Category Archives: for Teachers

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From the TRC…3D Printing Now Available to ECU Community

It’s the first Thursday of the month and a new edition of From the TRC is published to highlight an instructional technology resource Joyner Library’s Teaching Resources Center (TRC) has to support the College of Education’s faculty and students. Our first post of the school year highlights a new service in Joyner Library, 3D printing!

Do you know how common 3D printers are in North Carolina’s public schools? If it’s not now, it will be soon. NC State’s College of Education is busily working toward equipping every middle school in Wake County with a 3D printer. ECU’s own Innovation Design Lab is hoping to outfit seven (7) middle schools with a 3D printer by the end of the school year, and many other K-12 schools around the state have already started their own 3D printing initiatives.

3D printing in K-12 and higher education is definitely a trend. As a result, the TRC has been busy preparing two 3D printers for the College of Education and the rest of the campus community to use. I am proud to announce that, as of today, Joyner Library’s Teaching Resources Center is now accepting print requests for our 3D printers!

To help guide the ECU community, we have also developed a library guide for those who are unfamiliar with 3D printing, but would like to know more. Joyner Library currently has two 3D printers available for use, a FlashForge Creator Pro and a ZPrinter 310 (.pdf). We are also busy prepping a Lulzbot TAZ 5 for future use. This library guide will help you:

Contact us for help by email,

Stay tuned for workshops and other professional development opportunities that involve 3D printing in K-12 and higher education in the months ahead.

We hope to hear from you soon!

Until next time…Dan Z. in the TRC.

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Reading Education Faculty Highlights

At this time in the semester, students are showcasing what they have learned through papers, projects and mid-term exams. We thought we would share a few highlights of what the ECU College of Education Reading Faulty have been doing since the start of the fall 2015 semester.

Dr. Caitlin Ryan has presented multiple professional development sessions for Pitt County Teachers working on Literature Circles.  Dr. Ryan shared, “I really enjoy helping teachers learn about texts and activities that help students love reading. We focused on how talk about text is an important component of both student engagement and comprehension instruction in the reading curriculum.”

Dr. Anne Ticknor and Dr. Katie Schwartz (Associate Professor in Mathematics Education) led a mathematics-specific induction program, LAUNCH into Mathematics, for 20 beginning elementary teachers in eastern North Carolina. The induction program included over 60 hours of mathematics professional development and specialized mentoring across two years. The Z Smith Reynolds Foundation funded the program.  Ticknor and Schwartz are continuing research and publications related to the initiative and are facilitating a social media campaign, Teach for Changency, to showcase program guest bloggers, participant quotes, and key findings from the study. See:

Kelly Bahoric (Elementary Education, K-12 Reading License, ’15) and Dr. Elizabeth Swaggerty co-authored a journal article that explores fanfiction as a valuable literacy practice in both the real world and the K-12 classroom. Bahoric notes, “Reading and writing fanfiction is an exciting practice for students because it allows students to expand upon ideas they already love and enjoy. There is also a subversive element to the practice. One could rewrite established works in a way that is more challenging and less conservative than the original. The potentially subversive nature of the practice is highly appealing to young people.” Article available here:

Dr. Ran Hu is investigating Western teachers’ English teaching experience in China. She hopes to help more people understand the experiences and challenges of those who taught English in a foreign country.  If you have taught English in another country or have an interest in learning more about teaching English abroad, please contact Dr. Hu (

Blount Feature

College of Education hosts Margaret Blount Harvey Literacy Institute

East Carolina University’s College of Education hosted its second Margaret Blount Harvey Literacy Institute on Sept. 12 for close to 100 pre-service and in-service teacher educators from the Latham Clinical Schools Network, a privately funded partnership program that supports the enhancement of 39 school systems in eastern North Carolina.

As an expert in the field of literacy and student engagement, Dr. Peter Johnston, delivered the keynote presentation that inspired the educators to incorporate this year’s theme Words: The Power to Open Minds into the classroom.

Dr. Peter Johnson addresses a question during a literacy and teacher education panel discussion at the Margaret Blount Harvey Literacy Institute. Pictured from left to right: Johnston, Lauren Buck, vice president of the North Carolina reading association, Becky Taylor, North Carolina State Board of Education representative, Dr. Laura Bilbro-Berry, ECU’s assistant director of teacher education and Jim Cieslar, executive director of United Way Pitt County.

Dr. Peter Johnson addresses a question during a literacy and teacher education panel discussion at the Margaret Blount Harvey Literacy Institute. Pictured from left to right: Johnston, Lauren Buck, vice president of the North Carolina reading association, Becky Taylor, North Carolina State Board of Education representative, Dr. Laura Bilbro-Berry, ECU’s assistant director of teacher education and Jim Cieslar, executive director of United Way Pitt County.

“Attending Margaret Blount Harvey Literacy Institute was a wonderful experience,” said one participant. “The institute gave me the opportunity to learn about new approaches to literacy from district and national experts and leaders. It has also helped me to develop professionally by challenging me to use creative, proven methods of teaching in the classroom.”

Attendees participated in breakout sessions by reading education faculty and a literacy and teacher education panel discussion featuring Johnston, Dr. Laura Bilbro-Berry, ECU’s assistant director of teacher education, Lauren Buck, vice president of the North Carolina reading association, Jim Cieslar, executive director of United Way Pitt County, Dr. Don Davis, North Carolina senator, and Becky Taylor, North Carolina State Board of Education representative. Dr. Grant Hayes, dean of the College of Education, welcomed the group with comments on the importance of supporting literacy.

Dr. Peter Johnson with participants attending the Margaret Blount Harvey Literacy Institute.

Dr. Peter Johnson with participants attending the Margaret Blount Harvey Literacy Institute.

“The Margaret Blount Harvey Literacy events and my participation on the ECU Literacy Leaders Board provide a wonderful opportunity as a professional to interact and meet with other educators,” said another participant. “These events make me feel empowered and respected as an educator.”

In addition to LCSN teachers, the ECU Literacy Leaders Board and select ECU undergraduate and graduate students were invited to attend the conference. The Department of Literacy Studies, English Education and History Education in the COE held the conference at the Holiday Inn in Greenville, NC.

“We are thrilled with the enthusiasm of the participants who attended the institute,” said Dr. Johna Faulconer, conference director and associate professor in the College of Education. “Literacy is a critical issue and we are fortunate that through the generosity of Felix and Margaret Harvey, and daughters Leigh McNairy and Sunny Burrows, the family’s wishes of providing high quality literacy professional development opportunities for teachers and teachers in training has become a reality.”

A link to a photo album providing a pictorial account of the day is available at:

Celebrate International Literacy Day

Celebrate International Literacy Day

Faculty in the Department of Literacy Studies, English Education, and History Education are thrilled to celebrate International Literacy Day on Tuesday, September 8, 2015. #ILD2015

International Literacy Day helps bring our attention to the nearly 800 million adults worldwide who cannot read, write, or perform simple math calculations. This is a time when groups and individuals can renew their efforts to promote literacy and demonstrate their commitment to providing education for all.

Dr. Johna Faulconer, Associate Chair of the Department of Literacy Studies, English Education, and History Education, noted, “About 26% of the world’s population is illiterate and women make up two-thirds of that number and while that number is high, it has dropped. International Literacy Day is a day to call attention to the importance of literacy and to celebrate our accomplishments. We are thrilled that so many groups across the ECU campus are taking part in the effort to support International Literacy Day, Our ECU community truly models our mission to inspire positive change.”

The Department of Literacy Studies, English Education, and History Education, partnered with the Teaching Resource Center and the Pitt County Literacy Volunteers invites anyone to attend a Book Exchange in celebration of literacy awareness on Tuesday, September 8, 2015 outside of Joyner Library from 10:00 am – 2:00 pm. For more information, contact Emily-Lynn Adkins at

To mark the occasion, many ECU faculty, staff, and students submitted photos.

Students in Corey Gilman’s second-grade class use a mix of old-school and new technologies in the classroom. Photo: Peggy Barmore

Former Dean Keeping Teacher Preparation in the Spotlight

Dr. Linda Patriarca, former dean of the College of Education and current Special Education professor may be on hiatus, but she is still making sure that East Carolina and the work done in the College for teacher preparation stays in the spotlight, as shown in the US News and World Report article “Colleges Struggle to Blend Tech, Teacher-Training Lesson Plans.”

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Professional Development Opportunities for 2015-2016

The Office of Assessment and Accreditation’s professional development for the 2015-16 academic school year will have two different overarching themes for participants. The workshops will be presented in two different formats to better fit the schedules and preferred learning styles of those interested in attending.  Participants will have the opportunity to attend either a face-to-face or an online session.

Google Apps for Education – A Progressive Workshop Series

Google Apps for Education are becoming a powerful tool in the Pk-12 education world.  Google has created a cost-effective way to bring collaboration tools to the classroom.  This has led to greater integration and implementation of this tool in the classroom with many of our LCSN partners using them.  If you have any questions contact Jason Whited at

Instructional Design for Online Student Success

This professional development series will focus on motivating and retaining online learners by developing a course that incorporates interactive tools, student collaboration, and a variety of assessment activities. In addition, these sessions will include strategies for creating and fostering a sense of community in online or blended courses.  If you have any questions about this workshop contact Holly Fales at

For detailed descriptions of each of the sessions, please visit College of Education Professional Development for Faculty and Staff.

ECU faculty and staff can register for these session via Cornerstone.


edTPA Data Help Ensure Readiness to Teach

Dr. Diana Lys, Director of the Office of Assessment and Accreditation

I recently had the pleasure and honor of delivering the keynote address for the 2015 edTPA Mid-Atlantic Implementation Conference in Towson, Maryland. As a longtime supporter and champion of observation- and performance-based educator preparation and assessment, I was eager to share with peers from across the nation who are at different places on their journey with edTPA.

First, I wanted to commend each person for being there. By the virtue of their attendance and leadership, participants were helping shift the negative tone of dialogue around teacher preparation by highlighting innovative practices and committing to positive change. At the core of the narrative is a shared rallying call to ensure each teacher candidate enters tomorrow’s classroom ready to teach.

Quality teacher preparation matters, and too much external criticism of teacher preparation exists for the field to be fighting against itself. As a field, we have a moral obligation to prepare the best possible beginning teachers for school children; to ensure each graduate is ready for his or her first day of school. edTPA is a positive, uniting step forward.

For example, teacher educators are practically drowning in data. Yet what are we doing with it? In a program without actionable teacher candidate performance data, program improvement efforts often lack momentum or direction. At East Carolina University, our faculty were convinced our students were well prepared, but we couldn’t prove it. Something was missing. That something was a shared, validated summative assessment confirming the program’s outcomes.

Common Data Get Oars “Rowing in Unison”

Today, we use edTPA data to plan our program-improvement journey. By using a common performance assessment, all of the institution’s oars begin rowing in unison. The educative nature of edTPA helps programs to identify strengths and gaps and offers direction for improvements.

edTPA data help to build a culture of inquiry; again, the educative nature of edTPA has a uniting power for faculty, bringing them together to examine candidate portfolios and to assess their programs at a deeper level. In many ways, edTPA helped to break down the tall, isolating silos in teacher education.

edTPA is one improvement that launched others. We are developing new embedded signature assessments as formative metrics prior to edTPA. We are reconceptualizing our clinical practice through a 2:1 coteaching model, and early data and partner feedback are very positive.

As director of assessment and accreditation, I can’t underscore enough the power and value of edTPA in our accreditation process for the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation—a process that builds like a wave. edTPA was an essential uniting factor across our educator preparation programs, allowing us to surf that wave rather than letting it pummel us into the sand. With the right leadership, edTPA:

  • Provides valid and reliable candidate performance data
  • Fosters a culture of evidence in your teacher preparation program
  • Informs evidence-based program improvement

Let’s Not Waste Our Time

In a recent commencement speech to her son’s graduating class, ABC news correspondent Martha Raddatz said, “Don’t waste your time on those who don’t bring out the best in you.”

Similarly, let’s not waste our time on assessments that don’t bring out the best in our candidates and our programs. Let’s not waste our time on assessments that don’t inform our program improvement efforts and that fail to drive our programs in a positive direction.

Let’s focus the energy of our people, our program improvement efforts, and our analysis on data that are valid, reliable, and content and context specific.

And finally, let’s not be silent about what is best—what matters for the field. Make our voices heard as we endeavor to expand our reach with edTPA—blog, tweet, post, share your stories.

This article was also published to the EdPrepMatters blog at

Delilah Jackson

Dr. Delilah Jackson, 3-time Alumna, Named Superintendent of Washington County Schools

Dr. Delilah Jackson has been a long-time Pirate, earning her BS in Elementary Education, MAEd in Educational Leadership, and EdD in Educational Leadership all in the College of Education at East Carolina University.

Since earning her teaching license, she has served the children and parents of Pitt county, as a teacher,  assistant principal, principal, and finally worked her way up to Assistant Superintendent. “Pitt County Schools has been my teacher for 25 years,” Jackson said in a news release. “I am thankful for all who have been a part of my journey. I will miss each and every person that has had an impact on my life as educator in this school system.”

After 25 years, she is going to step out of Pitt county to move into the role of Superintendent of Washington County Schools. “My new role as superintendent of Washington County Schools will allow me to expand my impact on the lives of children,” Dr. Jackson said. “I am excited about my new opportunity, and I am looking forward to serving the students, parents, and community of Washington County.”

Nikki Manning

Partnership East Made it Possible for Nikki Manning to Become a Teacher

The moment you walk into Nikki Manning’s first grade classroom, you get the feeling something exciting is going to happen.  Nikki teaches at Benvenue Elementary School in Rocky Mount, NC.  She landed a job with Nash-Rocky Mount schools immediately after graduating from East Carolina University in December, 2012 and she says she loves the classroom.  Her kids love her too!  According to Denise, one of the first graders I met while visiting the school, “Ms. Manning makes us so happy!  She is the best teacher I’ve ever had.”

Nikki’s mother cared for children in her home while Nikki was young.  Many of her clients were teachers, which gave Nikki the opportunity to help out in classrooms at an early age.  While completing an internship in high school, she decided that she, too, wanted to be a teacher.

She found SECU Partnership East to be exactly what she needed to complete her degree while working two jobs.  Nikki says attending Nash Community College and then completing junior and senior coursework at ECU gave her the flexibility she needed to pursue her dream of teaching.  “I highly recommend Partnership East to everyone I can.  It is truly a great program and I feel that it more than prepared me as an educator.  The great instructors, advisors, and supervisors surely made the process that much more enjoyable, too!”

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Faculty in Elementary Mathematics Education Sought

The Department of Mathematics, Science, and Instructional Technology Education is seeking applications and nominations for a nine-month, full-time, fixed-term faculty position in the College of Education, East Carolina University to begin August 12, 2015.

Job Description: Teaching Faculty in Elementary Mathematics Education.

Rank/Salary: Commensurate with qualifications.

Application Due Date: June 29, 2015

Responsibilities of the position include: Teaching multiple sections of undergraduate elementary mathematics methods courses, developing ongoing partnerships with principals and teachers to coordinate field experiences, curriculum development and planning with other faculty, attending cross-curricular meetings in the elementary education program, assisting other faculty with recruitment and retention, and evaluation of mathematics degrees and concentration programs.

Minimum Qualifications:

  1. Masters degree in Mathematics Education or Related Field with a minimum of 18 graduate semester hours in mathematics education
  2. Demonstrated record of excellence in teaching and leadership in mathematics education
  3. North Carolina teaching license

Preference given to candidates with (optional):

  1. Three or more years experience teaching preK-6 mathematics
  2. Experience with designing and providing professional development in elementary mathematics teaching or in teaching mathematics/mathematics education courses for prospective elementary school teachers
  3. Active participation in NCCTM affiliates
  4. Program evaluation experience

Special Instructions to Applicants: Candidates must submit the following documents online at (1) a letter of application describing academic background, specific skills, and experiences relevant to the position, including professional development with teachers; and, (2) a current vita. Candidates also must submit a copy of all official transcripts and arrange to have three current letters of reference sent directly to: Dr. Katie Schwartz, MATE Search Chair, Department of Mathematics, Science, and Instructional Technology Education, College of Education, Flanagan 352, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858. Finalists will be asked to teach a class session of an elementary mathematics methods course and should be prepared to discuss their experiences and philosophy of teaching. Screening will begin June 29, 2015 and continue until position is filled. Official transcripts required upon employment.

Department Homepage:

ECU Statement: East Carolina University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action University that accommodates individuals with disabilities.

Individuals requesting accommodation under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) should contact the Department for Disability Support Services at (252) 737-1016 (Voice/TTY).

Proper documentation of identity and employability is required at the time of employment.

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