Category Archives: Faculty News

child_and_books

MLS Students at ECU Collect over 5,800 Books for the Needy

The end of each year is a time for many traditions, from caroling to trimming the tree to making a gingerbread house to pausing to give thanks, and the East Carolina University Master of Library Science program has developed and added its own tradition to the mix by annually completing a Holiday Book Drive. For ten years, the ECU American Library Association (ALA) Student Chapter has completed a book drive to help put over 25,000 books in the hands of willing but needy readers throughout North Carolina. The ECU MLS students take advantage of the fact they study in a Distance Education program and spread the good cheer of charitable literacy throughout several communities in the region.

Over 5,800 books were collected and donated to non-profit organizations, church programs for struggling families, schools, shelters, daycares, and food pantries.

This December, the ECU MLS program saw its faculty, current students, and alumni to work jointly in efforts to complete these collections. Many of the MLS students and alumni used the Annual Book Drive as an opportunity to include students in collection and donation, helping incorporate character education into school programs.

Kevin Vickers, an ECU alumnus and the librarian of Sun Valley Elementary in Monroe, NC, coordinated with a fourth grade teacher in his school to collect over 300 books and donate them to Turning Point of Union County, a shelter for victims of domestic abuse. Ever aware of the importance of technology and social media, Mr. Vickers posted information about the drive on his school’s Facebook site and watched the donations pour in. Parents and students asked if they could turn in books for all ages, and Vickers enthusiastically agreed. He excitedly reported that plenty of children and adult women were finding their reading needs met through the collection, and, asking “how cool is that?,” he was ecstatic to find several of the donations were in Spanish.

Kimberly Marone, the media coordinator of Holly Tree Elementary in Wilmington, NC, gathered over 125 titles as she and her students donated books to a local church program that provides services to families facing hardships. These books provide welcome relief and diversions in troubling times, as the gift of literacy and the opportunity for continued reading is an ever-welcome present.

Vanessa Taylor, a librarian currently completing her MLS through ECU, oversaw a donation project run by a Boy Scout throughout Onslow County. While her school (Dixon Elementary) donated over 200 books, the entire drive throughout the county brought in 4,700 total volumes. The young man clearly earned his merit badge by creating and maintaining fourteen collection sites around Jacksonville and Sneads Ferry and donating them to the Onslow County Partnership for Children. As Ms. Taylor said, his work was “quite amazing.”

Knowing that one of the strongest ways to support and increase literacy is within the community, with students helping students, Mary Tobin and her colleagues and students at Topsail Middle School collected 300 “gently used books” to donate to their local elementary schools. This middle school project proved and supported the idea that it takes a village, as older students gave the gift of reading to younger ones.

Hugh Davis, an MLS student in ECU’s program and an English teacher at CS Brown High School in Winton, NC, turned to his school’s Literary and Beta Clubs to complete the drive. Though CS Brown is a small school, with only 52 students this year, it collected 400 books and donated them to the Baptist Children’s Home. This shelter was selected by the students, who felt empowered through the process. Davis, the ECU ALA Chapter President, said that working alongside the students made the process even more meaningful, and he was thrilled to see the students take the initiative to research an appropriate donation site and to organize and coordinate their community’s efforts.

Not to be outdone or left out, the ECU MLS faculty continued their tradition of contributing to the Annual Book Drive by collecting and donating 19 books the Little Willie Center in Greenville, NC.

While many traditions abound at this time of year, one of the most rewarding is definitely the ECU MLS program’s Annual Book Drive. The ALA Chapter counts this year as a success and hopes to have as much participation next year.

Hugh Davis, President
ECU American Library Association Student Chapter

MBHLI Literacy Leaders

Spring 2016 Margaret Blount Harvey Literacy Institute

East Carolina University’s College of Education Reading Faculty hosted the spring 2016 Margaret Blount Harvey Literacy Institute on Saturday, January 30, 2016, for pre-service and in-service teacher educators from the Latham Clinical Schools Network, a privately funded partnership program that supports the enhancement of 39 school systems in eastern North Carolina.  The Margaret Blount Harvey Institutes are possible through the generosity of Felix and Margaret Harvey, and daughters Leigh McNairy and Sunny Burrows.

Targeting the Margaret Blount Harvey Literacy Leaders Board and undergraduate students in the College of Education, this working session provided opportunities for substantial and substantive work focused on literacy and literacy development.  Two sessions were held one for the Literacy Leaders Board and one for undergraduate College of Education students.

Dr. Elizabeth Swaggerty and Dr. Anne Ticknor led the session for the Literacy Leaders Board. Dr. Christy Howard and Dr. Ran Hu helped facilitate the work which focused on the current state of literacy instruction in public schools, the issues and challenges that literacy leaders and teachers face and importantly, session offered an opportunity to share concrete strategies for addressing challenges and moving forward.

Pre-service educators review the development and progression of literacy skills and instruction needed to be successful on the Foundations of Reading test.

Pre-service educators engaged in reviewing the development and progression of literacy skills and instruction needed to be successful on the Foundations of Reading test.

The session for students led by Dr. Kim Anderson, Dr. Johna Faulconer, Dr. Caitlin Ryan with support from Ms. Jean Gore and Ms. Tanya Cannon included a solid review of the development and progression of literacy skills and instruction needed to be successful on the Foundations of Reading test required for licensure in North Carolina.  Dr. Katherine Misulis, Chair of the Department of Literacy Studies, English Education, and History Education, said “While the session for students focused on insuring a solid knowledge base in preparation for the North Carolina Foundations of Reading test, in reality, the session did so much more.  It truly helped our future teachers become more prepared to teach and reinforce literacy skills, and with today’s session, particularly those early literacy skills and strategies focusing on word recognition and identification.”

MBHLI Foundations

Literacy Studies Undergraduates following their working session at the 2016 Margaret Blount Harvey Literacy Institute on Saturday, January 30.  Pictured at the top of the page: Literacy Leaders.

The next Margaret Blount Harvey Literacy Institute will be held September 24, 2016 in Greenville, NC.

President's Award3

Drs. Rhodes and Schmidt receive President’s Appreciation Award from AAACE

Dr. Christy Rhodes, Assistant Professor of Adult Education, and Dr. Steve Schmidt, Associate Professor of Adult Education, were both recipients of the 2015 President’s Appreciation Award at the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education’s (AAACE) annual conference in Oklahoma City, OK, November 17-20, 2015.  The President’s Appreciation Award honors people who have exemplified outstanding contributions to the Association during the past year.  Both Drs. Rhodes and Schmidt served on the AAACE Board of Directors in 2015.

Crystal Chambers

Drs. Chambers and Ransom co-author article on “Teaching Ethics in Higher Education”

In “Teaching Ethics in Higher Education Using the Values – Issues – Action (VIA) Model,” LEED Professor Dr. Crystal Chambers, along with co-author Hellen Ransom present a model through which higher education leaders can consider the values they have and whether their actions align with those values as they deal with issues. Dr. Chambers currently teaches courses on law and ethics for students in the higher education concentration of the doctoral program in educational leadership. For the past two years, Dr. Chambers has presented on the topic of teaching ethics in higher education to new faculty through an invited session by the Council for the Advancement Higher Education Programs (CAHEP) during the Association for the Study of Higher Education’s (ASHE) annual conferences. Dr. Ransom is an associate professor of bioethics. The two met through the university’s new faculty mentorship program offered through the office for faculty excellent, where Dr. Chambers serves as a faculty mentor.

A link to the article, published by the Journal for the Advancement of Postsecondary and Tertiary Edcuation is available here http://www.informingscience.org/Publications/2336

International Literacy Assoc

LEHE Faculty contribute to International Literacy Association Blog

Dr. Terry S. Atkinson, Associate Professor in the Department of Literacy Studies, English, and History Education, is a regular contributor to the International Literacy Association’s Teaching with Technology Blog.  Her most recent entry, “Inspiration and Motivation with Technology in the Midst of Constant Change” went live on January 8, 2016 and features research she conducted with LEHE colleague, Dr. Elizabeth Swaggerty.

http://www.literacyworldwide.org/blog/literacy-daily/2016/01/08/inspiration-and-motivation-with-technology-in-the-midst-of-constant-change

The International Literacy Association’s Teaching with Technology Blog is maintained by members of the Technology in Literacy Education Special Interest Group (TILE-SIG).

Crystal Chambers

Dr. Chambers named Faculty Coach for the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity

Dr. Crystal Renee Chambers was selected to be a Faculty Coach for the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity (NCFDD). NCFDD is a profesisonal development organization for faculty, graduate students, post-docs, and administrators with programming designed to support academics at each stage of their career. As a Faculty Coach, Dr. Chambers will support small groups of faculty at institutions nationwide as they embark towards developing habits of practice to boost productivity and work-life balance.

Tammy Lee

Dr. Tammy Lee Recognized as North Carolina’s Most Outstanding Science Leader

Dr. Tammy Lee received the Herman and Emma Gatling Award for Outstanding Leadership in Science Education from the North Carolina Science Leadership Association (NCSLA) on November 11, 2015 at the Fall 2015 NCSLA Membership Meeting in Winston Salem . As the recipient, she is recognized as North Carolina’s most outstanding science leader of 2015.  Congratulations, Dr. Lee!

Dr. Caitlin Ryan and co-presenter/co-author, Jill Hermann-Wilmarth of Western Michigan University

LEHE Faculty attend National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) Annual Convention

NCTE Annual Convention 2015The National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) held its annual convention November 19-22, 2015 in Minneapolis, MN.  With a membership of over 30,000, NCTE represents the entire range of individuals involved in fostering literacy skills of students from pre-school through doctoral programs.  Convention attendees mirrored the diversity of the membership and included PK-12 classroom teachers, administrators, teacher educators, researchers, and other policy makers. This year’s convention featured over 600 concurrent sessions that focused on timely topics critical to effective instruction and the future of English Language Arts (ELA).   Hundreds of vendors provided access to the most recent ELA publications and authors of children and young adult literature were present to discuss and sign their works.

English Education Associate Professor, Dr. Sharilyn Steadman, presented “Effectively Developing Expertise: Using Video to Hone Teacher Candidates’ Classroom Observation Skills.”  The session focused on the use of classroom videos in ENED 2123 and the observation skills that English Education teacher candidates develop as they observe, analyze, and discuss these videos before observing “live” classrooms. The teacher candidates’ abilities to transfer those observation skills from videos to classroom interactions was the highlight of the presentation.

Literacy Studies faculty member, Dr. Christy Howard presented “Strategies for Engaging Students in Content Area Literacy: A Look at Reading/Writing Connections in Social Studies.” This session focused on the role of content area literacy in classrooms. Specifically, Dr. Howard discussed how middle school teachers participating in the study used a variety of texts and strategies to engage students in social studies content with literacy activities. Strategies presented in the session represented an integration of literacy, history and technology across a range of topics.

Dr. Caitlin Ryan, also from the Literacy Studies program presented “Reading Jacqueline Woodson in Upper Elementary and Middle Grades Classrooms: Exploring LGBTQ Topics Through Her Novels and Picture Books”. This session considered the books of award-winning author Jacqueline Woodson as one way to make classrooms more inclusive of LGBTQ topics. Using lesson examples and student work samples from two 5th grade teachers’ classrooms, one of whom was a co-presenter of the session; presenters discussed ways to teach Woodson’s LGBT-inclusive books and ways to approach LGBT experiences indirectly through her books that address difference more generally.  They also explored how Woodson’s diverse characters can help readers understand ideas of intersectionality, or how characters have race AND class AND gender and other identities all at the same time.

Dr. Ryan also met with the LGBT Advisory Council, where she serves as a representative, and wrapped up her final term as NCTE’s GSEA (Gay/Straight Educators’ Alliance) chair. Dr. Ryan stepped down after leading that group for the past 5 years.

Image Caption: Dr. Caitlin Ryan and co-presenter/co-author, Jill Hermann-Wilmarth of Western Michigan University, at the GSEA table where they advertised GSEA-related sessions, displayed LGBTQ-inclusive literature, and encouraged people to become GSEA members

COE Seal - Feature Image

Drs. Howard and Guidry Present Research at CUFA and NCSS Annual Conferences

Two faculty members in the Department of Literacy Studies, English Education, and History Education, Dr. Christy Howard (Assistant professor in Reading Education) and Dr. Allen Guidry (Associate professor in History Education) recently presented research at the annual conferences of the College and University Faculty Assembly (CUFA) and the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS). At CUFA, Drs. Howard and Guidry presented a research paper entitled, Instructional Practices of Practicum Teacher Candidates in a Content Literacy and Social Studies Methods Co-teaching Environment.

This research arose from their collaborative project from spring 2015 where they co-taught a combined history teaching methods and content literacy course. Their qualitative research presented data that suggested that the co-taught course enhanced students’ recognition of the connection between history and literacy. Their research also suggested that both faculty and students found the co-taught university course to be an effective means for modeling and building collaboration among teacher candidates.

Dr. Howard commented, “While our purpose was to model the co-teaching process for our students, it was a tremendous benefit for me to collaborate with Dr. Guidry across disciplines.” At NCSS, Drs. Guidry and Howard teamed with a local high school teacher, Mrs. Jennifer Bryan at South Central HS, to present a new teaching strategy for analyzing and interpreting a variety of historical resources the team developed called SPACES. The presentation was entitled Civil Rights 360 – Viewing Complex Problems through Multiple Perspectives and presented an interactive website the team designed to guide high school students through an historical investigation.

Dr. Guidry noted of the reception of the presentation by NCSS attendees, “It was exciting to see so many teachers interested in this idea. The design team really wanted to create an engaging and academically rigorous approach to historical inquiry that all students could access. The feedback from the field trial of the method and from NCSS participants suggests that we are on the right track.”

COE Seal - Feature Image

NC New Teacher Support Coaches Provide Professional Development

Michelle Casey and April Shackleford provided professional development to the staff of the Lucille W. Gorham Intergenerational Community Center in November. The two North Carolina New Teacher Support Program coaches created an interactive workshop on classroom management for elementary students. The center staff was quite pleased with the best practices presented. The Lucille M. Gorham Intergenerational Center provides many services for the community, including an after school program for elementary and middle grades students.