Category Archives: for Teachers

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Dr. Sharon Schleigh’s book recognized on the AAAS 2014 Best Science Books & Films List

Scientific Argumentation in BiologyDr. Sharon Schleigh, Science Education faculty in the MSITE program, has received recognition from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).  The book she co-authored with Victor Sampson, Scientific Argumentation in a Biology: 30 Classroom Activities, was recognized as an outstanding science book in the category of life science, and listed in the AAAS 2014 Best Science Books & Films List. This National Science Teacher Association (NSTA) Press, 2013 book, is also a top selling NSTA book for middle school and high school teachers across the nation.

The American Association for the Advancement of Science is an international non-profit organization dedicated to advancing science for the benefit of all people, with a mission to promote science literacy to help ensure that all students receive a high-quality science education. AAAS was the first permanent organization formed to promote the development of science and engineering at the national level and to represent the interests of all its disciplines. The AAAS Science Books & Films (SB&F) Best Books Lists are published annually each January. SB&F Best Books Lists are a comprehensive list of highly recommended books, DVDs, and software for children and young adults reviewed over the previous year. Educators and scientists have come to rely on these lists as a definitive guide to the best science resources available for the library and classroom.

Being recognized by this leading international organization for supporting their mission is certainly a great honor for Dr. Sharon Schleigh and for the MSITE Department! We hear that she has another book in the works and we are looking forward to reading it as well. Congratulations to Dr. Sharon Schleigh of the Department of Mathematics, Science, and Instructional Technology Education for this recognition. And thank you Dr. Schleigh, for your impact on science education in our community!

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Educators Gather to Gain Super Teaching Powers

CTC_2015-1642On March 31, 2015, 220 clinical teachers, university supervisors, faculty and staff gathered for the 2015 Spring Clinical Teachers’ Conference at the Greenville Hilton sponsored by East Carolina University’s College of Education and the Latham Clinical Schools Network. The theme for the conference was iTeach: What’s Your Superpower? and included a keynote address by Ms. Jami Dickerson, Pitt County teacher and Northeast Region Teacher of the Year. Ms. Dickerson challenged teachers to develop their superpowers by building relationships with their students, making their classroom engaging, and through displaying passion for the profession.

CTC_2015-1610Participants could select from sixteen different breakout sessions where they learned about technology, teaching methods, and ideas to support their students at a variety of grade levels. The professional development sessions were offered by ECU faculty and guest presenters and were designed to assist teachers with enhancing their “superpowers” as teachers. One participant commented, “I enjoyed learning new ideas in a fun, engaging way.”

CTC_2015-1607Along with the superhero theme of the day, participants were asked to name a super teacher they knew and why they considered these individuals to be outstanding educators. These comments were shared throughout the day on Twitter and on presentation screens as a celebration of the wonderful educators within the East.

The clinical teachers who participated in the event have been assigned interns that are completing their educator preparation programs and will graduate this spring. The student interns served as unpaid substitutes in the clinical teachers’ classrooms so that these individuals could attend this professional development opportunity. An intern commented about her clinical teacher, “I’m glad to take over my teacher’s classroom for the day since she has done so much to help me. She deserves this day!”

CTC_2015-1598The College of Education was proud to sponsor this event as a way of saying thank you to the clinical teachers who work tirelessly to support teacher education interns during their year-long internship. We are grateful for their efforts in preparing the next generation of “super teachers!”

For more information about teacher education at East Carolina University, please visit our website at http://www.ecu.edu/cs-educ/

View the full Photo Album of the event at http://www.coe3.ecu.edu/coeweb/Albums/2015_CTC/

#CTC15 #ECUCOE

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From the TRC: SMART Board Workshops

It’s Thursday, and a new edition of From the TRC is published to highlight another service or resource Joyner Library’s Teaching Resources Center has to support the College of Education’s faculty and students. This week, it’s our upcoming SMART Board workshops.

smart-logoOver the next two weeks, the Teaching Resources Center (TRC) is offering two separate workshops covering the basic functions of the SMART Board and integrating the SMART Board into lesson plans and classroom activities using the TPACK Framework.

These workshops are being offered in an effort to gauge the interest level of the College of Education’s students as the TRC is looking to build and pilot an instructional technology program for the upcoming 2015-2016 school year.  This pilot program will offer COE students and faculty the opportunity to attend workshops, schedule individual or small group (<5 students/faculty) consultations, and course-integrated instruction. Each of these will cover a variety of instructional technologies used by schools within the Latham Clinical Schools Network.

Student attendance and subsequent feedback of these workshops will directly influence the content covered in future workshops, and will inform the TRC as it moves forward in the development of its new instructional technology program.

Here are the session descriptions and link to register:

SMART Board: Essentialssmart_logo_corp

This interactive workshop will teach you the basic functions of the SMART Board and SMART Notebook software. Topics covered will include: connecting the SMART Board to your computer, managing objects, inserting graphics, layering, linking and locking objects and adding animations and reveals.

Attendees who already have the SMART Notebook software installed on their laptop are encouraged to bring their computer. (There are no prerequisites or requirements to attend this session.) Click here to register.

smart_logo_corpSMART Board: Lesson Plans & Activities

This interactive workshop will teach you how to use the SMART Notebook activity builder and dive into the SMART gallery to find multimedia and interactive elements to integrate into your lessons. Six strategies to maximize student engagement and working within the TPACK Framework will be covered.

Attendees who already have the SMART Notebook software installed on their laptop are encouraged to bring their computer. (Prerequisites: Attendees must have previously used a SMART Board and SMART Notebook software to attend this session.) Click here to register.

Follow this link to register for either one or both of the sessions. You may also copy and paste the following URL into your browser, http://goo.gl/ODNRgf.

Until next time…Dan Z. in the TRC

Click here to view the archive of all From the TRC posts.

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From the TRC: NoveList Plus

It’s Thursday, and a new edition of From the TRC is published to highlight another service or resource Joyner Library’s Teaching Resources Center has to support the College of Education’s faculty and students. This week, it’s NoveList Plus.

This week’s post builds on a previous post we wrote about TeachingBooks.net. While TeachingBooks.net focuses on bringing the author to your students so students can experience how their favorite authors create and read their own works, NoveList Plus can help educators match readers with the right books to expand students’ literary world beyond the familiar.

NoveList_PlusNoveList Plus bills itself as a comprehensive online readers’ advisory (RA) tool used to search hundreds of thousands of popular fiction and nonfiction titles, which includes categories such as author read-alikes, book lists, and book discussion guides. It includes genre outlines and online training materials for librarians to familiarize staff with appeal factors, the RA interview, and other aspects of readers’ advisory.

Sounds like a resource for school librarians, right? Of course it is, but my experience as a teacher and school librarian has taught me that students won’t always turn to their librarian for book recommendations. Students will reach out to the teacher they feel most comfortable with for reading advice.  At the high school where I worked in Arizona, the English Department and I constructed and continuously updated a bulletin board highlighting the most recent books the staff had read. Students paid attention to which staff member’s interests matched their own, and turned to them for recommendations. I think it is a safe bet to say the English Department used NoveList Plus more than I did!

The teachers I’ve worked with loved the fact that NoveList Plus includes Lexile measures, book reviews, and lists the awards a book has won. Take a look at  “The Crossover”  which was awarded the 2015 Newbery Medal.

Here are other tools and resources NoveList Plus offers educators at all levels:

  • Professional Toolbox
  • Read-alikes
    • Love an author, but have already read all of their books? Finished a series and disappointed there aren’t more to read? Each book and author in NoveList Plus is paired with other books and authors that are similar to your favorites. Here is an example from George R. R. Martin’s A Game of Thrones, and Sherman Alexie’s author page.
  • Genre Overviews
    • Keeping Up…Genres covers “core genre essentials, links to key awards, lots of lists and on-point articles to help readers find the perfect genre match.”

NoveList Plus also offers a robust Support Center complete with an archive of training sessions, tutorials and additional materials such as “Help Sheets” and PowerPoint presentations to help you maximize NoveList’s resources.  Finally, watch their “News and Events” page for professional development webinars, press releases and new product demonstrations.

Until next time…Dan Z. in the TRC

Click here to view the archive of all From the TRC posts.

Epsilon Sigma Alpha

ESA Scholarships Available for Special Education Majors

The North Carolina Council of Epsilon Sigma Alpha Scholarship Board will continue to offer their Scholarship for students and teachers who are pursuing a degree or certification in Special Education in 2015.

The scholarship has been available since 1956 and is targeted to individuals training for work with exceptional children and has ranged from $500 to $2,500 per year. Current North Carolina teachers seeking additional training are also eligible. Applications must be post marked by April 1, 2015 and awards will be made by May 2, 2015.

Applicants should note the agreement to teacher in the North Carolina Public School System for a minimum of 1 year. Copies of both applications are available for downloading on the North Carolina Council of Epsilon Sigma Alpha website.

Rubric

Week 8 – Blackboard Rubrics – 3/2/15

As educators, particularly as educators teaching future educators, we understand the value of feedback when grading assignments. In fact, perhaps there is even more value in the feedback than in the actual grading. This is why so much time is spent meticulously going through a submitted paper marking and putting comments in the margins, all to help the student better understand where he/she went off the mark. Students certainly appreciate the extra time that is taken and learn from this information, but wouldn’t it be nice if Blackboard could give us a little help with this? Perhaps by showing the students what criteria an assignment will be graded based on and then allowing us to use those criteria to grade the assignment and add comments and deduct points directly based on those criteria? Well, we are all in luck, because it does!

Blackboard has provided a Rubric tool that allows the instructor to create rubric for any gradable item in Blackboard that they can choose to let the student see before an item is submitted, and then once submitted, the instructor can just check the boxes as to the level of competency for each category and add comments as necessary that the student can review. Pretty nice. The rubrics can be used in conjunction with the new inline grading system that allows the instructor to mark and comment on a submitted paper directly in Blackboard, again giving better feedback to the students that is easier for the instructor to give.  The following video will demonstrate how to set up rubrics in your Blackboard class:

A rubric can be used for multiple assignments in a class, but cannot be edited once it has been used. So, for example, you can set up a Discussion Board Rubric once, and then use it as a standard for all of the Discussion Boards without having to recreate it. Want to try one out without going through the trouble? Blackboard is compiling some shared Rubrics where you can download some rubrics that have been contributed by other educators and import them into your course at http://www.blackboard.com/Platforms/Learn/Products/Blackboard-Learn/Features/Sharing-Rubrics.aspx Once you get the hang of it, perhaps you may want to share one of the rubrics you have created there. To use one of the rubrics that are listed there, just download the rubric, then in your course, go to Course Tools, choose Rubrics and Import. It will then appear as one of your rubrics and you can then use it as you would any other rubric.

If you haven’t used Blackboard Rubrics before, I encourage you to take at least one of your assignments this semester and try it out. If you need help setting it up, I’m happy to help answer any questions, but in the long run, I think you will find it will help save you a lot of time, and your students will benefit much more from the assignments that use them.

Throughout the semester, the OAA-Instructional Technology Team will be offering Professional Development opportunities. For more information on these opportunities, please visit the COE Professional Development website. To register for any professional development sessions, please use Cornerstone.

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From the TRC: TeachingBooks.net

It’s Thursday, and a new edition of From the TRC is published to highlight another service or resource the Teaching Resources Center in Joyner Library has to support the College of Education’s faculty and students. This week, it’s TeachingBooks.net.

Short of inviting an author to speak on campus it can be difficult for children and young adults to feel a connection to or the relevancy of an author’s work. It can be even more difficult to gain insight on the process of creating a book or illustration. This is where a resource like TeachingBooks.net comes in. TeachingBooks.net provides educators an opportunity to add a multimedia dimension to their lessons and their students’ reading experiences.

TeachingBooks-net_logoTeachingBooks.net is more than just a database of books, authors, and illustrators. It is an invaluable resource teachers can use as to supplement existing lesson plans or look for ideas to craft new ones. Users can search by book title, author or illustrator from the front page, or simply browse the collection of meet the author videos and resources by grade level or subject area.

To find strategies for integrating books and resources into specific curricular areas, see the Curricular Uses page. Looking for foreign-language resources?  TeachingBooks.net has resources in Spanish, French, Chinese, Ojibwe, Hmong, Russian and others. Book guides and lesson plans aligned to the ELA Common Core standards are available as well as booklists put together by the North Carolina School Library Media Association, and the North Carolina Children’s Book Award. Additional booklists from other states and those categorized by theme or book series are also at the ready.

Here are a few links to some of the TRC’s favorite authors:

Be sure to check out TeachingBooks.net’s free monthly webinar series.  Upcoming webinars will cover “Culturally Relevant Materials” and “How TeachingBooks is Used in Schools/Districts”. In addition, their on demand video tutorials cover topics such as text complexity and creating your own custom reading list.

Believe it or not, all this is the tip of the iceberg as to what TeachingBooks.net has to offer. If you don’t believe me, maybe you should check them out yourself on their blog, on Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, or by signing up for their newsletter.

Until next time…Dan Z. in the TRC

asynchronous

Week 7 – Collaboration in Blackboard – 2/23/15

This week’s blog is a continuation of the discussion last week on collaboration tools. As discussed previously, it can be difficult to build the same kind of community in an online class as typically occurs naturally in a traditional, seated course. The collaboration tools that are either provided in Blackboard or are available by third parties, can help provide the tools necessary to make this community easier to build.

Last week, we discussed some synchronous tools that are available to faculty to use. As a reminder, synchronous tools, are tools that require everyone to be online at the same time. There will be an online follow-up professional development session coming soon for faculty to learn more about Saba Meeting. Please keep an eye on the COE PD page for details. Now, without further adieu, asynchronous tools!

Asynchronous Tools

Asynchronous tools are tools that do not require collaborators to be online at the same time. This blog could represent an asynchronous activity if you, the readers, decided to later participate by commenting below and contributing to the article. In fact there is a Blog tool in Blackboard, but its purpose is a bit different. One thing to note before starting is all of the asynchronous tools that will be mentioned here are native to Blackboard and can be set as gradable items. Each can also be set to grade with a Blackboard rubric (discussed in Week 8).

Blog - Essentially a blog is a shared online diary for use in a class. It can be used by an instructor to let students know what was or will be done in class to save the instructor from answering individual questions repeatedly. It can open up online discussions about related topics or a place to provide evidence of class participation. It is organized strictly by date. Blogs can be set up for each individual student or by course. Blogs are much less formal than discussion boards, which will be discussed later.

Discussion Board – Even a Blackboard newbie has probably heard of the discussion board. It is the most commonly used method of communicating in an online course. Essentially the instructor creates a discussion topic and the students then respond and discuss the topic. They are organized hierarchically with forums, threads, and replies. Discussion boards are easily collapsed, expanded and searched. Users can subscribe to a forum or thread to receive an email each time someone contributes to it. One of the newer features is students can be required to participate before they are able to see other student entries.

Journal – A journal does a bit less to build communication with the class, but potentially more with the instructor, as it provides a personal writing space for self-reflection and private communication with the instructor. It can be used to reflect on personal growth, assignments, personal experiences, etc. Be advised that if you choose “Permit Course Users to View Journal” in the settings all class participants will be able to see each others journals, removing the privacy feature, essentially creating a non-commentable blog.

Wiki – A wiki is a collaborative space where students can view, contribute and edit content. It can be used if students are collaborating on a paper, study guide, etc. The biggest difference between a wiki and any of the other tools is that everyone essentially works in the same space. What this means is there is one text box and each student can contribute, but the particular contribution of one student over another is not necessarily identified, besides look at the history.  Multiple pages can be created to make essentially a website for a project.

So that pretty much does it for the collaboration tools within Blackboard that are designed to potentially work with the entire class or groups. In addition to these tools, you can also divide your class up into groups and then assign group projects. When groups are created, there is another world that opens up for students in Blackboard that provides a place for Group assignments, file exchange, discussions, tasks, and more.

In addition to the tools we’ve looked at this week and last there are lots of third party tools that are also available that may meet your needs, and new ones become available every day. In face Google provides a wide range of free tools that are certainly worth looking into.

Once you start looking at the possibilities, you’ll find there really are ways to do the things you’ve been doing in your traditional classes all these years. It might take a bit of time and training to master it, as it has in your classroom, but once you do, you and your students will be quite satisfied with the results.

Throughout the semester, the OAA-Instructional Technology Team will be offering Professional Development opportunities. For more information on these opportunities, please visit the COE Professional Development website. To register for any professional development sessions, please use Cornerstone.

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From the TRC: Award Winning Author, Duncun Tonatiuh

It’s Thursday, and another edition of From the TRC is published to highlight another service or resource the Teaching Resources Center in Joyner Library has to support the College of Education’s faculty and students. This week, it’s a reminder that award winning author Duncan Tonatiuh will be visiting campus this Saturday, February 21st.

Duncan Tonatiuh

Duncan Tonatiuh

This event is free and open to the public.

Duncan Tonatiuh
“Contemporary Codex: Using the Past to Address the Present”
Saturday, February 21, 2015
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Joyner East, Room 201

The TRC is sponsoring a presentation featuring award-winning children’s author and illustrator Duncan Tonatiuh (toh-nah-tyou) as he discusses how ancient art of the Americas influences his artwork. In addition, Mr. Tonatiuh will share how he looks at the past to address issues that affect children today, especially Latino children. Immigration and segregation are two crucial issues addressed in his works.

Born in Mexico City and raised in San Miguel de Allende, Duncan Tonatiuh graduated from Parsons The New School for Design and Eugene Lang College in New York City. His children’s books have won Tomás Rivera Mexican American Children’s Book AwardsPura Belpré Awards, and the Orbis Pictus Award.

Award-winning book, Separate is Never Equal

Award-winning book, Separate is Never Equal

Mr. Tonatiuh’s books will be available for purchase in the lobby of Joyner Library from 10:00am – 4:30pm, and he will be autographing books in the same location from 10:30am – 1:00pm and 3:30pm – 4:30pm.

His latest work, Separate is Never Equal, was named an Honor Book by the Pura Belpré Illustrator Awards and received the same award from the Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Medal and the Orbis Pictus Award for Outstanding Nonfiction for Children. This book, along with his other works, are available in the TRC.

You can learn more about Duncan Tonatiuh and his books on his official website, www.duncantonatiuh.com, and access interviews with and book readings by the author on TeachingBooks.net. Tonatiuh

 

Dr. Robin Hamilton

LEED Alumna and Current Principal has Article Published

2014 LEED Graduate Dr. Robin Hamilton had an article published on February 16, 2015 in ASCD Express entitled, “Transformative Kindergarten Transition Practices.” The article discusses the impact the transition into kindergarten can make on their future academic and social success. It also discusses different transition practices that are currently used.

Dr. Hamilton is currently the principal at Parsley Elementary School in Wilmington, NC, where some of the practices are being used. In 2014, Dr. Hamilton was the recipient of LEED’s 2014 Glatthorn Distinguished Dissertation award.