Category Archives: General

Denny Sanford and Grant Hayes

ECU receives funding to develop leaders in education

GREENVILLE, N.C. (8/22/2016) – The East Carolina University College of Education is one of two universities invited to join the Sanford Education Collaborative (SEC), a network of universities committed to expanding a nationwide movement to create a new paradigm for pre-K–12 teaching excellence and student achievement.

Each year, the SEC selects a small number of universities to join the collaborative based on factors such as demonstrated effective teacher preparation, regional representation and institutional diversity, according to Dr. Grant Hayes, dean of the College of Education at ECU.

National University’s Sanford Education Center administers the collaborative that announced that the college will initially receive $50,000 to enhance the development of research and implementation of evidenced-based programs. The funding will support ECU’s teacher preparation programs for undergraduates and professional development offerings for teachers in eastern North Carolina.

“This program sets us up to strengthen the partnerships with our K–12 partners,” said Hayes. “Professional development for teachers in our region is a huge need for school districts. We can use these funds and our expertise to take some of the burden off schools.”

ECU will be able to enhance its work with the New Teacher Support Program (NTSP), a UNC-system program that facilitates coaching and professional development for teachers in their first through third years of teaching in eastern North Carolina.

“Often times, new teachers do not feel empowered in the current system to make any changes,” said Hayes. “They may think that because something has been done a certain way for a long time or they are a new teacher, they can’t make changes or improvements. We want to create agents of change and advocates.”

The SEC has two evidenced-based initiatives serving pre-K–12 education: Sanford Harmony and Sanford Inspire. Sanford Harmony strengthens social and emotional development in pre-K–6 children, and Sanford Inspire is a leadership program designed to empower current and future teachers to create inspiring pre-K-12 classroom experiences, said Hayes.

“These programs have been found to have positive impacts on attitudes towards school and academic performances in math and reading,” said Hayes. “Initial research findings have also shown that these programs have increased empathy, identified reductions in gender stereotyping and classroom aggression.”

The college’s initial focus will be on Sanford Harmony.

College of Education representatives officially accepted the invitation at the second annual Sanford Higher Education Collaborative Summit held on March 1–3 at National University in La Jolla, California.

“This recognition puts us on the national stage to display and showcase our work with initiatives like TeachLive, edTPA and PirateCODE beyond state and region,” said Hayes.

The Sanford Education Collaborative was established at National University in 2014 through a generous gift by renowned philanthropist and businessman T. Denny Sanford to address critical needs in the education and the nonprofit sectors.

For more information about the collaborative, visit sanfordeducationcenter.org.

SGA First Year Award

Two COE administrators recognized for supporting first-year students

The Student Government Association announced that two College of Education administrators were nominated for the 2015-2016 First Year Advocate Award.

Dr. Dionna Manning, director of the Education Community of Scholars and Education Living-Learning Community, and Caroline Hill, academic advisor, were nominated for their work in providing support to those students who are new to ECU.

“We received multiple nominations, representing ECU faculty and staff across Academic and Student Affairs,” according to the notification letter. “Each of the nominees personifies dedication to first year student growth by promoting academic success, intellectual growth, student engagement, personal growth and community involvement.”

Congratulations to Dionna and Caroline, and thank you for your service!

astronomy festival

ECU faculty inspire science on National Mall

Summers are warm but certainly not lazy for ECU faculty. Many ECU Faculty use this time as an opportunity to reach beyond the campus and inspire and excite people of all ages in learning and doing science.

In Washington D.C. the annual Astronomy Festival on the National Mall, hosted by Hofstra University and funded by NASA through the Music and Astronomy Under the Stars program is one such opportunity that engages an estimated 10,000 people.

Dr. Sharon Schleigh, faculty member in the Department of Mathematics, Science & Instructional Technology Education (MSITE) was invited to join a group of astronomers from the nation’s foremost scientific institutions, organizations and universities to present exciting demonstrations and answer questions about the latest astronomical discoveries or careers in science.

The annual event begins during the daylight hours by engaging visitors to the National Mall in hands-on astronomy activities, demonstrations and presentations. Visitors have opportunities to use solar telescopes, watch planetarium shows, and ask astronomers questions about topics of interest and possible career choices. Visitors continue to join the event late into the evening and as the day progresses to night, astronomers set up a variety of large telescopes across the Washington D.C. National Mall to allow participants to view local objects in the night sky such the Moon, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn; and spectacular objects such as colorful double stars, star clusters that sparkle like diamonds on black velvet, and some favorite nebulae such as Orion Nebula, the Ring Nebula and the Dumbbell Nebula.

“Bringing astronomy to the National Mall and partnering with astronomical organizations gives us a very special opportunity to encourage children to pursue their interest in science or math and to promote public understanding of science,” said Dr. Lubowich. “Gazing at the rings of Saturn or the Moon’s craters captures the imagination, no matter how old you are.”

Participating Science Organizations: American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Association of Physics Teachers, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Carnegie Institution for Science, Celestial Chart, Center of Physics & Astronomy Education Research, E-planetarium/Discovery Dome, International Dark Sky Association, NASA – Goddard Space Flight Center, Lunar and Planetary Institute, National Center for Earth and Space Science Education, National Radio Astronomy Observatory, National Science Foundation, Naval Research Laboratory, #Popscope, Society of Physics Students, Space Telescope Science Institute, US Naval Observatory, and the Washington Area Astronomy Meetup.

Participating Colleges and Universities: American University, Catholic University of American, East Carolina University, Georgetown University, George Mason University, George Washington University, Montgomery College, Rice University.

Participating Astronomy clubs and related organizations: Amateur Observers’ Society of New York, Astronomical Association of Greenbelt, Goddard Astronomy Club, National Capital Astronomers, Northern Virginia Astronomy Club, Rappahannock Astronomy Club, and the Society of Amateur Radio Astronomers.

Organizations that have supported the AFNM to spread the word to their members and the public via social media include: the American Astronomical Society, American Geophysical Union, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Association of Science-Technology Centers, Astronomers Without Borders, Astronomical League, Astronomical Society of the Pacific/Night Sky Network, Astronomy Magazine, National Academies of Science, Marian Koshland Science Museum, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, National Science Teachers Association, Nerd Nite DC, Sky and Telescope Magazine, Sidewalk Astronomers, Society for Science & the Public.

Miles and Rawls-

COE grant educates students on the science of drug abuse

Tonya Little presentationThe Science Education Against Drug Abuse Partnership (SEADAP) program aims to expose students from 6th through 12th grade to the real-world applications of the scientific method in order to teach them about drug addiction.

Now in its third year, the SEADAP program continues to implement hands-on curriculum educating students about the science of drug addiction and the adverse effects of widely abused substances while exposing students in research activities to increase their interest in STEM careers.

Students are led in the design of their own experiments on planaria, a type of flatworm, with Teachersnicotine, alcohol, and sucrose solutions to conduct investigations from lab manuals that specifically address the National Science Education Standards & Common Core, while building partnerships with medical scientists, addiction specialists and professional educators, to educate the general public about drug abuse.

ECU recently hosted a group of educators from Pitt, Martin and Lenoir county public schools, continuing to expand the SEADAP program into North Carolina’s STEM curriculum.

Rawls with teachersECU is collaborating with Temple University on this project. Dr. Scott Rawls of Temple is the co- principal investigator, and Dr. Rhea Miles of ECU is the co-principal investigator.

Teachers will be working with high school students from Pitt, Martin, and Lenoir counties to conduct research investigations at ECU to study the effect of nicotine, caffeine, alcohol and sucrose on planaria under the direction of Miles in the Department of Mathematics, Science, and Instructional Technology Education in the College of Education.

Teachers will also work with students to study the effects of drug addiction on flatworms through the SEADAP grant.

For more information on the SEADAP Program contact Dr. Rhea Miles at 252-328-9366 or milesr@ecu.edu.

EQUIPPED group 2[1]

EQUIPPED Scholars AT Summer Institute a huge success!

The Irene Howell Assistive Technology (IHAT) Center and EQUIPPED grant Co-Principal Investigators, Drs. Alana Zambone and Christopher Rivera, hosted the Assistive Technology (AT) Summer Institute during the week of July 18-22, 2016. The EQUIPPED Summer Institute was developed as a week-long professional development for seven graduate students through the OSEP Personnel Prep grant: EQUIPPED: Engendering High Quality Personnel Preparation for Educators Serving Students with Significant Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. The EQUIPPED grant is designed to prepare initially licensed teachers (B.S.) and teacher-leaders in Special Education and Assistance Technology for NC schools and communities. The teacher-leader goal of the grant provides special educators with tuition and other financial support to complete their MAEd in Special Education – Low Incidence Disabilities Licensure Area and the Graduate Certificate in Assistive Technology (AT). The participating EQUIPPED Scholars were Sara Farwell, Sara Graves, Katie Hancock, Morgan Kennedy, Jillian Kime, Brittney Roper, and April Vernon.EQUIPPED group web

With a focus on assistive technology and best practices for working with students with significant disabilities, the institute started with an expert panel discussion of two district level assistive technology teams- Alamance Burlington Schools represented by Pat Byers, Amy Chinnici, and Sara Hammond; and Winston Salem/Forsyth County Schools represented by Cindy Hall, Emma Sidden, Jennifer Kerr, and Adam Seipel. The teams shared their leadership journeys in their respective fields of education, speech language pathology, occupational therapy, and instructional technology. Furthermore, they discussed system processes and procedures that are used in their counties and tips for working collaboratively with other educators and related service personnel in the area of assistive technology. The following three days of the institute allowed for in-depth expertise training in the area of augmentative and alternative communication, which was facilitated by Lisa Erwin-Davidson of the Center for Literacy and Disability Studies at UNC-Chapel Hill; AT for literacy, which was facilitated by Dr. Pamela Mims from East Tennessee State University; and AT for Math, which was facilitated by Dr. Melissa Hudson of East Carolina University and Julie Brickhouse of Pitt County Schools. In addition to the expert speakers, assistive technology vendors from Attainment and Tobii Dynavox also shared new technologies in AT. The EQUIPPED participants worked on a cumulative project throughout the week of trainings and completed presentations to their peers on the final day of the institute.

The EQUIPPED graduate scholars will return to their schools and communities to engage in AT assignments over the next academic year, including mentoring of new teachers, conducting professional development, and engaging in other leadership activities under the guidance of Dr. Laura King, Director of the IHAT Center, and Dr. Chris Rivera, Co-PI on EQUIPPED. The Summer Institute allowed the scholars to network with their peers in the cohort, as well as a variety of AT experts who work in assistive technology in a variety of capacities. A second EQUIPPED Summer Institute will take place in 2018 for the next cohort of EQUIPPED Scholars.

Instructor Jose Gregory of Dunwoody, GA, leads the AP US History session during the 2016 APSI.

2016 AP Summer Institute a huge success!

The College of Education’s Center for STEM Education hosted the 2016 AP Summer Institute (APSI) at South Central High School in Greenville June 27 – June 30.   More than 120 educators from across the state and country attended this year’s APSI, which is more than double the amount of participation from last year.

“This is the fourteenth year that ECU’s College of Education has hosted the AP Summer Institute,” said APSI Director, Dr. Lori Flint. “Our goal is to train highly qualified teachers to bring more rigor to their classrooms and expose more students in rural areas to AP courses.”

Flint attributed the increase in participation to the addition four new AP sessions: AP US History, AP Psychology, AP English Language and AP English Literature. Previous APSI’s offered only STEM AP sessions including: AP Biology, AP Calculus AB, AP Chemistry, AP Environmental Science, AP Physics 1 and AP Statistics.087A1418

“AP courses enhance student skills and better prepare them for college-level work,” added APSI Coordinator Ann McClung. “First-year college students who have taken these classes are much better writers than students who were never exposed to AP coursework.”

Each session is four-days long and is taught by a certified College Board consultant who has taught the AP course, served as an exam reader for several years and received additional training from the College Board.

Participants pay $575 for 30 hours of intensive training over four days. The fee for the non-residential institute covers training materials, snacks and lunch. The ECU APSI is a College Board endorsed non-residential summer institute.087A1392

“Our consultants have been unbelievable,” said Flint. “The sessions have been so engaging our participants hardly take time for snacks or lunch. They are not only getting expert advice on how to prepare students for AP exams they are also networking and learning about best practices from their peers.”

ECU College of Education CSTEM AP Summer Institute

  • AP Biology – Instructor, Tom Willis of Saint Simons Island, GA
  • AP Calculus AB – Instructor, Deb Castello of Orlando, FL
  • AP Chemistry – Instructor, Linda Kruegel of Hertfort, NC
  • AP Environmental Science – Instructor, Gordon Chenery of Nashville, TN
  • AP Physics 1 – Instructor, Jiang Yu of Fitchburg, MA
  • AP Statistics – Instructor, Gloria Barrett of Pittsboro, NC
    NEW for 2016
  • AP US History – Instructor, Jose Gregory of Dunwoody, GA
  • AP English LanguageInstructor, Terry W. Filippo of Clemson, SC
  • AP English Literature Instructor, Patricia Whyte of Bluffton, SC
  • AP Psychology Instructor, Nancy Fenton of Trevor, WI

Above –  Instructor Jose Gregory of Dunwoody, GA, leads the AP US History session during the 2016 APSI.

gavin and girls

One in a million: COE alum has rare identical triplets

Congratulations to ECU College of Education alum Gavin Fradel and his family on their kim and gavin-Speightnewest addition–a rare identical set of triplet girls. The May 2016 graduate earned a master of arts in teaching in science education online and lives in Wake Forest, NC. In 2004, he graduated with a bachelor of science in middle grades education. Fradel is currently a teacher at Franklin Academy Middle School in Wake Forest.

 

By WSOC-TV/WFTV-9-ABC

WAKE FOREST, N.C. — A Wake Forest family recently welcomed natural identical triplet girls, a 1-in-a-million phenomenon.

Grace, Stella, and Emily were born to Kimberly and Gavin Fradel about a month ago, Channel 9’s partners WTVD reported.

The parents said they wanted to give their 2-year-old son, Gavin Jr, a sibling and were initially overwhelmed when they found out he would gain three.

“[The doctor] had a look on her face and I said ‘Well, what’s wrong?’ I could tell something was wrong, and she said, ‘I think you’re having multiples. I think you’re having triplets,’ and my first response was ‘Oh God no, please God no,’ and then she said ‘And I think they’re identical,’” Kimberly told WTVD.

The couple realized they could handle the extra blessings when their friends and family reassured them that they’d be there to help. They also said having understanding employers made a difference.

Gavin Sr. was taking online classes at East Carolina University when Kimberly found out she was pregnant.fradels2

His graduation was set for the day after the triplets were born, and Kimberly encouraged him to walk across the stage.

Gavin Sr. said that life with triplets can sometimes be like an “assembly line,” but it’s rewarding to see how the babies have already bonded with each other.

To tell each one apart, the couple paint the girls’ toenails a different color. Each also has a birthmark, but in a different place.

Gavin Jr. was a little taken aback by three girls entering his home.

“When we got home from the hospital … as soon as he saw them he said ‘Daddy, take them back,’ and he said it twice,” Gavin Sr. said. “I have no idea where he even got those words from or where he started saying that, but that was his first reaction, and it was hilarious. It was funny.”

The couple said Gavin Jr. quickly changed his attitude toward his sisters.

“He always kisses his sisters. He helps with bottles. He’s very patient. He’s just a really good, protective big brother and I believe all four of them are going to have unique gifts and a love for each other that will take care for each other for the rest of their lives,” Kimberly said.

Original story: Rare identical triplets born to North Carolina family

Dr. Grant Hayes

Public School Forum of NC elects Hayes as member

The Public School Forum of North Carolina’s Board of Directors officially welcomed Dr. Grant Hayes, dean of the College of Education, to its membership on June 7. Hayes was elected for a two-year term of service during the organization’s annual meeting on May 16 and is effective July 1.

The Public School Forum of NC’s mission is to “shape a world-class public school education that supports all children in reaching their pull potential and drives a vibrant North Carolina economy,” according to the Forum’s website: www.ncforum.org.

Established 30 years ago, the Forum has launched programs like the Beginning Teacher Network, Education Policy Fellowship Program, Teaching Fellows Program, and the NC Center for Afterschool Programs among others.

“The Forum is comprised of an impressive and well-rounded group of individuals who are working hard to advance and improve North Carolina’s public schools through research, policy and advocacy,” said Hayes. “I’m grateful for the opportunity to contribute to this work.”

Each year, the Forum determines top 10 education issues to address for the year. The 2016 list is below, and the list from 2015 can be found online: Top 10 Education Issues 2015.

  1. Direct Adequate Resources to Public Schools, Teachers, and Leaders
  2. Transform the Profession to Make NC a Teaching Destination Again
  3. Emphasize Quality, not Quantity, in Charter School Growth
  4. Elevate Race as a Focal Point of Public Education
  5. Fix the Broken A-F Grading System
  6. Support the State’s Struggling Schools
  7. Maintain High Standards for North Carolina
  8. Make Evidence-Based Decisions on Expansion of Private-School Vouchers
  9. Expand Access to High-Quality Early Childhood Education
  10. Build Bridges for Students through Expanded Learning

To follow or join conversations with the Forum and issues, #EdTalksNC can be found on Twitter, Facebook and at edtalks.ncforum.org/.

SODM Credential Group Spring 2016

COE Adult Education Program partners with School of Dental Medicine

The COE Adult Education Program has partnered with the School of Dental Medicine on a program to provide adult education courses to School of Dental Medicine faculty.  SODM Faculty in this photo completed three graduate-level courses in adult education over the past year, and each earned a graduate credential in Education in the Healthcare Professions.  All are continuing with their coursework to complete a graduate certificate in Education in the Healthcare Professions.  This partnership was organized up by Dr. Steve Schmidt, Associate Professor of Adult Education, and Drs. Geri Crane and Jo Anne Murray at the SODM.    

Pictured (L to R):  Dr. Steve Schmidt, with students Dr. Michael Webb, Dr. Angela Broome, Dr. Wally McCarlie, Dr. Paul Lindauer, Dr. Nisha Ganesh; Dr. Scott Glass, Chair of the IDP Department, and Dr. Greg Chadwick, Dean of the SODM.

 

Crystal Chambers

Chambers Awarded Distinguished Graduate Faculty Mentor

College of Education’s Dr. Crystal Chambers in the Department of Educational Leadership was selected as this year’s winners of the 4th Annual ECU Distinguished Graduate Faculty Mentor Award. These two awardees were recognized during Research and Creative Activities Week.

Students and faculty colleagues nominated many outstanding individuals. A selection committee of faculty and students reviewed nomination materials and awardees were selected based on evidence of success as mentors, which was demonstrated in the nomination letters, and the nominees’ mentoring statements.

Dr. Chambers recognized for her success in mentoring graduate students in their intellectual growth; helping them develop independent research interests; and fostering development of their communication skills, interpersonal skills, research skills, and professional skills.