Category Archives: Faculty News

MLS Faculty Celebratory Luncheon Feb 2015

ECU’s Master of Library Science Program Earns ALA Accreditation

It is with great pleasure that the East Carolina University Master of Library Science degree program is able to announce that their degree program is now accredited by the American Library Association (ALA).

ALA accredited sealALA accreditation provides students, and alumni who qualify, the ability to apply for library positions in any library setting. ALA accreditation is seen as essential to MLS graduates seeking employment in academic and public libraries. It is a required standard by the Association of College and Research Libraries. Graduating from an ALA-accredited program provides greater flexibility in the types of libraries that students and alumni can apply for and enhances career mobility. Most employers, except school libraries, require an ALA-accredited master’s for most professional level positions.

ALA accreditation indicates that the program has undergone a self-evaluation process, been reviewed by peers, and meets the Standards established by the American Library Association and Committee on Accreditation. Students currently in the program will receive an accredited degree upon graduation.

Alumni who graduated in 2013 and 2014 now have an accredited degree as well. However, for alumni who have graduated prior to 2013, the program cannot offer a path to altering their degree to become an accredited one, for example, taking an additional set of courses now that the program is accredited.

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From the TRC: Ronnie Barnes African-American Resource Collection

It’s Thursday, and another edition of From the TRC is published to highlight another service or resource the Teaching Resources Center in Joyner Library has to support the College of Education’s faculty and students. This week, it’s the Ronnie Barnes African-American Resource Collection.

Granted, it is Black History Month and that may be one reason why the Ronnie Barnes African-American Resource Collection is the subject of this week’s post. But, honestly, the main reason is to call attention to this valuable, yet underused resource in the Teaching Resources Center.

Allow me to back that statement up with numbers. So far this school year the Ronnie Barnes Collection has accounted for less than one (1) percent of the books circulated in the TRC. If that doesn’t sound small enough I’ll dig a little deeper into the statistics. Since July 2014, the TRC has accounted for 47%, on average, of Joyner Library’s monthly total circulation of books. What does that mean? Well, out of the 20,460 books that have been checked out from the TRC since July only 161 (0.7%) have come from the Ronnie Barnes Collection. Here’s why the collection is worth checking out any time of year:

Ronnie Barnes

Ronnie Barnes, ECU Class of ’75

Ronnie Barnes, an eastern North Carolina native, was the first graduate of ECU’s Sports Medicine program in 1975 and is the Senior Vice President of Medical Services and Head Athletic Trainer for the New York Giants of the National Football League. In 2002, he endowed a fund to develop and maintain a collection of materials written or illustrated by African-Americans, or about the African-American experience.

The children’s collection includes:

  • Coretta Scott King Award books
  • Caldecott Award books about African-Americans or by African-American authors or illustrators.
  • Newbery Award books about African-Americans or by African-American authors or illustrators.
  • Biographies of African-Americans for K12 students

Additionally, the adult collection contains all genres, from scholarly books  to general fiction. The adult collection is highlighted on an annual rotating basis. At the end of each year, these materials rotate out of the Ronnie Barnes Collection into Joyner Library’s general stacks.  The call numbers in the Ronnie Barnes Collection begin with “Barnes.”

For more resources to use in the classroom for Black History month click on these TRC and Joyner Library resources:

Not sure how to put these resources to use? Here are some lesson plan ideas for Black History Month from the National Education Association, Education World, Scholastic, Smithsonian Education, National Endowment for the Humanities, AfricanAmericanHistoryMonth.gov, African-American History Through the Arts, and PBS.

Until next time. – Dan Z. in the TRC

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College of Education Graduate Recognition Ceremony – May 9, 2015

The College of Education Graduate Recognition Ceremony is scheduled for 3:00 p.m. on Saturday, May 9, 2015 in Williams Arena at Minges Coliseum. The faculty and staff of the College of Education are pleased to present a special Graduate Recognition Ceremony (GRC) for our graduates. The ceremony will feature individual recognition of College of Education students receiving degrees. Friends and families of the graduates are cordially invited to attend. It is not necessary for graduates or guests to RSVP for this event. Tickets are not required to attend the ceremony.

For University Commencement Ceremony details and information about the ECU Commencement Weekend, please visit http://www.ecu.edu/commencement.

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Week 5 – Tips for Tests in Blackboard – 2/9/15

Giving your tests using Blackboard is a great option whether you have a seated, hybrid or online class. Tests given in Blackboard allow for many question types that are self-grading, which can make your life much easier and save a lot of time. Plus you can get statistics on the questions and the results. This can help you to identify a possible bad question. As great as tests are in Blackboard, there are a couple of tips you want to keep in mind when setting up your test.

  1. Always time your tests – You do not want to allow students to work on a test for more than a reasonable amount of time. The amount of time will vary depending on the question types. In Blackboard, once the time expires, the test does not stop and will record the amount of time given versus the amount of time taken.
  2. Don’t make your tests too long – Having a test that is over an hour long is really unrealistic – even an hour long exam is stretching it. If you have a lot of material to cover, why not break it down into multiple exams? Maybe a 2 hour exam broken into 30 minute chunks. This will give the students an opportunity to take a break every so often without being penalized.
  3. Turn Force Completion off – This option is often misunderstood. Instead of using Force Completion, set up a time limit. The way the time limit works is that once a student begins the test, their time starts. If the student exits the test for any reason – voluntary or otherwise – the time continues. So if a student works on a test for 15 minutes, then leaves and goes to work for 8 hours and then returns and completes the test in 45 minutes, the timer will show that it took 9 hours for the student to take the test. It is a misconception that the time stops on the test when the student comes out of the test. The benefit of using this feature though is the student could be kicked out of a test involuntarily, but can then go right back in and continue where he left off. With the test submission issues in Blackboard, this is something to definitely take advantage of.
  4. Randomize your questions and answers – If you use a set of questions, make sure you check to randomize the questions, so that everyone does not receive the questions in the same order. Even if you are randomly pulling questions from a large pool, there is a good chance that students will run into the same questions. If you at least randomize the answers, the order for multiple choice questions will at least be different (if you do though, remember the “none of the above” answer will need to be modified to something like “none of the other answers are correct.” Also, if you have several questions referring to a single image, make sure the image is included in each relevant question.
  5. Narrow Test Availability – When you are determining your start and end dates for a test, narrow the amount of time you give for the test to be taken, if at all possible, try to include at least one weekend day since many students work and/or have other classes. No more than 2-3 days should be adequate for all. You could even reduce it to one day or a certain time frame, but be sure to announce that on the first day of the semester, so arrangements can be made as necessary by the students.
  6. Do Not Reveal Answers – Set up the test so when a student completes an attempt, the score is the only thing shown. Once your classes, or all classes using the test, have completed the test, go back in and reveal whatever else you’d like to show them (correct answers, their answers, feedback, etc.).
  7. Use Exceptions – If you have students who require extra time, make it easy on yourself and set that up in the test options before you start a test. If you end up with a student who needs to take the test a second time, or on a date other than the dates you’ve specified, you can use these Availability Exceptions to allow it for a particular student or students without having to set up another version of the test that will confuse your gradebook and the rest of your class.
  8. Update Tests Regularly – Do not use the same tests each semester. There is no reason to believe students from one semester won’t share a test from another semester. Remove the effect this could have by regularly updating tests. Even if you don’t completely overhaul all of your questions, at least integrate some new questions and rework some of the old ones.
  9. Help Students Be Successful – There are several things you can do to help your students be successful when taking tests online. Following are some tips:
    • Encourage your students not to use Internet Explorer
    • Encourage your students to use a Wired Internet Connection
    • Tell your students not to double click and be patient
    • Tell your students not to use the Browser Refresh or Back buttons while taking a test
    • Tell your students not to use the Return/Enter key while taking the test except when typing an answer to an essay question
    • If giving essay questions, have the student type directly into the text box within the test rather than going into Word and copying and pasting into the test. Word brings in a lot of extra code that can cause problems within the test.
    • Advise your students to keep the window with the test active and not go to or open other windows.
    • Advise students to let the page load completely before starting to answer questions.
    • Advise students not to leave the exam until they have completed it. Even if Force Completion is turned off, time set for the exam will continue even if the exam is closed out.
    • Advise students when they finish an exam to click Submit only once.
  10. Grade by Question, not by Student – When the time comes to grade essay questions, take advantage of the option in the Grade Center at the top of the test column to Grade by Question.
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From the TRC: Distance Education & Award Winning Author, Duncan Tonatiuh

Distance Education

In this inaugural edition of From the TRC, the Teaching Resources Center would like to refresh the minds of the College of Education’s faculty, students and staff of our mission because it will also serve as the driving force behind this new weekly column:  The mission of the Teaching Resources Center is to facilitate teaching and learning initiatives by providing resources and services to educators at all levels.” [emphasis added]  It is my job to reach out to the College of Education and advertise the fact that the TRC’s collection and services does support educators at all levels.

With this in mind, it can be easy to forget about the needs of distance education students because they don’t physically walk through our doors on a regular basis, if ever. They may never even know the same resources and services we offer on-campus students are available to them. I earned my Master of Library and Information Science degree online, and experienced this exact scenario. Maybe it was because I was studying to become an academic librarian that the University felt I should already know these things or I would pick them up as I progressed through the program, but I never knew about document delivery, research consultations or even the research guides on the library’s website.

Here is a list of services and resources I hope all distance education students take advantage of:

Research Guides: We recently updated the Education Law and Educational Leadership guides and are working to update more.

Research Consultations: Something new! Students can contact me via FaceTime or Skype for a one-on-one session to help them with their specific research needs. Email Dan Zuberbier, to schedule an appointment.

Interlibrary Loan & Document Delivery: Need a book we don’t have? We can get it for you! Log into ILL with your PirateID and password to request a book. The same site will let you request document delivery where we will provide articles from our print and microform collections via email and will ship books and other media materials to you via UPS.

Cooperative Borrowing Agreements: As a DE student, you also have borrowing privileges at any UNC System library, plus a few others. Establish an account with Joyner Library to gain these privileges.  

Online Writing Lab: The Writing Center also provides assistance to DE students. Through consultations with a trained writing center consultant students can ask specific questions about their writing in any stage, from brainstorming to the final draft.


Duncan Tonatiuh

Duncan Tonatiuh

“Contemporary Codex:
Using the Past to Address the Present”

Saturday, February 21, 2015
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Joyner East, Room 201

The TRC is sponsoring a public presentation featuring award-winning children’s author and illustrator Duncan Tonatiuh (toh-nah-tyou) as he discusses how ancient art of the Americas influences his artwork. In addition, Mr. Tonatiuh will share how he looks at the past to address issues that affect children today, especially Latino children. Immigration and segregation are two crucial issues addressed in his works.

Born in Mexico City and raised in San Miguel de Allende, Duncan Tonatiuh graduated from Parsons The New School for Design and Eugene Lang College in New York City. His children’s books have won Tomás Rivera Mexican American Children’s Book Awards and Pura Belpré Awards.

Mr. Tonatiuh’s books will be available for purchase in the lobby of Joyner Library from 10:00am to 4:30pm, and he will be autographing books in the same location from 10:30am–1:00pm and 3:30pm – 4:30pm.

Award-winning book, Separate is Never Equal

Award-winning book, Separate is Never Equal

His latest work, Separate is Never Equal, was named an Honor Book by the Pura Belpré Illustrator Awards and received the same award from the Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Medal. This book, along with his other works, are available in the TRC.

You can learn more about Duncan Tonatiuh and his books on his official website, www.duncantonatiuh.com, and access interviews with and book readings by the author on TeachingBooks.net.

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Swaggerty’s Chapter Published in International Literacy Association’s Book

Elizabeth Swaggerty has recently had a chapter published in the newly released fourth edition of the International Literacy Association’s Children’s Literature in the Reading Program: Engaging Young Readers in the 21st Century. Swaggerty’s contributed chapter describes how teachers can support and select texts for upper elementary students who are reluctant to read or find reading difficult. She emphasizes the consideration of students’ preferences and reading abilities while simultaneously becoming familiar with a variety of high-interest texts and text types that are appropriate for this student population. A high-interest book list and teaching tips for supporting engaged reading are included. Elizabeth Swaggerty is an Associate Professor of reading education in the Department of Literacy Studies, English Education, and History Education.

Citation:
Swaggerty, E.A. (2015). Selecting Engaging Texts for Upper Elementary Students Who Avoid Reading or Find Reading Difficult. In D.A. Wooten & B.E. Cullinan (Eds.), Children’s Literature in the Reading Program: Engaging Young Readers in the 21st Century (4th ed., pp. 150–166). Newark, DE: International Literacy Association.

http://www.reading.org/general/Publications/Books/bk387

SafeAssign

Week 4 – Checking for Plagiarism with Blackboard – 2/2/15

We all know, of course, that no student would ever submit work that is not 100% their own. With that being said, there are times when it can be confusing to a student when pulling information from a source crosses the line from being a resource to plagiarizing. This is a great opportunity to use the SafeAssign tool in Blackboard as a learning tool, to allow students to submit work to allow them to see for themselves whether or not they have crossed that line before it even crosses the professor’s desk.

A SafeAssignment can be set up as a draft, so the student can submit a paper and see where problems may be and make corrections before submitting their final draft. When ready, the final draft can be submitted and the professor is at an advantage because he/she can focus on the content of the paper rather than on possible plagiarism issues since they will all be spelled out.

Truly all classes should have all papers submitted as SafeAssignments in Blackboard. Why, you ask. One of the most difficult types of plagiarism to catch is when it is local, meaning one student writes a paper for another. Each paper that is submitted via a SafeAssignment is automatically added to the local ECU pool. So, if a paper, or part of a paper, is submitted in a class, it will be flagged when it is submitted again.

Within the next few Blackboard upgrades, we should start to see the plagiarism feature integrated directly within a regular assignment, but unfortunately we aren’t quite there yet. Currently SafeAssignments don’t offer the same robust grading features that are available in regular assignments, so perhaps a combination of the two types of assignments are the best solution. Below is a video that explains the differences and shows how to use SafeAssign:

If you aren’t quite ready to have your entire class submit papers as SafeAssignments, but instead have one or two that have been submitted that are just bothering you, then you’ll be happy to know that instructors can go into Course Tools –> SafeAssign and use the DirectSubmit option to submit papers directly to SafeAssign.

I hope this information about the SafeAssign tool was useful to you. If you run into questions or problems throughout the semester with Blackboard, please take advantage of the COE Helpdesk.

Throughout the semester, the OAA-Instructional Technology Team will be offering Professional Development opportunities. For more information on these opportunities, please visit the COE Professional Development website. To register for any professional development sessions, please use Cornerstone.