Category Archives: Instructional Technology

2015 CAEP Visit Preparations Commence

caepThe Educator Preparation Provider (EPP) unit at East Carolina University will host its next CAEP accreditation visit February 8-10, 2015. In preparation for the on-site visit, the College of Education’s Office of Assessment and Accreditation established this section to share information, reminders, and updates with EPP faculty, staff, and administrators.

#ECU_CAEPiscoming

Below is the PowerPoint presentation from the COE’s Opening Day Faculty and Staff Meeting.

CAEP Presentation – Opening Faculty Meeting

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COE Students Initiated into Omicron Delta Kappa

Omicron Delta Kappa, the National Leadership Honor Society, was founded December 3, 1914 at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia by 15 student and faculty leaders. The founders formulated the idea that leadership of exceptional quality and versatility in college should be recognized, that representatives in all phases of college life should cooperate in worthwhile endeavors, and that outstanding students, faculty, and administrators should meet on a basis of mutual interest, understanding, and helpfulness.  OΔK was the first college honor society of a national scope to give recognition and honor for meritorious leadership and service in extracurricular activities and to encourage development of general campus citizenship. Since its founding, Omicron Delta Kappa has initiated over 300,000 members.

The Society recognizes achievement in the following five areas:

  • Scholarship
  • Athletics
  • Campus or Community Service, Social or Religious Activities and Campus Government
  • Journalism, Speech and the Mass Media
  • Creative and Performing Arts

Congrats to students from the College of Education who were initiated into this prestigious society—

James Coda is a native of Fayette City, Pennsylvania and is currently pursuing a Masters of Education in Adult Education and a graduate certificate in Hispanic Studies.  His organizational affiliations are ALMAS and he is a member of the College of Education’s Junior Advisory Board.  After finishing his studies at East Carolina, James hopes to pursue a PhD in Second/Foreign Language Acquisition.

Kimberly Nicole Herring lives in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. She is pursuing a doctoral degree in educational leadership, while holding an administrative position at Wake Forest University. She is highly engaged in her church, community, and, undergraduate and graduate alma maters, Salem College, and, Wake Forest University, serving on a diversity of boards, committees, guilds, and organizations. Kimberly is also a member of Golden Key International Honor Society, and, the Association for the Advancement of Educational Research.

Margaret Elizabeth LeGrand is a native of Belmont, North Carolina and is majoring in History Education. She has previously been a pirate tutor and is currently the secretary of Phi Sigma Pi National Honor Fraternity and a member of many honor societies.

Jennifer Moser is from Tolland, Connecticut and is a Hispanic Studies Education major.  She is the Vice President of Golden Key International Honor Society and Captain of ECU Women’s Rugby team.  She has served as a Resident Advisor for Scott Hall and works on campus as a lead tutor for the Pirate Tutoring Center.  Upon graduating East Carolina, Jen wants to be a high school teacher. Jennifer could not be with us today because she is traveling with the ECU Women’s Rugby to nationals.

Nathaniel Paul Over is a native of Fayetteville, Pennsylvania and is currently a major in the Masters of Arts and Teaching program for Health Education. His leadership positions include being a member at GCF Church and a Student Teaching Intern at Greene County Middle School. After graduating from East Carolina, Nathaniel hopes to teach Health and Physical Education

Morgan Elyse Pearce is a native of Bunn, North Carolina and is majoring in Elementary Education with a concentration in Mathematics. Her other organizational affiliations include being a part of Gamma Beta Phi, Kappa Delta Pi, the Elementary Education Club, and multiple intramural sports for all four years here at ECU. Upon graduating from East Carolina, Morgan hopes to find a job and begin her career in the classroom.

Vasti Rodriguez-Tejeda was born in the Dominican Republic and has been in a resident of the United States for twelve years with her family.  She is currently in the Masters of Arts in Teaching-Special Education. Her organization affiliations include East Carolina Abolitionists and the College of Education Dean’s Junior Advisory Board. She is also a Graduate Research Assistant in the College of Education and a volunteer in the support group for Hispanic families with children in Special Education. Upon graduating from ECU, she hopes to pursue Doctorate degree.

Amanda J. Sines is a native of Fayetteville, North Carolina. She is currently working on a Master’s in International Studies with a double concentration in Security Studies and Education Administration. She is simultaneously completing the certificate programs in Security Studies and International Teaching. Amanda is also a writing consultant here on ECU’s campus. Upon graduating from East Carolina, Amanda hopes to complete an internship with the Department of State

Lauren Renee Stefan is currently pursuing her Master’s in International Studies with a concentration in International Higher Education Administration. She is a graduate assistant at the Office of International Affairs, a consultant at the University Writing Center, and is the Vice President of the Graduate Student Association for International Studies. She is also a member of the Women’s Club Lacrosse team.

Kimberly Ann Sugg is a native of Middletown, New York and graduated from high school at Hoffman Estates High School in Hoffman Estates Illinois.  She is majoring in Middle School Education with a concentration in Math and Science, through the State Employee Credit Union Partnership East Program.  She is also a consisting member of Phi Kappa Phi and Kappa Delta Pi.  She is married and a mom of three children.  She coaches soccer and softball and is a foster fur-parent with Southern Bell Pit Bull Rescue. Upon graduating she hopes to work in the Greene County Public School System.

Julie Kennedy Whetzel is a Virginia native and currently resides in Eastern North Carolina. Julie is currently pursuing Curriculum Instructional Specialist licensure with the Department of Educational Leadership at East Carolina. She is currently employed as an Exceptional Children Program Specialist with Franklin County Schools, where she helps special education teachers better meet the needs of their students.

Lorin Nichole Wicker was born in Orangeburg, SC, but grew up in Rocky Mount, NC. Her major is Elementary Education with a concentration in literature. She has previously been a Leader at the Boys & Girls Clubs of Pitt County. She is affiliated with the Elementary Education club on campus. Upon graduating from East Carolina University, Lorin hopes to join a group of this states’ most prized professionals, educators!

Justin Waters hails from Pinetown, North Carolina, and transferred to ECU, then graduated in 2009 with a Bachelors of Science in Physical Education. Receiving an offer to become the graduate assistantship for Club Sports in the Campus Recreation and Wellness department, Justin accepted the offer and graduated in 2011 from East Carolina University with a Master’s of Education. After graduation he became the Club Sport Coordinator at NC State University before returning to his alma mater in July 2012.

Melvin Everett Lee III is a native of Knightdale, North Carolina and is currently the student ambassador for the East Carolina Political Science Department; where he works to inform prospective students about the advantages in majoring in the Liberal Arts Divisions. He is a five-time Dean’s list recipient and is now considering his options for fall admissions to various law schools around the state. Melvin is an important member of the COE Dean’s office as a student assistant and continues his service as a mentor for Project with Project LINC.

Dr. Abbie Brown earns 2014 Award for Teaching Excellence

Local Media Coverage
WITN: ECU Professor Wins Top Teaching Honor
ECU News Services: Top Honors: Brown receives prestigious teaching award

Official News Release:

CHAPEL HILL — The Board of Governors of the 17-campus University North Carolina has selected some of the University’s most outstanding faculty to receive its 2014 Awards for Excellence in Teaching.  The 17 recipients, representing an array of academic disciplines, were nominated by special committees on their home campuses and selected by the Board of Governors Committee on Personnel and Tenure.

Each award winner will receive a commemorative bronze medallion and a $12,500 cash prize.  All awards will be presented by a Board of Governors member during each campus’ spring graduation ceremonies.

Abbie Brown

Dr. Abbie Brown, professor of instructional technology in the College of Education at ECU, receives highest teaching award from the UNC Board of Governors.

Winners include Professor Timothy J. Huelsman, Department of Psychology, Appalachian State University; Dr. Abbie Brown, Department of Mathematics, Science, and Instructional Technology Education, East Carolina University; Associate Professor Eyualem B. Abebe, Department of Natural Science, Elizabeth City State University; Associate Professor Lori A. Guevara, Department of Criminal Justice, Fayetteville State University; Associate Professor Angela K. Miles, Department of Management, School of Business and Economics, NC Agricultural and Technical State University; and Associate Professor Jim C. Harper, II, Department of History, NC Central University.

Dr. Brown is professor of instructional technology in the Department of Mathematics, Science and Instructional Technology Education in the College of Education at East Carolina University. He is a nationally recognized, widely published expert in instructional design, media production, and teaching with technology. During his eight years at East Carolina, Dr. Brown has been a leader in the development of an online graduate program; he has also mentored faculty across the University in their development of online instruction.

Dr. Brown believes that online instruction can be as rich if not richer than face-to-face instruction.  He says, “With forethought, careful planning, and creative use of innovative technologies, one can develop learning environments that empower students by helping them gain mastery of content, as well as providing [them]a rich, satisfying social experience and access to a larger world.”   He models the very best instruction to the teachers and technology professionals in his classes, developing their content knowledge, skills, and confidence to be lifelong learners.  He structures his student-centered classes so he becomes the “guide on the side” rather than the “sage on the stage.”

Dr. Brown, says his dean, brings a “powerful blend of innovation, dedication, and passion to his teaching. He has distinguished himself as one of our most effective teachers and scholars.  He is professional, talented, and dedicated.  His passion and creative approach encourage his students to embrace both new technologies and design excellence.  His commitment to his discipline is also evidenced by his substantial publishing record.”

Dr. Brown believes it is his obligation to “model best teaching practices,” and his students praise his courses as interactive, engaging and reflective.  “[He] is an enthusiastic and well-organized instructor . . . [who] gives excellent and fast feedback and shows a genuine concern for each of his students.  He values and encourages student input, and his love for teaching shows.”

Students respond to the sense of community Dr. Brown creates.  One said, “Distance learning can be a very isolating experience but Dr. Brown requires students to engage with each other throughout the course as if we were all in one room together.  This allows us not only to learn from the course materials but also to learn from each other.”  His colleagues agree with his students.  One wrote: “Dr. Brown models exemplary design, organization, instructional delivery, and interaction within the online environment.  Transforming a course traditionally taught face-to-face to Blackboard requires the instructor to do more than move existing course content to the online environment.  It requires a different mindset.  The instructor must rethink what it means to teach and learn online. Dr. Brown’s [course] provides faculty with one model of the best of online teaching and learning.”  Another colleague wrote, “He is a rare, great teacher.  He has helped steer the current culture of online teaching on our campus and in our nation.”

Dr. Brown earned the BA in Communication and Theater Arts from Temple University, the MA in Languages, Literatures, & Social Studies: Teaching of English from Columbia University, and the MS and PhD in Instructional Systems Technology from Indiana University.  His teaching experiences as an elementary and middle grades teacher provided a rich background for his preparation of teachers and technology specialists at his previous institutions and East Carolina University.

Other winners are Professor George R. Hess, Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources, NC State University; Professor Dwight B. Mullen, Department of Political Science, UNC Asheville; Professor Christian Iliadis, Department of Physics and Astronomy, UNC-Chapel Hill; Professor Kimberly Kreisler Buch, Department of Psychology, UNC Charlotte; Professor Bruce K. Kirchoff, Department of Biology, UNC Greensboro; Professor Weston F. Cook, Jr., Department of History, UNC Pembroke; Professor Patricia H. Kelley, Department of Geography and Geology, UNC Wilmington; Associate Professor Tadeu Coelho, School of Music, UNC School of the Arts; Professor Annette Debo, Department of English; Western Carolina University; Associate Professor Leslee H. Shepard, Division of Nursing, Winston-Salem State University; and Jonathan R. Bennett, Instructor of Physics, NC School of Science and Mathematics.

Award citations and photos for all 17 award recipients can be found on the University of North Carolina website.

The oldest public university in the nation, the University of North Carolina enrolls more than 222,000 Students and encompasses all 16 of North Carolina’s public institutions that grant baccalaureate degrees, as well as the NC School of Science and Mathematics, the nation’s first public residential high school for gifted students.  UNC campuses support a broad array of distinguished liberal-arts programs, two medical schools and one teaching hospital, two law schools, a veterinary school, a school of pharmacy, 11 nursing programs, 15 schools of education, three schools of engineering and a specialized school for performing artists.  The UNC Center for Public Television, with its 11-station statewide broadcast network, is also under the University umbrella.

100 Google Tricks for Teachers | TeachHUB | Diigo

100 Google Tricks for Teachers | TeachHUB | Diigo.

It’s Google’s world, we’re just teaching in it.

Now, we can use it a little more easily. With classes, homework, and projects–not to mention your social life–time is truly at a premium for all teachers, so why not take advantage of the
wide world that Google has to offer?

From super-effective search tricks to Google tools specifically for education to tricks and tips for using Gmail, Google Docs, and Google Calendar, these tricks will surely save you some precious time

via 100 Google Tricks for Teachers | TeachHUB | Diigo.

15 Facts and Stats That Reveal The Power Of eLearning

Posted by Karla Gutierrez on Thu, Jun 27, 2013 @ 12:45 PM

eLearning statsThere is a lot of talk about how the internet has revolutionized the way companies do business. With eLearning that’s no different. But, without hard data and solid advice, how can training professionals move forward and get ahead of the curve?

Here are some great eLearning facts, figures and statistics that you should take notice of:

  1. Companies are now increasing their use of eLearning regardless of size, but 41.7% of global Fortune 500 Companies used technology during formal learning hours last year. (Elearning! Magazine, May 2013)
  2. With eLearning students have more control over their learning process and can better understand the material, leading to a 60% faster learning curve, compared to instructor-led training. (Facts, Figures and Forces Behind e-Learning – August, 2000)
  3. IBM, after rolling out an eLearning program for managers, found that participants learned nearly five times more material without increasing time spent training. (Article: eLearning Success – measuring the ROI impact and benefits, May 2013)
  4. According to a 2009 study from the Department of Education: “Students who took all or part of their class online performed better, on average, than those taking the same course through traditional face-to-face instruction.” Students who mix online learning with traditional coursework (i.e. blended learning) do even better. (Internet Time Group Report)
  5. eLearning is good for the environment. Britain’s Open University’s study found that producing and providing eLearning courses consumes an average of 90% less energy and produces 85% fewer CO2 emissions per student than conventional face-to-face courses. (Knowledge Direct Web)
  6. Learning Technologies are boosting agility. 35% improvement in time competency, 32% faster roll out of new IT systems, 32% improvement in ability to introduce new products and services, 26% overall cost saving. (Towards Maturity Report, 2012)
  7. Revenue generation per employee is 26% higher for companies who employ training and development best practices through eLearning. (The Business Impact of Next-Generation eLearning, 2011)
  8. Reduced learning times – Brandon-Hall, reported that eLearning typically requires from 40% to 60% less employee time than the same material delivered in a traditional classroom setting.
  9. eLearning can help companies boost productivity by 50%. Every $1 spent in eLearning results in $30 of productivity. (The Value of Training- IBM Report)
  10. The Research Institute of America found that the eLearning experience increases the retention rate 25-60%! This is due to the student having control over the learning process as well as providing them with an opportunity to revisit the training as needed, which is ideal for infrequent users. ( e-Learning – A Strategy for Maximizing Human Capital in the Knowledge Economy)
  11. Several software companies recently found that by using eLearning to give their sales force information on eLearning (as opposed to the traditional approach of instruction), they were able to cut six weeks off the time it took to get their products marketed.
  12. According to most recent data published by CertifyMe.net on the state of eLearning in corporate education: 72% of organizations interviewed believe that eLearning is providing them with the competitive advantage by continuing to keep them on top of changes in their particular market.
  13. Companies plan to invest nearly 240% more into elearning in 2013. This was a similar pattern found in the previous year’s report, and the data is backing it up as a reported $1.46 million was spent in 2011 compared to the $3.5 million spent in 2012. (Elearning! Magazine, May 2013)
  14. Organizations with strong learning culture significantly outperform their peers. 46% more likely to be first to market, 37% greater employee productivity, 34% better response to customer needs, 26% greater ability to deliver “quality products”, 58% more prepared to meet future demand, 17% more likely to be market share leader. (Bersin & Associates, 2012)
  15. Companies that use online learning technology achieve an 18% boost in employee engagement. This way, as you increase job satisfaction and engagement among your employees, the overall health of your organization also improves. (Article: 3 Reasons to Implement eLearning in Your Organization, 2013)

Key Takeaways:

The internet is where all businesses have to be. If you want to stay afloat, you need to get online. As these statistics reflect, implementing an effective eLearning initiative can be an invaluable tool in generating greater business performance and learning outcomes for your organization.

Which of these 15 statistics is most shocking to you? If you like some of these stats, please share them!

30 Incredibly Useful Tools and Resources for eLearning Professionals

Posted by Karla Gutierrez on Thu, Jun 06, 2013 @ 02:04 PM

eLearning tools There are thousands of free eLearning tools and resources available out there. So, to make life easier for you, we’ve collected a list of 30 free resources. We believe all eLearning professionals, especially those on a budget, should know of these tools and resources since they are quite common.

Take a close look at each one and consider the possible uses in your eLearning projects:

Free Stock Images:

When you need images for eLearning, you want to make sure the photos you use aren’t violating copyright law. Certainly, buying one every time you need can get expensive. So, here are five places to find FREE images:

1. SXC.hu: Definitely one of the most popular free photo sites. The photographers establish the terms, so read the conditions, but most pictures can be reused immediately.

2. eLearningArt: Find royalty free stock photography for eLearning courses.The site has some nice, free, downloadable useful images.

3. Stockvault: Stock Vault offers a lot of free images. Just make sure to read license agreements.

4. MorgueFile.com: Offers stock photographs in high resolution digital. With over 55,000 images, divided into several categories

Bonus: If you don’t want to see the same characters in many eLearning examples, check out eLearning Stock. This site provides the first comprehensive stock media site focused exclusively on the training industry. Images vary from $1-$5 based on size.

Also check this list curated by Connie Malamad. It includes a very complete collection of all paid stock photos and illustrations sites.

Free Color Tools:

When creating eLearning, how do you determine the overall color scheme? Take the guesswork out of design with this FREE Color Palette Generators:

5. COLOURLovers: There are loads of pre-made color palettes you can choose from.

6. Color Wizard: This easy to use color picker is quick and simple, and always seems to produce the perfect combo! You can submit a base color and it generates color schemes based on your color’s complementary color.

Free Graphics:

If you are looking for free vector art for your eLearning projects you can check out these sites:

7. Vecteezy: There are tons of wallpapers, icons, and vector graphics to use for your site.

8. Iconfinder: Browse icons of all types.

9. Vector Art: Vector Art StockImages for free under the creative commons license.

Free Image Creation and Editing:

If you don’t have the resources to hire a graphic designer or create high-quality images, don’t worry, here are some free tools to help you create and edit images:

10. Skitch: From the creators of Evernote comes this simple screenshot tool. Easily grab screen shots of your screen, and boost them text, shapes, and objects.

11. Sumopaint: Its a powerful graphics editor. All the basic features of Photoshop have been adopted and made easy-to-use by this free web-based photo editing app.

12. Picozu: If you’re looking for a nice tool for to create images for your eLearning courses, Picozu is worth giving a good look. Its a free online image editing tool. You can touch-up existing images or you can create new images from scratch.

Free ebooks:

13. The eLearning Guild’s Handbook of e-Learning Strategy: This e-Book will help you make a broad, fundamental connection between learning, e-Learning, and your organization’s mission, business objectives, and the bottom line.

14. Kineo’s first compilation of tips since 2005 through 2013: This anthology contains over 75 short articles focused on practical things you can do to design eLearning programs that make a difference. For the moment, you can just download part I.

15. 701 eLearning Tips from the Masie Center: This is a collection of 141 pages and 14 chapters, covering the main eLearning tips from all times. These tips are from senior managers and training professionals from major companies around the world. Specially take a look (and print) page 139, which has Elliot Massie’s Personal eLearning Tips.

16. The 9 Secrets of Effective eLearning Courses: is a eBook filled with the action items you can implement today to make your eLearning courses more successful. This is a must read for every eLearning professional looking to take their courses to the next level.

Blogs and sites:

17. eLearning Industry: The Leading eLearning Portal for professionals involved in the eLearning Industry. Find all the latest trends, articles and news.

18. Cammy Bean’s Learning Visions: Her blog has links to many useful instructional design resources, as well as information for those just getting started on the road to an instructional design degree.

19. Alltop: A great place to keep up with the latest stories from the top eLearning news, websites and blogs. If you love collecting interesting content as much as we do, you’ll love it too.

20. Bozarthzone: Dr. Jane Bozarth specializes in learning and development, workforce learning, and social media. This blog contains ideas for creating and outsourcing inexpensive eLearning solutions, along with general thoughts about the training and development.

21. The eLearning Coach: For tips and reviews for success with online and mobile learning check out Connie Malamed’s blog.

22. Cathy Moore’s Let’s save the world from boring e-learning: Cathy Moore is a recognized elearning and training expert. he tagline on your blog is, “Let’s save the world from boring e-learning!” … a must-read!

Magazines:

23. Trainingmag.com: is a 48-year-old professional development magazine that advocates training and workforce development as a business tool. The magazine delves into management issues such as leadership and succession planning, HR issues such as recruitment and retention, and training.

24. Learning Solutions Magazine: It’s a publication of The eLearning Guild since 2002, and is the industry’s oldest and most trusted source for practical information on the strategies, tools, technologies, services, and best practices for the management, design, development, and implementation of enterprise-wide learning programs. Provides hands-on information about techniques, and practical advice about learning technologies.

Other Free Resources:

25. Free Kit: Creating eLearning That Makes a Difference: In this kit, Ethan Edwards covers the concept of instructional interactivity, and demonstrates how it can transform the learning experience for learners working independently through an e-learning program.

26. Kineo’s free eLearning Reports: These are designed to provide you with the practical support you need to improve performance through eLearning. These free reports bring you quickly up to date with key trends. Browse them here.

27. eLearning Survival Guide: Everything you need to succeed in the wild world of mobile learning and eLearning.

28. The Compact Instructional Design Review Checklist: At this article you will find 12 Free Instructional Design and eLearning Review Checklists!

Inspiration:

29. TED: If you’re a designer, there are other 15 recommended TED Talks that will definitely inspire you.

30. Best eLearning Presentations: This is a collection of the presentations posted at SlideShare.net. They focus on eLearning.

Now, be sure to let us know your favorites (or if we missed one) in the comments!

10 Careless Mistakes That Will Totally Ruin Your eLearning

Posted by Karla Gutierrez on Tue, Apr 30, 2013 @ 12:21 PM

careless mistakes1It’s part of your job as an eLearning course developer to polish up your material before you hit publish. A single error speaks volumes. It tells learners you’re in a hurry to even check the course or think you don’t care enough about details. Worse, it may substantially delay or prevent them from completing on time. Don’t let careless mistakes muck up your eLearning courses.

Here are 10 careless mistakes we’ve seen eLearning professionals make that have the potential to totally mess with the effectiveness of your courses:

1) Wrong or misplaced links.

They may either be in the wrong place or nowhere to be found. Links are important extensions of your course content. They point to additional resources or further explain a subject. Double check them by clicking and verifying each link. Make them clear, specific, brief and accurately labeled.

2) Lack of clear instructions.

Vague instructions for quizzes, tests and games confuse learners. This is especially important in highly interactive tasks (think drag-and-drop games) and situations where they need to interact with content on-screen. Instead of completing activities to help students check their progress, unclear instructions can frustrate them and may even discourage them from continuing the course.

3) Copyright and usage.

The Internet is the best place to scour for educational images and other materials. But it isn’t a free-for-all place. When you use an image or data, make sure you’re not violating copyright laws. Check if it’s free for educational or commercial purposes. Google Search and other image sharing services such as Flickr usually makes it clear if the image is free to use. If you’re using Google, click on the Advanced Image Search and choose “free to share or use, even commercially” in the “usage rights” box. Flickr also has an Advanced Search feature that lets you filter images by usage rights.

This doesn’t just go for images. Some research companies may offer data and statistics for a fee. Avoid getting penalized by making sure that you’re legally allowed to use a material for your specific purpose.

4) Grammar and spelling errors.

eLearning course developers are expected to master grammar and spelling. This is the most evident way of showing learners that you’re dead serious about grammar and spelling. Remember, fluency in both spoken and written language is an essential skill for learners. What’s more, errors can hurt your credibility. You may lose learners as a result. Be sure to check your material for spelling and grammar mistakes.

5) Erroneous and unformatted screen titles.

Group screen titles when checking and editing them. You can easily do this by looking at the course menu, where all titles are listed. Are your titles logically organized? Are they written consistently or based on your style guide? Also, don’t forget to fix the format of your titles and subtitles. You can keep them in bold, italics or underlined formats.

6) Videos or media not working.

Many students rely on videos and interactive content. Why not? They’re much more efficient in packing a ton of content in as little as five minutes. The problem is, videos are prone to glitches. They play but are unable to sync accurately with the audio. Or they sometimes don’t play at all. Make sure your videos are working properly by reviewing your course just before opening it for students.

7) Incorrect labeling of graphics,charts, and diagrams.

These visual tools help simplify and organize content-heavy courses. Labeled incorrectly, they can misinform or confuse learners. Take a look at each name or number and edit them separately to make sure they are correct.

8) Illegible typography

This one might seem obvious, but it’s definitely not. Great typography is a huge part of a user-friendly experience; and if yours isn’t set correctly, you’re going to be losing learners’ attention quickly.

9) Confusing navigation buttons.

Navigation is one of those things you must get right. Create a course that has a friendly direction, that includes the intuitive navigation people look for, and that’s immediately clear to the learner what to do next. Try to keep every button simple.

10) Slow loading media.

Nothing frustrates people more than waiting for an image of video to load more than five minutes. You definitely want to deliver the course’s content to them as quickly as possible. So, start by getting to know your users, specially if they have slow connections or older hardware. Then, be sure to optimize all of your media so that it loads quickly.

Our tip: Set up a checklist and make sure each of the points are covered!

So next time you create an eLearning course, check it over for these errors. It should be error free. Here’s a formula: polish and perfect it before hitting publish.

What are some other things that people do that kill eLearning courses? And how can they be avoided?

eLearning visual design course