Category Archives: COE in the News

Advanced Placement Summer Institute Prepares Teachers to Give Their Best to the Brightest

Honors students in high school are anxious to take as many Advanced Placement courses as their schools offer so teachers go to school in the summer preparing to teach these courses.  ECU hosts  a College Board endorsed Advanced Placement Summer Institute. Each session is 4-days long and is taught by a certified College Board consultant. This summer, during the week of June 23-26, courses are being taught in

  • AP Biology
  • AP Calculus AB
  • AP Chemistry
  • AP Environmental Science
  • AP Physics 1 &2
  • AP Statistics

Classes have begun and teachers are involved in many hands-on activities around campus.

APchemistryAP Chemistry teachers are working hard at their lab stations to determine the equilibrium constants for a various chemical reactions here at South Central High School, this year’s hosting site for College Board’s Advanced Placement conference. Teachers will perform these same
labs later on with their AP chemistry students.

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NCTQ Recognizes ECU Teacher Quality

By Jane Dail

Thursday, June 19, 2014

A nationwide study of college teaching prep programs ranked one East Carolina University program among the top 15.

The National Council on Teaching Quality (NCTQ) released its second annual Teacher Prep Review this week after analyzing 2,400 elementary, secondary and special education programs at 1,127 institutions across the country.

ECU’s undergraduate special education program ranked 12th in the nation, tying with Fort Hayes State University’s undergraduate elementary education program, Montclair State University’s graduate secondary education program, and Austin Peay State University’s undergraduate secondary education program.

Kathi Wilhite — chairwoman of the department of special education, foundations and research in ECU College of Education — said she is proud of the recognition the program received.

“This recognition is a reflection of the dedicated professionals within the department who work tirelessly to conduct research and teach relevant practices to pre-service teacher candidates,” Wilhite said. “Our goal is to provide educational and practical experiences that will positively impact classrooms and services for individuals with disabilities.”

The undergraduate special education program has two areas — general curriculum and adapted curriculum — and about 200 students overall.

Wilhite said the nine key standards for special education are selection criteria, early reading, elementary mathematics, content for special education, classroom management, student teaching, instructional design for special education, outcomes and rigor.

ECU’s undergraduate elementary education program also ranked 188, tying with 13 other programs. The university’s undergraduate secondary education program ranked 356, which was tied with 11 other institutions’ programs.

NCTQ President Kate Walsh said in a Tuesday phone conference that the study helps to expand the national conversation on teacher quality

Walsh said though there are several areas of teaching that need improvement, there has been marked progress in reading instruction, classroom management and student teaching.

To view the entire report, visit www.nctq.org.

Contact Jane Dail at jdail@reflector.com or 252-329-9585.

Courtesy of ECU’s The Daily Clips blog.

Kenneth McKee ’13 Selected as ASCD Emerging Leader

Kenneth McKee

Kenneth McKee ’13

Kenneth “Kenny” McKee ’13 has been named to the ASCD Emerging Leaders Class of 2014. The ASCD Emerging Leaders program is designed to prepare a young, diverse group of educators for potential influence and ASCD leadership. McKee recently received his master’s degree in Reading Education from East Carolina University’s College of Education in Greenville, N.C. He is employed as an Instructional Coach with Buncombe County Schools in Asheville, N.C. Department of Literacy Studies, English Education and History Education (LEHE) Chair Dr. Katherine Misulis stated that “We (the department) are very proud of Kenny’s accomplishments and this well-deserved recognition.”

While the 2014 Class of Emerging Leaders is the largest group in the program’s history, still only 45 educators from across the nation were selected to participate in this prestigious two-year program. Dr. Elizabeth Swaggerty, Associate Professor, LEHE, remarked “This is an amazing honor.”

The 2014 Class of Emerging Leaders will receive exclusive access to a pool of grant funds. The grant program is designed to support students through innovative approaches to whole child education and to help emerging leaders grow professionally. Activities for Emerging Leaders may include serving on committees, hosting networking events for educators, advocating for sound education policy, and contributing to ASCD publications such as Educational Leadership and the Inservice blog.

The Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD) is a global community dedicated to excellence in learning, teaching, and leading. ASCD’s innovative solutions promote the success of each child. To learn more about ASCD and the 2014 Class of Emerging Leaders, visit the organization’s website: www.ascd.org.

Education Housing Community Still Accepting Applicants

First year education students have the chance to live in a residence hall with other freshman education majors through the College of Education Housing Community (EHC). This experience connects them in a unique way to the college while also providing a smooth transition to college life.

Sophomore Danielle Mehling, a special education major, was part of last year’s EHC. “It’s an automatic bond and a great way to meet new people,” said Mehling.

As part of the bonding experience, students partake in different activities both in and out of the residence hall together, such as guest speakers, cultural events and a teambuilding ropes course.  In addition to these activities, EHC residents will also take COAD 1000 together and make their transition easier by having a “Pirate Pal”.

EHC teambuilding exercises; Photo courtesy of the EHC

The social and bonding aspects are not the only perks of the program. “It helped a lot when we had classes together,” said Mehling. “There was always someone to study with right down the hall.”

There are several benefits to this program, including building leadership skills, having an academic-friendly environment, attention and support tailored to each student, a smooth transition to college and the opportunity to experience many new ideas, cultures and experiences.

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The EHC is still accepting applications for the 2014-2015 school year with a new deadline of June 20. There are no extra costs, other than standard room and board, to participate in the program. The application and more information can be found on the EHC’s website, which is http://www.ecu.edu/cs-educ/ehc/, and emailed or faxed to Dionna Manning, who can be contacted at (252) 328-4126 or at manningd@ecu.edu.

Journal of Curriculum and Instruction Issue Published

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Dr. Sharilyn Steadman, Assistant Professor in the Department of Literacy Studies, English Education and History Education, is the lead editor of the latest issue of JoCI.

The editorial team of the Journal of Curriculum and Instruction is delighted to announce publication of a new special topic issue, Performance Assessment of Pre-Service and In-Service Educators. Sharilyn C. Steadman is the lead editor for this issue. It is available at http://www.joci.ecu.edu. We invite you to review the Table of Contents here and then visit our web site to review articles and items of interest.

The Point of View, “Assessment of Pre-Service and In-Service Teachers,” offers a brief historical perspective of previous reform movements and situates more recent reforms, with a focus on the efficacy of in-service teachers and teacher education programs and their teacher candidates, within the broader contextual view of educational transformation.

The invited lead article is “Driving Blind: Why We Need Standardized Performance Assessment in Teacher Education.” Peck, Singer-Gabella, Sloan, and Lin put forward a compelling argument for the benefits of adopting standardized, common assessments for teacher candidates. Three articles in Practitioner Platform offer descriptions of innovations within pre-service teacher programs. Shaffer describes a locally constructed teacher candidate assessment instrument. Vostal and colleagues provide a step-by-step guide for special education candidates who use a Response to Intervention model and edTPA. Cuthrell and colleagues offer an account of a program revision that included data collection and analysis, innovative strategy use, and ongoing assessment. Finally, the Perspective article by Donovan and colleagues questions the degree to which large scale accountability reports are useful in identifying links between teacher program candidates’ performances in P-12 classrooms and the courses or program areas that shaped those performances and recommend instead a systems-based approach.

The American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education selected JoCI’s editorial board as the recipient of the 2010 Edward C. Pomeroy Award for Outstanding Contributions to Teacher Education. Please share this free, open-access resource with interested colleagues and students.

Currently the Journal of Curriculum and Instruction is indexed in EBSCOHosts, Directory of Open Access Journals, Cross Reference, BrowZine, Google Scholar, and Cabell’s Directories of Publishing Opportunities.

www.joci.ecu.edu

COE Faculty Member Receives $472,000 NC Quest Award

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Dr. Ann Bullock, chair of the Department of Elementary and Middle Grades Education, is partnering with NC Quest to expand the NC New Teacher Support Program.

Dr. Ann Bullock, Chair of the Department of Elementary and Middle Grades Education, received an NC-QUEST award of $472,394 titled Integrating Neuroscience into Mathematics Instruction (INMI). INMI continues the partnership with UNC-GA New Teacher Support Program (NTSP) and extends it to the Harriott College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Mathematics.

The INMI pilot project consists of an intensive scientifically-based professional development program designed to assist beginning teachers to become highly knowledgeable and pedagogically skilled in leading students to mastery of the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics. The INMI pilot project will target elementary schools in Edgecombe County and Hertford County that have been identified as among the lowest performing in the state.

The project will recruit thirty beginning teachers to participate in a year-long professional development program designed to increase their knowledge of the Common Core Standards for Mathematical practice, brain-compatible elements of mathematics instruction, brain-compatible instructional strategies, and whole-brain teaching techniques.

The INMI extends the professional development offerings currently provided by the NC NTSP, which include an institute/boot camp, six days of professional development, and ongoing instructional coaching. INMI teachers will attend an extended summer session at the beginning of the academic year, Saturday sessions and site-based sessions at their schools during the academic year, and a summer session at the conclusion of the academic year.

In addition, participating teachers will receive weekly on-site support from NC NTSP Instructional Coaches and monthly consultations from an ECU mathematics content expert. Through the integration of neuroscience in mathematics instruction, beginning teachers will be better equipped to engage diverse learners, offer effective feedback that leads to deeper understanding, create a rich learning environment that attends to students’ social and emotional needs, and ensure that students’ mathematical achievement is reflective of their true abilities.

Weekend of Celebrations for MSITE Graduates!

SaturdayreceptionIt was a wonderful weekend to celebrate with our MSITE Spring 2014 Graduates! Dr. Ganter joined faculty, students and guests for breakfast on Saturday before the ceremony in the Flanagan building.

EuniceEunice Hoefling enjoyed breakfast with family and friends as she joined our 2014 graduating class. Eunice teaches Radiography at Fayetteville Technical Community College. She plans to use her MS degree in Instructional Technology to develop and enhance the hybrid and distance education courses she will use teach to her X-Ray Tech students.

MathgradsDr. Adu-Gyamfi and Dr. Grady are pictured with purple-gowned Zack Credle and Joseph Otellio. Zack plans to teach math at Southwest Edgecombe High School after graduation and Joseph plans to math teach at Gray’s Creek High School in Cumberland County, NC.

Congratulations MSITE Graduates! Welcome to the Class of 2014…

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ECU Awards Day: Several COE Faculty Recognized

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Several College of Education faculty were honored and recognized ECU’s Founders Day Awards presentation held on April 30 in Hendrix Theatre. UNC Board of Governors member and ECU alumnus Bob Rippy presented the Board of Governors Award for Excellence in Teaching, the highest teaching award given by the board, to Dr. Abbie Brown.

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An online-only instructor, Brown teaches graduate-level courses to current or aspiring educators aiming to improve their ability to teach and create instructional materials. “This means I have to model the best teaching practices for a sophisticated and critical group,” he said. Results from Brown’s Google Glass video recording is available: Google Glass View of ECU University Awards Day.

The Board of Governors Distinguished Professor for Teaching Award recognizes and supports excellent teaching at each of the 16 constituent universities in the UNC system.  Two COE recipients were selected:

  • Dr. Kylie Dotson-Blake, Department of Higher, Adult and Counselor Education. Dr. Dotson-Blake was also a finalist for the ECU Alumni Association Award for Outstanding Teaching.
  • Dr. Allen O. Guidry, Department of Literacy Studies, English Education and History Education. Dr. Guidry was nominated for three awards.

The 2013-14 College of Education recipient of the Scholar-Teacher Award:

  • Dr. Steven W. Schmidt, Department of Higher, Adult, and Counselor Education

Other College of Education award nominees and recipients for 2013-14 are as follows:

  • Dr. Brian Housand, Department of Elementary and Middle Grade Education, was awarded the Max Ray Joyner Award for Faculty Service Through Distance Education.
  • Dr. Caitlin Ryan, Department of Literacy, English, and History Education, was a finalist for the ECU Alumni Association Award for Outstanding Teaching.
  • Dr. Al Jones, Department of Information Library Science, was inducted into the Servire Society.

The full story by ECU News Services is  available in addition to a photo gallery of the event.

Swaggerty Posts on NC Reading Association Blog

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Terry Atkinson, member of Tar River Reading Council and professor of reading education, reads to two students at the Earth Day Expo at East Carolina University on April 8, 2014.

Dr. Elizabeth Swaggerty wrote a post about the Tar River Reading Council’s participation in the ECU Earth Day Expo that was just published on the North Carolina Reading Association blog. “It was a great outreach activity that connected ECU faculty, area teachers, the Tar River Reading Council (local affiliate of the International Reading Association), and ECU’s Center for Biodiversity and Biology Department with local children,” said Swaggerty of the event.

 

MATE Student Wins Teacher-Leader Grant

Tomika Altman-Lewis receives 2014-2015 MET Emerging Teacher-Leaders in Elementary School Mathematics Grant from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. She will be providing professional development for teachers at Burton Magnet Elementary School.

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Mathematically Speaking: Best Practices for Teachers and Students
Tomika R. Altman-Lewis, Burton Magnet Elementary School, Durham, North Carolina

Elementary teachers are faced with the challenge of being “experts” in not just one subject area, but in multiple subjects. Often this results in being a novice in one area; which is especially daunting when we are equipped with the task of developing the mathematical foundation for all higher level mathematics. We are our students first introduction to mathematics in which they either learn to love or loath mathematics. More often than not, professional development is geared toward literacy with little to no emphasis on mathematics. Considering this, the purpose of this grant is to equip fourth and fifth grade elementary teachers at my school with much needed professional development. Teachers will participate in sessions that will expose them to best practices and strategies while deepening their mathematical reasoning and understanding in an effort to more effectively teach our students while allowing me to further develop my math leadership skills.