Category Archives: Faculty News

astronomy festival

ECU faculty inspire science on National Mall

Summers are warm but certainly not lazy for ECU faculty. Many ECU Faculty use this time as an opportunity to reach beyond the campus and inspire and excite people of all ages in learning and doing science.

In Washington D.C. the annual Astronomy Festival on the National Mall, hosted by Hofstra University and funded by NASA through the Music and Astronomy Under the Stars program is one such opportunity that engages an estimated 10,000 people.

Dr. Sharon Schleigh, faculty member in the Department of Mathematics, Science & Instructional Technology Education (MSITE) was invited to join a group of astronomers from the nation’s foremost scientific institutions, organizations and universities to present exciting demonstrations and answer questions about the latest astronomical discoveries or careers in science.

The annual event begins during the daylight hours by engaging visitors to the National Mall in hands-on astronomy activities, demonstrations and presentations. Visitors have opportunities to use solar telescopes, watch planetarium shows, and ask astronomers questions about topics of interest and possible career choices. Visitors continue to join the event late into the evening and as the day progresses to night, astronomers set up a variety of large telescopes across the Washington D.C. National Mall to allow participants to view local objects in the night sky such the Moon, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn; and spectacular objects such as colorful double stars, star clusters that sparkle like diamonds on black velvet, and some favorite nebulae such as Orion Nebula, the Ring Nebula and the Dumbbell Nebula.

“Bringing astronomy to the National Mall and partnering with astronomical organizations gives us a very special opportunity to encourage children to pursue their interest in science or math and to promote public understanding of science,” said Dr. Lubowich. “Gazing at the rings of Saturn or the Moon’s craters captures the imagination, no matter how old you are.”

Participating Science Organizations: American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Association of Physics Teachers, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Carnegie Institution for Science, Celestial Chart, Center of Physics & Astronomy Education Research, E-planetarium/Discovery Dome, International Dark Sky Association, NASA – Goddard Space Flight Center, Lunar and Planetary Institute, National Center for Earth and Space Science Education, National Radio Astronomy Observatory, National Science Foundation, Naval Research Laboratory, #Popscope, Society of Physics Students, Space Telescope Science Institute, US Naval Observatory, and the Washington Area Astronomy Meetup.

Participating Colleges and Universities: American University, Catholic University of American, East Carolina University, Georgetown University, George Mason University, George Washington University, Montgomery College, Rice University.

Participating Astronomy clubs and related organizations: Amateur Observers’ Society of New York, Astronomical Association of Greenbelt, Goddard Astronomy Club, National Capital Astronomers, Northern Virginia Astronomy Club, Rappahannock Astronomy Club, and the Society of Amateur Radio Astronomers.

Organizations that have supported the AFNM to spread the word to their members and the public via social media include: the American Astronomical Society, American Geophysical Union, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Association of Science-Technology Centers, Astronomers Without Borders, Astronomical League, Astronomical Society of the Pacific/Night Sky Network, Astronomy Magazine, National Academies of Science, Marian Koshland Science Museum, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, National Science Teachers Association, Nerd Nite DC, Sky and Telescope Magazine, Sidewalk Astronomers, Society for Science & the Public.

Miles and Rawls-

COE grant educates students on the science of drug abuse

Tonya Little presentationThe Science Education Against Drug Abuse Partnership (SEADAP) program aims to expose students from 6th through 12th grade to the real-world applications of the scientific method in order to teach them about drug addiction.

Now in its third year, the SEADAP program continues to implement hands-on curriculum educating students about the science of drug addiction and the adverse effects of widely abused substances while exposing students in research activities to increase their interest in STEM careers.

Students are led in the design of their own experiments on planaria, a type of flatworm, with Teachersnicotine, alcohol, and sucrose solutions to conduct investigations from lab manuals that specifically address the National Science Education Standards & Common Core, while building partnerships with medical scientists, addiction specialists and professional educators, to educate the general public about drug abuse.

ECU recently hosted a group of educators from Pitt, Martin and Lenoir county public schools, continuing to expand the SEADAP program into North Carolina’s STEM curriculum.

Rawls with teachersECU is collaborating with Temple University on this project. Dr. Scott Rawls of Temple is the co- principal investigator, and Dr. Rhea Miles of ECU is the co-principal investigator.

Teachers will be working with high school students from Pitt, Martin, and Lenoir counties to conduct research investigations at ECU to study the effect of nicotine, caffeine, alcohol and sucrose on planaria under the direction of Miles in the Department of Mathematics, Science, and Instructional Technology Education in the College of Education.

Teachers will also work with students to study the effects of drug addiction on flatworms through the SEADAP grant.

For more information on the SEADAP Program contact Dr. Rhea Miles at 252-328-9366 or milesr@ecu.edu.

EQUIPPED group 2[1]

EQUIPPED Scholars AT Summer Institute a huge success!

The Irene Howell Assistive Technology (IHAT) Center and EQUIPPED grant Co-Principal Investigators, Drs. Alana Zambone and Christopher Rivera, hosted the Assistive Technology (AT) Summer Institute during the week of July 18-22, 2016. The EQUIPPED Summer Institute was developed as a week-long professional development for seven graduate students through the OSEP Personnel Prep grant: EQUIPPED: Engendering High Quality Personnel Preparation for Educators Serving Students with Significant Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. The EQUIPPED grant is designed to prepare initially licensed teachers (B.S.) and teacher-leaders in Special Education and Assistance Technology for NC schools and communities. The teacher-leader goal of the grant provides special educators with tuition and other financial support to complete their MAEd in Special Education – Low Incidence Disabilities Licensure Area and the Graduate Certificate in Assistive Technology (AT). The participating EQUIPPED Scholars were Sara Farwell, Sara Graves, Katie Hancock, Morgan Kennedy, Jillian Kime, Brittney Roper, and April Vernon.EQUIPPED group web

With a focus on assistive technology and best practices for working with students with significant disabilities, the institute started with an expert panel discussion of two district level assistive technology teams- Alamance Burlington Schools represented by Pat Byers, Amy Chinnici, and Sara Hammond; and Winston Salem/Forsyth County Schools represented by Cindy Hall, Emma Sidden, Jennifer Kerr, and Adam Seipel. The teams shared their leadership journeys in their respective fields of education, speech language pathology, occupational therapy, and instructional technology. Furthermore, they discussed system processes and procedures that are used in their counties and tips for working collaboratively with other educators and related service personnel in the area of assistive technology. The following three days of the institute allowed for in-depth expertise training in the area of augmentative and alternative communication, which was facilitated by Lisa Erwin-Davidson of the Center for Literacy and Disability Studies at UNC-Chapel Hill; AT for literacy, which was facilitated by Dr. Pamela Mims from East Tennessee State University; and AT for Math, which was facilitated by Dr. Melissa Hudson of East Carolina University and Julie Brickhouse of Pitt County Schools. In addition to the expert speakers, assistive technology vendors from Attainment and Tobii Dynavox also shared new technologies in AT. The EQUIPPED participants worked on a cumulative project throughout the week of trainings and completed presentations to their peers on the final day of the institute.

The EQUIPPED graduate scholars will return to their schools and communities to engage in AT assignments over the next academic year, including mentoring of new teachers, conducting professional development, and engaging in other leadership activities under the guidance of Dr. Laura King, Director of the IHAT Center, and Dr. Chris Rivera, Co-PI on EQUIPPED. The Summer Institute allowed the scholars to network with their peers in the cohort, as well as a variety of AT experts who work in assistive technology in a variety of capacities. A second EQUIPPED Summer Institute will take place in 2018 for the next cohort of EQUIPPED Scholars.

Instructor Jose Gregory of Dunwoody, GA, leads the AP US History session during the 2016 APSI.

2016 AP Summer Institute a huge success!

The College of Education’s Center for STEM Education hosted the 2016 AP Summer Institute (APSI) at South Central High School in Greenville June 27 – June 30.   More than 120 educators from across the state and country attended this year’s APSI, which is more than double the amount of participation from last year.

“This is the fourteenth year that ECU’s College of Education has hosted the AP Summer Institute,” said APSI Director, Dr. Lori Flint. “Our goal is to train highly qualified teachers to bring more rigor to their classrooms and expose more students in rural areas to AP courses.”

Flint attributed the increase in participation to the addition four new AP sessions: AP US History, AP Psychology, AP English Language and AP English Literature. Previous APSI’s offered only STEM AP sessions including: AP Biology, AP Calculus AB, AP Chemistry, AP Environmental Science, AP Physics 1 and AP Statistics.087A1418

“AP courses enhance student skills and better prepare them for college-level work,” added APSI Coordinator Ann McClung. “First-year college students who have taken these classes are much better writers than students who were never exposed to AP coursework.”

Each session is four-days long and is taught by a certified College Board consultant who has taught the AP course, served as an exam reader for several years and received additional training from the College Board.

Participants pay $575 for 30 hours of intensive training over four days. The fee for the non-residential institute covers training materials, snacks and lunch. The ECU APSI is a College Board endorsed non-residential summer institute.087A1392

“Our consultants have been unbelievable,” said Flint. “The sessions have been so engaging our participants hardly take time for snacks or lunch. They are not only getting expert advice on how to prepare students for AP exams they are also networking and learning about best practices from their peers.”

ECU College of Education CSTEM AP Summer Institute

  • AP Biology – Instructor, Tom Willis of Saint Simons Island, GA
  • AP Calculus AB – Instructor, Deb Castello of Orlando, FL
  • AP Chemistry – Instructor, Linda Kruegel of Hertfort, NC
  • AP Environmental Science – Instructor, Gordon Chenery of Nashville, TN
  • AP Physics 1 – Instructor, Jiang Yu of Fitchburg, MA
  • AP Statistics – Instructor, Gloria Barrett of Pittsboro, NC
    NEW for 2016
  • AP US History – Instructor, Jose Gregory of Dunwoody, GA
  • AP English LanguageInstructor, Terry W. Filippo of Clemson, SC
  • AP English Literature Instructor, Patricia Whyte of Bluffton, SC
  • AP Psychology Instructor, Nancy Fenton of Trevor, WI

Above –  Instructor Jose Gregory of Dunwoody, GA, leads the AP US History session during the 2016 APSI.

SODM Credential Group Spring 2016

COE Adult Education Program partners with School of Dental Medicine

The COE Adult Education Program has partnered with the School of Dental Medicine on a program to provide adult education courses to School of Dental Medicine faculty.  SODM Faculty in this photo completed three graduate-level courses in adult education over the past year, and each earned a graduate credential in Education in the Healthcare Professions.  All are continuing with their coursework to complete a graduate certificate in Education in the Healthcare Professions.  This partnership was organized up by Dr. Steve Schmidt, Associate Professor of Adult Education, and Drs. Geri Crane and Jo Anne Murray at the SODM.    

Pictured (L to R):  Dr. Steve Schmidt, with students Dr. Michael Webb, Dr. Angela Broome, Dr. Wally McCarlie, Dr. Paul Lindauer, Dr. Nisha Ganesh; Dr. Scott Glass, Chair of the IDP Department, and Dr. Greg Chadwick, Dean of the SODM.

 

Crystal Chambers

Chambers Awarded Distinguished Graduate Faculty Mentor

College of Education’s Dr. Crystal Chambers in the Department of Educational Leadership was selected as this year’s winners of the 4th Annual ECU Distinguished Graduate Faculty Mentor Award. These two awardees were recognized during Research and Creative Activities Week.

Students and faculty colleagues nominated many outstanding individuals. A selection committee of faculty and students reviewed nomination materials and awardees were selected based on evidence of success as mentors, which was demonstrated in the nomination letters, and the nominees’ mentoring statements.

Dr. Chambers recognized for her success in mentoring graduate students in their intellectual growth; helping them develop independent research interests; and fostering development of their communication skills, interpersonal skills, research skills, and professional skills.

Manning-Tripp

Dionna Manning and Sherry Tripp Honored at CREED Ceremony

East Carolina University has a yearly CREED recognition ceremony to honor one faculty member, one staff member, and three students in each of its four pillars of excellence: Integrity, Diversity, Responsibility, and Citizenship. We are proud to announce that two College of Education members were award recipients.

In the area of Integrity, Mrs. Sherry Tripp won the staff member award. In the area of Diversity, Dr. Dionna Manning won the faculty award. Both of these Office of Educator Preparation personnel exemplify the traits honored by the Creed Awards.

The East Carolina Creed

In the pursuit of educational excellence, responsible stewardship, and intellectual freedom, the community of scholars at East Carolina University is committed to learning at the highest level. Founded in the tradition of service and leadership, members of our academic society exemplify high standards of professional and personal conduct at all times.

As an East Carolinian…

  • I will carry out personal and academic integrity.
  • I will respect and appreciate the diversity of our people, ideas, and opinions.
  • I will be thoughtful and responsible in my words and actions.
  • I will engage in purposeful citizenship by serving as a positive role model.

Adherence to these moral principles is the obligation of every East Carolinian on and off campus. In doing so, our individual freedom to learn and a pledge to serve will be preserved.

Levy Brown

Class of 2016 ECU 40 under 40 – 3 named in College of Education

Dr. Kylie Dotson-Blake, Levy Brown and Shawn Moore, were recently named as members of the Class of 2016 ECU 40 Under 40.

Dotson-Blake is an Associate Professor in the College of Education and Counselor Education Program Coordinator.  She received her BS in Health and Human Performance from East Carolina University in 2000 and her Masters of Arts in Education in 2002.

Brown is the Dean of Arts & Sciences at Lenoir Community College.  He received his undergraduate degree from East Carolina University in 2002.  He will receive his EDD in Educational Leadership on May 6, 2016.

Moore earned his BS in General Biology from ECU in 2001 and his Masters in Cell Biology in 2004.  He is currently pursuing his EDD in Educational Leadership while serving as the Interim Director of the College of education’s STEM Center.

In April of 2015, the Division of Student Affairs of East Carolina University premiered the 40 Under 40 Leadership Awards. This award was created in an effort to recognize emerging leaders that received their start at East Carolina University, as well as those who have used their ECU experience to make an impact in their respective professions, local communities and on the world.

The Class of 2016 40 Under 40 was honored at the 2nd Annual Division of Student Affairs Corporate & Leadership Awards Banquet on April 16, 2016.

http://www.ecu.edu/sadevelopment/40under40/2016Class.cfm.

Dr. James McKernan

Dr. James McKernan receives $1,000.00 stipend from the J.Y. Joyner Library

Dr. James McKernan, Department of Special Education, Foundations and Research has received a $1,000.00 stipend from the J.Y. Joyner Library to develop an alternative text for use in his Foundations Area courses. The primary goal of this program is to reduce costs for students. Congratulations Dr. McKernan!

Taylor Carangi Paige Anderson LMU Presentation

IHAT Center Presentation at Loyola Marymount University

The Irene Howell Assistive Technology [IHAT] Center was invited to do a virtual presentation at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles.

The presentation was facilitated by IHAT Center Co-Manager, Taylor Carangi and IHAT staff member, Paige Anderson, both ECU Special Education majors, via Skype on April 26, 2016. It offered a virtual tour of the IHAT Center and an introduction to assistive technology and universal design for learning.

The presentation was given to general education and special education pre-service teachers who are in an early field experience course taught by Dr. Vicki Graf at Loyola Marymount University.

The IHAT crew members did a phenomenal job sharing information and fielding questions about our special education program here at ECU, assistive technology, universal design for learning, and processes for determining AT selection for individuals with disabilities.