Category Archives: Higher, Adult and Counselor Education (HACE)

News from the Higher, Adult, and Counselor Education Department

Dr. Rhea Miles and Dr. Scott Rawls awarded National Institute of Health Grant

Dr. Rhea Miles, Associate Professor -Science Education, Department of Mathematics, Science and Instructional Technology Education and Dr. Scott Rawls, ECU Alumnus and Associate Professor of Pharmacology in the Center for Substance Abuse Research at Temple University have been awarded a four-year, $1,012,071.00 grant entitled Planarians and the Pharmacology of Addiction: An In Vivo Model for K-12 Education.

The project engages K-12 teachers and  students together with health care professionals, pharmacists, and scientists in the study of the pharmacological effects of addictive drugs and the behavior patterns that emerge during recreational and addictive drug use, using curricula and laboratory activities designed to meet the National Science Education Standards. Congratulations Dr. Miles and Dr. Rawls.

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NCTQ Recognizes ECU Teacher Quality

By Jane Dail

Thursday, June 19, 2014

A nationwide study of college teaching prep programs ranked one East Carolina University program among the top 15.

The National Council on Teaching Quality (NCTQ) released its second annual Teacher Prep Review this week after analyzing 2,400 elementary, secondary and special education programs at 1,127 institutions across the country.

ECU’s undergraduate special education program ranked 12th in the nation, tying with Fort Hayes State University’s undergraduate elementary education program, Montclair State University’s graduate secondary education program, and Austin Peay State University’s undergraduate secondary education program.

Kathi Wilhite — chairwoman of the department of special education, foundations and research in ECU College of Education — said she is proud of the recognition the program received.

“This recognition is a reflection of the dedicated professionals within the department who work tirelessly to conduct research and teach relevant practices to pre-service teacher candidates,” Wilhite said. “Our goal is to provide educational and practical experiences that will positively impact classrooms and services for individuals with disabilities.”

The undergraduate special education program has two areas — general curriculum and adapted curriculum — and about 200 students overall.

Wilhite said the nine key standards for special education are selection criteria, early reading, elementary mathematics, content for special education, classroom management, student teaching, instructional design for special education, outcomes and rigor.

ECU’s undergraduate elementary education program also ranked 188, tying with 13 other programs. The university’s undergraduate secondary education program ranked 356, which was tied with 11 other institutions’ programs.

NCTQ President Kate Walsh said in a Tuesday phone conference that the study helps to expand the national conversation on teacher quality

Walsh said though there are several areas of teaching that need improvement, there has been marked progress in reading instruction, classroom management and student teaching.

To view the entire report, visit www.nctq.org.

Contact Jane Dail at jdail@reflector.com or 252-329-9585.

Courtesy of ECU’s The Daily Clips blog.

COE Students Initiated into Omicron Delta Kappa

Omicron Delta Kappa, the National Leadership Honor Society, was founded December 3, 1914 at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia by 15 student and faculty leaders. The founders formulated the idea that leadership of exceptional quality and versatility in college should be recognized, that representatives in all phases of college life should cooperate in worthwhile endeavors, and that outstanding students, faculty, and administrators should meet on a basis of mutual interest, understanding, and helpfulness.  OΔK was the first college honor society of a national scope to give recognition and honor for meritorious leadership and service in extracurricular activities and to encourage development of general campus citizenship. Since its founding, Omicron Delta Kappa has initiated over 300,000 members.

The Society recognizes achievement in the following five areas:

  • Scholarship
  • Athletics
  • Campus or Community Service, Social or Religious Activities and Campus Government
  • Journalism, Speech and the Mass Media
  • Creative and Performing Arts

Congrats to students from the College of Education who were initiated into this prestigious society—

James Coda is a native of Fayette City, Pennsylvania and is currently pursuing a Masters of Education in Adult Education and a graduate certificate in Hispanic Studies.  His organizational affiliations are ALMAS and he is a member of the College of Education’s Junior Advisory Board.  After finishing his studies at East Carolina, James hopes to pursue a PhD in Second/Foreign Language Acquisition.

Kimberly Nicole Herring lives in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. She is pursuing a doctoral degree in educational leadership, while holding an administrative position at Wake Forest University. She is highly engaged in her church, community, and, undergraduate and graduate alma maters, Salem College, and, Wake Forest University, serving on a diversity of boards, committees, guilds, and organizations. Kimberly is also a member of Golden Key International Honor Society, and, the Association for the Advancement of Educational Research.

Margaret Elizabeth LeGrand is a native of Belmont, North Carolina and is majoring in History Education. She has previously been a pirate tutor and is currently the secretary of Phi Sigma Pi National Honor Fraternity and a member of many honor societies.

Jennifer Moser is from Tolland, Connecticut and is a Hispanic Studies Education major.  She is the Vice President of Golden Key International Honor Society and Captain of ECU Women’s Rugby team.  She has served as a Resident Advisor for Scott Hall and works on campus as a lead tutor for the Pirate Tutoring Center.  Upon graduating East Carolina, Jen wants to be a high school teacher. Jennifer could not be with us today because she is traveling with the ECU Women’s Rugby to nationals.

Nathaniel Paul Over is a native of Fayetteville, Pennsylvania and is currently a major in the Masters of Arts and Teaching program for Health Education. His leadership positions include being a member at GCF Church and a Student Teaching Intern at Greene County Middle School. After graduating from East Carolina, Nathaniel hopes to teach Health and Physical Education

Morgan Elyse Pearce is a native of Bunn, North Carolina and is majoring in Elementary Education with a concentration in Mathematics. Her other organizational affiliations include being a part of Gamma Beta Phi, Kappa Delta Pi, the Elementary Education Club, and multiple intramural sports for all four years here at ECU. Upon graduating from East Carolina, Morgan hopes to find a job and begin her career in the classroom.

Vasti Rodriguez-Tejeda was born in the Dominican Republic and has been in a resident of the United States for twelve years with her family.  She is currently in the Masters of Arts in Teaching-Special Education. Her organization affiliations include East Carolina Abolitionists and the College of Education Dean’s Junior Advisory Board. She is also a Graduate Research Assistant in the College of Education and a volunteer in the support group for Hispanic families with children in Special Education. Upon graduating from ECU, she hopes to pursue Doctorate degree.

Amanda J. Sines is a native of Fayetteville, North Carolina. She is currently working on a Master’s in International Studies with a double concentration in Security Studies and Education Administration. She is simultaneously completing the certificate programs in Security Studies and International Teaching. Amanda is also a writing consultant here on ECU’s campus. Upon graduating from East Carolina, Amanda hopes to complete an internship with the Department of State

Lauren Renee Stefan is currently pursuing her Master’s in International Studies with a concentration in International Higher Education Administration. She is a graduate assistant at the Office of International Affairs, a consultant at the University Writing Center, and is the Vice President of the Graduate Student Association for International Studies. She is also a member of the Women’s Club Lacrosse team.

Kimberly Ann Sugg is a native of Middletown, New York and graduated from high school at Hoffman Estates High School in Hoffman Estates Illinois.  She is majoring in Middle School Education with a concentration in Math and Science, through the State Employee Credit Union Partnership East Program.  She is also a consisting member of Phi Kappa Phi and Kappa Delta Pi.  She is married and a mom of three children.  She coaches soccer and softball and is a foster fur-parent with Southern Bell Pit Bull Rescue. Upon graduating she hopes to work in the Greene County Public School System.

Julie Kennedy Whetzel is a Virginia native and currently resides in Eastern North Carolina. Julie is currently pursuing Curriculum Instructional Specialist licensure with the Department of Educational Leadership at East Carolina. She is currently employed as an Exceptional Children Program Specialist with Franklin County Schools, where she helps special education teachers better meet the needs of their students.

Lorin Nichole Wicker was born in Orangeburg, SC, but grew up in Rocky Mount, NC. Her major is Elementary Education with a concentration in literature. She has previously been a Leader at the Boys & Girls Clubs of Pitt County. She is affiliated with the Elementary Education club on campus. Upon graduating from East Carolina University, Lorin hopes to join a group of this states’ most prized professionals, educators!

Justin Waters hails from Pinetown, North Carolina, and transferred to ECU, then graduated in 2009 with a Bachelors of Science in Physical Education. Receiving an offer to become the graduate assistantship for Club Sports in the Campus Recreation and Wellness department, Justin accepted the offer and graduated in 2011 from East Carolina University with a Master’s of Education. After graduation he became the Club Sport Coordinator at NC State University before returning to his alma mater in July 2012.

Melvin Everett Lee III is a native of Knightdale, North Carolina and is currently the student ambassador for the East Carolina Political Science Department; where he works to inform prospective students about the advantages in majoring in the Liberal Arts Divisions. He is a five-time Dean’s list recipient and is now considering his options for fall admissions to various law schools around the state. Melvin is an important member of the COE Dean’s office as a student assistant and continues his service as a mentor for Project with Project LINC.

Counselor Education Earns CACREP Accreditation

The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), a national accrediting body for professional preparation programs within academic institutions, has granted accreditation to the following master of science programs in the Department of Higher, Adult, and Counselor Education (HACE) in the College of Education:

  • Clinical Mental Health CounselingCouncil for Accreditation of Counseling & Related Educational Programs
  • School Counseling
  • Student Affairs and College Counseling

The decision to pursue CACREP accreditation began approximately seven years ago when Counselor Education faculty determined that for long-term sustainability, and for the benefit of students within the program, it would be critical to attain such recognition.

“We are extremely excited about earning this distinction,” said Dr. Scott Glass, interim department chair of HACE. “It took an incredible amount of work on behalf of our faculty, mostly done for little or no personal gain. We were successful because of the hard work of a few people who believed in the importance of this task.”

A number of benefits result from having a program seek accreditation including:

  • Provides program enhancement through a thorough self-assessment
  • Stimulates self-review and self-directed improvement
  • Improves the quality of students seeking enrollment in program
  • Demonstrates a commitment to meeting the highest academic standards
  • Additional licensure and career benefits

Many thanks go out to all who participated and helped the Counselor Education program achieve the CACREP accreditation. In particular, the Counselor Education program would like to recognize the efforts of Dr. Kylie Dotson-Blake. She took on the responsibility of guiding the program through the process, and the program would not have experienced this level of success without her work. It was a team effort that should benefit students and stakeholders for many years to come.

Dr. Steven Schmidt Sworn in as President of AAACE

Steven Schmidt

Dr. Steven Schmidt, associate professor of adult education, was sworn in as president of the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education (AAACE) at the association’s annual conference that was held in November in Lexington, Kentucky.

Counselors connect with ECU College of Education

Forty-Four high school guidance counselors from Eastern North Carolina gained up-to-date information about East Carolina University and its teacher programs during “Each One-Reach One,” held on campus Feb. 12.

ECU hosted school counselors from across eastern North Carolina this month.

Sponsored by the ECU College of Education, event drew educators from the following school districts: Beaufort, Bertie, Clinton City Schools, Duplin, Edgecombe, Gates, Hertford, Hyde, Johnston, Martin, Nash-Rocky Mount, Pitt, Roanoke Rapids, Sampson, Vance, Wayne, and Wilson. Invitations were issued to each high school within the Latham Clinical Schools Network which comprises 37 counties within eastern North Carolina.

The counselors learned about the processes involved for applying to ECU. The Honors College provided details about its unique opportunity for academically talented students. Attendees also participated in a crash course by the ECU Financial Aid office about changes to application processes at the federal level.

The College of Education shared detailed information about the college’s scholarship opportunities. Teaching faculty from mathematics, science and instructional technology education, as well as special education and middle grades education, spoke about their high-need programs.

Counselors attending the outreach event at ECU learned about the college application process.

The event aimed to assist counselors with information about the college application process, while encouraging them to prompt students to consider education as a career choice. Recruitment packets, along with College of Education scholarship information, were given to each attendee for use back at their high schools.

For more information about recruitment efforts for the College of Education at East Carolina University, contact Laura Bilbro-Berry, assistant director of teacher education, at bilbroberryl@ecu.edu or via phone at 252-328-1123.

Counselors connect with ECU College of Education

Second Century Campaign

The College of Education, in partnership with East Carolina University, launched the largest campaign in its history– the COE Second Century Campaign.  The College of Education set campaign priorities specific to our projected needs for improved 21st century education.  Our priorities are identified by the following four categories:

  • Scholarships and Student Support
  • Endowed Professorships
  • Faculty Research, Outreach and Professional Development
  • Strategic Initiatives to Support Programs

Your gift will enable the College of Education to offer cutting edge technology, top notch educational programs and support to students to enhance their education.  Gifts will enhance instruction, provide students with diverse, real-world experiences for their prospective careers, and enable the College of Education to attract the strongest candidates possible for our programs.

The College of Education also houses six departments and the Office of Teacher Education.  Each of these departments identified their top priorities based on the categories set by the College.  Please click on the links below to view more specific needs listed by department.

The Department of Business and Information Technologies Education
Department of Counselor and Adult Education
Department of Curriculum and Instruction
Department of Educational Leadership
Department of Library Science
Department of Mathematics, Science and Instructional Technology Education
Office of Teacher Education

National Science Foundation Team Evaluates NC-PIMS Grant at ECU

Greenville, NC – The National Science Foundation (NSF) Team is visiting East Carolina University this week to evaluate the management of the North Carolina Partnership for Improving Mathematics and Science (NC-PIMS) Grant.  They arrived on campus Wednesday, June, 15th and will be in Greenville through Friday, June, 17th.  The NSF team began their visit by listening to a presentation from the grant management team.  Members of ECU’s higher education community including Marilyn Sheerer, dean for ECU’s College of Education; Molly Broad, President of the UNC System; and district superintendents were also present. Wednesday afternoon, faculty at other sites involved with the project met with the NSF team via video-conference.

The NSF team is meeting again on Thursday, June, 16th at J.H.  Rose High  School to observe NC-PIMS Lead Teacher classes. They will meet lead teachers, facilitators and other district members of the project afterwards. Feature presentations will be given by the math team and grant operators Thursday afternoon.

The NC-PIMS grant was established to increase mathematics achievement while decreasing achievement gaps in Eastern North Carolina school districts.  NC-PIMS does this through school leadership, professional teacher development, student encouragement and parental involvement.  A partnership among several institutions was formed to accomplish these goals.  They include: The University of North Carolina General Administration, NC Department of Public Instruction, NC Mathematics and Science Education Network, East Carolina University, Fayetteville State University, UNC Pembroke, UNC Wilmington and the NC Community College System.

NC-PIMS brings schools, universities and community leaders together to form leadership teams.  These teams are in partner districts as well three Regional Leadership Teams in 17 counties across Eastern North Carolina.  The teams work together to align resources that will support student achievement in mathematics.

NC-PIMS provides professional development to teachers through structured workshops and courses.  University faculty design and teach graduate-level classes. Teachers selected from various districts are designated as “Lead Teachers”.  The Lead Teachers receive training for workshops they will teach to teacher-colleagues in their home schools.  The workshops are designed by facilitators with NC-PIMS to aid teachers with tools to increase student achievement.  The facilitators continue to support Lead Teachers throughout the school year and summer.

The NC-PIMS partnership also focuses on parent involvement.   In addition to teacher training, the grant also provides workshops for parents to learn how to engage their students in mathematics at home.

For more information, contact Dr. Ron Preston, Mathematics and Science Education Chair, at 252-328-9353 or Jessica W. Davenport, Director of Communications, College of Education at 252-328-2179.