Category Archives: Student News

Student focused news in the College of Education

image

ECU to Participate in Global Day of Giving

image‘Tis the season for giving! In honor of #GivingTuesday, East Carolina University is inviting alumni, friends, parents, students, faculty, and staff to join the movement by giving a charitable gift* on Tuesday, December 2, to the university that is near and dear to our hearts.

Founded in 2012 to inspire a new tradition of generosity, #GivingTuesday focuses on celebrating kindness and giving back. Support a culture of philanthropy at ECU by making a gift on December 2nd and becoming a partner in securing the university’s future for current students and future generations of Pirates.

Your gifts provide scholarships, enrich teaching resources and libraries, offer hands-on learning lessons, support research and the arts, deliver classroom enhancements, and afford study abroad living/learning opportunities – all of which help ECU attract and retain the best and brightest students and faculty.

Help spread the word! Mark you calendar to #GiveTueECU on December 2, tell your friends, and post on social media using the hashtags #GivingTuesdayECU and #GiveTueECU. “I Gave” badges will be available through ECU’s University Advancement and East Carolina Alumni Association’s social media accounts on December 2.

Learn more about the #GivingTuesdayECU movement. Thank you for your support!

Contact us at (252) ECU-GIVE (252-328-4483) or give2ecu@ecu.edu.

*Your gift is tax-deductible to the extent the law allows.

FacebookTwitterLinkedInGoogle+
COE Seal - Feature Image

East Carolina University Principal Fellows Program

According to the North Carolina Principal Fellows Program website, The Principal Fellows Program provides a competitive, merit-based scholarship loan to individuals of exceptional academic ability who have teaching or relevant experience and who desire to enter school administration in a North Carolina public school. Through this scholarship loan, fellows have the opportunity to pursue their studies full-time and earn a Master of School Administration (MSA) degree in two years. The program consists of one year of full-time academic study at one of eleven designated colleges in the UNC system, followed by one year of a full-time internship in a North Carolina public school while attending school part-time. Fellows are provided with and must participate in regularly scheduled enrichment experiences to augment their learning opportunities as they prepare for the challenges of being a principal or assistant principal. Fellows must agree to practice as full-time administrators for four years within six years following the completion of their degree as repayment for their scholarship loan.

The opportunity to become a school administrator is an exciting one to be sure. Personally, I am extremely excited to be pursuing a MSA degree because it will give me the opportunity to serve staff, students, parents, and the community in which I will be working to a greater degree than was possible in my role as a classroom teacher. Elbert Maynard, current MSA Principal Fellow, explains this best in his perspective on becoming a school administrator. He stated, “Students are in desperate need of good teachers-those who will challenge them with high expectations in a caring and respectful way, in order to prepare them for the challenges their futures hold. Therefore, why would a teacher leave the classroom to become an administrator? An administrator can do the same thing for a staff of teachers that a teacher does for his/her students. By being a support for teachers, an administrator can influence an entire school. If an administrator can positively influence two teachers, then that administrator doubled the number of students positively affected. If an administrator can positively influence 50 teachers, 100 teachers…the positive effects on students’ lives grow exponentially.”

The program design clearly addresses the idea that individuals would be best served by being able to focus solely on their studies during the first year. According to Elbert Maynard, “Dividing time between a full-time job and studies in an MSA program takes away from both. I would be taking away from my students by dividing my attention between them and pursuing an advanced degree; the reverse is also true as I would be taking away from my potential as a future administrator by not focusing solely on my studies while pursuing the MSA. The Principal Fellows Program is a blessing that allows individuals to focus solely on becoming the best administrator they can be, without taking away from the students those teachers have a responsibility to. Not only that, the Principal Fellows Program has a prestigious reputation of excellence that any MSA candidate would be honored to be a part of.”

East Carolina University has had the largest cohort of fellows among the eleven universities for at least the last four years. This speaks to the attractiveness and success of the university. The MSA program at East Carolina University prides itself on being grounded in service to our surrounding school region. With a focus on servant-leadership, students in the MSA program at East Carolina University are required to complete six Service Leadership Projects where they go into schools within our region to serve as problem-solvers, collaborators, and change agents. The authentic learning received by fellows provides them with the knowledge and confidence they need to further prepare them for the role of principal and assistant principal. We are actually given the opportunity to go into schools and provide assistance and support to staff and students in the role of principal or assistant principal. Elbert Maynard stated he chose East Carolina University because, “ECU is known statewide-even nationwide-as having excellent teacher and administrator programs. Having enrolled in the programs here at ECU, I can report that this reputation is not exaggerated–if anything, it is understated. My courses taken, and my experiences as a GA working with the Office of Accreditation and Assessment, have been more valuable to me than I could possibly quantify with words. Success as an administrator hinges on, in large part, the preparation gained through an MSA program. I can predict confidently that I will be successful as a future administrator due to the excellence of the program here at ECU.” I concur with Elbert’s view about East Carolina University.

Kelvin Shackleford
MSA Principal Fellow
East Carolina University

ncctmposters

21 Math Education Students Attend NCCTM Conference and Share Posters

ncctmposters3The North Carolina Council Teachers of Mathematics held their state conference Oct 30-31, 2014 in Greensboro, NC. A delegation of 21 Senior 1, secondary mathematics education students were among those representing ECU as attendees at this event. Upon their return from the conference, these students created posters highlighting several interesting or useful ideas gleaned from the sessions and workshops.

On Tuesday, Nov 11, 2014, these students hosted a special Gamma Student Chapter event to share their posters with other mathematics education students and faculty. Over 50 mathematics education students and faculty attended the event. The Senior 1 students talked to visitors about their posters and experiences at the conference. The active engagement between presenters and attendees provided participants with a greater appreciation of the exciting happenings in North Carolina mathematics education.

ncctmposters2

caep_for_blog

What is the Senior Year Internship?

The Senior Year Internship is a required clinical experience for teacher education majors at East Carolina University.  It is a two-semester experience within a public school classroom, under the mentorship and coaching of a specially trained and licensed clinical teacher.  The Senior Year Internship is designed to provide students with opportunities to internalize and apply previous teaching and learning experience, as well as opportunities to teach and grow professionally through observation, planning, teaching, assessment, and reflective work with an effective classroom teacher.

In Senior I, a teaching intern’s first semester, students acclimate themselves to the public school environment by gaining an understanding of policies and procedures, multiple roles of classroom teachers, the diverse needs of the students, as well as the beginning stages of a range of experiences of curricular planning, delivery of instruction, and assessment.

The second semester, Senior II, is an emersion semester of involvement with clinical teachers providing constant feedback to the intern about the teaching and learning process.  In addition, the intern will complete a portfolio to document his or her growth and development as a classroom teacher with support from the clinical teacher and the university supervisor.

The Senior Year Internship is designed to allow students to gain practical experience and attain a level of competency needed for a high functioning novice beginning teacher.  There is a key focus on specific and timely feedback from clinical teachers and university supervisors which is meant to augment the intern’s growth.  The internship is invaluable in that it is practical learning combined with expert coaching from seasoned and trained teachers and supervisors.

Interns are generally able to make smooth transitions into their own classrooms once they are hired because of the depth of knowledge and experience they have acquired in this experience.

For more information regarding the Senior Year Internship, please see the Teacher Education Handbook.

coventing

The Senior Year Internship is a central feature of the initial teacher preparation programs at ECU and aligns with NCATE Standard 3: Field Experiences and Clinical Practice

Rose and Ron 2

Not One, Not Two, but Many ECU Award Recipients!

At its 44th Annual North Carolina Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCCTM)  Conference held in Greensboro, NC on 30-31 October 2014, ECU was featured mightily during the Awards Ceremony.  Two ECU Mathematics Education faculty, Dr. Ron Preston and Dr. Rose Sincrope were recognized with the highest honor that NCCTM can bestow, the W. W. Rankin Award.  MATE senior, Rebekah Currie, double majoring in a BS Mathematics Education and a BA in Mathematics won the Outstanding Mathematics Education Student from the Eastern Region award.  Several alumni also were recognized as the Outstanding Secondary Mathematics Teacher for their school districts.  Congratulations to:

W.T. Edwards, Columbus Co. – Class of ’11
Jennifer Simmons, Onslow Co. – Class of ’97, current student MAEd IT (Onslow Cohort)
Renea Baker, Pitt Co. – Class of ’92

ECU rises to the top once again!

gamma1

Math Club Receives an “Insider’s View of Getting a Job”

On Wednesday, October 22, 2014, the Gamma Student Chapter of NCCTM hosted a 12 person panel consisting of principals, math department chairs/lead grade level math teachers, and a director of human resources.  These “insiders” represented elementary, middle, and high school mathematics and shared their knowledge from a combined 185 years of educational expertise.  The full panel was introduced to an audience that consisted of approximately 50 students and six Mathematics Education faculty members before breaking into smaller subgroups for elementary, middle, and high school.  The conversations within the smaller groups provided the opportunity for panel members to share unique insight for their given educational context, and for Gamma students to ask important questions about not only the hiring process, but also how to become the best math teacher possible. One main theme heard from panel members in each subgroup was that they are looking for, “good math teachers that want to be great math teachers” and that there are supports in place to help them achieve greatness in the math classroom.

gamma4

Our sincere thanks goes out to the “insider” panel, consisting of the following individuals:

Elementary

  • Chena Cayton – Principal, Wahl-Coates Elem School, Pitt County
  • Karin Stefko – Kindergarten Teacher, Wahl-Coates Elem School, Pitt County
  • Coni Clark – Third Grade Teacher, Wahl-Coates Elem School, Pitt County

Middle Grades

  • Charlie Langley – Principal, CM Eppes Middle School, Pitt County
  • Barskdale Thompson – Sixth Grade Teacher, CM Eppes Middle School, Pitt County
  • Kristen Coleman – Sixth Grade Teacher, CM Eppes Middle School, Pitt County
  • Thomas Sisson – Seventh Grade Teacher, CM Eppes Middle School, Pitt County

High School

  • Jerry Simmons – Principal , New Bern High School, Craven County
  • Brad Johnston – Principal , Farmville Central High School, Pitt County
  • Renea Baker – Dept Chair , DH Conley High School, Pitt County
  • Tina Petty – Dept Chair, Southside High School, Beaufort County

Human Resources

  • Delilah Jackson – Director of Human Resources, Pitt County Schools

gamma2

wantzconference

COE Faculty Instilling Confidence, Inspiring Success

In a recent interview, senior Elementary Education (with a concentration in Science) major, Beth Wantz, credits COE and MSITE faculty with having a profound influence on her life.  She feels that they “truly care” about their students and go above and beyond to help them succeed.  She gives particular credit to Tammy Lee, explaining that, “Mrs. Tammy Lee has inspired me in so many different ways.  She has pushed me with my assignments and lessons throughout my college career because she knows what I am capable of doing.  Mrs. Lee has given me many opportunities outside of school that will greatly benefit me as a teacher, such as taking me to the National Science Teacher Association Conference in the fall of 2013.  With doing this, Mrs. Lee has given me the confidence that every effective teacher must have in order to benefit their students.  Mrs. Lee has also taken the time to teach me how to be a good teacher and a good person.  She is my biggest influence and my role model.”

Teachers teaching teachers–clearly a step in the right direction.

Teacher Cadet

East Carolina College of Education Hosts Future Teachers for Teacher Cadet Day 2014

2014 Burroughs Wellcome Fund North Carolina Teacher of the Year, James Ford

2014 Burroughs Wellcome Fund North Carolina Teacher of the Year, James Ford

One hundred plus potential teachers from high schools within the East visited the campus of East Carolina University on October 15, 2014 for Teacher Cadet Day. The Office of Professional Development and Student Outreach within the College of Education offered this event to high school students who are enrolled in the North Carolina Teacher Cadet Program.  It is an innovative year-long or semester-block activity-based curriculum for high school juniors and seniors. The course is designed to promote a better understanding and create interest in those students who may consider teaching as a profession. It is an honors program that details many components of the education environment and involves students in content, application, observations and teaching in preschool, elementary, middle school, and high school settings.

While on campus students listened to a keynote address by the 2014 Burroughs Wellcome Fund North Carolina Teacher of the Year, James Ford. Mr. Ford is a world history teacher at Garinger High School with Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools.

Students also attended a Program Fair with representatives from the various program areas in the College of Education, as well as representatives from teacher education programs across campus.  This was followed by informative sessions around the theme of the conference: What’s Your Superpower? I TEACH.  Students participated in sessions on college admissions, career exploration, and options for teacher education. In addition, these prospective teachers engaged in a dialogue with teacher education students in a panel discussion. The visiting students completed their day on campus with a trip to West End Dining Hall and tours provided by ECU Admissions.

Teacher Cadet students from Duplin, Gates, Johnston, Nash, and Wayne counties participated in Teacher Cadet Day 2014. Special thanks is extended to Ms. Christa Monroe for her efforts in organizing this recruitment event.

If the video above does not load, use the following link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAF0H0mD4D0&feature=youtu.be

For more information about the College of Education’s efforts in the area of teacher recruitment, please contact Dr. Laura Bilbro-Berry at bilbroberryl@ecu.edu or 252-328-1123.

ScienceClub_1

Science Education Club on the Path to National Recognition

It’s official!  The Science Education Club has completed all the requirements and workshops to be officially registered as a student organization at East Carolina University.  This has been a two year project that was finalized by the work of graduate student Megan Garner, and undergraduate elementary science concentration students: Beth Wantz, KC Hart, Kayla Sager, and Lauren Brewington.  The club is under the direction of faculty adviser, Tammy D. Lee who speaks with pride of the student’s accomplishment, “We are very excited to have this recognition at the university level so we can now apply for national recognition at the National Science Teacher’s Association.  The students have been diligent in their work and pursuit of this recognition which demonstrates their dedication and desire to be a part of science education and to have others participate in a student organization of a collected interest, Science! I am honored to be a part of this journey with these students.”  For more information about the Science Education Club visit them at their website or contact Tammy D. Lee at leeta@ecu.edu.

Dynamic Dialogue about Diversity panelist

Event Discussed Difficulty Recruiting, Retaining Diverse Educators in Schools

On October 15, 2014, the Office of Professional Development and Student Outreach in the College of Education collaborated with the Office of Equity and Diversity and the Ledonia Wright Cultural Center to offer a Dynamic Dialogue about Diversity event entitled “Diversity in Education.

This event featured a roundtable discussion between the 2014 North Carolina Teacher of the Year, James Ford, and two local educators, Juan Castillo from Greene County Schools and Joey Crutchfield from Pitt County Schools. The discussion integrated the topic of assessment of diversity within the teaching profession. The distinguished panelists shared the African American, Latino American, and Native American perspectives as well as their thoughts on the lack of representation of male educators from these subgroups in the classroom.

The panelist and participants engaged in dialogue about the challenges facing higher education in meeting the need for focused recruitment and retention in teacher education programs of underrepresented populations. The impact of the presence of these subgroups in the classroom as teachers as well as the support found in the schools and school systems that encourage retention in the profession was also intertwined into the conversation.  Additionally, current students and faculty shared how East Carolina University is meeting the needs for the recruitment and retention of diverse populations of students.