Category Archives: General

MBHLI Literacy Leaders

Spring 2016 Margaret Blount Harvey Literacy Institute

East Carolina University’s College of Education Reading Faculty hosted the spring 2016 Margaret Blount Harvey Literacy Institute on Saturday, January 30, 2016, for pre-service and in-service teacher educators from the Latham Clinical Schools Network, a privately funded partnership program that supports the enhancement of 39 school systems in eastern North Carolina.  The Margaret Blount Harvey Institutes are possible through the generosity of Felix and Margaret Harvey, and daughters Leigh McNairy and Sunny Burrows.

Targeting the Margaret Blount Harvey Literacy Leaders Board and undergraduate students in the College of Education, this working session provided opportunities for substantial and substantive work focused on literacy and literacy development.  Two sessions were held one for the Literacy Leaders Board and one for undergraduate College of Education students.

Dr. Elizabeth Swaggerty and Dr. Anne Ticknor led the session for the Literacy Leaders Board. Dr. Christy Howard and Dr. Ran Hu helped facilitate the work which focused on the current state of literacy instruction in public schools, the issues and challenges that literacy leaders and teachers face and importantly, session offered an opportunity to share concrete strategies for addressing challenges and moving forward.

Pre-service educators review the development and progression of literacy skills and instruction needed to be successful on the Foundations of Reading test.

Pre-service educators engaged in reviewing the development and progression of literacy skills and instruction needed to be successful on the Foundations of Reading test.

The session for students led by Dr. Kim Anderson, Dr. Johna Faulconer, Dr. Caitlin Ryan with support from Ms. Jean Gore and Ms. Tanya Cannon included a solid review of the development and progression of literacy skills and instruction needed to be successful on the Foundations of Reading test required for licensure in North Carolina.  Dr. Katherine Misulis, Chair of the Department of Literacy Studies, English Education, and History Education, said “While the session for students focused on insuring a solid knowledge base in preparation for the North Carolina Foundations of Reading test, in reality, the session did so much more.  It truly helped our future teachers become more prepared to teach and reinforce literacy skills, and with today’s session, particularly those early literacy skills and strategies focusing on word recognition and identification.”

MBHLI Foundations

Literacy Studies Undergraduates following their working session at the 2016 Margaret Blount Harvey Literacy Institute on Saturday, January 30.  Pictured at the top of the page: Literacy Leaders.

The next Margaret Blount Harvey Literacy Institute will be held September 24, 2016 in Greenville, NC.

Crystal Chambers

Drs. Chambers and Ransom co-author article on “Teaching Ethics in Higher Education”

In “Teaching Ethics in Higher Education Using the Values – Issues – Action (VIA) Model,” LEED Professor Dr. Crystal Chambers, along with co-author Hellen Ransom present a model through which higher education leaders can consider the values they have and whether their actions align with those values as they deal with issues. Dr. Chambers currently teaches courses on law and ethics for students in the higher education concentration of the doctoral program in educational leadership. For the past two years, Dr. Chambers has presented on the topic of teaching ethics in higher education to new faculty through an invited session by the Council for the Advancement Higher Education Programs (CAHEP) during the Association for the Study of Higher Education’s (ASHE) annual conferences. Dr. Ransom is an associate professor of bioethics. The two met through the university’s new faculty mentorship program offered through the office for faculty excellent, where Dr. Chambers serves as a faculty mentor.

A link to the article, published by the Journal for the Advancement of Postsecondary and Tertiary Edcuation is available here http://www.informingscience.org/Publications/2336

International Literacy Assoc

LEHE Faculty contribute to International Literacy Association Blog

Dr. Terry S. Atkinson, Associate Professor in the Department of Literacy Studies, English, and History Education, is a regular contributor to the International Literacy Association’s Teaching with Technology Blog.  Her most recent entry, “Inspiration and Motivation with Technology in the Midst of Constant Change” went live on January 8, 2016 and features research she conducted with LEHE colleague, Dr. Elizabeth Swaggerty.

http://www.literacyworldwide.org/blog/literacy-daily/2016/01/08/inspiration-and-motivation-with-technology-in-the-midst-of-constant-change

The International Literacy Association’s Teaching with Technology Blog is maintained by members of the Technology in Literacy Education Special Interest Group (TILE-SIG).

Afolayan5w[1]

LEED alumna, LaTonya Afolayan, named Associate Vice President for Advancement at Lamar University

ECU alumna LaTanya Afolayan has joined the advancement division at Lamar University as associate vice president for university advancement after a national search.

“We are very pleased to have LaTanya at Lamar University,” said Juan Zabala, vice president for university advancement. “Her fund raising and donor relations experience complements our staff well. She will be a tremendous asset to our role of making LU an ever stronger university through philanthropy.”

The 15-year career development professional comes to LU from Appalachian State University in North Carolina where she served as major gifts officer and director of development since 2011.

Previously, Afolayan served as vice chancellor of institutional advancement at North Carolina Central University from 2009 to 2010. There she managed the day-to-day operations of the alumni relations, annual fund, major gifts, and foundation and stewardship staff.

Her career also includes service as the first director of major and planned gifts at Elizabeth City State University, 2002-2005, as associate vice chancellor, 2005-2008, then vice chancellor, 2008-2009.

She began her advancement career at Emory University in Atlanta where she served as program associate, assistant director of corporate relations, 1994-1998.

Afolayan served as news director and senior producer for WPRL-FM, Alcorn State University in Lorman, Miss., 1988-1992.  She was a reporter, producer and instructor for KOMU-TB, Columbia, Mo., 1986-1987.

She holds a Ed.D., from East Carolina University, Greenville, N.C., a M.A., from the University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo., and a bachelor’s from Indiana State University, Terre Haute, Ind.

She holds certification in fundraising management and is a member of the Association of Fundraising Professionals and the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education.


(January 2016). Afolayan joins LU advancement staff
, Beaumont Business Journal. Retrieved from http://beaumontbusinessjournal.com/article/higher-education/afolayan-joins-lu-advancement-staff

Montague Franklin with Jennifer Stalls

College of Education’s online graduate education programs ranked among nation’s best by U.S. News & World Report

Dr. Grant Hayes

Dr. B. Grant Hayes, dean of ECU’s College of Education

Four online graduate programs at East Carolina University have been ranked among the nation’s best by U.S. News & World Report.

ECU’s programs in business, criminal justice, education and nursing are listed in U.S. News 2016 Best Online Programs announced Jan. 12.

The College of Education’s online graduate education programs tied for 14th out of 252 schools.

“Our high ranking is a testament to the hard work and dedication of all College of Education faculty and staff,” said Dr. Grant Hayes, dean of the College of Education. “It has been a priority over the past several years to develop online master’s programs that are rigorous, appealing and accessible for education professionals who are dedicated to enriching the lives of others.”

A total of 366 students were enrolled in the following online education programs during the 2014-15 year: adult education, business education, elementary education, instructional technology, science education, reading education, special education and middle grades education.

ECU’s College of Nursing programs were ranked 23rd out of 147 schools. This fall, 316 students were enrolled in the college’s six online graduate options: adult-gerontology clinical nurse specialist, neonatal clinical nurse specialist, neonatal nurse practitioner, nursing education, nursing leadership and nurse midwifery.

“The College of Nursing has been at the forefront of online education almost since its inception,” said Dean Sylvia Brown. “It’s an important educational avenue for us to provide because it gives working nurses the ability to pursue advanced degrees while continuing to serve their communities. Better educated nurses mean better patient outcomes, and that’s key because it ties back to ECU’s mission of service.”

ECU’s online Master of Business Administration program has been recognized by U.S. News since it began ranking graduate-level business distance education programs. ECU’s MBA program tied at 72nd out of 221 schools in the country.

“We’re proud to continue leading the way as a top innovator in distance education,” said Dr. Stan Eakins, dean of the ECU College of Business. “Our strong showing in the latest U.S. News rankings reflects our commitment to academic excellence and reinforces our reputation as one of the nation’s finest institutions of higher learning.”

The online program in the College of Business has grown from a single course offering in 1998 to undergraduate and graduate degrees in various concentrations. Of the 709 total students enrolled in the ECU MBA program this fall, nearly 80 percent selected online classes. More students are enrolled in the ECU College of Business than in any other business school in the state.

ECU’s online graduate criminal justice program placed the highest in North Carolina and tied for 30th out of 51 schools ranked in the nation.

“Our ranking recognizes our commitment to educate the next generation of criminal justice leaders through excellence in graduate study,” said Dr. William Bloss, professor and chair of the ECU Department of Criminal Justice.

The recognition comes amid substantial growth in ECU’s criminal justice program, which also offers a graduate certificate in criminal justice education and two multidisciplinary graduate certificate options.

More than 50 students are pursuing an online graduate criminal justice degree, and Bloss expects an increase in enrollment this fall. “The recent growth marks over a 50 percent increase in admissions and enrollment since 2010 and provides further evidence of the demand for advanced criminal justice education among practitioners and post-baccalaureate students in the region and beyond,” Bloss said.

To develop the rankings, U.S. News & World Report evaluated areas such as student engagement, faculty credentials and training, student services and technology, admissions selectivity and peer reputation.

The complete listing can be viewed at http://www.usnews.com/online.

Jan. 12, 2016
By Crystal Baity
ECU News Services

Social media activity SECU PE meeting Fall 2015

“Growing Our Own!” – Eastern North Carolina Community Colleges, School Systems and East Carolina University Collaborate to Fill Classrooms in the East

left-Rich Hudson - right- Grant HayesOn December 2, 2015, sixty-six community college and school system leaders gathered with East Carolina University faculty at the East Carolina Heart Institute in Greenville to focus on the collaborative efforts in preparing educators for the region through State Employees’ Credit Union Partnership East (SECU PE).   The partnership involves a network of 20 community college partners and 41 school system partners within the Latham Clinical Schools Network with the common goal of providing access to teacher education degrees “close to home.”

Dr. Grant Hayes, dean of the College of Education, brought greetings to the group of community college presidents, vice presidents, and liaisons as well as superintendents, assistant superintendents, and human resource directors of eastern North Carolina public school systems.

“There is a growing need to address teacher shortages in rural areas within the region and ECU is committed to offering innovative ways to provide convenient and affordable access to education degrees for students within their home communities,” said Dr. Hayes.

Hayes also recognized the contribution of the State Employees’ Credit Union Foundation who awarded ECU a multi-million dollar gift for student scholarships that are distributed during the SECU PE students’ senior year. Hayes noted that the scholarship funds from the SECU Foundation are crucial for students during their clinical internship which requires these working adults to quit their jobs to complete clinical field work. Mr. Rich Hudson, the Greenville manager of the State Employees’ Credit Union, was present at the event representing the SECU Foundation. He thanked those in attendance for their efforts in producing educators who later become state employees.

A status update regarding the impact of SECU Partnership East was shared with participants. Since its inception in 2002, SECU Partnership East has prepared 674 teachers. 91% of those licensed and teaching are educating children within eastern North Carolina. These graduates have gone on to serve students well in their districts, have become school level Teachers of the Year, and have demonstrated innovation and leadership. Through this well-established partnership, SECU PE positively impacts families in our region to include those of our graduates and those of the students they teach.

A snapshot of the current students enrolled was also provided to the partners in attendance. SECU Partnership East has 227 students currently enrolled with applications being sought for 2016 for degrees in elementary education, special education and middle grades education. Guests at the event also engaged in a social media activity to learn about recent marketing efforts by faculty within SECU Partnership East. Ideas for capitalizing on the use of social media were also shared by community college and school system partners.

SECU Partnership East supports East Carolina University’s mission to engage in regional transformation through providing access to teacher education degrees for students who otherwise could not attend college. Through the collaborative efforts of community colleges, schools systems, and ECU, students in the partnership are recruited from their home communities, learn in those home communities, and upon graduation, go on to positively impact the lives of children in the East.

For information about SECU Partnership East, please visit our website at www.ecu.edu/pe or contact Dr. Laura Bilbro-Berry at 252-328-1123 or bilbroberryl@ecu.edu

SCEC

SCEC Holds Holiday Gathering

The Student Council for Exceptional Children (SCEC) pre-professional club recently celebrated their Fall Holiday Gathering at Dr. Melissa Hudson’s home. The officers and members took time to reflect on the accomplishments of the club for the Fall semester, make plans for the upcoming Spring semester, and spend time bonding over good food and fun activities with their peers and faculty. Happy Holidays to the College of Education from SCEC!

NC-NNSTOY Fall Meeting Pix

Current and Former North Carolina Teachers of the Year Meet in Greenville

On Saturday, November 14th, thirteen current and former state and regional North Carolina Teachers of the Year met at the College of Education at East Carolina University to discuss teacher leadership, development, and recruitment at the quarterly meeting of the newly founded North Carolina chapter of the National Network of State Teachers of the Year (NC-NNSTOY). The NC-NNSTOY chapter is a service organization that was chartered in 2014-2015 and is spending this year planning activities to promote education as a profession across North Carolina. The purpose of the organization is to “advance the teaching profession and advocate for public education to ensure the best educational opportunities for all North Carolina students.” The group is currently working its platform for encouraging more individuals to consider teaching as a profession as well as avenues for supporting current educational professionals.

As a part of the members visit to Greenville, the current N.C. Teacher of the Year team engaged with 5th grade students in Jami Dickerson’s classroom at Eastern Elementary as well as visited Pactolus Elementary where they were hosted by Steve Lassiter, the current North Carolina Principal of the Year.

The NC-NNSTOY chapter looks forward to growing its membership and to taking a leading role in shaping educational policy, advocating for education, as well as sharing professional expertise within the field of education. For more information about the National Network of State Teachers of the Year, visit this website: http://www.nnstoy.org/

In attendance were teacher leaders from across the state including:

  • Diana Beasley, 2006-2007 North Carolina Teacher of the Year
  • *James Bell, 2007-2008 North Carolina Teacher of the Year
  • Jennifer Bell, 2010-2011 North Carolina Teacher of the Year
  • *Laura Bilbro-Berry, 2000-2001 North Carolina Teacher of the Year
  • *Jami Dickerson, 2015-2016 Region 1 Teacher of the Year
  • Allison Ormond, 2003-2004 North Carolina Teacher of the Year
  • Ruth Ann Parker, 2008-2009 Region 2 Teacher of the Year
  • Malinda Pennington, 2012-2013 Region 3 Teacher of the Year
  • Cindi Rigsbee, 2008-2009 North Carolina Teacher of the Year
  • Sonya Rinehart, 2008-2009 Region 1 Teacher of the Year
  • Mariel Barker Sellers, 2015-2016 Region 4 Teacher of the Year
  • Keana Triplett, 2015-2016 North Carolina Teacher of the Year
  • Jennifer Whitley, 2015-2016 Region 6 Teacher of the Year

*ECU College of Education Alumni

Captain Arrrgh Headshot

From the TRC: Reluctant Readers

It’s the third Thursday of the month and a new edition of From the TRC is published to highlight another service or resource Joyner Library’s Teaching Resources Center (TRC) has to support the College of Education’s faculty and students. Today we’ll cover one of our newest bibliographies, Reluctant Readers.

The TRC has created, and constantly updates, an extensive list of bibliographies and guides available to help students, faculty and staff easily navigate our collections. Print copies for select topics are available in the TRC while our entire catalog of bibliographies and guides are available on the TRC’s website. The reluctant readers bibliography is currently only available online, and is based on titles from the Young Adult Library Association’s (YALSA) Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers List.

But, we need to define who a reluctant reader. The umbrella term, reluctant reader, is used to describe a few different groups of students. Reluctant readers generally fall into one of three categories, those who can’t, don’t or won’t read. Students may not read because they lack the literacy and comprehension skills needed to do so which can lead to self-doubt and a fear of their secret being “found out.” The latter two categories encompass students able to read, but either dislike reading itself or their personal interests lead them to other activities they find more attractive.

So, what to do? A simple Internet search will overwhelm you. There is no shortage of parenting websites, non-profit and for-profit companies willing to share tips, tricks, and books. The Lexile Framework for Reading also offers tips and links to additional resources.

One theme you will find over and over again as you sift through all these resources is student choice. Allow your reluctant readers to choose reading material (e.g., comic book, graphic novel, popular magazine, etc.) about topics they are interested in. Of course, if a teacher knows their students’ interests, and happens to know a few books that may pique their interest, it’s a win-win. That’s why the TRC created our bibliography for reluctant readers.

Joyner Library’s subscription to Novelist Plus will also come in handy at times like this. Novelist Plus allows users to search for “Title Read-alikes” and “Author Read-alikes”. For example, if a student liked Kwame Alexander’s novel, The Crossover” A Basketball Novel, you can use that feature to find a list of similar reads:

Figure 1: The Crossover: A Basketball Novel’s entry in Novelist Plus. Read-alikes are found just above the “Find It!” button.

Figure 1: The Crossover: A Basketball Novel’s entry in Novelist Plus. Read-alikes are found just above the “Find It!” button.

Figure 2: Clicking on the “Title Read-alikes” will show a list of novels with similar themes.

Figure 2: Clicking on the “Title Read-alikes” will show a list of novels with similar themes.

Why is it important to become familiar with Novelist Plus? All K-12 educators in North Carolina have free access to either Novelist K-8 or Novelist Plus through NC WiseOwlJoyner Library’s subscription to Novelist Plus is the only way pre-service teachers can access this resource until you have your own classroom.

We hope to hear from you soon!

Until next time…Dan Z. in the TRC

Patricia Slagter Van Tryon and Ken Luterbach welcome AECT Executive Director Phil Harris to the ECU conference reception table.

ECU College of Education at AECT International Conference

The Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) held its annual international conference in Indianapolis, IN November 2-7, 2015. The ECU College of Education had a particularly strong presence at the event this year. ECU faculty made over a dozen presentations of their work, and facilitated a multitude of activities including the Pacificorp Instructional Design Competition.