Category Archives: Library Science

Daniel Dickerson

Dr. Daniel Dickerson Represents ECU on Fulbright Commission Panel Addressing STEM Study Abroad Partnerships with the Czech Republic

Dr. Daniel Dickerson, associate professor in the Department of Mathematics, Science, and Instructional Technology Education and ECU STEM CoRE (Collaborative for Research in Education) Co-Director, is among a small group of scholars from across the United States selected to sit on a Fulbright Commission sponsored STEM Expert Panel to address university faculty from across the Czech Republic regarding STEM study abroad possibilities. He will join faculty from MIT, Purdue, Michigan, Georgia Tech, and other STEM intensive institutions.

The STEM Expert Panel is part of a capacity building workshop, “Bringing More U.S. Students in STEM to Czech Universities,” sponsored by the Department of State, Office of Global Educational Program, the Fulbright Commission in the Czech Republic in cooperation with Czech universities that offer education in STEM. The workshop will take place in Prague, Czech Republic on April 19-20, 2016 and will be followed by campus visits on April 21-22.

While there, Dickerson will speak to participants during meeting sessions regarding STEM education program development and explore ways to build collaborative efforts with the Czech Republic. Additionally, the US delegation will tour eight Czech universities, attend a reception at the residence of the US Ambassador, and explore innovative ways to enhance global partnerships.

Dr. Dickerson has more than 70 publications, 130 conference presentations, and has been involved in grants as PI, Co-PI, Senior Personnel, or Evaluator totaling over $10 million.

Rob Lucas

People Need to Know: Confronting History in the Heartland — New book by Dr. Robert M. Lucas

The book,  People Need to Know: Confronting History in the Heartland by Dr. Robert M. Lucas, Assistant Professor in the Department of Elementary & Middle Grades Education, has just been published by Lang Publishing Company. This book chronicles Dr. Lucas’ engaged research with students and their teacher “as they study the defining event in their community’s history.”  Dr. Lucas presents an approach to teaching and learning in social studies that fully engages students to not only learn about the history of their community, but to contribute something of value to their communities and beyond.

Through his start-up research grant, a Library of Congress grant, and his teaching in the Elementary Education program, Dr. Lucas continues to provide teachers and teacher candidates with a meaningful and dynamic evidence-based approach to teaching history and social studies that enables students to “better understand the complex ethical ramifications of historical work and appreciate why learning matters.” (Note: quotations in both paragraphs are from Vendor’s website, below). To learn more about or secure a copy of the book, go to: http://www.amazon.com/People-Need-Know-Confronting-Counterpoints/dp/1433129787.

Go to the College of Education Research Website to engage in a Blog discussion about Engaged Scholarship and Research

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MLS Students at ECU Collect over 5,800 Books for the Needy

The end of each year is a time for many traditions, from caroling to trimming the tree to making a gingerbread house to pausing to give thanks, and the East Carolina University Master of Library Science program has developed and added its own tradition to the mix by annually completing a Holiday Book Drive. For ten years, the ECU American Library Association (ALA) Student Chapter has completed a book drive to help put over 25,000 books in the hands of willing but needy readers throughout North Carolina. The ECU MLS students take advantage of the fact they study in a Distance Education program and spread the good cheer of charitable literacy throughout several communities in the region.

Over 5,800 books were collected and donated to non-profit organizations, church programs for struggling families, schools, shelters, daycares, and food pantries.

This December, the ECU MLS program saw its faculty, current students, and alumni to work jointly in efforts to complete these collections. Many of the MLS students and alumni used the Annual Book Drive as an opportunity to include students in collection and donation, helping incorporate character education into school programs.

Kevin Vickers, an ECU alumnus and the librarian of Sun Valley Elementary in Monroe, NC, coordinated with a fourth grade teacher in his school to collect over 300 books and donate them to Turning Point of Union County, a shelter for victims of domestic abuse. Ever aware of the importance of technology and social media, Mr. Vickers posted information about the drive on his school’s Facebook site and watched the donations pour in. Parents and students asked if they could turn in books for all ages, and Vickers enthusiastically agreed. He excitedly reported that plenty of children and adult women were finding their reading needs met through the collection, and, asking “how cool is that?,” he was ecstatic to find several of the donations were in Spanish.

Kimberly Marone, the media coordinator of Holly Tree Elementary in Wilmington, NC, gathered over 125 titles as she and her students donated books to a local church program that provides services to families facing hardships. These books provide welcome relief and diversions in troubling times, as the gift of literacy and the opportunity for continued reading is an ever-welcome present.

Vanessa Taylor, a librarian currently completing her MLS through ECU, oversaw a donation project run by a Boy Scout throughout Onslow County. While her school (Dixon Elementary) donated over 200 books, the entire drive throughout the county brought in 4,700 total volumes. The young man clearly earned his merit badge by creating and maintaining fourteen collection sites around Jacksonville and Sneads Ferry and donating them to the Onslow County Partnership for Children. As Ms. Taylor said, his work was “quite amazing.”

Knowing that one of the strongest ways to support and increase literacy is within the community, with students helping students, Mary Tobin and her colleagues and students at Topsail Middle School collected 300 “gently used books” to donate to their local elementary schools. This middle school project proved and supported the idea that it takes a village, as older students gave the gift of reading to younger ones.

Hugh Davis, an MLS student in ECU’s program and an English teacher at CS Brown High School in Winton, NC, turned to his school’s Literary and Beta Clubs to complete the drive. Though CS Brown is a small school, with only 52 students this year, it collected 400 books and donated them to the Baptist Children’s Home. This shelter was selected by the students, who felt empowered through the process. Davis, the ECU ALA Chapter President, said that working alongside the students made the process even more meaningful, and he was thrilled to see the students take the initiative to research an appropriate donation site and to organize and coordinate their community’s efforts.

Not to be outdone or left out, the ECU MLS faculty continued their tradition of contributing to the Annual Book Drive by collecting and donating 19 books the Little Willie Center in Greenville, NC.

While many traditions abound at this time of year, one of the most rewarding is definitely the ECU MLS program’s Annual Book Drive. The ALA Chapter counts this year as a success and hopes to have as much participation next year.

Hugh Davis, President
ECU American Library Association Student Chapter

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Library Science Program Ranked #5 in Nation!

The Library Science program, housed in the Department of Interdisciplinary Professions with the College of Education at East Carolina University is pleased to announce that they were recognized in the Top 10 of the Fall 2015 Online Library and Information Science Graduate Rankings as ranked by Graduateprograms.com.  The program was listed as being the #5 program in the nation.  These rankings are based solely on ratings and reviews from current or recent graduate students.  Program rankings, compiled using data gathered between September 1, 2012 and September 30, 2015, include reviews posted by more than 75,000 students participating in over 1,600 graduate programs nationwide.  The rankings cover a number of student topics including academic competitiveness, career support, and financial aid.

“Our program is in very good company with the other four programs ranked in the top 5 by Graduateprograms.com. The University of Arizona, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the University of Kentucky, and the University of South Florida are well established American Library Association (ALA) accredited programs,” said Dr. John Harer, Associate Professor of Library Science and Program Coordinator for the Master of Library Science Degree Program.

“Along with receiving our ALA accreditation in January of this year and being named the number one ‘Best Buy Online Master’s Degree in Library Science’ by GetEducated.com,  the Library Science program is pleased to be recognized for this distinction,” said Dr. Scott Glass, Chair of the Department of Interdisciplinary Professions.

Library Science faculty pictured above: front – Dr. Elaine Yontz; second row – Dr. Lou Sua and Dr. Kaye Dotson; and back row – Dr. Barbara Marson, Dr. John Harer and Dr. Al Jones.

TRC Web Image Final

From the TRC: Instruction & Consultation Services

It’s the third Thursday of the month and a new edition of From the TRC is published to highlight another service or resource Joyner Library’s Teaching Resources Center (TRC) has to support the College of Education’s faculty and students. Today we’ll review a few changes to how students and faculty schedule the TRC’s instruction and consultation services.

These changes are meant to accomplish two things. First, students, faculty and staff will be able to schedule a library instruction session for their classes or a research consultation in less time. Second, these new forms will provide TRC librarians with all pertinent information at the beginning of the scheduling process. This will eliminate extra time used to email questions back and forth after a request is first submitted.

All links below can be found on the left hand side of the TRC’s web page.

Library Instruction for Classes

The Instruction Session Request Form is for professors seeking to schedule a TRC librarian to teach their students not only about Joyner Library’s resources and services, but also how the TRC specifically supports the College of Education and its faculty and students. This form can also be used to schedule whole class SMART Board workshops, and general orientations and tours of the TRC.

The semester may be half over, but there is still time to schedule a library instruction session for your class today!

Consultation Services

Research Consultations – This form will offer students and faculty a direct link to TRC librarians who would like to schedule research consultations. Until now, Joyner Library’s Book a Librarian portal acted as the middle man, but this change will streamline the scheduling process..

SMART Board Consultations – Students and faculty can schedule one-on-one or small group consultations with the TRC’s SMART Certified Education Trainer. Each consultation is specifically tailored to meet your needs.

3D Printing Consultations – The TRC’s newest service! 3D printing consultations are one-on-one sessions that can range from a simple introduction to 3D printing to specific design needs for an academic project and everything in between. It is not necessary to have a finished product in mind when scheduling a consultation.

We hope to hear from you soon!

Until next time…Dan Z. in the TRC

ILD2015c

International Literacy Day Celebration a Great Success!

On September 8, 2015, the Department of Literacy Studies, Teaching Resource Center, and Literacy Volunteers of Pitt County partnered together to celebrate International Literacy Day. The celebration included a free book exchange outside of Joyner Library on East Carolina University’s campus.

Department representatives, along with partners from the Teaching Resource Center and Literacy Volunteers of Pitt County engaged with over 200 students, staff, and faculty to exchange books and talk about local and international literacy statistics. Participants were able to choose titles from non-fiction, fiction, and children’s literature.

Dr. Katherine Misulis stated, “Literacy, as we know, is such an essential ability – and unfortunately still so many experience it as a challenge. Highlighting the importance of literacy to others speaks volumes about its importance, and causes all to truly appreciate it as a vital element of our lives.”

It was a successful afternoon as many of the students expressed their interest in reading and were excited about the opportunity to trade books for free.

For more information about International Literacy Day, visit http://internationalliteracyday.org/

BoB

Sampson County Battle of the Books Team Led by Coaches with COE Connections

For the first time in Sampson County Schools history, a Battle of the Books (BOB) team will be one of the eight teams competing in the State competition. Over 500 teams across North Carolina read a list of books and competed in quiz-bowl-style tournaments. Roseboro-Salemburg Middle School is the first team in Sampson County to place first in both the District and Region 4 competitions.

The Roseboro-Salemburg Middle School team is led by two of East Carolina University’s own. Catina Iverson, the school’s media specialist, is a current recipient of the Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services and is a candidate in the Master of Library Science program. Olivia Hall, a sixth grade language arts teacher, is a 2011 Teaching Fellow and Summa Cum Laude graduate of East Carolina’s Middle Grades Education program with a concentration in language arts and social studies.

The middle school team will be representing Region 4 at the State competition on May 15th, 2015.

Captain Arrrgh Headshot

From the TRC: NoveList Plus

It’s Thursday, and a new edition of From the TRC is published to highlight another service or resource Joyner Library’s Teaching Resources Center has to support the College of Education’s faculty and students. This week, it’s NoveList Plus.

This week’s post builds on a previous post we wrote about TeachingBooks.net. While TeachingBooks.net focuses on bringing the author to your students so students can experience how their favorite authors create and read their own works, NoveList Plus can help educators match readers with the right books to expand students’ literary world beyond the familiar.

NoveList_PlusNoveList Plus bills itself as a comprehensive online readers’ advisory (RA) tool used to search hundreds of thousands of popular fiction and nonfiction titles, which includes categories such as author read-alikes, book lists, and book discussion guides. It includes genre outlines and online training materials for librarians to familiarize staff with appeal factors, the RA interview, and other aspects of readers’ advisory.

Sounds like a resource for school librarians, right? Of course it is, but my experience as a teacher and school librarian has taught me that students won’t always turn to their librarian for book recommendations. Students will reach out to the teacher they feel most comfortable with for reading advice.  At the high school where I worked in Arizona, the English Department and I constructed and continuously updated a bulletin board highlighting the most recent books the staff had read. Students paid attention to which staff member’s interests matched their own, and turned to them for recommendations. I think it is a safe bet to say the English Department used NoveList Plus more than I did!

The teachers I’ve worked with loved the fact that NoveList Plus includes Lexile measures, book reviews, and lists the awards a book has won. Take a look at  “The Crossover”  which was awarded the 2015 Newbery Medal.

Here are other tools and resources NoveList Plus offers educators at all levels:

  • Professional Toolbox
  • Read-alikes
    • Love an author, but have already read all of their books? Finished a series and disappointed there aren’t more to read? Each book and author in NoveList Plus is paired with other books and authors that are similar to your favorites. Here is an example from George R. R. Martin’s A Game of Thrones, and Sherman Alexie’s author page.
  • Genre Overviews
    • Keeping Up…Genres covers “core genre essentials, links to key awards, lots of lists and on-point articles to help readers find the perfect genre match.”

NoveList Plus also offers a robust Support Center complete with an archive of training sessions, tutorials and additional materials such as “Help Sheets” and PowerPoint presentations to help you maximize NoveList’s resources.  Finally, watch their “News and Events” page for professional development webinars, press releases and new product demonstrations.

Until next time…Dan Z. in the TRC

Click here to view the archive of all From the TRC posts.

Captain Arrrgh Headshot

From the TRC: TeachingBooks.net

It’s Thursday, and a new edition of From the TRC is published to highlight another service or resource the Teaching Resources Center in Joyner Library has to support the College of Education’s faculty and students. This week, it’s TeachingBooks.net.

Short of inviting an author to speak on campus it can be difficult for children and young adults to feel a connection to or the relevancy of an author’s work. It can be even more difficult to gain insight on the process of creating a book or illustration. This is where a resource like TeachingBooks.net comes in. TeachingBooks.net provides educators an opportunity to add a multimedia dimension to their lessons and their students’ reading experiences.

TeachingBooks-net_logoTeachingBooks.net is more than just a database of books, authors, and illustrators. It is an invaluable resource teachers can use as to supplement existing lesson plans or look for ideas to craft new ones. Users can search by book title, author or illustrator from the front page, or simply browse the collection of meet the author videos and resources by grade level or subject area.

To find strategies for integrating books and resources into specific curricular areas, see the Curricular Uses page. Looking for foreign-language resources?  TeachingBooks.net has resources in Spanish, French, Chinese, Ojibwe, Hmong, Russian and others. Book guides and lesson plans aligned to the ELA Common Core standards are available as well as booklists put together by the North Carolina School Library Media Association, and the North Carolina Children’s Book Award. Additional booklists from other states and those categorized by theme or book series are also at the ready.

Here are a few links to some of the TRC’s favorite authors:

Be sure to check out TeachingBooks.net’s free monthly webinar series.  Upcoming webinars will cover “Culturally Relevant Materials” and “How TeachingBooks is Used in Schools/Districts”. In addition, their on demand video tutorials cover topics such as text complexity and creating your own custom reading list.

Believe it or not, all this is the tip of the iceberg as to what TeachingBooks.net has to offer. If you don’t believe me, maybe you should check them out yourself on their blog, on Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, or by signing up for their newsletter.

Until next time…Dan Z. in the TRC

Captain Arrrgh Headshot

From the TRC: Award Winning Author, Duncun Tonatiuh

It’s Thursday, and another edition of From the TRC is published to highlight another service or resource the Teaching Resources Center in Joyner Library has to support the College of Education’s faculty and students. This week, it’s a reminder that award winning author Duncan Tonatiuh will be visiting campus this Saturday, February 21st.

Duncan Tonatiuh

Duncan Tonatiuh

This event is free and open to the public.

Duncan Tonatiuh
“Contemporary Codex: Using the Past to Address the Present”
Saturday, February 21, 2015
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Joyner East, Room 201

The TRC is sponsoring a presentation featuring award-winning children’s author and illustrator Duncan Tonatiuh (toh-nah-tyou) as he discusses how ancient art of the Americas influences his artwork. In addition, Mr. Tonatiuh will share how he looks at the past to address issues that affect children today, especially Latino children. Immigration and segregation are two crucial issues addressed in his works.

Born in Mexico City and raised in San Miguel de Allende, Duncan Tonatiuh graduated from Parsons The New School for Design and Eugene Lang College in New York City. His children’s books have won Tomás Rivera Mexican American Children’s Book AwardsPura Belpré Awards, and the Orbis Pictus Award.

Award-winning book, Separate is Never Equal

Award-winning book, Separate is Never Equal

Mr. Tonatiuh’s books will be available for purchase in the lobby of Joyner Library from 10:00am – 4:30pm, and he will be autographing books in the same location from 10:30am – 1:00pm and 3:30pm – 4:30pm.

His latest work, Separate is Never Equal, was named an Honor Book by the Pura Belpré Illustrator Awards and received the same award from the Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Medal and the Orbis Pictus Award for Outstanding Nonfiction for Children. This book, along with his other works, are available in the TRC.

You can learn more about Duncan Tonatiuh and his books on his official website, www.duncantonatiuh.com, and access interviews with and book readings by the author on TeachingBooks.net. Tonatiuh