Category Archives: Literacy Studies, English and History Education (LEHE)

News from the Literacy Studies, English Education, and History Education Department

Dan Zuberbier

Meet Dan Zuberbier: A Great Resource for Students, Faculty, and Educators in Eastern NC

Recently, the Joyner Library made a new addition specifically to benefit the College of Education. Dan Zuberbier was hired as the Education and Instructional Technologies Librarian in the Teaching Resource Center.

Like many academic librarians, Dan Zuberbier didn’t follow a straight path to the profession. While finishing his B.A. in History at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, he was an assistant baseball coach at Edgewood College, a small private college down the street from the UW. “Baseball had been the center of my life for as long as I could remember,” he said. “Since I wasn’t playing ball any more it made sense to try and break into the coaching ranks.” Unfortunately being an assistant coach at an NCAA Division III school wasn’t enough to pay the bills, and he picked up odd jobs to make ends meet.

Eventually, Dan decided he needed a more stable career path. “Working the equivalent of two full-time jobs to pay the bills took the fun out of coaching baseball,” and reflected on what he wanted to get out of a career. “I needed a career that fulfilled my intellectual curiosities, and, at the same time, provided opportunities to develop meaningful relationships with young adults as I had been able to do with my baseball players. Teaching seemed like a natural fit.”

Setting his sights on becoming a high school history teacher, he enrolled in Pima Community College’s online Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Education Program, moved to Arizona to complete his student teaching, and earned his teaching license. Yet, four years later, his career took another unexpected turn. “I was having a hard time building up my students’ research skills, so I reached out to who I thought was our school librarian,” he said. “She kindly informed me she was the library clerk and had no experience teaching students research skills.”

Saying he was surprised his high school, the largest school in the district, didn’t have a certified library media specialist on staff is putting it mildly. To make matters worse, soon after their initial conversation, the library clerk broke her foot and was out of work for a week. Zuberbier stated, “Because she wasn’t a certified teacher-librarian, the school was under no obligation to hire a substitute to keep the library open in her absence. I was speechless.” After being shut out of their library for an entire week, Zuberbier wondered what else his students were missing out on because the school did not have a certified teacher-librarian.

He dove head-first into researching the role a library media specialist should play on a high school campus and petitioned the school board to fund the position. His request was denied. The Superintendent argued that because the school was only four years old, its collection was ‘still so new’ and students had access to so many online resources the school didn’t need a certified librarian. It took another year for Zuberbier’s efforts to succeed, and, in the meantime, he began earning his Master in Library and Information Science (MLIS) through UW-Milwaukee. He was also able to earn his library media specialist endorsement, and became his school’s first certified teacher-librarian.

“Soon after I started my MLIS program, I knew I couldn’t stop being a teacher. But, I also realized I wanted to give myself the opportunity to have an impact on the profession as an advocate for school libraries and through my work as an education librarian,” Zuberbier said. Which is why he considers himself fortunate to be working in East Carolina University’s Teaching Resources Center. “This is my dream job. To not only work with pre-service teachers by teaching them about instructional technologies and what they should expect out of their school library when they enter the workforce, but also serve educators throughout eastern North Carolina is an awesome responsibility.”

Zuberbier is currently working on developing workshops for students and faculty around the basic functions and lesson planning around the use of SMART Boards. He is also looking to collaborate with COE faculty to develop a series of workshops for students that will cover current and emerging K12 instructional technologies that will take place during the Fall semester. He currently resides in the TRC, room 2504, and can be reached through email, zuberbierd14@ecu.edu, or by phone, 328-0406.

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Everyone Has News to Share

In the College of Education, we believe the best way to find out about what is going on in our departments, classrooms, and clubs as well as in the lives of our students, faculty, staff, and alumni is by encouraging them to share their news and events with us.

As one of the larger colleges at East Carolina University, we do our best to cover all that is going on, but we know there is more, and we want to know about it! If there is something newsworthy that you believe the college should share, please let us know about it.

Members of the community can share their news by sending an email to coewebteam@ecu.edu. We are happy to share relevant news stories on our news blog, website, Facebook page and Twitter. Please remember that in order for us to run a story on the website, it must be accompanied by a photo. If you have an upcoming event that would be of interest, we would be happy to share that as well.

ECU faculty, staff, and students are encouraged to use the COE helpdesk to submit their news and other promotion requests. College of Education faculty are invited to attend the upcoming professional development session “Keep Your Department in the Spotlight” on February 25th from 10-11 am to learn about all the tools COE faculty and staff have at their disposal to get the word out.

You know your story better than anyone. Won’t you share it with us?

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Countdown to the CAEP Accreditation Visit

While students are preparing for the spring 2015 semester, the ECU College of Education is gearing up for the CAEP Accreditation Visit scheduled for February 7-10, 2015. Hopefully, everyone is rested, refreshed, and ready for another exciting and productive semester. Please remember that the CAEP Accreditation Visit is just around the corner. There are 26 more days before the visit. Read here for more CAEP Preparation news.

Kelvin Shackleford
MSA Principal Fellow
East Carolina University

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ECU to Participate in Global Day of Giving

image‘Tis the season for giving! In honor of #GivingTuesday, East Carolina University is inviting alumni, friends, parents, students, faculty, and staff to join the movement by giving a charitable gift* on Tuesday, December 2, to the university that is near and dear to our hearts.

Founded in 2012 to inspire a new tradition of generosity, #GivingTuesday focuses on celebrating kindness and giving back. Support a culture of philanthropy at ECU by making a gift on December 2nd and becoming a partner in securing the university’s future for current students and future generations of Pirates.

Your gifts provide scholarships, enrich teaching resources and libraries, offer hands-on learning lessons, support research and the arts, deliver classroom enhancements, and afford study abroad living/learning opportunities – all of which help ECU attract and retain the best and brightest students and faculty.

Help spread the word! Mark you calendar to #GiveTueECU on December 2, tell your friends, and post on social media using the hashtags #GivingTuesdayECU and #GiveTueECU. “I Gave” badges will be available through ECU’s University Advancement and East Carolina Alumni Association’s social media accounts on December 2.

Learn more about the #GivingTuesdayECU movement. Thank you for your support!

Contact us at (252) ECU-GIVE (252-328-4483) or give2ecu@ecu.edu.

*Your gift is tax-deductible to the extent the law allows.

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The Swivl is here.

What is the Swivl?  Swivl is a camera dock with a twist.  Instead of holding your camera still, the Swivl will follow you around the room, tracking you as you move around on stage or in front of an audience.  This device follows the paired mic wherever it goes.  It is compatible with Android and IOS devices.

So who is using it in COE?  Students have begun to use it to record class sessions for edTPA and ISLES.  OAA has been using it to interview faculty and students about Pirate Code innovations.  Why use this instead of a video camera?  It’s ease of set up and video download capabilities.  The device can connect to any Android or IOS device that has the Swivl app.  You place it in the dock, hook up the mic cable, sync the mic, turn on app and you are ready to go.  The Swivl zeros in on the mic and follows it.  You can use it for one speaker or pass the mic for a group.  The quality of the recording ability lets you place it in the middle of a table to record a small group.  If you want to know more or are interested in trying out the Swivl, feel free to contact OAA IT for more information.

 

#ECU_CAEPisComing

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ICYMI: Implementing edTPA in Small Teacher Prep Programs

In small teacher preparation programs, the issue of implementation and scale-up of using a standardized performance assessment, like edTPA, can be challenging.  Peck and McDonald (2013) found one of the most significant outcomes of implementing a standardized performance assessment was faculty-initiated change. In small teacher preparation programs – those with five or fewer faculty and approximately 30 graduates annually – how do faculty lead systemic change in an edTPA implementation with fidelity and rigor?

At the 2013 edTPA Implementation Conference in San Diego, four ECU teacher education faculty shared their experiences and how each is initiating change through their edTPA implementation.

  • Barbara Brehm, Birth through Kindergarten Education
  • Ann Bullock, Middle Grades Education
  • Sharilyn Steadman, English Education
  • Michele Wallen, Health Education

Faculty shared models of communication, the development of common signature assessments, content-specific sticking points, and early successes as part of the session.  These programs proved that big change can be had with a small, committed team of faculty focused on a common goal.

Learn more about their experiences through video interviews posted on the ECU Pirate CODE-edTPA website or on the national edTPA website at 2013 National edTPA Implementation Conference.

edTPA is a teacher candidate performance assessment used in all initial teacher preparation programs at ECU, supporting the EPP’s efforts to meet NCATE Standards 1 and 2.

#ECU_CAEPisComing

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ICYMI – Co-Teaching, “A New Model for Student Teaching.”

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Sarah Young ‘13 leads a group of kindergarten students in Amy McGregor’s classroom at Wintergreen Primary School in Greenville. She was one of two ECU students assigned to that classroom for their spring semester internship as part of the Co-Teaching Program in ECU’s College of Education.

The fall 2013 issue of ECU’s East magazine featured the Co-Teaching initiative in the ECU College of Education as an exciting and innovative new practice, “A New Model for Student Teaching.”

Co-Teaching provides a comprehensive and rigorous experience for interns and enhances the quality of learning for P12 students. The Co-Teaching partnership enables clinical teachers to provide consistent mentoring, giving interns the time and support necessary to gain skills and the confidence required to teach successfully.

Since this article was published, the Co-Teaching initiative has grown from a few interns to 111 interns in 91 classrooms, representing seven teacher preparation programs at ECU. Such growth would not be possible without strong public school partnerships.  Greene County Schools liaison to the Latham Clinical Schools Network at ECU, Gwen Smith, says her teachers are:

“just beginning to understand what a wonderful model (co-teaching) could be.”

“Over the past years, (fear of relinquishing the classroom) has been the biggest (deterrent),” Smith said. “They tell me ‘I can’t take an intern this year.’ But anytime you’ve got more than one teacher in the classroom, the students are certain to benefit.

“We want to get our best teachers for these interns—our master teachers. This 2-1 model works better.”

The Co-Teaching initiative’s team of lead faculty—Judy Smith, Liz Fogarty, Christina Tschida, and Vivian Covington—is actively working not only to improve and expand the initiative, but also to study its impact on clinical practice, the focus of NCATE’s Standard 3. Early co-teaching research is focusing on candidate learning outcomes and candidate efficacy in co-teaching settings. Preliminary findings indicate:

  • Co-Teaching interns significantly outperformed non-Co-Teaching interns on two rubrics on the edTPA: Subject-Specific Pedagogy and Using Assessment to Inform Instruction.
  • When surveyed, Co-Teaching interns indicated a higher degree of self-efficacy in their ability to differentiate instruction than that indicated by non-Co-Teaching interns.

For more on Co-teaching and NCATE Standard 3, see the ECU TI IR, Standard 3.

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CAEP Prep: Meeting Standard 1 – Candidate Knowledge, Skills, and Dispositions

Since the 2006 NCATE visit, the ECU EPP developed several of its Pirate CODE innovations as specific enhancements to current curricula to improve program quality and address significant issues in the field. Several Pirate CODE innovations influence how the EPP meets Standard 1: Candidate Knowledge, Skills, and Disposition. This post highlights two Pirate CODE innovations supporting the EPP’s efforts to meet Standard 1 as part of ECU’s Transformation Initiative. For more detail visit ECU’s online exhibit room for Standard 1.

The VGR model introduces a conceptual framework for novice teacher candidates’ observations by using video clips as common and shared texts that are a standardized and efficient means for guiding classroom observation experiences. VGR requires teacher-candidates to: (1) view a series of four classroom-based videos (one video per week); (2) complete a structured observation protocol in Taskstream™ after watching each video; and (3) participate in a full-class debriefing discussion with classmates and one faculty member following each video observation. During these debriefing sessions, faculty intentionally model how classroom teachers may or may not think about the events shown in the video. Through prompting questions and comments, faculty encourage candidates to see classrooms from the perspective of a teacher, rather than through the lens of a P-12 classroom student, a position that teacher candidates have occupied for most of their academic careers. The overarching goal of the VGR model, then, is to provide teacher candidates with structured opportunities to develop the observation skills necessary to focus on elements of quality instruction.

The need to develop student understanding at the declarative, procedural, and conditional levels is a cornerstone of the TQP grant. This type of module series facilitates a developmental progression of knowledge and understanding in a consistent and coherent manner in baccalaureate coursework (PT3 Group at Vanderbilt, 2003; Schwartz, D. L., Lin, X., Brophy, S., & Bransford, J. D. ,1999b ; Bransford, J. D., Vye, N., Bateman, H., Brophy, S., & Roselli, B. J., 2004; Brophy, S. P., 2000). There are three ECU ISLES modules addressing ten research-based strategies. The strategies were identified from a list of 28 strategies currently being implemented by TQP grant partner districts. The goal of the first module—ISLES 1—is to teach pre-service candidates what exactly the strategies are (which is deemed “declarative knowledge”). The second module—ISLES 2—is designed to teach pre-service candidates how to use these strategies (which is considered “procedural knowledge”). The third module—ISLES 3—guides candidate development about when to use certain strategies (otherwise referred to as “conditional knowledge”). Each ISLES module is embedded in program coursework within ELMID and Special Education programs. The end result is a comprehensive series of online modules designed to build pre-service candidates’ understanding and use of research-based instructional strategies. Assessments collected in Taskstream™ provide data from the modules that are available to lead faculty for practice-based research.

 

Christa Monroe

2014 Fall Clinical Teacher Conference and the 32nd Annual Mary Lois Staton Reading/Language Arts Conference a Success

The Fall Clinical Teacher Conference and the 32nd Annual Mary Lois Staton Reading/Language Arts Conference were held October 9th, emceed by Christa Monroe, the College of Education’s Lead Coordinator in the Office of Professional Development and Student Outreach.   Jennifer Jones, a K-12 Reading and Intervention specialist was the keynote speaker for the event, motivating audiences with “power strategies to teach like a champion!”

The event was held at the Greenville Hilton, jointly sponsored by the Latham Clinical Schools Network in the Office of Teacher Education and the Department of Literacy Studies, English Education, and History Education, both in the College of Education.  This dynamic symposium brought together clinical teachers, reading coaches, instructional coaches and other educators from throughout eastern North Carolina to participate in quality professional development administered by ECU faculty.

An opportunity for networking and educator engagement followed the event.  The next conference will be held in Fall 2015.

Slideshow: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lt-v1YgeDPU&feature=youtu.be

Video Credit: COE Office of Teacher Education, Photo Credit: Dr. Laura Bilbro-berry


TOP MARKS: Dr. Don Phipps, Superintendent of Beaufort County Schools; Megan Ormond, 2014-2015 BCS Teacher of the Year; Bubs Carson, 2014-2015 Principal of the Year; and Mark Doane, assistant superintendent of Beaufort County Schools at the annual banquet on Sept. 16.

Megan Potter, ’11 MAEd READ graduate, was named the Beaufort County Teacher of the Year for 2014-2015

Mrs. Meredith Megan Potter Ormond, who teaches English at the Beaufort County Early College High School, was named Beaufort County’s Teacher of the Year for 2014-2015 during the annual banquet on Sept. 16. Megan taught at Greene Central High School for nine years and currently teaches English at the Beaufort County Early College High School. When asked about the award, she said, “Winning teacher of the year was certainly an honor. There is no shortage of amazing teachers in Beaufort County so it was humbling to be chosen by my colleagues and the interview board.”

In reflecting on her teaching career, she said that her success in the classroom is due to her supportive administrator and colleagues, a desire to try new teaching strategies and lifelong learning, and engagement in professional development. However, she explained that, “The most important piece is my students. Building relationships with them, creating a classroom culture where everyone feels safe and respected and wants to learn, and having high expectations that are clearly conveyed to students are all core beliefs in my teaching philosophy.”

Megan also described the impact of her undergraduate and graduate studies at ECU: “I never considered going anywhere other than ECU for my preparation as a teacher; I knew it was the best College of Education in the state. I was lucky to have amazing professors as an undergrad like Dr. Sundwall, Dr. Finley, Dr. Muller, and Dr. Wilenz who made me excited to learn about my content and provided me with sound strategies to use in the classroom. The fantastic Teaching Fellows program at ECU instilled in me professionalism and high standards.

My graduate degree in reading education pushed me out of my comfort zone and renewed my love for learning and teaching. I had professors like Dr. Swaggerty, Dr. Atkinson, and Dr. Griffith who were always willing to answer any question and discuss any topic. I felt lucky to work with these wonderful professors so closely and learned so much during my time as a graduate student. I feel like the depth and breadth of my pedagogical knowledge was increased tremendously during that time.”

(Pictured: Dr. Don Phipps, Superintendent of Beaufort County Schools; Megan Ormond, 2014-2015 BCS Teacher of the Year; Bubs Carson, 2014-2015 Principal of the Year; and Mark Doane, assistant superintendent of Beaufort County Schools at the annual banquet on Sept. 16.)