Category Archives: for Teachers

Miles and Rawls-

COE grant educates students on the science of drug abuse

Tonya Little presentationThe Science Education Against Drug Abuse Partnership (SEADAP) program aims to expose students from 6th through 12th grade to the real-world applications of the scientific method in order to teach them about drug addiction.

Now in its third year, the SEADAP program continues to implement hands-on curriculum educating students about the science of drug addiction and the adverse effects of widely abused substances while exposing students in research activities to increase their interest in STEM careers.

Students are led in the design of their own experiments on planaria, a type of flatworm, with Teachersnicotine, alcohol, and sucrose solutions to conduct investigations from lab manuals that specifically address the National Science Education Standards & Common Core, while building partnerships with medical scientists, addiction specialists and professional educators, to educate the general public about drug abuse.

ECU recently hosted a group of educators from Pitt, Martin and Lenoir county public schools, continuing to expand the SEADAP program into North Carolina’s STEM curriculum.

Rawls with teachersECU is collaborating with Temple University on this project. Dr. Scott Rawls of Temple is the co- principal investigator, and Dr. Rhea Miles of ECU is the co-principal investigator.

Teachers will be working with high school students from Pitt, Martin, and Lenoir counties to conduct research investigations at ECU to study the effect of nicotine, caffeine, alcohol and sucrose on planaria under the direction of Miles in the Department of Mathematics, Science, and Instructional Technology Education in the College of Education.

Teachers will also work with students to study the effects of drug addiction on flatworms through the SEADAP grant.

For more information on the SEADAP Program contact Dr. Rhea Miles at 252-328-9366 or milesr@ecu.edu.

Daniel Dickerson

Dr. Daniel Dickerson Represents ECU on Fulbright Commission Panel Addressing STEM Study Abroad Partnerships with the Czech Republic

Dr. Daniel Dickerson, associate professor in the Department of Mathematics, Science, and Instructional Technology Education and ECU STEM CoRE (Collaborative for Research in Education) Co-Director, is among a small group of scholars from across the United States selected to sit on a Fulbright Commission sponsored STEM Expert Panel to address university faculty from across the Czech Republic regarding STEM study abroad possibilities. He will join faculty from MIT, Purdue, Michigan, Georgia Tech, and other STEM intensive institutions.

The STEM Expert Panel is part of a capacity building workshop, “Bringing More U.S. Students in STEM to Czech Universities,” sponsored by the Department of State, Office of Global Educational Program, the Fulbright Commission in the Czech Republic in cooperation with Czech universities that offer education in STEM. The workshop will take place in Prague, Czech Republic on April 19-20, 2016 and will be followed by campus visits on April 21-22.

While there, Dickerson will speak to participants during meeting sessions regarding STEM education program development and explore ways to build collaborative efforts with the Czech Republic. Additionally, the US delegation will tour eight Czech universities, attend a reception at the residence of the US Ambassador, and explore innovative ways to enhance global partnerships.

Dr. Dickerson has more than 70 publications, 130 conference presentations, and has been involved in grants as PI, Co-PI, Senior Personnel, or Evaluator totaling over $10 million.

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ECU hosts design thinking sessions for education professionals

The College of Education hosted two design thinking workshops. Local K–12 educators, high school students and ECU faculty attended a workshop to confront important challenges in higher education and design innovative solutions on Monday, March 21.

Design ThinkingThe next day, local K–12 educators were taken through the full cycle of design thinking in a short timeframe. The activity focused on the fundamental values of human-centered design: a bias toward action, a culture of iteration and the importance of rapid prototyping. The latter portion of the session will uncover the results of the activity and tie them back to the day-to-day challenges.

As a new way to problem solve, companies like IDEO and Google are embracing design thinking, according to Militello.

“This workshop may affect our professional students in profound ways because it provides them with a tool set for managing change in schools which is not generally provided in preparation programs,” said Militello. “In making the case for design thinking, we’re asking school leaders to admit that the answers to modern challenges they face don’t yet exist; that off-the-shelf solutions or strategies that neighboring schools employ are not going to meet the unique needs of the communities they serve.”

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Dr. Nash presenting during the COE’s design thinking workshops.

Dr. John Nash, associate professor of educational leadership studies at the University of Kentucky and the founding director of the Laboratory on Design Thinking in Education, or dLab, will facilitate the sessions on both dates. He’s also a director at the Center for Advanced Study of Technology Leadership in Education, or CASTLE, at the University of Kentucky.

Nash is a specialist in the design and prototyping of innovations in education. He teaches a range of courses on design thinking, school technology leadership, and school reform. His current research agenda focuses on the methods to design and prototype of innovations in education.

The events are sponsored by the Wells Fargo Distinguished Professor in Educational Leadership, Dr. Matt Militello.

Design thinking is a creative strategy for dealing with old and emerging problems. This approach differs from the traditional scientific method by considering known and unknown parameters to seek alternative solutions in an iterative manner.

“The intent of the Wells Fargo Endowment in Educational Leadership is to build capacity for local school educators,” said Militello. “Design thinking is a way to build capacity for these educators and for those who train them. ECU’s College of Education is well positioned to be at the forefront of technologies and innovations that can best assist our school educators. This series is another example of this type of forward thinking work.”

 

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College of Education to host first Edcamp.

ECU’s College of Education will be hosting the first EdcampECU on Saturday, April 23, on the ECU main campus. EdcampECU is an “unconference” designed to provide FREE participant-driven professional development for P-12 educators with a focus on educational technology. Teachers, specialists, administrators and district personnel that are ready to share, collaborate and learn about educational technology are encouraged to attend. Participants can have an active role at edcamp by proposing a session topic, voting on proposed topics, choosing what sessions to attend and how they want to participate in each session (sharing ideas in a session or facilitating a session). Each session will have a collaborative Google Doc for educators to share their discussion, link resources and learn from others. Breakfast and lunch will be provided on-site to allow attendees to continuously participate in throughout the event. Register for Edcamp ECU today at bit.ly/edcampecu. For more information contact COE Instructional Technology Consultants, Holly Fales (heathh@ecu.edu) or Jason Whited (whitedj@ecu.edu) in the Office of Assessment, Accreditation and Data Management.

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ECU graduate Erin Kessel named Teacher of the Year

THE DAILY REFLECTOR
For Creekside Elementary School teacher Erin Kessel, the time she spends with her students outside of the classroom is just as important as the time she spends in it.

Her dedication to supporting students in their after-school activities, along with her passion for teaching and being a school leader, earned her the title of Pitt County Schools Teacher of the Year for 2016-17. She was presented the award Wednesday at the district’s annual Teacher of the Year Luncheon at Rock Springs Center.

Kessel, a fourth-grade teacher with five years of experience, described in her Teacher of the Year portfolio how cheering on a student at his baseball game changed his attitude toward her and his schoolwork.

“I saw this student every day in class, saw his struggles, then saw him on the ball field and how excited he was that I was there,” she wrote. ”Seeing how successful he was on the baseball field allowed me to build a connection that carried back to the classroom.”

She said in her acceptance speech Wednesday that investing time in students’ lives is the only way to teach them how to overcome their challenges and build on their strengths.

“Our kids are unbelievable in Pitt County,” she said. “They, some of them, go home to hardly anything, and they come in with a smile on their face. We are the reason for that smile. Our schools are the reason for that smile; every person in our school is the reason for that smile. And if they don’t come in smiling, we make sure they smile at some point in that day.”

031016teacheroftheyear2A two-time graduate of East Carolina University, Kessel has held many leadership roles at Creekside, including as a Key Beginning Teachers Program member, lead mentor, representative for technology company Istation and Relay for Life captain. She also is a clinical teacher for ECU’s College of Education and a participant in Pitt County Schools’ Teacher Executive Institute for this school year. She has obtained two grants for integrating technology into her classroom and was named the Sylvan Learning Center Teacher of the Year in 2012.

As Pitt County’s Teacher of the Year, she will get to drive a 2017 Hyundai Elantra from Joe Pecheles Hyundai in Greenville free of charge for one year. She also received an HP laptop, a printer, school supplies and a plethora of checks and gift cards from local businesses, including the luncheon’s sponsor, Pitt County Farm Bureau.

The runner-up was veteran educator Jada Rogers, a fourth-grade teacher at Wahl-Coates Elementary.

Kessel3In her 24 years as a teacher, she has helped develop new curricula and teaching strategies both at Wahl-Coates and in partnership with the ECU College of Education. She has been involved with various groups on the local level, including the Curriculum Reform Focus Group and Teacher Executive Institute, and on the state level, including the North Carolina Teacher Academy and the North Carolina Teaching Fellows Educational Panel. She is a clinical instructor for ECU’s College of Education and was chosen as a researcher and unit writer for the 2011 Teacher Quality Partnership Grant between the college and the school district.

Rogers said in her acceptance speech that she sees teaching as an act of optimism.

“I truly believe that we have to be full of optimism to continue to come in every day and try to bring courage and hope and to be able to pack that into every child’s future,” she said. “We do that starting with loving them.”

Other finalists for Teacher of the Year were: Carol Briley, a kindergarten dual immersion teacher at Belvoir Elementary; Lauren McDermott, a first grade teacher at Wintergreen Primary; Kathryn Shafer, a fifth grade teacher at Wintergreen Intermediate; and Kara Snyder, a second grade teacher at Elmhurst Elementary.

Also at the luncheon, Pitt County Schools recognized its classified employees of the year. The winners, which were announced in January, were: Custodian of the Year Gary Outlaw, Wellcome Middle; Office Employee of the Year Lori Coleman, W.H. Robinson Elementary; Teacher Assistant of the Year Rose Roebuck, Bethel; Child Nutrition Manager of the Year Diane Sumlin, Northwest Elementary; Child Nutrition Employee of the Year Vivian Ordonez, H.B. Sugg Elementary;  Bus Driver of the Year Vanessa Mooring, Northwest Elementary; K-8 Bus Driver of the Year Bettie Jones, Grifton; 9-12 Bus Driver of the Year Anthony Johnson, Ayden-Grifton High.

Superintendent Ethan Lenker congratulated all the winners and thanked the sponsors for their dedication to helping local students get a good education.

“You saw the quality of all these individuals out here today, from our teacher assistants to our school secretaries to our bus drivers,” he said. “We’re stacked with quality people here in Pitt County.”

By Holly West, The Daily Reflector
http://www.reflector.com/News/2016/03/10/Teacher-of-the-year-invests-in-students-lives.html
Thursday, March 10, 2016

Contact Holly West at hwest@reflector.com or 252-329-9585.

Rob Lucas

People Need to Know: Confronting History in the Heartland — New book by Dr. Robert M. Lucas

The book,  People Need to Know: Confronting History in the Heartland by Dr. Robert M. Lucas, Assistant Professor in the Department of Elementary & Middle Grades Education, has just been published by Lang Publishing Company. This book chronicles Dr. Lucas’ engaged research with students and their teacher “as they study the defining event in their community’s history.”  Dr. Lucas presents an approach to teaching and learning in social studies that fully engages students to not only learn about the history of their community, but to contribute something of value to their communities and beyond.

Through his start-up research grant, a Library of Congress grant, and his teaching in the Elementary Education program, Dr. Lucas continues to provide teachers and teacher candidates with a meaningful and dynamic evidence-based approach to teaching history and social studies that enables students to “better understand the complex ethical ramifications of historical work and appreciate why learning matters.” (Note: quotations in both paragraphs are from Vendor’s website, below). To learn more about or secure a copy of the book, go to: http://www.amazon.com/People-Need-Know-Confronting-Counterpoints/dp/1433129787.

Go to the College of Education Research Website to engage in a Blog discussion about Engaged Scholarship and Research

DesignThinkingLunchSession

Learning Exchange: LUNCH SESSION – Design Thinking in Your Pedagogy

Sponsored by: the Wells Fargo Distinguished Professorship in Educational Leadership

Participants are guided in an immersive activity that exposes
participants to the full cycle of design thinking in a short timeframe.
It will touch on the fundamental values of human-centered design: a
bias toward action, a culture of iteration, and the importance of rapid
prototyping. The latter portion of the session will unpack the results
of the activity and tie them back to the day-to-day challenges that
participants face in their home institution.

Date: Tuesday, March 22, 2016
Time: 12:00p.m.–2:00p.m.
Location: Sweetheart Dining Room Todd Dining Hall on top of College Hill

John Nash (PhD University of Wisconsin) is an Associate Professor
of Educational Leadership Studies at the University of Kentucky and
the founding director of the Laboratory on Design Thinking in
Education, or dLab. He’s also a director at the Center for Advanced
Study of Technology Leadership in Education, or CASTLE,
also at the University of Kentucky.

John is a specialist in the design and prototyping of innovations in
education. He teaches a range of courses on design thinking, school
technology leadership, and school reform. His current research agenda
focuses on the methods to design and prototype of innovations in education.

He has held faculty positions at Iowa State University and the
University of Texas at El Paso. As a social research scientist at
Stanford University, Nash held associate directorship positions in two
laboratories: the Stanford Center for Innovations in Learning (SCIL),
and the Stanford Learning Laboratory, where he managed
interdisciplinary and international teams of research scientists
examining the effects of innovative technologies on learning.

Space is Limited
Please RSVP to Matthew Militello
Wells Fargo Distinguished Professor in Educational Leadership
militellom14@ecu.edu

DesignThinkingFullDaySession

Learning Exchange: FULL DAY SESSION – Design Thinking in Education

Learning Exchange
Sponsored by: the Wells Fargo Distinguished Professorship in Educational Leadership

Design Thinking in Education

Your group brings in a set of key users for whom the participants act
as designers, applying the lessons learned in the first session. In this
exercise the participants break into small “design teams” to tackle
an challenge important in higher education and rapidly prototype
innovative solutions to that challenge.

Date: Monday, March 21, 2016
Time: 10:00a.m.–3:00p.m.
Location: Croatan Building- Green Room

John Nash (PhD University of Wisconsin) is an Associate Professor
of Educational Leadership Studies at the University of Kentucky and
the founding director of the Laboratory on Design Thinking in
Education, or dLab. He’s also a director at the Center for Advanced
Study of Technology Leadership in Education, or CASTLE, also at the University of Kentucky.

John is a specialist in the design and prototyping of innovations in
education. He teaches a range of courses on design thinking, school
technology leadership, and school reform. His current research agenda focuses on the methods to design and prototype of innovations in education.

He has held faculty positions at Iowa State University and the
University of Texas at El Paso. As a social research scientist at
Stanford University, Nash held associate directorship positions in two laboratories: the Stanford Center for Innovations in Learning (SCIL), and the Stanford Learning Laboratory, where he managed interdisciplinary and international teams of research scientists examining the effects of innovative technologies on learning.

Space is Limited
Please RSVP to Matthew Militello
Wells Fargo Distinguished Professor in Educational Leadership
militellom14@ecu.edu

Captain Arrrgh Headshot

From the TRC: Reluctant Readers

It’s the third Thursday of the month and a new edition of From the TRC is published to highlight another service or resource Joyner Library’s Teaching Resources Center (TRC) has to support the College of Education’s faculty and students. Today we’ll cover one of our newest bibliographies, Reluctant Readers.

The TRC has created, and constantly updates, an extensive list of bibliographies and guides available to help students, faculty and staff easily navigate our collections. Print copies for select topics are available in the TRC while our entire catalog of bibliographies and guides are available on the TRC’s website. The reluctant readers bibliography is currently only available online, and is based on titles from the Young Adult Library Association’s (YALSA) Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers List.

But, we need to define who a reluctant reader. The umbrella term, reluctant reader, is used to describe a few different groups of students. Reluctant readers generally fall into one of three categories, those who can’t, don’t or won’t read. Students may not read because they lack the literacy and comprehension skills needed to do so which can lead to self-doubt and a fear of their secret being “found out.” The latter two categories encompass students able to read, but either dislike reading itself or their personal interests lead them to other activities they find more attractive.

So, what to do? A simple Internet search will overwhelm you. There is no shortage of parenting websites, non-profit and for-profit companies willing to share tips, tricks, and books. The Lexile Framework for Reading also offers tips and links to additional resources.

One theme you will find over and over again as you sift through all these resources is student choice. Allow your reluctant readers to choose reading material (e.g., comic book, graphic novel, popular magazine, etc.) about topics they are interested in. Of course, if a teacher knows their students’ interests, and happens to know a few books that may pique their interest, it’s a win-win. That’s why the TRC created our bibliography for reluctant readers.

Joyner Library’s subscription to Novelist Plus will also come in handy at times like this. Novelist Plus allows users to search for “Title Read-alikes” and “Author Read-alikes”. For example, if a student liked Kwame Alexander’s novel, The Crossover” A Basketball Novel, you can use that feature to find a list of similar reads:

Figure 1: The Crossover: A Basketball Novel’s entry in Novelist Plus. Read-alikes are found just above the “Find It!” button.

Figure 1: The Crossover: A Basketball Novel’s entry in Novelist Plus. Read-alikes are found just above the “Find It!” button.

Figure 2: Clicking on the “Title Read-alikes” will show a list of novels with similar themes.

Figure 2: Clicking on the “Title Read-alikes” will show a list of novels with similar themes.

Why is it important to become familiar with Novelist Plus? All K-12 educators in North Carolina have free access to either Novelist K-8 or Novelist Plus through NC WiseOwlJoyner Library’s subscription to Novelist Plus is the only way pre-service teachers can access this resource until you have your own classroom.

We hope to hear from you soon!

Until next time…Dan Z. in the TRC

busta

Apply Now for ECU’s Online Teacher Education Partnership

Do you want to be a part of a profession that makes all others possible?

Do you want to make a difference?

Do you want a career that is meaningful, challenging, and creative?

Are you looking for a degree program that will fit your busy lifestyle?

If your answer to any of these questions is yes, then you should become a teacher through State Employees’ Credit Union Partnership East!

East Carolina University offers four-year teaching degrees through the  State Employees’ Credit Union Partnership East (SECU PE).  Students take the first two years of specific college transfer courses at any NC Community College and enter ECU as juniors to complete – a bachelor’s degree in Elementary Education, Special Education – General Curriculum, or Middle Grades Education.  The online option for Middle Grades Education includes concentrations in language arts and social studies.    All SECU Partnership East coursework is offered through online instruction with classroom learning experiences in your local schools.  Students participate in a full-time internship at the culmination of the degree coursework.

Applications for 2016 cohorts are now open.  Test scores from the Praxis Core for Educators, prerequisite coursework, an interview, and a minimum GPA are required for admission to SECU PE.  Applicants must meet minimum transfer admission requirements to East Carolina University to be eligible to participate.

Degree Program Beginning Semester Application Deadline
Elementary Education (Full-time) Summer January 15
Elementary Education (Part-time) Fall February 15
Special Education (Part-time) Summer January 15
Middle Grades Language Arts and Social Studies (Part-time) Fall February 15

Graduates from SECU PE have a high rate of employment with the majority finding jobs right in their home counties. The convenience of online course delivery, field work close to home, and an opportunity to shape future generations are all reasons YOU should consider this opportunity.

For more information or to apply, contact the SECU Partnership East Coordinator for your region.  Contact information is located at www.edu.edu/pe.