Category Archives: Educational Leadership (LEED)

News from the Educational Leadership Department

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Everyone Has News to Share

In the College of Education, we believe the best way to find out about what is going on in our departments, classrooms, and clubs as well as in the lives of our students, faculty, staff, and alumni is by encouraging them to share their news and events with us.

As one of the larger colleges at East Carolina University, we do our best to cover all that is going on, but we know there is more, and we want to know about it! If there is something newsworthy that you believe the college should share, please let us know about it.

Members of the community can share their news by sending an email to coewebteam@ecu.edu. We are happy to share relevant news stories on our news blog, website, Facebook page and Twitter. Please remember that in order for us to run a story on the website, it must be accompanied by a photo. If you have an upcoming event that would be of interest, we would be happy to share that as well.

ECU faculty, staff, and students are encouraged to use the COE helpdesk to submit their news and other promotion requests. College of Education faculty are invited to attend the upcoming professional development session “Keep Your Department in the Spotlight” on February 25th from 10-11 am to learn about all the tools COE faculty and staff have at their disposal to get the word out.

You know your story better than anyone. Won’t you share it with us?

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Countdown to the CAEP Accreditation Visit

While students are preparing for the spring 2015 semester, the ECU College of Education is gearing up for the CAEP Accreditation Visit scheduled for February 7-10, 2015. Hopefully, everyone is rested, refreshed, and ready for another exciting and productive semester. Please remember that the CAEP Accreditation Visit is just around the corner. There are 26 more days before the visit. Read here for more CAEP Preparation news.

Kelvin Shackleford
MSA Principal Fellow
East Carolina University

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Dr. Robin Hamilton

Alumna is Southeast Regional Principal of the Year

Dr. Robin Hamilton of Parsley Elementary School has been named 2015 Southeast Regional Principal of the Year by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI). Hamilton is a recent graduate of the College of Education’s Educational Leadership program.

The news was delivered to Dr. Hamilton at a surprise ceremony and reception this morning, Friday, January 9, 2015. In attendance were New Hanover County Board of Education members, NCDPI officials, New Hanover County Schools (NHCS) Senior Staff, Parsley Elementary School staff and students, and Dr. Hamilton’s family. Dr. Sandra Sheridan, retired assistant superintendent of Human Resources, was the keynote speaker for the event.

“I love being a principal. I am humbled and so surprised by this honor,” Dr. Hamilton said.

This past June, Dr. Hamilton was named New Hanover County’s Principal of the Year, and was then chosen out of other top principals from 13 counties in Southeastern North Carolina to be named 2015 Regional Principal of the Year. She will now go on to compete against seven other principals for the honor of State Principal of the Year in May of 2015.

While earning her doctorate, Hamilton was also the recipient of the 2014 Glatthorn Distinguished Dissertation award.

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LEED Student Selected for AERA Institue

AERA_LogoMr. Levy Brown, a current student in the Educational Leadership program, was selected as a participant in the 8th Annual Asa G. Hilliard III and Barbara A. Sizemore Research Institute on African Americans and Education sponsored by the American Educational Research Association’s (AERA) Research Focus on Black Education SIG to pursue his doctorate.

According to the institute’s directors, Drs. Jerlando F L. Jackson (Vilas Distinguished Professor of Higher Education, Director and Chief Research Scientist, Wisconsin’s Equity and Inclusion Laboratory University of Wisconsin-Madison) and Lamont A. Flowers (Distinguished Professor of Educational Leadership and Executive Director, Charles H. Houston Center for the Study of the Black Experience in Education Clemson University), Mr. Brown was selected from among a large national pool of applicants.

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Student Videos Screened at National UCEA Annual Convention

One of Dr. Martin Rearon’s favorite assignments when he teaches ethics invites participants to story board, script, cast, and create a short video to illustrate either a positive or a problematic instance of ethics in educational leadership. In spring 2014, the participants in LEED 6909 formed four groups and created four seven-minute videos. The videography and editing services were professionally supplied by Mike Myles and Sam Saunders of ECU’s Media and Technology Services, and they both worked with the participants in each video to edit them to the seven minutes stipulated by the assignment.

The quality of the acting contributed to the impact of the multiple points that each of the videos made about ethics in education. Consequently, he sought the participants’ permission to submit all four videos for blind review for possible screening at the Film Festival conducted in conjunction with the Annual Convention of the University Council for Educational Administration (UCEA, http://ucealee.squarespace.com/). Mike and Sam worked with him to edit the assignment videos to meet UCEA’s five-minute requirement. Two of the four videos were accepted by the reviewers, and the other two were just below the cut-off. The two videos accepted for screening are Double Standard and Who’s to Blame.

  • Double Standard was directed by Heather Gray,  and included Denise Adler, Nydra Jones, Donna Moore, and Susan Agrue.
  • Who’s to Blame was directed by Scott Pagona and included Jennifer McClure, DeeDee Barrett, and Cynthia Sego.

The films were screened on Friday and Saturday, Nov 21 and 22, 2014, at the UCEA Annual Convention in Washington, DC (http://ucealee.squarespace.com/annual-convention-2014/).

Congratulations to the directors and casts of the two accepted videos, and many thanks to Mike Myles and Sam Saunders for their professional services.

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ECU to Participate in Global Day of Giving

image‘Tis the season for giving! In honor of #GivingTuesday, East Carolina University is inviting alumni, friends, parents, students, faculty, and staff to join the movement by giving a charitable gift* on Tuesday, December 2, to the university that is near and dear to our hearts.

Founded in 2012 to inspire a new tradition of generosity, #GivingTuesday focuses on celebrating kindness and giving back. Support a culture of philanthropy at ECU by making a gift on December 2nd and becoming a partner in securing the university’s future for current students and future generations of Pirates.

Your gifts provide scholarships, enrich teaching resources and libraries, offer hands-on learning lessons, support research and the arts, deliver classroom enhancements, and afford study abroad living/learning opportunities – all of which help ECU attract and retain the best and brightest students and faculty.

Help spread the word! Mark you calendar to #GiveTueECU on December 2, tell your friends, and post on social media using the hashtags #GivingTuesdayECU and #GiveTueECU. “I Gave” badges will be available through ECU’s University Advancement and East Carolina Alumni Association’s social media accounts on December 2.

Learn more about the #GivingTuesdayECU movement. Thank you for your support!

Contact us at (252) ECU-GIVE (252-328-4483) or give2ecu@ecu.edu.

*Your gift is tax-deductible to the extent the law allows.

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Junior 2 Teaching Interns and Principal Fellows MSA Students Collaborate

Junior 2 Teaching Interns and Principal Fellows MSA Students Collaborate
Something new and exciting is happening this semester in the COE that you might miss if you are not currently a Junior 2 intern or a Principal Fellow. The two programs are collaborating for the benefit of both student sets, and the process has been extremely promising. First, the interns and Fellows meet and discuss lesson plans and teaching strategies. Next, the Jr 2’s teach a class, while the Fellows observe either in person or by watching a video of the lesson uploaded to Taskstream. The Fellows then evaluate the lesson and provide constructive feedback. This process is repeated across three lessons the interns teach.
The process is valuable to the interns because they get another set of eyes from experienced classroom teachers. The MSA students get the valuable experience of observing and evaluating teachers with a rubric, which will be a fundamental part of their future jobs as administrators, as they must observe their teaching staff and evaluate according to The Rubric for Evaluating North Carolina Teachers:

North Carolina Teacher Evaluation Process

As a Principal Fellow, this experience has been valuable and has taught me some practical lessons. I spent hours watching my intern’s lesson videos, brainstorming constructive advice and writing helpful comments. And this was for an intern who had well-prepared lessons and did a fantastic job. Yet I realize as an administrator I will not have hours to spend on each individual teacher. I can reflect with empathy now on some of my past evaluations, which may have seemed rushed and minimal. A principal with 80 staff members must schedule 80 pre-conferences, observe 80 lessons, and schedule 80 post-conferences. Each teacher should be observed a minimum of three times per year, and ILT’s require even more. Hundreds of hours are required to meet the minimum standards for evaluating and assessing teachers, and to truly help teachers improve, more time will be needed than just the minimum. But for the moment, my responsibility is to one intern and I have the luxury of time. I hope that my feedback will help her to ease into her future as an NC teacher. This experience has definitely been worthwhile for me in my preparation in becoming an NC school administrator.
Elbert Maynard
Principal Fellow

 

#ECU_CAEPisComing

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The Swivl is here.

What is the Swivl?  Swivl is a camera dock with a twist.  Instead of holding your camera still, the Swivl will follow you around the room, tracking you as you move around on stage or in front of an audience.  This device follows the paired mic wherever it goes.  It is compatible with Android and IOS devices.

So who is using it in COE?  Students have begun to use it to record class sessions for edTPA and ISLES.  OAA has been using it to interview faculty and students about Pirate Code innovations.  Why use this instead of a video camera?  It’s ease of set up and video download capabilities.  The device can connect to any Android or IOS device that has the Swivl app.  You place it in the dock, hook up the mic cable, sync the mic, turn on app and you are ready to go.  The Swivl zeros in on the mic and follows it.  You can use it for one speaker or pass the mic for a group.  The quality of the recording ability lets you place it in the middle of a table to record a small group.  If you want to know more or are interested in trying out the Swivl, feel free to contact OAA IT for more information.

 

#ECU_CAEPisComing

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East Carolina University Principal Fellows Program

According to the North Carolina Principal Fellows Program website, The Principal Fellows Program provides a competitive, merit-based scholarship loan to individuals of exceptional academic ability who have teaching or relevant experience and who desire to enter school administration in a North Carolina public school. Through this scholarship loan, fellows have the opportunity to pursue their studies full-time and earn a Master of School Administration (MSA) degree in two years. The program consists of one year of full-time academic study at one of eleven designated colleges in the UNC system, followed by one year of a full-time internship in a North Carolina public school while attending school part-time. Fellows are provided with and must participate in regularly scheduled enrichment experiences to augment their learning opportunities as they prepare for the challenges of being a principal or assistant principal. Fellows must agree to practice as full-time administrators for four years within six years following the completion of their degree as repayment for their scholarship loan.

The opportunity to become a school administrator is an exciting one to be sure. Personally, I am extremely excited to be pursuing a MSA degree because it will give me the opportunity to serve staff, students, parents, and the community in which I will be working to a greater degree than was possible in my role as a classroom teacher. Elbert Maynard, current MSA Principal Fellow, explains this best in his perspective on becoming a school administrator. He stated, “Students are in desperate need of good teachers-those who will challenge them with high expectations in a caring and respectful way, in order to prepare them for the challenges their futures hold. Therefore, why would a teacher leave the classroom to become an administrator? An administrator can do the same thing for a staff of teachers that a teacher does for his/her students. By being a support for teachers, an administrator can influence an entire school. If an administrator can positively influence two teachers, then that administrator doubled the number of students positively affected. If an administrator can positively influence 50 teachers, 100 teachers…the positive effects on students’ lives grow exponentially.”

The program design clearly addresses the idea that individuals would be best served by being able to focus solely on their studies during the first year. According to Elbert Maynard, “Dividing time between a full-time job and studies in an MSA program takes away from both. I would be taking away from my students by dividing my attention between them and pursuing an advanced degree; the reverse is also true as I would be taking away from my potential as a future administrator by not focusing solely on my studies while pursuing the MSA. The Principal Fellows Program is a blessing that allows individuals to focus solely on becoming the best administrator they can be, without taking away from the students those teachers have a responsibility to. Not only that, the Principal Fellows Program has a prestigious reputation of excellence that any MSA candidate would be honored to be a part of.”

East Carolina University has had the largest cohort of fellows among the eleven universities for at least the last four years. This speaks to the attractiveness and success of the university. The MSA program at East Carolina University prides itself on being grounded in service to our surrounding school region. With a focus on servant-leadership, students in the MSA program at East Carolina University are required to complete six Service Leadership Projects where they go into schools within our region to serve as problem-solvers, collaborators, and change agents. The authentic learning received by fellows provides them with the knowledge and confidence they need to further prepare them for the role of principal and assistant principal. We are actually given the opportunity to go into schools and provide assistance and support to staff and students in the role of principal or assistant principal. Elbert Maynard stated he chose East Carolina University because, “ECU is known statewide-even nationwide-as having excellent teacher and administrator programs. Having enrolled in the programs here at ECU, I can report that this reputation is not exaggerated–if anything, it is understated. My courses taken, and my experiences as a GA working with the Office of Accreditation and Assessment, have been more valuable to me than I could possibly quantify with words. Success as an administrator hinges on, in large part, the preparation gained through an MSA program. I can predict confidently that I will be successful as a future administrator due to the excellence of the program here at ECU.” I concur with Elbert’s view about East Carolina University.

Kelvin Shackleford
MSA Principal Fellow
East Carolina University

 

#ECU_CAEPisComing

 

 

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ICYMI – Co-Teaching, “A New Model for Student Teaching.”

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Sarah Young ‘13 leads a group of kindergarten students in Amy McGregor’s classroom at Wintergreen Primary School in Greenville. She was one of two ECU students assigned to that classroom for their spring semester internship as part of the Co-Teaching Program in ECU’s College of Education.

The fall 2013 issue of ECU’s East magazine featured the Co-Teaching initiative in the ECU College of Education as an exciting and innovative new practice, “A New Model for Student Teaching.”

Co-Teaching provides a comprehensive and rigorous experience for interns and enhances the quality of learning for P12 students. The Co-Teaching partnership enables clinical teachers to provide consistent mentoring, giving interns the time and support necessary to gain skills and the confidence required to teach successfully.

Since this article was published, the Co-Teaching initiative has grown from a few interns to 111 interns in 91 classrooms, representing seven teacher preparation programs at ECU. Such growth would not be possible without strong public school partnerships.  Greene County Schools liaison to the Latham Clinical Schools Network at ECU, Gwen Smith, says her teachers are:

“just beginning to understand what a wonderful model (co-teaching) could be.”

“Over the past years, (fear of relinquishing the classroom) has been the biggest (deterrent),” Smith said. “They tell me ‘I can’t take an intern this year.’ But anytime you’ve got more than one teacher in the classroom, the students are certain to benefit.

“We want to get our best teachers for these interns—our master teachers. This 2-1 model works better.”

The Co-Teaching initiative’s team of lead faculty—Judy Smith, Liz Fogarty, Christina Tschida, and Vivian Covington—is actively working not only to improve and expand the initiative, but also to study its impact on clinical practice, the focus of NCATE’s Standard 3. Early co-teaching research is focusing on candidate learning outcomes and candidate efficacy in co-teaching settings. Preliminary findings indicate:

  • Co-Teaching interns significantly outperformed non-Co-Teaching interns on two rubrics on the edTPA: Subject-Specific Pedagogy and Using Assessment to Inform Instruction.
  • When surveyed, Co-Teaching interns indicated a higher degree of self-efficacy in their ability to differentiate instruction than that indicated by non-Co-Teaching interns.

For more on Co-teaching and NCATE Standard 3, see the ECU TI IR, Standard 3.