Category Archives: Instructional Technology

Dan Zuberbier

Meet Dan Zuberbier: A Great Resource for Students, Faculty, and Educators in Eastern NC

Recently, the Joyner Library made a new addition specifically to benefit the College of Education. Dan Zuberbier was hired as the Education and Instructional Technologies Librarian in the Teaching Resource Center.

Like many academic librarians, Dan Zuberbier didn’t follow a straight path to the profession. While finishing his B.A. in History at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, he was an assistant baseball coach at Edgewood College, a small private college down the street from the UW. “Baseball had been the center of my life for as long as I could remember,” he said. “Since I wasn’t playing ball any more it made sense to try and break into the coaching ranks.” Unfortunately being an assistant coach at an NCAA Division III school wasn’t enough to pay the bills, and he picked up odd jobs to make ends meet.

Eventually, Dan decided he needed a more stable career path. “Working the equivalent of two full-time jobs to pay the bills took the fun out of coaching baseball,” and reflected on what he wanted to get out of a career. “I needed a career that fulfilled my intellectual curiosities, and, at the same time, provided opportunities to develop meaningful relationships with young adults as I had been able to do with my baseball players. Teaching seemed like a natural fit.”

Setting his sights on becoming a high school history teacher, he enrolled in Pima Community College’s online Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Education Program, moved to Arizona to complete his student teaching, and earned his teaching license. Yet, four years later, his career took another unexpected turn. “I was having a hard time building up my students’ research skills, so I reached out to who I thought was our school librarian,” he said. “She kindly informed me she was the library clerk and had no experience teaching students research skills.”

Saying he was surprised his high school, the largest school in the district, didn’t have a certified library media specialist on staff is putting it mildly. To make matters worse, soon after their initial conversation, the library clerk broke her foot and was out of work for a week. Zuberbier stated, “Because she wasn’t a certified teacher-librarian, the school was under no obligation to hire a substitute to keep the library open in her absence. I was speechless.” After being shut out of their library for an entire week, Zuberbier wondered what else his students were missing out on because the school did not have a certified teacher-librarian.

He dove head-first into researching the role a library media specialist should play on a high school campus and petitioned the school board to fund the position. His request was denied. The Superintendent argued that because the school was only four years old, its collection was ‘still so new’ and students had access to so many online resources the school didn’t need a certified librarian. It took another year for Zuberbier’s efforts to succeed, and, in the meantime, he began earning his Master in Library and Information Science (MLIS) through UW-Milwaukee. He was also able to earn his library media specialist endorsement, and became his school’s first certified teacher-librarian.

“Soon after I started my MLIS program, I knew I couldn’t stop being a teacher. But, I also realized I wanted to give myself the opportunity to have an impact on the profession as an advocate for school libraries and through my work as an education librarian,” Zuberbier said. Which is why he considers himself fortunate to be working in East Carolina University’s Teaching Resources Center. “This is my dream job. To not only work with pre-service teachers by teaching them about instructional technologies and what they should expect out of their school library when they enter the workforce, but also serve educators throughout eastern North Carolina is an awesome responsibility.”

Zuberbier is currently working on developing workshops for students and faculty around the basic functions and lesson planning around the use of SMART Boards. He is also looking to collaborate with COE faculty to develop a series of workshops for students that will cover current and emerging K12 instructional technologies that will take place during the Fall semester. He currently resides in the TRC, room 2504, and can be reached through email, zuberbierd14@ecu.edu, or by phone, 328-0406.

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caep_for_blog

Who are the BOE Team Members?

There are five Board of Examiners team members who will lead the accreditation review that the College of Education at East Carolina University will undergo in February 2015. These individuals are Dr. W. Hal Knight, Dr. Linda F. Cornelious, Dr. Harold London, Mr. Thomas J. White and Dr. Pamela S. Wolfe.

Dr. Knight is from East Tennessee State University where he is Dean of the Claudius G. Clemmer College of Education. He holds a Ph.D. in Educational Administration from Kansas State University.

Dr. Cornelious, another BOE Team Member, is employed as a professor in the Department of Instructional Systems, Leadership, and Workforce Development at Mississippi State University. Her interests are in evaluation and measurement, instructional technology, educational leadership, faculty governance, multicultural education and service learning.

Dr. London is currently a visiting assistant professor in secondary education at DePaul University. He earned an Ed.D. in Educational Leadership at Northern Illinois University.

Mr. White is a 4th grade teacher at Lynnwood Elementary school in Lynnwood, WA. He is a lead author for the award winning online publication and blog Stories from School: Practice Meets Policy.

Dr. Wolfe is an associate professor of education/special education in the Department of Educational Psychology, Counseling, and Special Education at Penn State University. She has written numerous articles in international and national journals as well as book chapters on transition, advocacy, and functional academics.

Also joining the BOE Team are Dr. Debbie Hill and Mr. Nate Thomas. Dr. Debbie Hill is the NC Department of Public Instruction consultant assigned to the BOE Team. Mr. Nate Thomas, an Accreditation Associate at CAEP, will join the visit as an observer.

The EPP at ECU is looking forward to welcoming the accreditation team on campus, and hosting our accreditation visit this year.

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College of Education Instructional Technology Center Lab

The mission of the COE Instructional Technology Center Lab is to provide support for faculty, staff and students in the integration of technology for teaching and learning. The ITC supports the development of technology-rich instruction by providing hardware and software, staff development, media production and consulting services to faculty and staff.

The ITC Lab is provided to help faculty, teacher candidates and practitioners attain the skills needed to integrate technology in their careers as educators. It is equipped with SMART boards, iPad carts, and other technology that can be found in a K-12 environment.

The ITC labs host classes, workshops and meetings that have need of its specific systems (See ITC Lab for scheduled events). The lab is set up with multiple SMART boards for faculty and students to be trained on. Many faculty schedule classes in the lab allowing candidates to plan Smart boards activities and practice prior to field experiences and clinical internships.

The ITC Lab has become a desirable meeting space for faculty working on innovations in the Pirate CODE, particularly those innovations utilizing technology, such as Video Grand Rounds, ISLES, and edTPA. Though not always available due to class and other schedule conflicts, faculty use the space to view multiple videos, capture notes using Smart Notebook, and run statistical analysis in group settings.

#ECU_CAEPisComing

Store-Swivl3

The Swivl is here.

What is the Swivl?  Swivl is a camera dock with a twist.  Instead of holding your camera still, the Swivl will follow you around the room, tracking you as you move around on stage or in front of an audience.  This device follows the paired mic wherever it goes.  It is compatible with Android and IOS devices.

So who is using it in COE?  Students have begun to use it to record class sessions for edTPA and ISLES.  OAA has been using it to interview faculty and students about Pirate Code innovations.  Why use this instead of a video camera?  It’s ease of set up and video download capabilities.  The device can connect to any Android or IOS device that has the Swivl app.  You place it in the dock, hook up the mic cable, sync the mic, turn on app and you are ready to go.  The Swivl zeros in on the mic and follows it.  You can use it for one speaker or pass the mic for a group.  The quality of the recording ability lets you place it in the middle of a table to record a small group.  If you want to know more or are interested in trying out the Swivl, feel free to contact OAA IT for more information.

 

#ECU_CAEPisComing

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CAEP Prep: ECU’s Pirate CODE Process

The ECU Pirate CODE features a set of seven coordinated innovations linked throughout the teacher education curriculum and clinical practice. Each innovation is evolving through a series of carefully planned stages, to institutionalize each innovation in the Department of Elementary Education and Middle Grades Education. Once refined and data analysis proves it an effective model, the innovation is scaled up and implemented in other teacher preparation programs across the EPP.

TIThe stages of the ECU Pirate CODE begin with small scale, squishy pilots and more through a carefully planned set of stages to refine, study, and expand the innovation.

Since the submission and approval of the Pirate CODE, the Research on Practice model has evolved within the unique and complete context of the ECU EPP. The language of the model has morphed into an implementation language from the original descriptors rooted in the R&D research literature. The Pirate CODE TI and model have been presented in multiple venues across the EPP and at the American Educational Research Association (AERA) Division K Research Summit as well as at an invited session to the 2014 AERA Annual Meeting.

#ECU_CAEPisComing

100 Google Tricks for Teachers | TeachHUB | Diigo

100 Google Tricks for Teachers | TeachHUB | Diigo.

It’s Google’s world, we’re just teaching in it.

Now, we can use it a little more easily. With classes, homework, and projects–not to mention your social life–time is truly at a premium for all teachers, so why not take advantage of the
wide world that Google has to offer?

From super-effective search tricks to Google tools specifically for education to tricks and tips for using Gmail, Google Docs, and Google Calendar, these tricks will surely save you some precious time

via 100 Google Tricks for Teachers | TeachHUB | Diigo.

15 Facts and Stats That Reveal The Power Of eLearning

Posted by Karla Gutierrez on Thu, Jun 27, 2013 @ 12:45 PM

eLearning statsThere is a lot of talk about how the internet has revolutionized the way companies do business. With eLearning that’s no different. But, without hard data and solid advice, how can training professionals move forward and get ahead of the curve?

Here are some great eLearning facts, figures and statistics that you should take notice of:

  1. Companies are now increasing their use of eLearning regardless of size, but 41.7% of global Fortune 500 Companies used technology during formal learning hours last year. (Elearning! Magazine, May 2013)
  2. With eLearning students have more control over their learning process and can better understand the material, leading to a 60% faster learning curve, compared to instructor-led training. (Facts, Figures and Forces Behind e-Learning – August, 2000)
  3. IBM, after rolling out an eLearning program for managers, found that participants learned nearly five times more material without increasing time spent training. (Article: eLearning Success – measuring the ROI impact and benefits, May 2013)
  4. According to a 2009 study from the Department of Education: “Students who took all or part of their class online performed better, on average, than those taking the same course through traditional face-to-face instruction.” Students who mix online learning with traditional coursework (i.e. blended learning) do even better. (Internet Time Group Report)
  5. eLearning is good for the environment. Britain’s Open University’s study found that producing and providing eLearning courses consumes an average of 90% less energy and produces 85% fewer CO2 emissions per student than conventional face-to-face courses. (Knowledge Direct Web)
  6. Learning Technologies are boosting agility. 35% improvement in time competency, 32% faster roll out of new IT systems, 32% improvement in ability to introduce new products and services, 26% overall cost saving. (Towards Maturity Report, 2012)
  7. Revenue generation per employee is 26% higher for companies who employ training and development best practices through eLearning. (The Business Impact of Next-Generation eLearning, 2011)
  8. Reduced learning times – Brandon-Hall, reported that eLearning typically requires from 40% to 60% less employee time than the same material delivered in a traditional classroom setting.
  9. eLearning can help companies boost productivity by 50%. Every $1 spent in eLearning results in $30 of productivity. (The Value of Training- IBM Report)
  10. The Research Institute of America found that the eLearning experience increases the retention rate 25-60%! This is due to the student having control over the learning process as well as providing them with an opportunity to revisit the training as needed, which is ideal for infrequent users. ( e-Learning – A Strategy for Maximizing Human Capital in the Knowledge Economy)
  11. Several software companies recently found that by using eLearning to give their sales force information on eLearning (as opposed to the traditional approach of instruction), they were able to cut six weeks off the time it took to get their products marketed.
  12. According to most recent data published by CertifyMe.net on the state of eLearning in corporate education: 72% of organizations interviewed believe that eLearning is providing them with the competitive advantage by continuing to keep them on top of changes in their particular market.
  13. Companies plan to invest nearly 240% more into elearning in 2013. This was a similar pattern found in the previous year’s report, and the data is backing it up as a reported $1.46 million was spent in 2011 compared to the $3.5 million spent in 2012. (Elearning! Magazine, May 2013)
  14. Organizations with strong learning culture significantly outperform their peers. 46% more likely to be first to market, 37% greater employee productivity, 34% better response to customer needs, 26% greater ability to deliver “quality products”, 58% more prepared to meet future demand, 17% more likely to be market share leader. (Bersin & Associates, 2012)
  15. Companies that use online learning technology achieve an 18% boost in employee engagement. This way, as you increase job satisfaction and engagement among your employees, the overall health of your organization also improves. (Article: 3 Reasons to Implement eLearning in Your Organization, 2013)

Key Takeaways:

The internet is where all businesses have to be. If you want to stay afloat, you need to get online. As these statistics reflect, implementing an effective eLearning initiative can be an invaluable tool in generating greater business performance and learning outcomes for your organization.

Which of these 15 statistics is most shocking to you? If you like some of these stats, please share them!

30 Incredibly Useful Tools and Resources for eLearning Professionals

Posted by Karla Gutierrez on Thu, Jun 06, 2013 @ 02:04 PM

eLearning tools There are thousands of free eLearning tools and resources available out there. So, to make life easier for you, we’ve collected a list of 30 free resources. We believe all eLearning professionals, especially those on a budget, should know of these tools and resources since they are quite common.

Take a close look at each one and consider the possible uses in your eLearning projects:

Free Stock Images:

When you need images for eLearning, you want to make sure the photos you use aren’t violating copyright law. Certainly, buying one every time you need can get expensive. So, here are five places to find FREE images:

1. SXC.hu: Definitely one of the most popular free photo sites. The photographers establish the terms, so read the conditions, but most pictures can be reused immediately.

2. eLearningArt: Find royalty free stock photography for eLearning courses.The site has some nice, free, downloadable useful images.

3. Stockvault: Stock Vault offers a lot of free images. Just make sure to read license agreements.

4. MorgueFile.com: Offers stock photographs in high resolution digital. With over 55,000 images, divided into several categories

Bonus: If you don’t want to see the same characters in many eLearning examples, check out eLearning Stock. This site provides the first comprehensive stock media site focused exclusively on the training industry. Images vary from $1-$5 based on size.

Also check this list curated by Connie Malamad. It includes a very complete collection of all paid stock photos and illustrations sites.

Free Color Tools:

When creating eLearning, how do you determine the overall color scheme? Take the guesswork out of design with this FREE Color Palette Generators:

5. COLOURLovers: There are loads of pre-made color palettes you can choose from.

6. Color Wizard: This easy to use color picker is quick and simple, and always seems to produce the perfect combo! You can submit a base color and it generates color schemes based on your color’s complementary color.

Free Graphics:

If you are looking for free vector art for your eLearning projects you can check out these sites:

7. Vecteezy: There are tons of wallpapers, icons, and vector graphics to use for your site.

8. Iconfinder: Browse icons of all types.

9. Vector Art: Vector Art StockImages for free under the creative commons license.

Free Image Creation and Editing:

If you don’t have the resources to hire a graphic designer or create high-quality images, don’t worry, here are some free tools to help you create and edit images:

10. Skitch: From the creators of Evernote comes this simple screenshot tool. Easily grab screen shots of your screen, and boost them text, shapes, and objects.

11. Sumopaint: Its a powerful graphics editor. All the basic features of Photoshop have been adopted and made easy-to-use by this free web-based photo editing app.

12. Picozu: If you’re looking for a nice tool for to create images for your eLearning courses, Picozu is worth giving a good look. Its a free online image editing tool. You can touch-up existing images or you can create new images from scratch.

Free ebooks:

13. The eLearning Guild’s Handbook of e-Learning Strategy: This e-Book will help you make a broad, fundamental connection between learning, e-Learning, and your organization’s mission, business objectives, and the bottom line.

14. Kineo’s first compilation of tips since 2005 through 2013: This anthology contains over 75 short articles focused on practical things you can do to design eLearning programs that make a difference. For the moment, you can just download part I.

15. 701 eLearning Tips from the Masie Center: This is a collection of 141 pages and 14 chapters, covering the main eLearning tips from all times. These tips are from senior managers and training professionals from major companies around the world. Specially take a look (and print) page 139, which has Elliot Massie’s Personal eLearning Tips.

16. The 9 Secrets of Effective eLearning Courses: is a eBook filled with the action items you can implement today to make your eLearning courses more successful. This is a must read for every eLearning professional looking to take their courses to the next level.

Blogs and sites:

17. eLearning Industry: The Leading eLearning Portal for professionals involved in the eLearning Industry. Find all the latest trends, articles and news.

18. Cammy Bean’s Learning Visions: Her blog has links to many useful instructional design resources, as well as information for those just getting started on the road to an instructional design degree.

19. Alltop: A great place to keep up with the latest stories from the top eLearning news, websites and blogs. If you love collecting interesting content as much as we do, you’ll love it too.

20. Bozarthzone: Dr. Jane Bozarth specializes in learning and development, workforce learning, and social media. This blog contains ideas for creating and outsourcing inexpensive eLearning solutions, along with general thoughts about the training and development.

21. The eLearning Coach: For tips and reviews for success with online and mobile learning check out Connie Malamed’s blog.

22. Cathy Moore’s Let’s save the world from boring e-learning: Cathy Moore is a recognized elearning and training expert. he tagline on your blog is, “Let’s save the world from boring e-learning!” … a must-read!

Magazines:

23. Trainingmag.com: is a 48-year-old professional development magazine that advocates training and workforce development as a business tool. The magazine delves into management issues such as leadership and succession planning, HR issues such as recruitment and retention, and training.

24. Learning Solutions Magazine: It’s a publication of The eLearning Guild since 2002, and is the industry’s oldest and most trusted source for practical information on the strategies, tools, technologies, services, and best practices for the management, design, development, and implementation of enterprise-wide learning programs. Provides hands-on information about techniques, and practical advice about learning technologies.

Other Free Resources:

25. Free Kit: Creating eLearning That Makes a Difference: In this kit, Ethan Edwards covers the concept of instructional interactivity, and demonstrates how it can transform the learning experience for learners working independently through an e-learning program.

26. Kineo’s free eLearning Reports: These are designed to provide you with the practical support you need to improve performance through eLearning. These free reports bring you quickly up to date with key trends. Browse them here.

27. eLearning Survival Guide: Everything you need to succeed in the wild world of mobile learning and eLearning.

28. The Compact Instructional Design Review Checklist: At this article you will find 12 Free Instructional Design and eLearning Review Checklists!

Inspiration:

29. TED: If you’re a designer, there are other 15 recommended TED Talks that will definitely inspire you.

30. Best eLearning Presentations: This is a collection of the presentations posted at SlideShare.net. They focus on eLearning.

Now, be sure to let us know your favorites (or if we missed one) in the comments!

10 Careless Mistakes That Will Totally Ruin Your eLearning

Posted by Karla Gutierrez on Tue, Apr 30, 2013 @ 12:21 PM

careless mistakes1It’s part of your job as an eLearning course developer to polish up your material before you hit publish. A single error speaks volumes. It tells learners you’re in a hurry to even check the course or think you don’t care enough about details. Worse, it may substantially delay or prevent them from completing on time. Don’t let careless mistakes muck up your eLearning courses.

Here are 10 careless mistakes we’ve seen eLearning professionals make that have the potential to totally mess with the effectiveness of your courses:

1) Wrong or misplaced links.

They may either be in the wrong place or nowhere to be found. Links are important extensions of your course content. They point to additional resources or further explain a subject. Double check them by clicking and verifying each link. Make them clear, specific, brief and accurately labeled.

2) Lack of clear instructions.

Vague instructions for quizzes, tests and games confuse learners. This is especially important in highly interactive tasks (think drag-and-drop games) and situations where they need to interact with content on-screen. Instead of completing activities to help students check their progress, unclear instructions can frustrate them and may even discourage them from continuing the course.

3) Copyright and usage.

The Internet is the best place to scour for educational images and other materials. But it isn’t a free-for-all place. When you use an image or data, make sure you’re not violating copyright laws. Check if it’s free for educational or commercial purposes. Google Search and other image sharing services such as Flickr usually makes it clear if the image is free to use. If you’re using Google, click on the Advanced Image Search and choose “free to share or use, even commercially” in the “usage rights” box. Flickr also has an Advanced Search feature that lets you filter images by usage rights.

This doesn’t just go for images. Some research companies may offer data and statistics for a fee. Avoid getting penalized by making sure that you’re legally allowed to use a material for your specific purpose.

4) Grammar and spelling errors.

eLearning course developers are expected to master grammar and spelling. This is the most evident way of showing learners that you’re dead serious about grammar and spelling. Remember, fluency in both spoken and written language is an essential skill for learners. What’s more, errors can hurt your credibility. You may lose learners as a result. Be sure to check your material for spelling and grammar mistakes.

5) Erroneous and unformatted screen titles.

Group screen titles when checking and editing them. You can easily do this by looking at the course menu, where all titles are listed. Are your titles logically organized? Are they written consistently or based on your style guide? Also, don’t forget to fix the format of your titles and subtitles. You can keep them in bold, italics or underlined formats.

6) Videos or media not working.

Many students rely on videos and interactive content. Why not? They’re much more efficient in packing a ton of content in as little as five minutes. The problem is, videos are prone to glitches. They play but are unable to sync accurately with the audio. Or they sometimes don’t play at all. Make sure your videos are working properly by reviewing your course just before opening it for students.

7) Incorrect labeling of graphics,charts, and diagrams.

These visual tools help simplify and organize content-heavy courses. Labeled incorrectly, they can misinform or confuse learners. Take a look at each name or number and edit them separately to make sure they are correct.

8) Illegible typography

This one might seem obvious, but it’s definitely not. Great typography is a huge part of a user-friendly experience; and if yours isn’t set correctly, you’re going to be losing learners’ attention quickly.

9) Confusing navigation buttons.

Navigation is one of those things you must get right. Create a course that has a friendly direction, that includes the intuitive navigation people look for, and that’s immediately clear to the learner what to do next. Try to keep every button simple.

10) Slow loading media.

Nothing frustrates people more than waiting for an image of video to load more than five minutes. You definitely want to deliver the course’s content to them as quickly as possible. So, start by getting to know your users, specially if they have slow connections or older hardware. Then, be sure to optimize all of your media so that it loads quickly.

Our tip: Set up a checklist and make sure each of the points are covered!

So next time you create an eLearning course, check it over for these errors. It should be error free. Here’s a formula: polish and perfect it before hitting publish.

What are some other things that people do that kill eLearning courses? And how can they be avoided?

eLearning visual design course