Category Archives: COE in the News

Crystal Chambers

Dr. Chambers Awarded the FSP Spring 2015 Arronette White Tuition Scholarship

Nat_Center_Faculty_Dev_Div_LogoThis Spring, Dr. Crystal Chambers, of the Educational Leadership Department, will participate in the 2015 Faculty Success Program (FSP) sponsored by the National Center for Faculty Diversity and Development (NCFDD).

The purpose of the program is to support faculty towards increasing overall productivity while attaining a healthy work/life balance. Dr. Chambers is attending courtesy of the Faculty Success Program Spring 2015 Arronette White Tuition Scholarship.

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Dr. William Sugar
Associate Professor of Mathematics, Science,
and Instructional Technology Education
College of Education

Dr. Sugar Selected for COE 2015 Scholar-Teacher Award

Dr. Bill Sugar of the Department of Mathematics, Science and Instructional Technology Education (MSITE) has been selected to represent the College of Education for the 2015 Scholar-Teacher Award.

The ECU Scholar-Teacher Award recognizes outstanding faculty members who integrate scholarship and teaching. Each year the colleges in Academic Affairs and colleges and schools in Health Sciences recognize one or more scholar-teacher(s), based on the number of faculty in the unit.

During the symposium, each scholar-teacher provides a succinct presentation (approximately 15 minutes) concerning his/her integration of scholarship in teaching. Each recipient also develops a poster presentation or display for viewing during the symposium. This year the symposium will be held during the Annual Research & Creative Achievement Week: March 23 – 27, 2015.

Dr. Sugar will be presenting in on March 26th in Mendenhall 244 at 2:50 p.m. on the topic of “Studies of Instructional Design Practices: Recent Research and Takeways.” Faculty, staff, students, and community friends are encouraged to attend all or parts of the afternoon symposium and to enjoy another wonderful celebration of scholarship and teaching at ECU!

MLS Faculty Celebratory Luncheon Feb 2015

ECU’s Master of Library Science Program Earns ALA Accreditation

It is with great pleasure that the East Carolina University Master of Library Science degree program is able to announce that their degree program is now accredited by the American Library Association (ALA).

ALA accredited sealALA accreditation provides students, and alumni who qualify, the ability to apply for library positions in any library setting. ALA accreditation is seen as essential to MLS graduates seeking employment in academic and public libraries. It is a required standard by the Association of College and Research Libraries. Graduating from an ALA-accredited program provides greater flexibility in the types of libraries that students and alumni can apply for and enhances career mobility. Most employers, except school libraries, require an ALA-accredited master’s for most professional level positions.

ALA accreditation indicates that the program has undergone a self-evaluation process, been reviewed by peers, and meets the Standards established by the American Library Association and Committee on Accreditation. Students currently in the program will receive an accredited degree upon graduation.

Alumni who graduated in 2013 and 2014 now have an accredited degree as well. However, for alumni who have graduated prior to 2013, the program cannot offer a path to altering their degree to become an accredited one, for example, taking an additional set of courses now that the program is accredited.

Captain Arrrgh Headshot

From the TRC: Ronnie Barnes African-American Resource Collection

It’s Thursday, and another edition of From the TRC is published to highlight another service or resource the Teaching Resources Center in Joyner Library has to support the College of Education’s faculty and students. This week, it’s the Ronnie Barnes African-American Resource Collection.

Granted, it is Black History Month and that may be one reason why the Ronnie Barnes African-American Resource Collection is the subject of this week’s post. But, honestly, the main reason is to call attention to this valuable, yet underused resource in the Teaching Resources Center.

Allow me to back that statement up with numbers. So far this school year the Ronnie Barnes Collection has accounted for less than one (1) percent of the books circulated in the TRC. If that doesn’t sound small enough I’ll dig a little deeper into the statistics. Since July 2014, the TRC has accounted for 47%, on average, of Joyner Library’s monthly total circulation of books. What does that mean? Well, out of the 20,460 books that have been checked out from the TRC since July only 161 (0.7%) have come from the Ronnie Barnes Collection. Here’s why the collection is worth checking out any time of year:

Ronnie Barnes

Ronnie Barnes, ECU Class of ’75

Ronnie Barnes, an eastern North Carolina native, was the first graduate of ECU’s Sports Medicine program in 1975 and is the Senior Vice President of Medical Services and Head Athletic Trainer for the New York Giants of the National Football League. In 2002, he endowed a fund to develop and maintain a collection of materials written or illustrated by African-Americans, or about the African-American experience.

The children’s collection includes:

  • Coretta Scott King Award books
  • Caldecott Award books about African-Americans or by African-American authors or illustrators.
  • Newbery Award books about African-Americans or by African-American authors or illustrators.
  • Biographies of African-Americans for K12 students

Additionally, the adult collection contains all genres, from scholarly books  to general fiction. The adult collection is highlighted on an annual rotating basis. At the end of each year, these materials rotate out of the Ronnie Barnes Collection into Joyner Library’s general stacks.  The call numbers in the Ronnie Barnes Collection begin with “Barnes.”

For more resources to use in the classroom for Black History month click on these TRC and Joyner Library resources:

Not sure how to put these resources to use? Here are some lesson plan ideas for Black History Month from the National Education Association, Education World, Scholastic, Smithsonian Education, National Endowment for the Humanities, AfricanAmericanHistoryMonth.gov, African-American History Through the Arts, and PBS.

Until next time. – Dan Z. in the TRC

COE_Graduation_for_Screens_May15

College of Education Graduate Recognition Ceremony – May 9, 2015

The College of Education Graduate Recognition Ceremony is scheduled for 3:00 p.m. on Saturday, May 9, 2015 in Williams Arena at Minges Coliseum. The faculty and staff of the College of Education are pleased to present a special Graduate Recognition Ceremony (GRC) for our graduates. The ceremony will feature individual recognition of College of Education students receiving degrees. Friends and families of the graduates are cordially invited to attend. It is not necessary for graduates or guests to RSVP for this event. Tickets are not required to attend the ceremony.

For University Commencement Ceremony details and information about the ECU Commencement Weekend, please visit http://www.ecu.edu/commencement.

Captain Arrrgh Headshot

From the TRC: Distance Education & Award Winning Author, Duncan Tonatiuh

Distance Education

In this inaugural edition of From the TRC, the Teaching Resources Center would like to refresh the minds of the College of Education’s faculty, students and staff of our mission because it will also serve as the driving force behind this new weekly column:  The mission of the Teaching Resources Center is to facilitate teaching and learning initiatives by providing resources and services to educators at all levels.” [emphasis added]  It is my job to reach out to the College of Education and advertise the fact that the TRC’s collection and services does support educators at all levels.

With this in mind, it can be easy to forget about the needs of distance education students because they don’t physically walk through our doors on a regular basis, if ever. They may never even know the same resources and services we offer on-campus students are available to them. I earned my Master of Library and Information Science degree online, and experienced this exact scenario. Maybe it was because I was studying to become an academic librarian that the University felt I should already know these things or I would pick them up as I progressed through the program, but I never knew about document delivery, research consultations or even the research guides on the library’s website.

Here is a list of services and resources I hope all distance education students take advantage of:

Research Guides: We recently updated the Education Law and Educational Leadership guides and are working to update more.

Research Consultations: Something new! Students can contact me via FaceTime or Skype for a one-on-one session to help them with their specific research needs. Email Dan Zuberbier, to schedule an appointment.

Interlibrary Loan & Document Delivery: Need a book we don’t have? We can get it for you! Log into ILL with your PirateID and password to request a book. The same site will let you request document delivery where we will provide articles from our print and microform collections via email and will ship books and other media materials to you via UPS.

Cooperative Borrowing Agreements: As a DE student, you also have borrowing privileges at any UNC System library, plus a few others. Establish an account with Joyner Library to gain these privileges.  

Online Writing Lab: The Writing Center also provides assistance to DE students. Through consultations with a trained writing center consultant students can ask specific questions about their writing in any stage, from brainstorming to the final draft.


Duncan Tonatiuh

Duncan Tonatiuh

“Contemporary Codex:
Using the Past to Address the Present”

Saturday, February 21, 2015
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Joyner East, Room 201

The TRC is sponsoring a public presentation featuring award-winning children’s author and illustrator Duncan Tonatiuh (toh-nah-tyou) as he discusses how ancient art of the Americas influences his artwork. In addition, Mr. Tonatiuh will share how he looks at the past to address issues that affect children today, especially Latino children. Immigration and segregation are two crucial issues addressed in his works.

Born in Mexico City and raised in San Miguel de Allende, Duncan Tonatiuh graduated from Parsons The New School for Design and Eugene Lang College in New York City. His children’s books have won Tomás Rivera Mexican American Children’s Book Awards and Pura Belpré Awards.

Mr. Tonatiuh’s books will be available for purchase in the lobby of Joyner Library from 10:00am to 4:30pm, and he will be autographing books in the same location from 10:30am–1:00pm and 3:30pm – 4:30pm.

Award-winning book, Separate is Never Equal

Award-winning book, Separate is Never Equal

His latest work, Separate is Never Equal, was named an Honor Book by the Pura Belpré Illustrator Awards and received the same award from the Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Medal. This book, along with his other works, are available in the TRC.

You can learn more about Duncan Tonatiuh and his books on his official website, www.duncantonatiuh.com, and access interviews with and book readings by the author on TeachingBooks.net.

Pirate CODE

CAEP Prep: Pirate CODE Innovations (Review)

caepThe ECU College of Education is one of several teacher education institutions nationwide to receive approval from the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP) to implement a transformation initiative (TI) called Pirate CODE (Continuum of Developing Expertise) as the framework for its spring 2015 National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) accreditation visit.

Pirate CODE brings seven research-based teacher education assessment initiatives that have previously operated independently throughout the college under one umbrella to strengthen and develop teacher candidates.

Students enrolled in the College’s Elementary Education and Middle Grades Education programs begin working with the first component of Pirate CODE during their sophomore year and experience different components throughout their junior and senior years. Each component is designed to improve and assess teacher preparedness using different, but complementary, methods.

A brief overview of the TI Innovations

  1. Video Grand Rounds- Teacher candidates are given an introductory framework for classroom observations and subsequent discussions guided by faculty.
  2. ISLES- Pre-service candidates develop a common framework of instructional practices which highlight effective evidence-based strategies for increasing student achievement through a series of online modules.
  3. edTPA Preparation Modules- Informal perspectives and skills are gained based on interdisciplinary research that complements traditional teacher education programs and facilitates student edTPA™ performance.
  4. Instructional Coaching- Instructional coaches maximize teacher candidates’ growth in the internship experience through instructional coaching of performance.
  5. Professional Development for Clinical Teachers and University Supervisors- The local level of professional development consists of departments within the College of Education: The Office of Professional Development and Student Outreach, the Office of Assessment and Accreditation/Instructional Technology, the Office of Clinical Experiences, and the Irene Howell Assistive Technology Center.
  6. Co-Teaching- The Co-Teaching partnership enables clinical teachers to provide consistent mentoring, giving interns the time and support necessary to gain skills required to teach successfully.
  7. edTPA™- The edTPA™ is a valid and reliable summative capstone assessment to assess candidate readiness and provide data to inform program improvement.

For more information on each of the innovations, please visit the Pirate CODE website.

 

#ECU_CAEPisComing

 

Childrens_Literature_Cover

Swaggerty’s Chapter Published in International Literacy Association’s Book

Elizabeth Swaggerty has recently had a chapter published in the newly released fourth edition of the International Literacy Association’s Children’s Literature in the Reading Program: Engaging Young Readers in the 21st Century. Swaggerty’s contributed chapter describes how teachers can support and select texts for upper elementary students who are reluctant to read or find reading difficult. She emphasizes the consideration of students’ preferences and reading abilities while simultaneously becoming familiar with a variety of high-interest texts and text types that are appropriate for this student population. A high-interest book list and teaching tips for supporting engaged reading are included. Elizabeth Swaggerty is an Associate Professor of reading education in the Department of Literacy Studies, English Education, and History Education.

Citation:
Swaggerty, E.A. (2015). Selecting Engaging Texts for Upper Elementary Students Who Avoid Reading or Find Reading Difficult. In D.A. Wooten & B.E. Cullinan (Eds.), Children’s Literature in the Reading Program: Engaging Young Readers in the 21st Century (4th ed., pp. 150–166). Newark, DE: International Literacy Association.

http://www.reading.org/general/Publications/Books/bk387

2015 Recruitment Day

College of Education Hosts Prospective Pirates

On Saturday, January 24, 2015, the East Carolina University College of Education hosted prospective teacher education students at their College Of Education Recruitment Day which was held in Mendenhall Student Center. The theme of the event was iTeach: What’s Your Superpower? and provided 46 junior and senior high school students and their families with information about teacher education degree programs offered at the institution as well as information about transitioning from high school to a four-year institution.

Invitations were issued to high schools within the Latham Clinical Schools Network which comprises 39 counties within eastern North Carolina. Dr. Linda Patriarca, Dean of the College of Education, welcomed the group with motivational comments about why becoming a teacher is crucial in today’s society. Prospective students and their families received information about admissions, financial aid, and housing. Teacher education faculty members provided participants with degree requirements and the unique features of ECU’s teacher education programs. In a student panel and throughout the day, teacher education students interacted with program participants and provided advice on successful transition from high school to college as well as engaged in conversations about what it’s like to be a Pirate at ECU. Prospective students and their families received information about the Education Living and Learning Community and the myriad of scholarships available for teacher education students. Tours of the campus led by current teacher education students rounded out the COE Recruitment Day.

Participants commented positively about the day by saying, “I loved the amazing ECU spirit…. There was excitement from everyone…. What a wise use of time…. The student panel was very helpful.” The teacher education programs represented at the event are hopeful that the day’s interactions will help prospective students solidify their choice to attend ECU in the future.

The College of Education was delighted to host this event to encourage high school students to choose East Carolina University as their home away from home. The unit extends its gratitude to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, Financial Aid, Campus Living, and teacher education faculty and staff across campus for making this a successful recruitment event.

A link to a photo album providing a pictorial account of the day is available at: Recruitment Day Photo Album – January 24, 2015.

For more information about recruitment efforts for the College of Education at East Carolina University, please contact Ms. Dionna Manning in the COE Academic Success Center, at manningd@ecu.edu or 252-328-5453 or Dr. Laura Bilbro-Berry, in the Office of Teacher Education, at bilbroberryl@ecu.edu or 252-328-1123. Interested individuals are encouraged to visit www.ecu.edu/becomeateacher for more information about teacher education programs offered at ECU.

Glee and New Directions for Social Change

LEED Doctoral Student Published

The book Glee and New Directions for Social Change features a chapter from Davis B. Smith entitled “The Asteroid and the Active Shooter.” This work is about the importance of everyday interactions and using active listening so that we can better understand one another. Smith is a 3rd year doctoral student in the Doctor of Educational Leadership program with the Higher Education concentration.

Since his submission, Sense Publishers has contacted Smith for a future project on ethical decision-making using the TV show The Walking Dead as a backdrop as part of a sociology in television series.