Category Archives: Information and Library Science (ILS)

News from the Information and Library Science Department

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College of Education is Busting Myths about Teaching

On August 23, 2015, the College of Education helped welcome over 5,000 students at Pirate Palooza, the university’s largest annual welcome back celebration, held in Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium. . Pirate Palooza featured a variety of ECU traditions and activities where students had the chance to participate in athletic games, speak with vendors, enjoy food, and win prizes!

The College of Education hosted an outreach and recruitment booth at Pirate Palooza with a theme of: Myth Busting: Why You Should Teach! which featured information about the 17 undergraduate teacher education programs and 23 graduate and certificate programs ECU offers.

College of Education faculty and staff engaged students in conversation to dispel myths about the field of education and teaching through an interactive, informative activity. Students were able to choose a question related to teaching and respond to whether it was a truth or myth. Topics covered through the activity ranged from questions about salary to the employment demand for teachers.

It was a successful night for the COE team that staffed the Palooza Outreach booth, speaking with 232 students, many of whom expressed an interest in education and or teaching. Students were impressed with the College of Education representation at the event and the opportunity to get interesting factoids about the teaching profession, college, and ECU.

The College of Education was proud to participate in this event as a creative method of outreach, recruitment, and retention for teacher education programs!

For more information about teacher education at East Carolina University, please visit our website at http://www.ecu.edu/coe

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From the TRC: NoveList Plus

It’s Thursday, and a new edition of From the TRC is published to highlight another service or resource Joyner Library’s Teaching Resources Center has to support the College of Education’s faculty and students. This week, it’s NoveList Plus.

This week’s post builds on a previous post we wrote about TeachingBooks.net. While TeachingBooks.net focuses on bringing the author to your students so students can experience how their favorite authors create and read their own works, NoveList Plus can help educators match readers with the right books to expand students’ literary world beyond the familiar.

NoveList_PlusNoveList Plus bills itself as a comprehensive online readers’ advisory (RA) tool used to search hundreds of thousands of popular fiction and nonfiction titles, which includes categories such as author read-alikes, book lists, and book discussion guides. It includes genre outlines and online training materials for librarians to familiarize staff with appeal factors, the RA interview, and other aspects of readers’ advisory.

Sounds like a resource for school librarians, right? Of course it is, but my experience as a teacher and school librarian has taught me that students won’t always turn to their librarian for book recommendations. Students will reach out to the teacher they feel most comfortable with for reading advice.  At the high school where I worked in Arizona, the English Department and I constructed and continuously updated a bulletin board highlighting the most recent books the staff had read. Students paid attention to which staff member’s interests matched their own, and turned to them for recommendations. I think it is a safe bet to say the English Department used NoveList Plus more than I did!

The teachers I’ve worked with loved the fact that NoveList Plus includes Lexile measures, book reviews, and lists the awards a book has won. Take a look at  “The Crossover”  which was awarded the 2015 Newbery Medal.

Here are other tools and resources NoveList Plus offers educators at all levels:

  • Professional Toolbox
  • Read-alikes
    • Love an author, but have already read all of their books? Finished a series and disappointed there aren’t more to read? Each book and author in NoveList Plus is paired with other books and authors that are similar to your favorites. Here is an example from George R. R. Martin’s A Game of Thrones, and Sherman Alexie’s author page.
  • Genre Overviews
    • Keeping Up…Genres covers “core genre essentials, links to key awards, lots of lists and on-point articles to help readers find the perfect genre match.”

NoveList Plus also offers a robust Support Center complete with an archive of training sessions, tutorials and additional materials such as “Help Sheets” and PowerPoint presentations to help you maximize NoveList’s resources.  Finally, watch their “News and Events” page for professional development webinars, press releases and new product demonstrations.

Until next time…Dan Z. in the TRC

Click here to view the archive of all From the TRC posts.

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From the TRC: TeachingBooks.net

It’s Thursday, and a new edition of From the TRC is published to highlight another service or resource the Teaching Resources Center in Joyner Library has to support the College of Education’s faculty and students. This week, it’s TeachingBooks.net.

Short of inviting an author to speak on campus it can be difficult for children and young adults to feel a connection to or the relevancy of an author’s work. It can be even more difficult to gain insight on the process of creating a book or illustration. This is where a resource like TeachingBooks.net comes in. TeachingBooks.net provides educators an opportunity to add a multimedia dimension to their lessons and their students’ reading experiences.

TeachingBooks-net_logoTeachingBooks.net is more than just a database of books, authors, and illustrators. It is an invaluable resource teachers can use as to supplement existing lesson plans or look for ideas to craft new ones. Users can search by book title, author or illustrator from the front page, or simply browse the collection of meet the author videos and resources by grade level or subject area.

To find strategies for integrating books and resources into specific curricular areas, see the Curricular Uses page. Looking for foreign-language resources?  TeachingBooks.net has resources in Spanish, French, Chinese, Ojibwe, Hmong, Russian and others. Book guides and lesson plans aligned to the ELA Common Core standards are available as well as booklists put together by the North Carolina School Library Media Association, and the North Carolina Children’s Book Award. Additional booklists from other states and those categorized by theme or book series are also at the ready.

Here are a few links to some of the TRC’s favorite authors:

Be sure to check out TeachingBooks.net’s free monthly webinar series.  Upcoming webinars will cover “Culturally Relevant Materials” and “How TeachingBooks is Used in Schools/Districts”. In addition, their on demand video tutorials cover topics such as text complexity and creating your own custom reading list.

Believe it or not, all this is the tip of the iceberg as to what TeachingBooks.net has to offer. If you don’t believe me, maybe you should check them out yourself on their blog, on Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, or by signing up for their newsletter.

Until next time…Dan Z. in the TRC

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From the TRC: Award Winning Author, Duncun Tonatiuh

It’s Thursday, and another edition of From the TRC is published to highlight another service or resource the Teaching Resources Center in Joyner Library has to support the College of Education’s faculty and students. This week, it’s a reminder that award winning author Duncan Tonatiuh will be visiting campus this Saturday, February 21st.

Duncan Tonatiuh

Duncan Tonatiuh

This event is free and open to the public.

Duncan Tonatiuh
“Contemporary Codex: Using the Past to Address the Present”
Saturday, February 21, 2015
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Joyner East, Room 201

The TRC is sponsoring a presentation featuring award-winning children’s author and illustrator Duncan Tonatiuh (toh-nah-tyou) as he discusses how ancient art of the Americas influences his artwork. In addition, Mr. Tonatiuh will share how he looks at the past to address issues that affect children today, especially Latino children. Immigration and segregation are two crucial issues addressed in his works.

Born in Mexico City and raised in San Miguel de Allende, Duncan Tonatiuh graduated from Parsons The New School for Design and Eugene Lang College in New York City. His children’s books have won Tomás Rivera Mexican American Children’s Book AwardsPura Belpré Awards, and the Orbis Pictus Award.

Award-winning book, Separate is Never Equal

Award-winning book, Separate is Never Equal

Mr. Tonatiuh’s books will be available for purchase in the lobby of Joyner Library from 10:00am – 4:30pm, and he will be autographing books in the same location from 10:30am – 1:00pm and 3:30pm – 4:30pm.

His latest work, Separate is Never Equal, was named an Honor Book by the Pura Belpré Illustrator Awards and received the same award from the Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Medal and the Orbis Pictus Award for Outstanding Nonfiction for Children. This book, along with his other works, are available in the TRC.

You can learn more about Duncan Tonatiuh and his books on his official website, www.duncantonatiuh.com, and access interviews with and book readings by the author on TeachingBooks.net. Tonatiuh

 

MLS Faculty Celebratory Luncheon Feb 2015

ECU’s Master of Library Science Program Earns ALA Accreditation

It is with great pleasure that the East Carolina University Master of Library Science degree program is able to announce that their degree program is now accredited by the American Library Association (ALA).

ALA accredited sealALA accreditation provides students, and alumni who qualify, the ability to apply for library positions in any library setting. ALA accreditation is seen as essential to MLS graduates seeking employment in academic and public libraries. It is a required standard by the Association of College and Research Libraries. Graduating from an ALA-accredited program provides greater flexibility in the types of libraries that students and alumni can apply for and enhances career mobility. Most employers, except school libraries, require an ALA-accredited master’s for most professional level positions.

ALA accreditation indicates that the program has undergone a self-evaluation process, been reviewed by peers, and meets the Standards established by the American Library Association and Committee on Accreditation. Students currently in the program will receive an accredited degree upon graduation.

Alumni who graduated in 2013 and 2014 now have an accredited degree as well. However, for alumni who have graduated prior to 2013, the program cannot offer a path to altering their degree to become an accredited one, for example, taking an additional set of courses now that the program is accredited.

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From the TRC: Ronnie Barnes African-American Resource Collection

It’s Thursday, and another edition of From the TRC is published to highlight another service or resource the Teaching Resources Center in Joyner Library has to support the College of Education’s faculty and students. This week, it’s the Ronnie Barnes African-American Resource Collection.

Granted, it is Black History Month and that may be one reason why the Ronnie Barnes African-American Resource Collection is the subject of this week’s post. But, honestly, the main reason is to call attention to this valuable, yet underused resource in the Teaching Resources Center.

Allow me to back that statement up with numbers. So far this school year the Ronnie Barnes Collection has accounted for less than one (1) percent of the books circulated in the TRC. If that doesn’t sound small enough I’ll dig a little deeper into the statistics. Since July 2014, the TRC has accounted for 47%, on average, of Joyner Library’s monthly total circulation of books. What does that mean? Well, out of the 20,460 books that have been checked out from the TRC since July only 161 (0.7%) have come from the Ronnie Barnes Collection. Here’s why the collection is worth checking out any time of year:

Ronnie Barnes

Ronnie Barnes, ECU Class of ’75

Ronnie Barnes, an eastern North Carolina native, was the first graduate of ECU’s Sports Medicine program in 1975 and is the Senior Vice President of Medical Services and Head Athletic Trainer for the New York Giants of the National Football League. In 2002, he endowed a fund to develop and maintain a collection of materials written or illustrated by African-Americans, or about the African-American experience.

The children’s collection includes:

  • Coretta Scott King Award books
  • Caldecott Award books about African-Americans or by African-American authors or illustrators.
  • Newbery Award books about African-Americans or by African-American authors or illustrators.
  • Biographies of African-Americans for K12 students

Additionally, the adult collection contains all genres, from scholarly books  to general fiction. The adult collection is highlighted on an annual rotating basis. At the end of each year, these materials rotate out of the Ronnie Barnes Collection into Joyner Library’s general stacks.  The call numbers in the Ronnie Barnes Collection begin with “Barnes.”

For more resources to use in the classroom for Black History month click on these TRC and Joyner Library resources:

Not sure how to put these resources to use? Here are some lesson plan ideas for Black History Month from the National Education Association, Education World, Scholastic, Smithsonian Education, National Endowment for the Humanities, AfricanAmericanHistoryMonth.gov, African-American History Through the Arts, and PBS.

Until next time. – Dan Z. in the TRC

Dan Zuberbier

Meet Dan Zuberbier: A Great Resource for Students, Faculty, and Educators in Eastern NC

Recently, the Joyner Library made a new addition specifically to benefit the College of Education. Dan Zuberbier was hired as the Education and Instructional Technologies Librarian in the Teaching Resource Center.

Like many academic librarians, Dan Zuberbier didn’t follow a straight path to the profession. While finishing his B.A. in History at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, he was an assistant baseball coach at Edgewood College, a small private college down the street from the UW. “Baseball had been the center of my life for as long as I could remember,” he said. “Since I wasn’t playing ball any more it made sense to try and break into the coaching ranks.” Unfortunately being an assistant coach at an NCAA Division III school wasn’t enough to pay the bills, and he picked up odd jobs to make ends meet.

Eventually, Dan decided he needed a more stable career path. “Working the equivalent of two full-time jobs to pay the bills took the fun out of coaching baseball,” and reflected on what he wanted to get out of a career. “I needed a career that fulfilled my intellectual curiosities, and, at the same time, provided opportunities to develop meaningful relationships with young adults as I had been able to do with my baseball players. Teaching seemed like a natural fit.”

Setting his sights on becoming a high school history teacher, he enrolled in Pima Community College’s online Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Education Program, moved to Arizona to complete his student teaching, and earned his teaching license. Yet, four years later, his career took another unexpected turn. “I was having a hard time building up my students’ research skills, so I reached out to who I thought was our school librarian,” he said. “She kindly informed me she was the library clerk and had no experience teaching students research skills.”

Saying he was surprised his high school, the largest school in the district, didn’t have a certified library media specialist on staff is putting it mildly. To make matters worse, soon after their initial conversation, the library clerk broke her foot and was out of work for a week. Zuberbier stated, “Because she wasn’t a certified teacher-librarian, the school was under no obligation to hire a substitute to keep the library open in her absence. I was speechless.” After being shut out of their library for an entire week, Zuberbier wondered what else his students were missing out on because the school did not have a certified teacher-librarian.

He dove head-first into researching the role a library media specialist should play on a high school campus and petitioned the school board to fund the position. His request was denied. The Superintendent argued that because the school was only four years old, its collection was ‘still so new’ and students had access to so many online resources the school didn’t need a certified librarian. It took another year for Zuberbier’s efforts to succeed, and, in the meantime, he began earning his Master in Library and Information Science (MLIS) through UW-Milwaukee. He was also able to earn his library media specialist endorsement, and became his school’s first certified teacher-librarian.

“Soon after I started my MLIS program, I knew I couldn’t stop being a teacher. But, I also realized I wanted to give myself the opportunity to have an impact on the profession as an advocate for school libraries and through my work as an education librarian,” Zuberbier said. Which is why he considers himself fortunate to be working in East Carolina University’s Teaching Resources Center. “This is my dream job. To not only work with pre-service teachers by teaching them about instructional technologies and what they should expect out of their school library when they enter the workforce, but also serve educators throughout eastern North Carolina is an awesome responsibility.”

Zuberbier is currently working on developing workshops for students and faculty around the basic functions and lesson planning around the use of SMART Boards. He is also looking to collaborate with COE faculty to develop a series of workshops for students that will cover current and emerging K12 instructional technologies that will take place during the Fall semester. He currently resides in the TRC, room 2504, and can be reached through email, zuberbierd14@ecu.edu, or by phone, 328-0406.

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Countdown to the CAEP Accreditation Visit

While students are preparing for the spring 2015 semester, the ECU College of Education is gearing up for the CAEP Accreditation Visit scheduled for February 7-10, 2015. Hopefully, everyone is rested, refreshed, and ready for another exciting and productive semester. Please remember that the CAEP Accreditation Visit is just around the corner. There are 26 more days before the visit. Read here for more CAEP Preparation news.

Kelvin Shackleford
MSA Principal Fellow
East Carolina University

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ECU to Participate in Global Day of Giving

image‘Tis the season for giving! In honor of #GivingTuesday, East Carolina University is inviting alumni, friends, parents, students, faculty, and staff to join the movement by giving a charitable gift* on Tuesday, December 2, to the university that is near and dear to our hearts.

Founded in 2012 to inspire a new tradition of generosity, #GivingTuesday focuses on celebrating kindness and giving back. Support a culture of philanthropy at ECU by making a gift on December 2nd and becoming a partner in securing the university’s future for current students and future generations of Pirates.

Your gifts provide scholarships, enrich teaching resources and libraries, offer hands-on learning lessons, support research and the arts, deliver classroom enhancements, and afford study abroad living/learning opportunities – all of which help ECU attract and retain the best and brightest students and faculty.

Help spread the word! Mark you calendar to #GiveTueECU on December 2, tell your friends, and post on social media using the hashtags #GivingTuesdayECU and #GiveTueECU. “I Gave” badges will be available through ECU’s University Advancement and East Carolina Alumni Association’s social media accounts on December 2.

Learn more about the #GivingTuesdayECU movement. Thank you for your support!

Contact us at (252) ECU-GIVE (252-328-4483) or give2ecu@ecu.edu.

*Your gift is tax-deductible to the extent the law allows.

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CAEP Prep: Introduction to the edTPA

The edTPA is a pre-service performance assessment designed to determine a teacher Plan_Assess_Instructcandidate’s readiness to teach.  It is the first nationally available, educator designed performance assessment for candidates entering the teaching profession.  The edTPA requires the teacher candidate to plan, instruct and assess a 3 to 5 hour learning segment while developing an electronic portfolio of evidence of teaching competency. The assessment is completed during the second semester of the teaching internship. The 27 subject-specific versions of the assessment share a common architecture and common language.

The edTPA was introduced to the College of Education during the spring semester of AY 2010-2011.  Three program areas participated in the national field test of the original version of the TPA, as it was known at the time.  Since then, all initial licensure programs have adopted the edTPA as a summative assessment.  During AY 2011-12, 284 portfolios were submitted and evaluated.  The number of portfolios increased to 575 in AY 2012-13.  During the most recent administration of the edTPA, 535 portfolios were submitted and evaluated.

Authored by Dr. Ellen E. Dobson

 

#ECU_CAEPisComing