Category Archives: General

Dynamic Dialogue about Diversity panelist

Event Discussed Difficulty Recruiting, Retaining Diverse Educators in Schools

On October 15, 2014, the Office of Professional Development and Student Outreach in the College of Education collaborated with the Office of Equity and Diversity and the Ledonia Wright Cultural Center to offer a Dynamic Dialogue about Diversity event entitled “Diversity in Education.

This event featured a roundtable discussion between the 2014 North Carolina Teacher of the Year, James Ford, and two local educators, Juan Castillo from Greene County Schools and Joey Crutchfield from Pitt County Schools. The discussion integrated the topic of assessment of diversity within the teaching profession. The distinguished panelists shared the African American, Latino American, and Native American perspectives as well as their thoughts on the lack of representation of male educators from these subgroups in the classroom.

The panelist and participants engaged in dialogue about the challenges facing higher education in meeting the need for focused recruitment and retention in teacher education programs of underrepresented populations. The impact of the presence of these subgroups in the classroom as teachers as well as the support found in the schools and school systems that encourage retention in the profession was also intertwined into the conversation.  Additionally, current students and faculty shared how East Carolina University is meeting the needs for the recruitment and retention of diverse populations of students.

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Why Does Accreditation Matter? A Student Perspective.

As a student, I can recall several times when professors have shared that the program I am in is “accredited.”  My mental response was “That’s nice.”  I didn’t care.  All I wanted to know was when the next assignment was due, and what I had to do in order to pass that assignment, the class, and then get my degree.  Sure, it is great that my program has been given a stamp of approval by some mystery third party, but all of that is outside my realm of experiences.
Then a friend of mine at another university shared that they had failed their bid at re-accreditation.  When she graduated, her degree would be from a non-accredited program.  I asked her what that meant for her.  She told me that it would be harder for her to find a job because employers would see her degree as having less value than one from an applicant who had graduated from an accredited program.  Some employers might not even consider her qualified, despite her degree.  She had always wanted to move to the New York-New Jersey area, and now she wasn’t sure she could find a job in that competitive market.  New Jersey actually has a law requiring applicants to notify employers if their degree is from a non-accredited institution.  At that moment, I became alarmed.  Does that mean that all of my hard work might come to mean nothing if the program I was in suddenly lost its accreditation?
All of a sudden my immediate focus of passing the current assignment and class seemed less relevant.  After all, my current assignment and class would mean nothing if I couldn’t find a job after receiving my degree.  I was upset for my friend, who had always studied hard to maintain a high GPA so that she could go anywhere once she graduated.  Now her options were limited.  Attending and graduating from an accredited program suddenly became important to me, and I realized how important it was all along.

In today’s world of online universities and degrees, employers are concerned about hiring quality individuals.  In today’s job market, it can be hard to find a job when there are few positions and many applicants.  Employers look to whittle down the applicants they consider, and one of the first filters they use is whether or not the applicant has attended an accredited program.

Don’t let all of your hard work be in vain.  Make sure your program is accredited, or you may have just gone to school for nothing.

Written by:
Elbert E. Maynard
MSA Principal Fellow
East Carolina University

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Video Grand Rounds

Video Grand Rounds (VGR) provides teacher candidates with an introductory framework for classroom observations and subsequent faculty-guided discussions. This experience provides a conceptual foundation for their future study in teacher education.

Based on the medical grand rounds model, teacher candidates view video segments of typical classrooms, complete structured classroom observation protocols, and then debrief with faculty regarding the observations.

The common classroom observations provide teacher candidates with a common language to discuss quality teaching throughout their programs. These shared experiences lead to in-depth discussions of best practices.

VGR is currently integrated into the Early Experience course in the Elementary Education, Special Education, English Education, Birth-Kindergarten Education and Health Education programs.

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EPP Dashboards – Candidate Knowledge, Skills, and Dispositions (Standard 1)

In the Professional Standards for the Accreditation of Teacher Preparation Institutions, Standard 1 states that, “candidates preparing to work in schools as teachers or other school professionals know and demonstrate the content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge and skills, pedagogical and professional knowledge and skills, and professional dispositions necessary to help all students learn. Assessments indicate that candidates meet professional, state, and institutional standards.”

In an effort to show that the EPP aligned with NCATE/CAEP Standard 1, the OAA focused attentions on evidences used for assessing candidate learning and dispositions, identified in the unit’s conceptual framework, regardless of location or method of delivery.  Dashboard summaries were created for the following exhibits and updates to the dashboards were scheduled to be completed by ITCS in October 2014.

Initial Teacher Preparation Programs:

Advanced Teacher Preparation Programs:

To learn more about key assessments aligning with Standard 1, please visit Exhibit 1.4.e located in the COE Office of Assessment and Accreditation’s NCATE/CAEP Exhibit Room.

*If dashboards fail to load properly, we recommend refreshing the link.
Christa Monroe

2014 Fall Clinical Teacher Conference and the 32nd Annual Mary Lois Staton Reading/Language Arts Conference a Success

The Fall Clinical Teacher Conference and the 32nd Annual Mary Lois Staton Reading/Language Arts Conference were held October 9th, emceed by Christa Monroe, the College of Education’s Lead Coordinator in the Office of Professional Development and Student Outreach.   Jennifer Jones, a K-12 Reading and Intervention specialist was the keynote speaker for the event, motivating audiences with “power strategies to teach like a champion!”

The event was held at the Greenville Hilton, jointly sponsored by the Latham Clinical Schools Network in the Office of Teacher Education and the Department of Literacy Studies, English Education, and History Education, both in the College of Education.  This dynamic symposium brought together clinical teachers, reading coaches, instructional coaches and other educators from throughout eastern North Carolina to participate in quality professional development administered by ECU faculty.

An opportunity for networking and educator engagement followed the event.  The next conference will be held in Fall 2015.

Slideshow: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lt-v1YgeDPU&feature=youtu.be

Video Credit: COE Office of Teacher Education, Photo Credit: Dr. Laura Bilbro-berry


TOP MARKS: Dr. Don Phipps, Superintendent of Beaufort County Schools; Megan Ormond, 2014-2015 BCS Teacher of the Year; Bubs Carson, 2014-2015 Principal of the Year; and Mark Doane, assistant superintendent of Beaufort County Schools at the annual banquet on Sept. 16.

Megan Potter, ’11 MAEd READ graduate, was named the Beaufort County Teacher of the Year for 2014-2015

Mrs. Meredith Megan Potter Ormond, who teaches English at the Beaufort County Early College High School, was named Beaufort County’s Teacher of the Year for 2014-2015 during the annual banquet on Sept. 16. Megan taught at Greene Central High School for nine years and currently teaches English at the Beaufort County Early College High School. When asked about the award, she said, “Winning teacher of the year was certainly an honor. There is no shortage of amazing teachers in Beaufort County so it was humbling to be chosen by my colleagues and the interview board.”

In reflecting on her teaching career, she said that her success in the classroom is due to her supportive administrator and colleagues, a desire to try new teaching strategies and lifelong learning, and engagement in professional development. However, she explained that, “The most important piece is my students. Building relationships with them, creating a classroom culture where everyone feels safe and respected and wants to learn, and having high expectations that are clearly conveyed to students are all core beliefs in my teaching philosophy.”

Megan also described the impact of her undergraduate and graduate studies at ECU: “I never considered going anywhere other than ECU for my preparation as a teacher; I knew it was the best College of Education in the state. I was lucky to have amazing professors as an undergrad like Dr. Sundwall, Dr. Finley, Dr. Muller, and Dr. Wilenz who made me excited to learn about my content and provided me with sound strategies to use in the classroom. The fantastic Teaching Fellows program at ECU instilled in me professionalism and high standards.

My graduate degree in reading education pushed me out of my comfort zone and renewed my love for learning and teaching. I had professors like Dr. Swaggerty, Dr. Atkinson, and Dr. Griffith who were always willing to answer any question and discuss any topic. I felt lucky to work with these wonderful professors so closely and learned so much during my time as a graduate student. I feel like the depth and breadth of my pedagogical knowledge was increased tremendously during that time.”

(Pictured: Dr. Don Phipps, Superintendent of Beaufort County Schools; Megan Ormond, 2014-2015 BCS Teacher of the Year; Bubs Carson, 2014-2015 Principal of the Year; and Mark Doane, assistant superintendent of Beaufort County Schools at the annual banquet on Sept. 16.)

Dr. William Sugar

Dr. Sugar Goes to Press Again with Book, “Studies of ID Practices”

This book provides a comprehensive analysis of cutting edge research studies on contemporary instructional design practices. Written for instructional designers, instructional technologists and researchers in the field, it provides state of the art, practically focused information and guidelines for designing curriculum and professional ID practice. Dr. Sugar compares professional instructional design practices with the competencies established by the International Board for Training, Performance, and Instruction to evaluate and investigate their effectiveness and increase the efficiency of the entire instructional design process.Dr. William Sugar of the College of Education’s Mathematics, Science and Instructional Technology Education Department has recently finished his latest book, “Studies of ID Practices: A Review and Synthesis of Research of ID Current Practices.”

This book provides a comprehensive analysis of cutting edge research studies on contemporary instructional design practices. Written for instructional designers, instructional technologists and researchers in the field, it provides state of the art, practically focused information and guidelines for designing curriculum and professional ID practice. The overall purpose of this book is to provide a comprehensive review of 102 studies of instructional design (ID) practices. Studies of ID practices are research on instructional designers’ current practices and activities. For over thirty years, individual researchers have evaluated the practices of ID professionals and instructional designers and ID students (e.g., Kerr, 1983; Zemke, 1985). This summary and analysis of existing research in these studies of ID practices directly impact the Instructional Design and Technology (IDT) discipline. Congratulations, Dr. Sugar!

samsha

Counselor Education Students to Participate in Mental Health Emergency Training

On Oct. 3, graduate students in the counselor education program in the ECU College of Education will participate in an all-day, intensive training session on mental health, first aid and other emergencies.

Upon completion, participants will receive a three-year certification to help people in mental health emergencies.

Students enrolled in ECU’s program are preparing to work in clinical mental health, college and school settings as professional counselors after graduation.

It’s the first time the specialized training has been offered to ECU counselor education students. While crisis, mental illness and mental health emergency information is available in several courses, organizers said students will benefit from the additional focus. ECU social work and rehabilitation students also will participate in the training, which is hosted by the Counselor Education Association.

“It’s important to think about these issues as they relate to college campuses, and hosting this sort of workshop may help raise awareness for those here at ECU who might be struggling,” said Allison Crowe, assistant professor for counselor education in the College of Education.

ECU counselor education students to participate in mental health emergency training. by Joy Holster.

carden_interview

COE Instructional Technology Student Named AAC Player of the Week

Shane Carden during the ECU game with UNC. The final score of this game was UNC 43 ECU 70.

Shane Carden during the ECU game with UNC on September 20, 2014. The final score was UNC 43 ECU 70.

Shane Carden, a MS Instructional Technology student, was named the AAC player of the week for his performance on the football field this week. According to the news release from ECU, Carden completed 30 of 48 passes for 438 yards and four touchdowns while adding a pair of ground scores, which accounted for six of the Pirates’ 10 scores.  Carden is not new to winning awards.  Other recent awards include:

  • American Athletic Conference Player-of-the-Week
  • Athlon Sports American Offensive Player-of-the-Week (second-time in 2014)
  • College Football Performance Awards (CFPA) honorable mention
  • College Sports Madness American Player-of-the-week
  • Manning Award Stars-of-the-Week (second-time in 2014)

Soon he will have an MS degree in Instructional Technology to add to his list of achievements.

Congratulations, Shane.

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CAEP Prep: NCATE-Legacy Transformation Initiative

ECU’s accreditation cycle was extended by one year – from Spring 2014 to Spring 2015 – when our Transformation Initiative (TI) was approved. As a result, ECU was allowed to complete this accreditation visit under the old NCATE Standards, not the newly approved CAEP Standards. As a result, ECU is hosting an NCATE-Legacy Transformation Initiative accreditation visit.

The NCATE Unit Standards (2008) are:

  • Standard 1: Candidate Knowledge, Skills, and Professional Dispositions
  • Standard 2: Assessment System and Unit Evaluation
  • Standard 3: Field Experiences and Clinical Practice
  • Standard 4: Diversity
  • Standard 5: Faculty Qualifications, Performance, and Development
  • Standard 6: Unit Governance and Resources

More information about the NCATE Unit Standards (2008) and their indicators are available at http://www.ncate.org/.