Category Archives: Foundations and Research


College of Education Graduate Recognition Ceremony – December 19, 2015

The College of Education Graduate Recognition Ceremony is scheduled for 9:00 a.m. on Saturday, December 19, 2015 in Williams Arena at Minges Coliseum. The faculty and staff of the College of Education are pleased to present a special Graduate Recognition Ceremony (GRC) for our graduates. The ceremony will feature individual recognition of College of Education students receiving degrees. Friends and families of the graduates are cordially invited to attend. It is not necessary for graduates or guests to RSVP for this event. Tickets are not required to attend the ceremony.

For University Commencement Ceremony details and information about the ECU Commencement Weekend, please visit

Abbie Brown

The COE Research Committee Presents Dr. Abbie Brown: Increasing Your Impact with Social Media

Come to Speight 202 on October 22, 2015 from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. to learn how to use web-based and mobile applications to create and share content.

Making good use of web-based and mobile applications can significantly increase one’s academic impact. Social media offers a variety of opportunities for scholarship and service to one’s discipline, while increasing the visibility of academic programs and institutions. For the past two years, Dr. Abbie Brown has been experimenting with podcasting, blogging, and content curation via the Flipboard app, resulting in the receipt of a national award for his podcast series, opportunities to collaborate with major figures in his discipline, and invitations to speak at international conferences. It’s one example of using innovative social media to positively affect productivity in more traditional venues.

The workshop’s purpose is to share information about making effective use of social media to increase your own academic impact by reviewing examples and describing the tasks involved in blogging, ‘casting, and curating content

Faculty participants will receive Distance Education Professional Development Credits. ECU

Faculty and Staff can register for this event in Cornerstone.

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From the TRC: Instruction & Consultation Services

It’s the third Thursday of the month and a new edition of From the TRC is published to highlight another service or resource Joyner Library’s Teaching Resources Center (TRC) has to support the College of Education’s faculty and students. Today we’ll review a few changes to how students and faculty schedule the TRC’s instruction and consultation services.

These changes are meant to accomplish two things. First, students, faculty and staff will be able to schedule a library instruction session for their classes or a research consultation in less time. Second, these new forms will provide TRC librarians with all pertinent information at the beginning of the scheduling process. This will eliminate extra time used to email questions back and forth after a request is first submitted.

All links below can be found on the left hand side of the TRC’s web page.

Library Instruction for Classes

The Instruction Session Request Form is for professors seeking to schedule a TRC librarian to teach their students not only about Joyner Library’s resources and services, but also how the TRC specifically supports the College of Education and its faculty and students. This form can also be used to schedule whole class SMART Board workshops, and general orientations and tours of the TRC.

The semester may be half over, but there is still time to schedule a library instruction session for your class today!

Consultation Services

Research Consultations – This form will offer students and faculty a direct link to TRC librarians who would like to schedule research consultations. Until now, Joyner Library’s Book a Librarian portal acted as the middle man, but this change will streamline the scheduling process..

SMART Board Consultations – Students and faculty can schedule one-on-one or small group consultations with the TRC’s SMART Certified Education Trainer. Each consultation is specifically tailored to meet your needs.

3D Printing Consultations – The TRC’s newest service! 3D printing consultations are one-on-one sessions that can range from a simple introduction to 3D printing to specific design needs for an academic project and everything in between. It is not necessary to have a finished product in mind when scheduling a consultation.

We hope to hear from you soon!

Until next time…Dan Z. in the TRC


Upcoming Professional Development Offering: Instructional Design for Online Student Success

The NEW Instructional Design for Online Student Success professional development series will focus on motivating and retaining online learners by developing a course that incorporates interactive tools, student collaboration and a variety of assessment activities. Topics will also include strategies for creating and fostering a sense of community in online or blended courses.

The first session, Collaborative Tools in Blackboard, will focus on using the collaboration tools that are readily available within Blackboard and many other learning management software suites including groups, discussions, wikis and blogs. Both novice and experienced online instructors are encouraged to attend the session, as it will focus on sharing collaborative ideas among faculty in addition to showing how to use these tools.

Collaborative Tools in Blackboard-Part I will be offered face to face on Thursday, September 17th at 1:00 in Speight 239. Participants are encouraged to bring their own device to participate in the interactive session. The session will also be offered online Thursday, September 24th at 2:00 via Saba Meeting.

Part 2 of Collaborative Tools in Blackboard will provide a more focused look at one or more of the collaborative tools discussed in Part 1 based on participant interest and feedback provided during the sessions.

Faculty and staff can register for these sessions via Cornerstone. For more information contact Holly Fales at

View all detailed descriptions of all COE Faculty/Staff Professional Development opportunities at

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Professional Development Opportunities for 2015-2016

The Office of Assessment and Accreditation’s professional development for the 2015-16 academic school year will have two different overarching themes for participants. The workshops will be presented in two different formats to better fit the schedules and preferred learning styles of those interested in attending.  Participants will have the opportunity to attend either a face-to-face or an online session.

Google Apps for Education – A Progressive Workshop Series

Google Apps for Education are becoming a powerful tool in the Pk-12 education world.  Google has created a cost-effective way to bring collaboration tools to the classroom.  This has led to greater integration and implementation of this tool in the classroom with many of our LCSN partners using them.  If you have any questions contact Jason Whited at

Instructional Design for Online Student Success

This professional development series will focus on motivating and retaining online learners by developing a course that incorporates interactive tools, student collaboration, and a variety of assessment activities. In addition, these sessions will include strategies for creating and fostering a sense of community in online or blended courses.  If you have any questions about this workshop contact Holly Fales at

For detailed descriptions of each of the sessions, please visit College of Education Professional Development for Faculty and Staff.

ECU faculty and staff can register for these session via Cornerstone.

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2015 College of Education Faculty and Student Research Showcase

The COE Research Committee is proud to announce the 2015 College of Education Faculty and Student Research Showcase.  Please plan to attend and participate in this event on Wednesday, March 25 from 4:00-6:00PM in Mendenhall 244.

Date:  Wednesday, March 25, 2015
Time:  4:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Location:  Mendenhall room 244

Presenters and Research Studies:

Faculty invited paper presentation (4:15-5:00):

  • Dr. Benjamin Blaisdell (SEFR), Schools as Racial Spaces: Understanding and Resisting Structural Racism

Faculty invited round table presentation (5:00-5:45):

  • Dr. Abbie Brown (MSITE), 3D Printing in Instructional Settings: Identifying A Curricular Hierarchy of Activities
  • Drs. Christina Tschida, Judy Smith, & Liz Fogarty (ELMID), “It Just Works Better”: Introducing the 2:1 Model of Co-Teaching in Teacher Preparation

Graduate student poster presentations (5:00-5:45):

  • Kristin Justice (ELEM), Thinking Maps and Latin Instruction
  • Kathy Robertson (ELEM), Tutoring to Improve Language and Grammar Skills
  • Kathryn V. Cayco (ELEM), Explicit Instruction vs. Student led Learning Experiences
  • Ashley Lynn (ELEM), Literature Based Instruction vs. Phonics in Isolation
  • Audrey Dexter (ELEM), The Effects of Music in the Elementary Classroom
  • Melinda Harrell (ELEM), Math Notebooks: Should They be Structured for 6th Grade?
  • Kelsey Shue (ELEM), Determining If the Use of Technology Has a Positive Effect on Math Fact Fluency and Automaticity
  • Kelly Hylton (ELEM), Project Based Learning: Does it Make Science Education Better?
  • Lisa Howell Langley (ELEM), Multiplication Fact Fluency:  Traditional Instructional Practices versus iPad/Web Based Applications
  • Catherine Bademian (ELEM), The Effects of Background Music on Student Work
  • Lauren Griffin (ELEM), Best Small Group Reading Instruction Method for Upper Elementary: Guided Reading or Literature Circles?
  • Jessica Stroud (ELEM), Will K-2 Students Produce Higher Scores on their DIBELS Reading Assessment if Tested in the Morning versus in the Afternoon?
  • Samantha Dinner (ELEM), Stability Balls in the Classroom- Does Usage Increase Student Achievement?
  • Blythe McGowan (ELEM), Reading Comprehension Strategies
  • Tracy Lynn McIntyre (ELEM), Singapore Math: The Modeling of Word Problems
  • Heather Marshall (ELEM), Does Integrating the Arts, Specifically Music, into the Math Class, Increase Student Performance?
  • Jennifer Burleson (ELEM), The Effectiveness of Technology on Reading in the Classroom

For more information, contact the COE Research Committee:

Dan Zuberbier

Meet Dan Zuberbier: A Great Resource for Students, Faculty, and Educators in Eastern NC

Recently, the Joyner Library made a new addition specifically to benefit the College of Education. Dan Zuberbier was hired as the Education and Instructional Technologies Librarian in the Teaching Resource Center.

Like many academic librarians, Dan Zuberbier didn’t follow a straight path to the profession. While finishing his B.A. in History at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, he was an assistant baseball coach at Edgewood College, a small private college down the street from the UW. “Baseball had been the center of my life for as long as I could remember,” he said. “Since I wasn’t playing ball any more it made sense to try and break into the coaching ranks.” Unfortunately being an assistant coach at an NCAA Division III school wasn’t enough to pay the bills, and he picked up odd jobs to make ends meet.

Eventually, Dan decided he needed a more stable career path. “Working the equivalent of two full-time jobs to pay the bills took the fun out of coaching baseball,” and reflected on what he wanted to get out of a career. “I needed a career that fulfilled my intellectual curiosities, and, at the same time, provided opportunities to develop meaningful relationships with young adults as I had been able to do with my baseball players. Teaching seemed like a natural fit.”

Setting his sights on becoming a high school history teacher, he enrolled in Pima Community College’s online Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Education Program, moved to Arizona to complete his student teaching, and earned his teaching license. Yet, four years later, his career took another unexpected turn. “I was having a hard time building up my students’ research skills, so I reached out to who I thought was our school librarian,” he said. “She kindly informed me she was the library clerk and had no experience teaching students research skills.”

Saying he was surprised his high school, the largest school in the district, didn’t have a certified library media specialist on staff is putting it mildly. To make matters worse, soon after their initial conversation, the library clerk broke her foot and was out of work for a week. Zuberbier stated, “Because she wasn’t a certified teacher-librarian, the school was under no obligation to hire a substitute to keep the library open in her absence. I was speechless.” After being shut out of their library for an entire week, Zuberbier wondered what else his students were missing out on because the school did not have a certified teacher-librarian.

He dove head-first into researching the role a library media specialist should play on a high school campus and petitioned the school board to fund the position. His request was denied. The Superintendent argued that because the school was only four years old, its collection was ‘still so new’ and students had access to so many online resources the school didn’t need a certified librarian. It took another year for Zuberbier’s efforts to succeed, and, in the meantime, he began earning his Master in Library and Information Science (MLIS) through UW-Milwaukee. He was also able to earn his library media specialist endorsement, and became his school’s first certified teacher-librarian.

“Soon after I started my MLIS program, I knew I couldn’t stop being a teacher. But, I also realized I wanted to give myself the opportunity to have an impact on the profession as an advocate for school libraries and through my work as an education librarian,” Zuberbier said. Which is why he considers himself fortunate to be working in East Carolina University’s Teaching Resources Center. “This is my dream job. To not only work with pre-service teachers by teaching them about instructional technologies and what they should expect out of their school library when they enter the workforce, but also serve educators throughout eastern North Carolina is an awesome responsibility.”

Zuberbier is currently working on developing workshops for students and faculty around the basic functions and lesson planning around the use of SMART Boards. He is also looking to collaborate with COE faculty to develop a series of workshops for students that will cover current and emerging K12 instructional technologies that will take place during the Fall semester. He currently resides in the TRC, room 2504, and can be reached through email,, or by phone, 328-0406.

Dr. Rob Lucas and Dr. Christina Tschida Awarded a Grant from the Library of Congress

Congratulations to Dr. Rob Lucas and Dr. Christina Tschida in the Department of Elementary and Middle Grades Education (ELMID) for their Grant Award from the Library of Congress. The Project, Teaching with Primary Sources will develop sets of primary sources on key regional topics that are also of national significance and make them available to teachers across the state. Additionally, the project will increase elementary teacher candidates’ capacities, particularly in the areas of historical investigation, academic language, disciplinary reading of non-fiction texts and instructional planning. Pre-service elementary teachers will learn to locate and use original documents and other primary sources as they design and implement instruction in history. The project will help teachers and their students to connect to North Carolina’s own rich history and its role in the nation’s history.


ECU to Participate in Global Day of Giving

image‘Tis the season for giving! In honor of #GivingTuesday, East Carolina University is inviting alumni, friends, parents, students, faculty, and staff to join the movement by giving a charitable gift* on Tuesday, December 2, to the university that is near and dear to our hearts.

Founded in 2012 to inspire a new tradition of generosity, #GivingTuesday focuses on celebrating kindness and giving back. Support a culture of philanthropy at ECU by making a gift on December 2nd and becoming a partner in securing the university’s future for current students and future generations of Pirates.

Your gifts provide scholarships, enrich teaching resources and libraries, offer hands-on learning lessons, support research and the arts, deliver classroom enhancements, and afford study abroad living/learning opportunities – all of which help ECU attract and retain the best and brightest students and faculty.

Help spread the word! Mark you calendar to #GiveTueECU on December 2, tell your friends, and post on social media using the hashtags #GivingTuesdayECU and #GiveTueECU. “I Gave” badges will be available through ECU’s University Advancement and East Carolina Alumni Association’s social media accounts on December 2.

Learn more about the #GivingTuesdayECU movement. Thank you for your support!

Contact us at (252) ECU-GIVE (252-328-4483) or

*Your gift is tax-deductible to the extent the law allows.


CAEP Prep: ECU’s Pirate CODE Process

The ECU Pirate CODE features a set of seven coordinated innovations linked throughout the teacher education curriculum and clinical practice. Each innovation is evolving through a series of carefully planned stages, to institutionalize each innovation in the Department of Elementary Education and Middle Grades Education. Once refined and data analysis proves it an effective model, the innovation is scaled up and implemented in other teacher preparation programs across the EPP.

TIThe stages of the ECU Pirate CODE begin with small scale, squishy pilots and more through a carefully planned set of stages to refine, study, and expand the innovation.

Since the submission and approval of the Pirate CODE, the Research on Practice model has evolved within the unique and complete context of the ECU EPP. The language of the model has morphed into an implementation language from the original descriptors rooted in the R&D research literature. The Pirate CODE TI and model have been presented in multiple venues across the EPP and at the American Educational Research Association (AERA) Division K Research Summit as well as at an invited session to the 2014 AERA Annual Meeting.