculty-initiated change. In small teacher preparation programs – those with five or fewer faculty and approximately 30 graduates annually – how do faculty lead systemic change in an edTPA implementation with fidelity and rigor?

At the 2013 edTPA Implementation Conference in San Diego, four ECU teacher education faculty shared their experiences and how each is initiating change through their edTPA implementation.

  • Barbara Brehm, Birth through Kindergarten Education
  • Ann Bullock, Middle Grades Education
  • Sharilyn Steadman, English Education
  • Michele Wallen, Health Education

Faculty shared models of communication, the development of common signature assessments, content-specific sticking points, and early successes as part of the session.  These programs proved that big change can be had with a small, committed team of faculty focused on a common goal.

Learn more about their experiences through video interviews posted on the ECU Pirate CODE-edTPA website or on the national edTPA website at 2013 National edTPA Implementation Conference.

edTPA is a teacher candidate performance assessment used in all initial teacher preparation programs at ECU, supporting the EPP’s efforts to meet NCATE Standards 1 and 2.

#ECU_CAEPisComing

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CAEP Prep: Call for Third Party Comments

The Educator Preparation Provider (EPP) Unit at East Carolina University is hosting an accreditation visit by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) on February 8-10, 2015.

The EPP is inviting interested parties to submit comments addressing substantive matters related to the quality of the professional education programs offered.  When commenting, please be sure to specify the party’s relationship to the EPP (graduate, present or former faculty member, employer of graduates, etc.).

Please use the form located at http://www.ecu.edu/epp as a convenient way to submit comments.

Comments must be submitted no later than November 7 to ensure they are uploaded to NCATE’s Accreditation Information Management System (AIMS) by November 8, 2014. Anonymous comments will not be accepted by NCATE, and therefore cannot be submitted using the form.

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ICYMI: Now What? Using edTPA Data to Drive Program Improvement

With edTPA implementations growing nationwide, it is imperative that teacher preparation programs explore meaningful ways to feed that data back to faculty for program and unit improvement.  Key to this work is engaging faculty in edTPA data analysis and examining issues and trends across content areas, program pathways, and portfolio components.  Peck and McDonald (2013) found one of the most significant outcomes of implementing a standardized performance assessment was faculty-initiated change; therefore, creating venues for faculty to engage with, analyze, and dialogue about edTPA data is critical.

At the 2013 edTPA Implementation Conference, ECU faculty—Drs. Diana Lys, Kristen Cuthrell, and Ellen Dobson—highlighted how the large teacher preparation program at East Carolina University uses edTPA data to inform program-level and unit-level decision making.  Presenters shared two models of data use: 1) at the program level with a focus on student learning outcomes and continuous program improvement; and 2) a data summit at the unit level where faculty from across teacher education programs examined collective issues and identified action items for to drive unit improvement.

Conference organizers approached Drs. Diana Lys, Kristen Cuthrell, and Ellen Dobson to interview them about their session and related edTPA experiences. Video clips from these interviews are available on the ECU Pirate CODE-edTPA website or on the national edTPA website at 2013 National edTPA Implementation Conference.

edTPA is a teacher candidate performance assessment used in all initial teacher preparation programs at ECU, supporting the EPP’s efforts to meet NCATE Standards 1 and 2.

#ECU_CAEPisComing

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Not One, Not Two, but Many ECU Award Recipients!

At its 44th Annual North Carolina Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCCTM)  Conference held in Greensboro, NC on 30-31 October 2014, ECU was featured mightily during the Awards Ceremony.  Two ECU Mathematics Education faculty, Dr. Ron Preston and Dr. Rose Sincrope were recognized with the highest honor that NCCTM can bestow, the W. W. Rankin Award.  MATE senior, Rebekah Currie, double majoring in a BS Mathematics Education and a BA in Mathematics won the Outstanding Mathematics Education Student from the Eastern Region award.  Several alumni also were recognized as the Outstanding Secondary Mathematics Teacher for their school districts.  Congratulations to:

W.T. Edwards, Columbus Co. – Class of ’11
Jennifer Simmons, Onslow Co. – Class of ’97, current student MAEd IT (Onslow Cohort)
Renea Baker, Pitt Co. – Class of ’92

ECU rises to the top once again!

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Dr. Preston Recieves Highest Honor at NCCTM Conference

During the 44th Annual North Carolina Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCCTM)  Conference held in Greensboro, NC on 30-31 October 2014, Dr. Ron Preston was presented the W. W. Rankin Memorial Award for Excellence in Mathematics Education, the highest honor that NCCTM can bestow upon a member.

According to the Chair of the W. W. Rankin Award Committee, Dr. Lee V. Stiff, “Dr. Preston is universally regarded as an excellent mathematics teacher, a scholar of mathematics education, and as a person whose service to NCCTM and the teachers of NC is exemplary.”

Dr. Ron Preston has enhanced the quality of mathematics education in North Carolina through his service at East Carolina University in the Department of Math, Science, and Technology through his teaching, his advising and his role as Director of Students.  Through his involvement in the greater community, he has been instrumental in the success of such programs as: the North Carolina Project in Improving Mathematics, the Noyce Scholars Program, and the North Carolina Middle Math Project.

Dr. Preston has provided leadership to the North Carolina Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCCTM) having served as: the Program Chair of two Annual Conferences, a member of the Board of Directors and the Executive Board, and a Regional President. Currently, Ron is the newly-elected President of NCCTM He assumed his position as president-elect on 1 May and will serve in that position for a year, becoming president for a two-year term on 1 May 2015.

Rep. Jean Farmer-Butterfield stands with Dr. William Martin as he holds his Order of the Longleaf Pine award in the studio at The Daily Reflector on Thursday. (Rhett Butler/The Daily Reflector)

Emeritus Professor Awarded “The Order of the Long Leaf Pine”

Dr. William B. Martin, College of Education Professor Emeritus, recently, received one of the most prestigious honors the Governor of North Carolina can award The Order of the Long Leaf Pine. This award is presented to individuals who have a proven record of extraordinary service to the state. In Dr. Martin’s case, his service is well documented within the College of Education.  He was one of the Charter members of the Eleanor Roosevelt Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi, the international honor society in education. The society presented him the Dr. Thomas E. Musselman Award for Service Excellence, which is given to members who have inspired others through their volunteer efforts with education-focused service programs and who have made a difference in their local, regional, and global communities. He also created an endowed scholarship through KDP for two education majors at ECU: one special education and one middle grades education.

Dr. Martin spent 31 years as a faculty member in the College of Education, retiring in 1991, after being awarded the position of Professor Emeritus at ECU in 1990. In addition to his endeavors at ECU, he continues to be an active member of First Presbyterian Church, Kiwanis, and the Civitan Club (for more than 53 years). He also is active in the Arc of North Carolina, having served as president, vice president of the Southeast Region and chairman of the Eastern Division of the Life Guardianship program.

State Representative Jean Farmer-Butterfield surprised Dr. Martin by presenting the award at a recent Kiwanis Club meeting. “It was a total surprise for me,” Martin, 90, said, explaining that the award was announced at the end of a recent Kiwanis meeting.

For more information, please view the Daily Reflector Article.

Pictured: Rep. Jean Farmer-Butterfield stands with Dr. William Martin as he holds his Order of the Longleaf Pine award in the studio at The Daily Reflector on Thursday. (Rhett Butler/The Daily Reflector)

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Math Club Receives an “Insider’s View of Getting a Job”

On Wednesday, October 22, 2014, the Gamma Student Chapter of NCCTM hosted a 12 person panel consisting of principals, math department chairs/lead grade level math teachers, and a director of human resources.  These “insiders” represented elementary, middle, and high school mathematics and shared their knowledge from a combined 185 years of educational expertise.  The full panel was introduced to an audience that consisted of approximately 50 students and six Mathematics Education faculty members before breaking into smaller subgroups for elementary, middle, and high school.  The conversations within the smaller groups provided the opportunity for panel members to share unique insight for their given educational context, and for Gamma students to ask important questions about not only the hiring process, but also how to become the best math teacher possible. One main theme heard from panel members in each subgroup was that they are looking for, “good math teachers that want to be great math teachers” and that there are supports in place to help them achieve greatness in the math classroom.

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Our sincere thanks goes out to the “insider” panel, consisting of the following individuals:

Elementary

  • Chena Cayton – Principal, Wahl-Coates Elem School, Pitt County
  • Karin Stefko – Kindergarten Teacher, Wahl-Coates Elem School, Pitt County
  • Coni Clark – Third Grade Teacher, Wahl-Coates Elem School, Pitt County

Middle Grades

  • Charlie Langley – Principal, CM Eppes Middle School, Pitt County
  • Barskdale Thompson – Sixth Grade Teacher, CM Eppes Middle School, Pitt County
  • Kristen Coleman – Sixth Grade Teacher, CM Eppes Middle School, Pitt County
  • Thomas Sisson – Seventh Grade Teacher, CM Eppes Middle School, Pitt County

High School

  • Jerry Simmons – Principal , New Bern High School, Craven County
  • Brad Johnston – Principal , Farmville Central High School, Pitt County
  • Renea Baker – Dept Chair , DH Conley High School, Pitt County
  • Tina Petty – Dept Chair, Southside High School, Beaufort County

Human Resources

  • Delilah Jackson – Director of Human Resources, Pitt County Schools

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ICYMI – Co-Teaching, “A New Model for Student Teaching.”

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Sarah Young ‘13 leads a group of kindergarten students in Amy McGregor’s classroom at Wintergreen Primary School in Greenville. She was one of two ECU students assigned to that classroom for their spring semester internship as part of the Co-Teaching Program in ECU’s College of Education.

The fall 2013 issue of ECU’s East magazine featured the Co-Teaching initiative in the ECU College of Education as an exciting and innovative new practice, “A New Model for Student Teaching.”

Co-Teaching provides a comprehensive and rigorous experience for interns and enhances the quality of learning for P12 students. The Co-Teaching partnership enables clinical teachers to provide consistent mentoring, giving interns the time and support necessary to gain skills and the confidence required to teach successfully.

Since this article was published, the Co-Teaching initiative has grown from a few interns to 111 interns in 91 classrooms, representing seven teacher preparation programs at ECU. Such growth would not be possible without strong public school partnerships.  Greene County Schools liaison to the Latham Clinical Schools Network at ECU, Gwen Smith, says her teachers are:

“just beginning to understand what a wonderful model (co-teaching) could be.”

“Over the past years, (fear of relinquishing the classroom) has been the biggest (deterrent),” Smith said. “They tell me ‘I can’t take an intern this year.’ But anytime you’ve got more than one teacher in the classroom, the students are certain to benefit.

“We want to get our best teachers for these interns—our master teachers. This 2-1 model works better.”

The Co-Teaching initiative’s team of lead faculty—Judy Smith, Liz Fogarty, Christina Tschida, and Vivian Covington—is actively working not only to improve and expand the initiative, but also to study its impact on clinical practice, the focus of NCATE’s Standard 3. Early co-teaching research is focusing on candidate learning outcomes and candidate efficacy in co-teaching settings. Preliminary findings indicate:

  • Co-Teaching interns significantly outperformed non-Co-Teaching interns on two rubrics on the edTPA: Subject-Specific Pedagogy and Using Assessment to Inform Instruction.
  • When surveyed, Co-Teaching interns indicated a higher degree of self-efficacy in their ability to differentiate instruction than that indicated by non-Co-Teaching interns.

For more on Co-teaching and NCATE Standard 3, see the ECU TI IR, Standard 3.