Category Archives: for Teachers

Dan Zuberbier

Meet Dan Zuberbier: A Great Resource for Students, Faculty, and Educators in Eastern NC

Recently, the Joyner Library made a new addition specifically to benefit the College of Education. Dan Zuberbier was hired as the Education and Instructional Technologies Librarian in the Teaching Resource Center.

Like many academic librarians, Dan Zuberbier didn’t follow a straight path to the profession. While finishing his B.A. in History at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, he was an assistant baseball coach at Edgewood College, a small private college down the street from the UW. “Baseball had been the center of my life for as long as I could remember,” he said. “Since I wasn’t playing ball any more it made sense to try and break into the coaching ranks.” Unfortunately being an assistant coach at an NCAA Division III school wasn’t enough to pay the bills, and he picked up odd jobs to make ends meet.

Eventually, Dan decided he needed a more stable career path. “Working the equivalent of two full-time jobs to pay the bills took the fun out of coaching baseball,” and reflected on what he wanted to get out of a career. “I needed a career that fulfilled my intellectual curiosities, and, at the same time, provided opportunities to develop meaningful relationships with young adults as I had been able to do with my baseball players. Teaching seemed like a natural fit.”

Setting his sights on becoming a high school history teacher, he enrolled in Pima Community College’s online Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Education Program, moved to Arizona to complete his student teaching, and earned his teaching license. Yet, four years later, his career took another unexpected turn. “I was having a hard time building up my students’ research skills, so I reached out to who I thought was our school librarian,” he said. “She kindly informed me she was the library clerk and had no experience teaching students research skills.”

Saying he was surprised his high school, the largest school in the district, didn’t have a certified library media specialist on staff is putting it mildly. To make matters worse, soon after their initial conversation, the library clerk broke her foot and was out of work for a week. Zuberbier stated, “Because she wasn’t a certified teacher-librarian, the school was under no obligation to hire a substitute to keep the library open in her absence. I was speechless.” After being shut out of their library for an entire week, Zuberbier wondered what else his students were missing out on because the school did not have a certified teacher-librarian.

He dove head-first into researching the role a library media specialist should play on a high school campus and petitioned the school board to fund the position. His request was denied. The Superintendent argued that because the school was only four years old, its collection was ‘still so new’ and students had access to so many online resources the school didn’t need a certified librarian. It took another year for Zuberbier’s efforts to succeed, and, in the meantime, he began earning his Master in Library and Information Science (MLIS) through UW-Milwaukee. He was also able to earn his library media specialist endorsement, and became his school’s first certified teacher-librarian.

“Soon after I started my MLIS program, I knew I couldn’t stop being a teacher. But, I also realized I wanted to give myself the opportunity to have an impact on the profession as an advocate for school libraries and through my work as an education librarian,” Zuberbier said. Which is why he considers himself fortunate to be working in East Carolina University’s Teaching Resources Center. “This is my dream job. To not only work with pre-service teachers by teaching them about instructional technologies and what they should expect out of their school library when they enter the workforce, but also serve educators throughout eastern North Carolina is an awesome responsibility.”

Zuberbier is currently working on developing workshops for students and faculty around the basic functions and lesson planning around the use of SMART Boards. He is also looking to collaborate with COE faculty to develop a series of workshops for students that will cover current and emerging K12 instructional technologies that will take place during the Fall semester. He currently resides in the TRC, room 2504, and can be reached through email, zuberbierd14@ecu.edu, or by phone, 328-0406.

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History of ECU as a Teacher Preparation Institution

ECU has a proud heritage with a mission of teaching, research, and service. Its commitment to the region is an expression of its motto, “Servire,” or To Serve. Chartered in 1907 as East Carolina Teachers Training School (ECTTS), ECU has continually served the region with quality and commitment. In 1972, ECU joined the UNC System, becoming the third largest university in the system, and the College of Education (COE) is its founding college.

The Mission Statement was revised in 2014 to reflect ECU’s goal “To be a national model for student success, public service and regional transformation.” ECU is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) to award baccalaureate, master’s, and doctoral degrees. ECU’s conceptual framework for preparing education professionals focuses on empowering all learners in all educational endeavors and achieving excellence through partnership.

The EPP unit at ECU consistently produces the most educational professionals in the state annually. Many graduates teach and lead in the eastern part of NC within The Walter and Daisy Carson Latham Clinical Schools Network (LCSN) and continue to be valued partners with the EPP and ECU Pirate Nation.

In 2009, the COE was awarded an $8.9 million Teacher Quality Partnership (TQP) grant from the US Department of Education to reform teacher preparation and impact school reform. Several TQP reforms are innovations in the EPP’s Pirate CODE, Transformation Initiative. In 2010, the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education (AACTE) awarded the Edward C. Pomeroy Award for Outstanding Contributions to Teacher Education to the editorial team of the Journal of Curriculum and Instruction (JoCI), a COE-supported online journal.

More recently, the teacher preparation programs at ECU were studied as part of a Spencer Foundation project on data use practices in teacher education. This work is being featured by AACTE as a forthcoming series of institutional profiles and problems of practice briefs.

Learn more about ECU’s mission and values: http://www.ecu.edu/cs-admin/chancellor/mission.cfm

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Fidelity of Implementation

Fidelity of implementation (FOI) refers to the degree to which an innovation, program, or practice is implemented as intended. Fidelity assessments answer the question, “Did we do what we said we would do?”

The broader context and challenge for teacher education institutions implementing programmatic or evaluation interventions is to begin to look at the fidelity of implementation to ensure that the interventions support candidate success. Additionally, it is critical that faculty members are doing their part moving from a normed implementation of negotiated accountability to fidelity of understanding the context, compliance, and competence related to each intervention to limit the possibility of tainting the results. Key faculty members engaged in the Pirate CODE implementation are leading the effort to measure and improve the FOI of the innovations. The goal is create a model of FOI that can be applied to educational innovations in the higher education setting.

In July 2014, faculty members attended a full-day workshop on developing, measuring and improving program fidelity. The workshop was facilitated by Dr. Karen Blasé of the National Implementation Research Network (NIRN).   The initial challenge was to develop the measures needed to assess the current level of FOI for ISLES and the edTPA. These measures include the context (the prerequisites that must be in place for a program or practice to operate), compliance (the extent to which the practitioner uses the core intervention components prescribed by the evidence-based program or practice), and competence (the level of skill shown by the therapist in using the core intervention components as prescribed while delivering the treatment).

In addition to measuring the levels of FOI for ISLES and the edTPA, the faculty members are developing a research agenda to identify the interventions that need to occur to enhance FOI of education innovations. The research agenda will be presented at the 2015 AACTE conference.

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Who are the BOE Team Members?

There are five Board of Examiners team members who will lead the accreditation review that the College of Education at East Carolina University will undergo in February 2015. These individuals are Dr. W. Hal Knight, Dr. Linda F. Cornelious, Dr. Harold London, Mr. Thomas J. White and Dr. Pamela S. Wolfe.

Dr. Knight is from East Tennessee State University where he is Dean of the Claudius G. Clemmer College of Education. He holds a Ph.D. in Educational Administration from Kansas State University.

Dr. Cornelious, another BOE Team Member, is employed as a professor in the Department of Instructional Systems, Leadership, and Workforce Development at Mississippi State University. Her interests are in evaluation and measurement, instructional technology, educational leadership, faculty governance, multicultural education and service learning.

Dr. London is currently a visiting assistant professor in secondary education at DePaul University. He earned an Ed.D. in Educational Leadership at Northern Illinois University.

Mr. White is a 4th grade teacher at Lynnwood Elementary school in Lynnwood, WA. He is a lead author for the award winning online publication and blog Stories from School: Practice Meets Policy.

Dr. Wolfe is an associate professor of education/special education in the Department of Educational Psychology, Counseling, and Special Education at Penn State University. She has written numerous articles in international and national journals as well as book chapters on transition, advocacy, and functional academics.

Also joining the BOE Team are Dr. Debbie Hill and Mr. Nate Thomas. Dr. Debbie Hill is the NC Department of Public Instruction consultant assigned to the BOE Team. Mr. Nate Thomas, an Accreditation Associate at CAEP, will join the visit as an observer.

The EPP at ECU is looking forward to welcoming the accreditation team on campus, and hosting our accreditation visit this year.

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Countdown to the CAEP Accreditation Visit

While students are preparing for the spring 2015 semester, the ECU College of Education is gearing up for the CAEP Accreditation Visit scheduled for February 7-10, 2015. Hopefully, everyone is rested, refreshed, and ready for another exciting and productive semester. Please remember that the CAEP Accreditation Visit is just around the corner. There are 26 more days before the visit. Read here for more CAEP Preparation news.

Kelvin Shackleford
MSA Principal Fellow
East Carolina University

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Alumna is NC Regional Teacher of the Year

North Carolina’s Northeast Regional Teacher of the Year is Jami Dickerson ’08, a third grade teacher at Eastern Elementary in Greenville. The announcement was made during a special ceremony at the school on December 9. Dickerson qualified for the honor after being named the 2013-2014 Pitt County Teacher of the Year in March.

“I’m honored; it’s very humbling,” said Dickerson, who is in her fifth year of teaching. “It’s also mind-blowing. I still can’t believe it happened. It’s been a long process, but it’s gone by fast. I’m excited for things to come.”

Read more at http://piratealumni.wordpress.com/2014/12/22/alumna-is-nc-regional-teacher-of-the-year/.

 

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Ann Rhem Schwarzmann Production Center

So where does a Teacher Candidate go to create materials for their classes?   Joyner Library’s Teaching Resource Center houses the Schwarzmann Production Center to assist Teacher Candidate with preparing classroom materials for their internships.

The Schwarzmann Production Center is located on the second floor of Joyner Library in the Teaching Resources Center, and is available for use when the TRC service desk is open. The center is designed to assist in the creation and preparation of materials used in lesson units, classrooms, and presentations. Staff is available to assist patrons with any equipment operations in the center.

The Production Center contains the following equipment:

Artwaxer
Award Maker
Badge-A-Minit button maker and cutter
Comb Binder
Ellison Die-Cut Center with over 900 patterns
Laminator
Light Box
Poster Maker
Vinyl Letter Cutter
The center also houses computer workstations with scanners and access to a color printer. Educational software available in the room includes: Button Builder, Kid Pix, Adobe Design Premium CS5, Timeliner, and Math Type. Learn more about Die Cutting

Take a Tour of the Production Center (video)

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Joyner Library’s Teaching Resource Center

Established in 1988, the Teaching Resources Center (TRC) contains children and young adult materials, K-12 North Carolina state adopted textbooks, multi-media, kits, and reference resources. The department primarily serves students enrolled in teacher education programs and educators in eastern North Carolina.

Our Mission
The mission of the Teaching Resources Center is to facilitate teaching and learning initiatives by providing resources and services to educators at all levels.

Our Goals
To serve as a model resource center by:

Developing and maintaining a birth to 12th grade collection
Conducting reference and instruction
Providing outreach to area schools and educators
Supporting educators with technology and equipment in the Ann Rhem Schwarzmann Production Center
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Teaching Resources Center Collections materials;

Biographies: Biographies in the TRC’s collection are used by elementary, middle and high school age students.

Big Books: The TRC offers a wide selection of Big Books.  A Big Book is an enlarged version of a beginning reading book, incorporating very large print and pictures. Big Books are educational tools often used to instruct groups of emergent readers.

Children’s Award Book Collection Plan: The Teaching Resources Center automatically acquires various Children’s Award Books each year.

Easy Fiction/Picture Books: Easy Fiction Books are illustrated stories that are written for birth to grade 2 children.   The TRC’s picture book collection includes copies of Caldecott Medal award winners and honor books as well as other prominent children’s award books.

Mixed Media Collection: The TRC’s Mixed Media collection contains read-a-longs, CDs, MP3s, audio cassettes, flashcards, and other media used by K-12 students and educators.

Nonfiction Books: The Nonfiction collection contains materials for birth to grade 12 readers. Titles in the TRC’s nonfiction collection correspond to the content areas of the Common Core Standards and the North Carolina Essential Standards, as well as informational topics of interest to school-aged children.  Additionally, the TRC’s collection of folktales and poetry are located within this collection.  The TRC’s nonfiction collection includes copies of prominent children’s award winning books including the Outstanding Science Trade Books for Students K-12 award winners.
Professional Collection: The Professional Collection contains teaching materials and other valuable resources for K-12 educators. The collection includes books pertaining to classroom activities, lesson planning, bulletin boards, and instructional methods.

Reference Books: The non-circulating reference collection contains reference materials for elementary, middle and high school age students as well as professional reference materials for educators.

Review Center: The TRC serves as a review center for publishers of children’s materials and invites educators, including pre-service teachers, to review and evaluate the titles within the collection.

Ronnie Barnes African-American Resource Collection: The Ronnie Barnes collection contains children’s books written by and/or about African-Americans.  The collection contains many award winning books, including Coretta Scott King award winners and honor titles.

Teaching Aids: The tactile objects in the Teaching Aids Collection are used by educators to reinforce learning and teach new skills. These objects are often referred to as manipulatives.

Textbooks: The TRC collection contains both North Carolina State Adopted K-12 Textbooks and supplementary K-12 textbooks.

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Junior 2 Teaching Interns and Principal Fellows MSA Students Collaborate

Junior 2 Teaching Interns and Principal Fellows MSA Students Collaborate
Something new and exciting is happening this semester in the COE that you might miss if you are not currently a Junior 2 intern or a Principal Fellow. The two programs are collaborating for the benefit of both student sets, and the process has been extremely promising. First, the interns and Fellows meet and discuss lesson plans and teaching strategies. Next, the Jr 2’s teach a class, while the Fellows observe either in person or by watching a video of the lesson uploaded to Taskstream. The Fellows then evaluate the lesson and provide constructive feedback. This process is repeated across three lessons the interns teach.
The process is valuable to the interns because they get another set of eyes from experienced classroom teachers. The MSA students get the valuable experience of observing and evaluating teachers with a rubric, which will be a fundamental part of their future jobs as administrators, as they must observe their teaching staff and evaluate according to The Rubric for Evaluating North Carolina Teachers:

North Carolina Teacher Evaluation Process

As a Principal Fellow, this experience has been valuable and has taught me some practical lessons. I spent hours watching my intern’s lesson videos, brainstorming constructive advice and writing helpful comments. And this was for an intern who had well-prepared lessons and did a fantastic job. Yet I realize as an administrator I will not have hours to spend on each individual teacher. I can reflect with empathy now on some of my past evaluations, which may have seemed rushed and minimal. A principal with 80 staff members must schedule 80 pre-conferences, observe 80 lessons, and schedule 80 post-conferences. Each teacher should be observed a minimum of three times per year, and ILT’s require even more. Hundreds of hours are required to meet the minimum standards for evaluating and assessing teachers, and to truly help teachers improve, more time will be needed than just the minimum. But for the moment, my responsibility is to one intern and I have the luxury of time. I hope that my feedback will help her to ease into her future as an NC teacher. This experience has definitely been worthwhile for me in my preparation in becoming an NC school administrator.
Elbert Maynard
Principal Fellow

 

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Store-Swivl3

The Swivl is here.

What is the Swivl?  Swivl is a camera dock with a twist.  Instead of holding your camera still, the Swivl will follow you around the room, tracking you as you move around on stage or in front of an audience.  This device follows the paired mic wherever it goes.  It is compatible with Android and IOS devices.

So who is using it in COE?  Students have begun to use it to record class sessions for edTPA and ISLES.  OAA has been using it to interview faculty and students about Pirate Code innovations.  Why use this instead of a video camera?  It’s ease of set up and video download capabilities.  The device can connect to any Android or IOS device that has the Swivl app.  You place it in the dock, hook up the mic cable, sync the mic, turn on app and you are ready to go.  The Swivl zeros in on the mic and follows it.  You can use it for one speaker or pass the mic for a group.  The quality of the recording ability lets you place it in the middle of a table to record a small group.  If you want to know more or are interested in trying out the Swivl, feel free to contact OAA IT for more information.

 

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