Category Archives: Elementary and Middle Grades Education (ELMID)

News from the Elementary Education and Middle Grades Education Department

College of Education Welcomes New Pirate Educators!

The College of Education welcomed 86 State Employee’s Credit Union (SECU) Partnership East students and approximately 245 incoming freshmen during summer orientations in June, July, and August 2014.

SECU Partnership East allows students to graduate with a four-year degree from East Carolina University (ECU) by completing their first two years at one of the partnering community colleges and then taking ECU courses online. At the beginning of the second summer session, there were 10 new elementary majors. This fall, 62 elementary majors and 14 special education-general curriculum majors will begin completing their degree.

2014 SECU PE Orientation

College of Education SECU Partnership East students participate in orientation.

 

The Academic Success Center worked with approximately 245 students attending the ten orientation sessions throughout the summer. Academic Success Center staff assisted 216 intended education majors through one-on-one appointments. Of these, approximately 116 intend on majoring in elementary education, 12 in English education, 21 in history education, 10 in mathematics education, 8 in middle grades education, 9 in science education and 40 in special education.

Sarah at advising (1)

Professional Advisor Caroline Hill meets with an incoming College of Education freshman in the Academic Success Center.

 

The Academic Success Center anticipates additional advising appointments during the first weeks of classes.

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2015 CAEP Visit Preparations Commence

caepThe Educator Preparation Provider (EPP) unit at East Carolina University will host its next CAEP accreditation visit February 8-10, 2015. In preparation for the on-site visit, the College of Education’s Office of Assessment and Accreditation established this section to share information, reminders, and updates with EPP faculty, staff, and administrators.

#ECU_CAEPiscoming

Below is the PowerPoint presentation from the COE’s Opening Day Faculty and Staff Meeting.

CAEP Presentation – Opening Faculty Meeting

ECU COE Faculty Members seen as Leaders at Stanford University

Pictured from left to right Drs. Diana Lys, Kristen Cuthrell, Sherilyn Steadman, and Ellen Dobson.

Pictured from left to right Drs. Diana Lys, Kristen Cuthrell, Sharilyn Steadman, and Ellen Dobson.

On August 11-13, four ECU COE faculty members participated in an invitation-only forum at Stanford University. The American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education (AACTE) and the Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning and Equity (SCALE) endorsed the event that focused on the development of Embedded Signature Assessments (ESAs). Drs. Diana Lys, Kristen Cuthrell, Ellen Dobson, and Sharilyn Steadman formed one of seven invited teams of teacher educators who are considered to be leaders in the field. Other teams represented individual university, state-level, and national teams.

The goal of the forum was to develop or refine an ESA and to align the ESA with InTASC and state-level standards. Products from the event will be presented as exemplars at the national CAEP Conference in September 2014. Additionally, invited attendees are micro-credentialed as ESA developers.

Dr. William B. Martin Awarded Kappa Delta Pi Honors

Dr. William B. Martin

Dr. William B. Martin

Dr. William B. Martin, College of Education Professor Emeritus, was honored this past year for two awards through Kappa Delta Pi International. He was inducted as one of the charter members into the Eleanor Roosevelt Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi (KDP). Membership in this chapter is a lifetime honor and is limited to only 100 people. Dr. Martin has also been awarded one of only four KDP Founders Awards that are given out every two years at the KDP Convocation. He received the Dr. Thomas E. Musselman Award for Service Excellence, which is given to members who have inspired others through their volunteer efforts with education-focused service programs and who have made a difference in their local, regional, and global communities.

Dr. Martin’s teaching career reached across a number of states and education levels, including elementary school in Phoenix, AZ, junior high in Nashville, TN and graduate school at the University of Nevada in Reno, NV. He retired in 1990 after 31 years with the College of Education, Department of Secondary Education at East Carolina University. He was awarded the position of Professor Emeritus at ECU in 1990.

He is a lifetime member of KDP and served 26 years as a counselor for the Eta Chi Chapter at ECU. Dr. Martin also created an endowed scholarship through KDP for two education majors at ECU: one special education and one middle grades education.

Dr. Martin is from Duquesne and McKeesport, Pennsylvania and served as the Quarter Master in The Navigation Division on board a troop-ship of the U.S. Navy during World War II. He received a Bachelor of Science degree from Clarion University in Clarion, PA, a Master’s degree from Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona, and a doctorate degree from George Peabody College, Vanderbilt University in Nashville, TN.

Dr. Martin has spent a great deal of time working with The Arc of the United States, a community-based organization advocating for and serving people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families. He has worked with the United States chapter as well as the North Carolina and Pitt County chapters. During his time with The Arc, he held several leadership positions, such as the state president of the North Carolina chapter and the Vice President of the Southeast Region – ARC/US.

Locally, he has worked with the Pitt County Mental Health Association, including serving as president (1989-90), vice president (1988) and treasurer (1986-87). He is currently the chairman of The Arc of North Carolina’s Life Guardianship Program for the Eastern North Carolina region.

Dr. Rhea Miles and Dr. Scott Rawls awarded National Institute of Health Grant

Dr. Rhea Miles

Dr. Rhea Miles, Associate Professor -Science Education, Department of Mathematics, Science and Instructional Technology Education and Dr. Scott Rawls, ECU Alumnus and Associate Professor of Pharmacology in the Center for Substance Abuse Research at Temple University have been awarded a four-year, $1,012,071.00 grant entitled Planarians and the Pharmacology of Addiction: An In Vivo Model for K-12 Education.

The project engages K-12 teachers and  students together with health care professionals, pharmacists, and scientists in the study of the pharmacological effects of addictive drugs and the behavior patterns that emerge during recreational and addictive drug use, using curricula and laboratory activities designed to meet the National Science Education Standards. Congratulations Dr. Miles and Dr. Rawls.

NCTQ Recognizes ECU Teacher Quality

By Jane Dail

Thursday, June 19, 2014

A nationwide study of college teaching prep programs ranked one East Carolina University program among the top 15.

The National Council on Teaching Quality (NCTQ) released its second annual Teacher Prep Review this week after analyzing 2,400 elementary, secondary and special education programs at 1,127 institutions across the country.

ECU’s undergraduate special education program ranked 12th in the nation, tying with Fort Hayes State University’s undergraduate elementary education program, Montclair State University’s graduate secondary education program, and Austin Peay State University’s undergraduate secondary education program.

Kathi Wilhite — chairwoman of the department of special education, foundations and research in ECU College of Education — said she is proud of the recognition the program received.

“This recognition is a reflection of the dedicated professionals within the department who work tirelessly to conduct research and teach relevant practices to pre-service teacher candidates,” Wilhite said. “Our goal is to provide educational and practical experiences that will positively impact classrooms and services for individuals with disabilities.”

The undergraduate special education program has two areas — general curriculum and adapted curriculum — and about 200 students overall.

Wilhite said the nine key standards for special education are selection criteria, early reading, elementary mathematics, content for special education, classroom management, student teaching, instructional design for special education, outcomes and rigor.

ECU’s undergraduate elementary education program also ranked 188, tying with 13 other programs. The university’s undergraduate secondary education program ranked 356, which was tied with 11 other institutions’ programs.

NCTQ President Kate Walsh said in a Tuesday phone conference that the study helps to expand the national conversation on teacher quality

Walsh said though there are several areas of teaching that need improvement, there has been marked progress in reading instruction, classroom management and student teaching.

To view the entire report, visit www.nctq.org.

Contact Jane Dail at jdail@reflector.com or 252-329-9585.

Courtesy of ECU’s The Daily Clips blog.

Journal of Curriculum and Instruction Issue Published

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Dr. Sharilyn Steadman, Assistant Professor in the Department of Literacy Studies, English Education and History Education, is the lead editor of the latest issue of JoCI.

The editorial team of the Journal of Curriculum and Instruction is delighted to announce publication of a new special topic issue, Performance Assessment of Pre-Service and In-Service Educators. Sharilyn C. Steadman is the lead editor for this issue. It is available at http://www.joci.ecu.edu. We invite you to review the Table of Contents here and then visit our web site to review articles and items of interest.

The Point of View, “Assessment of Pre-Service and In-Service Teachers,” offers a brief historical perspective of previous reform movements and situates more recent reforms, with a focus on the efficacy of in-service teachers and teacher education programs and their teacher candidates, within the broader contextual view of educational transformation.

The invited lead article is “Driving Blind: Why We Need Standardized Performance Assessment in Teacher Education.” Peck, Singer-Gabella, Sloan, and Lin put forward a compelling argument for the benefits of adopting standardized, common assessments for teacher candidates. Three articles in Practitioner Platform offer descriptions of innovations within pre-service teacher programs. Shaffer describes a locally constructed teacher candidate assessment instrument. Vostal and colleagues provide a step-by-step guide for special education candidates who use a Response to Intervention model and edTPA. Cuthrell and colleagues offer an account of a program revision that included data collection and analysis, innovative strategy use, and ongoing assessment. Finally, the Perspective article by Donovan and colleagues questions the degree to which large scale accountability reports are useful in identifying links between teacher program candidates’ performances in P-12 classrooms and the courses or program areas that shaped those performances and recommend instead a systems-based approach.

The American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education selected JoCI’s editorial board as the recipient of the 2010 Edward C. Pomeroy Award for Outstanding Contributions to Teacher Education. Please share this free, open-access resource with interested colleagues and students.

Currently the Journal of Curriculum and Instruction is indexed in EBSCOHosts, Directory of Open Access Journals, Cross Reference, BrowZine, Google Scholar, and Cabell’s Directories of Publishing Opportunities.

www.joci.ecu.edu

COE Faculty Member Receives $472,000 NC Quest Award

bullock

Dr. Ann Bullock, chair of the Department of Elementary and Middle Grades Education, is partnering with NC Quest to expand the NC New Teacher Support Program.

Dr. Ann Bullock, Chair of the Department of Elementary and Middle Grades Education, received an NC-QUEST award of $472,394 titled Integrating Neuroscience into Mathematics Instruction (INMI). INMI continues the partnership with UNC-GA New Teacher Support Program (NTSP) and extends it to the Harriott College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Mathematics.

The INMI pilot project consists of an intensive scientifically-based professional development program designed to assist beginning teachers to become highly knowledgeable and pedagogically skilled in leading students to mastery of the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics. The INMI pilot project will target elementary schools in Edgecombe County and Hertford County that have been identified as among the lowest performing in the state.

The project will recruit thirty beginning teachers to participate in a year-long professional development program designed to increase their knowledge of the Common Core Standards for Mathematical practice, brain-compatible elements of mathematics instruction, brain-compatible instructional strategies, and whole-brain teaching techniques.

The INMI extends the professional development offerings currently provided by the NC NTSP, which include an institute/boot camp, six days of professional development, and ongoing instructional coaching. INMI teachers will attend an extended summer session at the beginning of the academic year, Saturday sessions and site-based sessions at their schools during the academic year, and a summer session at the conclusion of the academic year.

In addition, participating teachers will receive weekly on-site support from NC NTSP Instructional Coaches and monthly consultations from an ECU mathematics content expert. Through the integration of neuroscience in mathematics instruction, beginning teachers will be better equipped to engage diverse learners, offer effective feedback that leads to deeper understanding, create a rich learning environment that attends to students’ social and emotional needs, and ensure that students’ mathematical achievement is reflective of their true abilities.

ECU Awards Day: Several COE Faculty Recognized

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Several College of Education faculty were honored and recognized ECU’s Founders Day Awards presentation held on April 30 in Hendrix Theatre. UNC Board of Governors member and ECU alumnus Bob Rippy presented the Board of Governors Award for Excellence in Teaching, the highest teaching award given by the board, to Dr. Abbie Brown.

awardsdaybrown

An online-only instructor, Brown teaches graduate-level courses to current or aspiring educators aiming to improve their ability to teach and create instructional materials. “This means I have to model the best teaching practices for a sophisticated and critical group,” he said. Results from Brown’s Google Glass video recording is available: Google Glass View of ECU University Awards Day.

The Board of Governors Distinguished Professor for Teaching Award recognizes and supports excellent teaching at each of the 16 constituent universities in the UNC system.  Two COE recipients were selected:

  • Dr. Kylie Dotson-Blake, Department of Higher, Adult and Counselor Education. Dr. Dotson-Blake was also a finalist for the ECU Alumni Association Award for Outstanding Teaching.
  • Dr. Allen O. Guidry, Department of Literacy Studies, English Education and History Education. Dr. Guidry was nominated for three awards.

The 2013-14 College of Education recipient of the Scholar-Teacher Award:

  • Dr. Steven W. Schmidt, Department of Higher, Adult, and Counselor Education

Other College of Education award nominees and recipients for 2013-14 are as follows:

  • Dr. Brian Housand, Department of Elementary and Middle Grade Education, was awarded the Max Ray Joyner Award for Faculty Service Through Distance Education.
  • Dr. Caitlin Ryan, Department of Literacy, English, and History Education, was a finalist for the ECU Alumni Association Award for Outstanding Teaching.
  • Dr. Al Jones, Department of Information Library Science, was inducted into the Servire Society.

The full story by ECU News Services is  available in addition to a photo gallery of the event.

MATE Student Wins Teacher-Leader Grant

Tomika Altman-Lewis receives 2014-2015 MET Emerging Teacher-Leaders in Elementary School Mathematics Grant from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. She will be providing professional development for teachers at Burton Magnet Elementary School.

Burton

Mathematically Speaking: Best Practices for Teachers and Students
Tomika R. Altman-Lewis, Burton Magnet Elementary School, Durham, North Carolina

Elementary teachers are faced with the challenge of being “experts” in not just one subject area, but in multiple subjects. Often this results in being a novice in one area; which is especially daunting when we are equipped with the task of developing the mathematical foundation for all higher level mathematics. We are our students first introduction to mathematics in which they either learn to love or loath mathematics. More often than not, professional development is geared toward literacy with little to no emphasis on mathematics. Considering this, the purpose of this grant is to equip fourth and fifth grade elementary teachers at my school with much needed professional development. Teachers will participate in sessions that will expose them to best practices and strategies while deepening their mathematical reasoning and understanding in an effort to more effectively teach our students while allowing me to further develop my math leadership skills.