Category Archives: Mathematics, Science, and Instructional Technology Education (MSITE)

News from the Mathematics, Science, and Instructional Technology Education Department

astronomy festival

ECU faculty inspire science on National Mall

Summers are warm but certainly not lazy for ECU faculty. Many ECU Faculty use this time as an opportunity to reach beyond the campus and inspire and excite people of all ages in learning and doing science.

In Washington D.C. the annual Astronomy Festival on the National Mall, hosted by Hofstra University and funded by NASA through the Music and Astronomy Under the Stars program is one such opportunity that engages an estimated 10,000 people.

Dr. Sharon Schleigh, faculty member in the Department of Mathematics, Science & Instructional Technology Education (MSITE) was invited to join a group of astronomers from the nation’s foremost scientific institutions, organizations and universities to present exciting demonstrations and answer questions about the latest astronomical discoveries or careers in science.

The annual event begins during the daylight hours by engaging visitors to the National Mall in hands-on astronomy activities, demonstrations and presentations. Visitors have opportunities to use solar telescopes, watch planetarium shows, and ask astronomers questions about topics of interest and possible career choices. Visitors continue to join the event late into the evening and as the day progresses to night, astronomers set up a variety of large telescopes across the Washington D.C. National Mall to allow participants to view local objects in the night sky such the Moon, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn; and spectacular objects such as colorful double stars, star clusters that sparkle like diamonds on black velvet, and some favorite nebulae such as Orion Nebula, the Ring Nebula and the Dumbbell Nebula.

“Bringing astronomy to the National Mall and partnering with astronomical organizations gives us a very special opportunity to encourage children to pursue their interest in science or math and to promote public understanding of science,” said Dr. Lubowich. “Gazing at the rings of Saturn or the Moon’s craters captures the imagination, no matter how old you are.”

Participating Science Organizations: American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Association of Physics Teachers, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Carnegie Institution for Science, Celestial Chart, Center of Physics & Astronomy Education Research, E-planetarium/Discovery Dome, International Dark Sky Association, NASA – Goddard Space Flight Center, Lunar and Planetary Institute, National Center for Earth and Space Science Education, National Radio Astronomy Observatory, National Science Foundation, Naval Research Laboratory, #Popscope, Society of Physics Students, Space Telescope Science Institute, US Naval Observatory, and the Washington Area Astronomy Meetup.

Participating Colleges and Universities: American University, Catholic University of American, East Carolina University, Georgetown University, George Mason University, George Washington University, Montgomery College, Rice University.

Participating Astronomy clubs and related organizations: Amateur Observers’ Society of New York, Astronomical Association of Greenbelt, Goddard Astronomy Club, National Capital Astronomers, Northern Virginia Astronomy Club, Rappahannock Astronomy Club, and the Society of Amateur Radio Astronomers.

Organizations that have supported the AFNM to spread the word to their members and the public via social media include: the American Astronomical Society, American Geophysical Union, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Association of Science-Technology Centers, Astronomers Without Borders, Astronomical League, Astronomical Society of the Pacific/Night Sky Network, Astronomy Magazine, National Academies of Science, Marian Koshland Science Museum, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, National Science Teachers Association, Nerd Nite DC, Sky and Telescope Magazine, Sidewalk Astronomers, Society for Science & the Public.

Miles and Rawls-

COE grant educates students on the science of drug abuse

Tonya Little presentationThe Science Education Against Drug Abuse Partnership (SEADAP) program aims to expose students from 6th through 12th grade to the real-world applications of the scientific method in order to teach them about drug addiction.

Now in its third year, the SEADAP program continues to implement hands-on curriculum educating students about the science of drug addiction and the adverse effects of widely abused substances while exposing students in research activities to increase their interest in STEM careers.

Students are led in the design of their own experiments on planaria, a type of flatworm, with Teachersnicotine, alcohol, and sucrose solutions to conduct investigations from lab manuals that specifically address the National Science Education Standards & Common Core, while building partnerships with medical scientists, addiction specialists and professional educators, to educate the general public about drug abuse.

ECU recently hosted a group of educators from Pitt, Martin and Lenoir county public schools, continuing to expand the SEADAP program into North Carolina’s STEM curriculum.

Rawls with teachersECU is collaborating with Temple University on this project. Dr. Scott Rawls of Temple is the co- principal investigator, and Dr. Rhea Miles of ECU is the co-principal investigator.

Teachers will be working with high school students from Pitt, Martin, and Lenoir counties to conduct research investigations at ECU to study the effect of nicotine, caffeine, alcohol and sucrose on planaria under the direction of Miles in the Department of Mathematics, Science, and Instructional Technology Education in the College of Education.

Teachers will also work with students to study the effects of drug addiction on flatworms through the SEADAP grant.

For more information on the SEADAP Program contact Dr. Rhea Miles at 252-328-9366 or milesr@ecu.edu.

Instructor Jose Gregory of Dunwoody, GA, leads the AP US History session during the 2016 APSI.

2016 AP Summer Institute a huge success!

The College of Education’s Center for STEM Education hosted the 2016 AP Summer Institute (APSI) at South Central High School in Greenville June 27 – June 30.   More than 120 educators from across the state and country attended this year’s APSI, which is more than double the amount of participation from last year.

“This is the fourteenth year that ECU’s College of Education has hosted the AP Summer Institute,” said APSI Director, Dr. Lori Flint. “Our goal is to train highly qualified teachers to bring more rigor to their classrooms and expose more students in rural areas to AP courses.”

Flint attributed the increase in participation to the addition four new AP sessions: AP US History, AP Psychology, AP English Language and AP English Literature. Previous APSI’s offered only STEM AP sessions including: AP Biology, AP Calculus AB, AP Chemistry, AP Environmental Science, AP Physics 1 and AP Statistics.087A1418

“AP courses enhance student skills and better prepare them for college-level work,” added APSI Coordinator Ann McClung. “First-year college students who have taken these classes are much better writers than students who were never exposed to AP coursework.”

Each session is four-days long and is taught by a certified College Board consultant who has taught the AP course, served as an exam reader for several years and received additional training from the College Board.

Participants pay $575 for 30 hours of intensive training over four days. The fee for the non-residential institute covers training materials, snacks and lunch. The ECU APSI is a College Board endorsed non-residential summer institute.087A1392

“Our consultants have been unbelievable,” said Flint. “The sessions have been so engaging our participants hardly take time for snacks or lunch. They are not only getting expert advice on how to prepare students for AP exams they are also networking and learning about best practices from their peers.”

ECU College of Education CSTEM AP Summer Institute

  • AP Biology – Instructor, Tom Willis of Saint Simons Island, GA
  • AP Calculus AB – Instructor, Deb Castello of Orlando, FL
  • AP Chemistry – Instructor, Linda Kruegel of Hertfort, NC
  • AP Environmental Science – Instructor, Gordon Chenery of Nashville, TN
  • AP Physics 1 – Instructor, Jiang Yu of Fitchburg, MA
  • AP Statistics – Instructor, Gloria Barrett of Pittsboro, NC
    NEW for 2016
  • AP US History – Instructor, Jose Gregory of Dunwoody, GA
  • AP English LanguageInstructor, Terry W. Filippo of Clemson, SC
  • AP English Literature Instructor, Patricia Whyte of Bluffton, SC
  • AP Psychology Instructor, Nancy Fenton of Trevor, WI

Above –  Instructor Jose Gregory of Dunwoody, GA, leads the AP US History session during the 2016 APSI.

gavin and girls

One in a million: COE alum has rare identical triplets

Congratulations to ECU College of Education alum Gavin Fradel and his family on their kim and gavin-Speightnewest addition–a rare identical set of triplet girls. The May 2016 graduate earned a master of arts in teaching in science education online and lives in Wake Forest, NC. In 2004, he graduated with a bachelor of science in middle grades education. Fradel is currently a teacher at Franklin Academy Middle School in Wake Forest.

 

By WSOC-TV/WFTV-9-ABC

WAKE FOREST, N.C. — A Wake Forest family recently welcomed natural identical triplet girls, a 1-in-a-million phenomenon.

Grace, Stella, and Emily were born to Kimberly and Gavin Fradel about a month ago, Channel 9’s partners WTVD reported.

The parents said they wanted to give their 2-year-old son, Gavin Jr, a sibling and were initially overwhelmed when they found out he would gain three.

“[The doctor] had a look on her face and I said ‘Well, what’s wrong?’ I could tell something was wrong, and she said, ‘I think you’re having multiples. I think you’re having triplets,’ and my first response was ‘Oh God no, please God no,’ and then she said ‘And I think they’re identical,’” Kimberly told WTVD.

The couple realized they could handle the extra blessings when their friends and family reassured them that they’d be there to help. They also said having understanding employers made a difference.

Gavin Sr. was taking online classes at East Carolina University when Kimberly found out she was pregnant.fradels2

His graduation was set for the day after the triplets were born, and Kimberly encouraged him to walk across the stage.

Gavin Sr. said that life with triplets can sometimes be like an “assembly line,” but it’s rewarding to see how the babies have already bonded with each other.

To tell each one apart, the couple paint the girls’ toenails a different color. Each also has a birthmark, but in a different place.

Gavin Jr. was a little taken aback by three girls entering his home.

“When we got home from the hospital … as soon as he saw them he said ‘Daddy, take them back,’ and he said it twice,” Gavin Sr. said. “I have no idea where he even got those words from or where he started saying that, but that was his first reaction, and it was hilarious. It was funny.”

The couple said Gavin Jr. quickly changed his attitude toward his sisters.

“He always kisses his sisters. He helps with bottles. He’s very patient. He’s just a really good, protective big brother and I believe all four of them are going to have unique gifts and a love for each other that will take care for each other for the rest of their lives,” Kimberly said.

Original story: Rare identical triplets born to North Carolina family

Brown-AERA

Abbie Brown Serves as Panelist at the 2016 AERA Conference in Washington, DC

Professor Abbie Brown was one of four panelists invited to discuss recent trends and issues affecting the field of Instructional Technology at the American Educational Research Association’s (AERA) annual meeting in Washington, DC. The three other panelists were Susan Grajak, Vice President of EDUCAUSE; Larry Johnson, Chief Executive Office of the New Media Consortium, and Robert Reiser, Associate Dean at Florida State University – each of whom regularly collects data about and reports upon innovations in Instructional Technology. Professor Brown’s podcast series (see http://trendsandissues.com ) was cited as a respected resource for  information on current trends in the field.

2016 COE Awards

DAY OF DISTINCTION: COE Awards Day recipients

East Carolina University’s faculty and staff were presented with awards recognizing their service, leadership, ambition and spirit during the seventh annual Founders Day and University Awards Celebration on April 27 in Hendrix Theatre.

Provost Ron Mitchelson welcomed the audience to the event and commended the award nominees and recipients for their service to the university.

“We offer promises of student success, public service and regional transformation,” Mitchelson said. “The recipients of awards today are helping to ensure that we are making very good on those promises.” FULL ECU STORY: Founders Day Awards

Congratulations are in order for the following College of Education award recipients and nominees for the University Awards.

Award Recipients
Max Ray Joyner Award for Outstanding Teaching in DE –
Steve W. Schmidt (IDP)
Diversity and Inclusion Award – Dr. Lori Flint ( SEFR)
Scholar-Teacher Award – Guili Zhang (SEFR)

Servire Society Members
Dan Dickerson (MSITE)
Al Jones (IDP)
Rhea Miles (MSITE)
Lou Anna Hardee (Dean’s Office)
Vivian W. Mott (Dean’s Office)

Nominees
Five-Year Achievement Award for Excellence in Research and Creative Activity
Nominee
– Katie Schwartz (MSITE)

UNC Board of Governors Distinguished Professor for Teaching
Nominees
– Patricia Slagter Van Tryon (MSITE) and Christina Tschida (ELMID)

UNC Board of Governors Award for Excellence in Teaching
Nominees
– Lori Flint (SEFR) and Katie Schwartz (MSITE)

ECU Alumni Assc Award for Outstanding Teaching Award
Nominees
– Steve W. Schmidt (IDP), Katie Schwartz (MSITE), and Christina Tschida (ELMID)

Scholarship of Engagement Award
Nominee
– Christina Tschida (ELMID)

Winners with Dr. Hayes

Max Ray Joyner Award for Outstanding Teaching in DE
Nominee
– Lori Flint (SEFR)

The James R. Talton Jr. Leadership Award
Nominee
– Abbie Brown (MSITE)

Centennial Award for Excellence – Ambition Category
Nominee –
Matt Militello (LEED)

2016 Spring EdCamp

ECU College of Education Hosts First EdcampECU

The ECU College of Education successfully hosted its first EdcampECU on Saturday, April 23 at Speight and Rivers Buildings. The event drew over sixty participants including  teachers, media coordinators, instructional technology specialists, and school district personnel from across the region and several ECU Faculty members.  EdcampECU followed the unique “unconference” format with sessions being suggested by participants during the conference. Sessions did not have presenters, instead they were organized as discussion groups where educators shared and learned from each other. EdcampECU focused on the integration of technology in the classroom and included topics such as formative assessment tools, Google Apps, project based learning, flipped classrooms, gamification, technology to improve literacy and much more. In addition to the regular EdcampECU sessions, participants joined a lunchtime webinar from teacher and author, Heather Wolpert-Gawron of www.tweenteacher.com who discussed “writing as creating” in her experience teaching ELL students writing with the integration of 3-D printing projects.

Participants brought their own devices to the conference where they followed the live agenda and session notes on Google Docs while highlighting the events of the day via the #edcampecu live twitter feed. In the high energy closing session, referred to as the “Smackdown” in Edcamp tradition, participants drew and a representation of their EdcampECU experience and shared with the group in 30 seconds or less in order to have a chance to win one of several document cameras or devices donated by IPEVO.

EdcampECU participants had rave reviews of the event. When asked about their favorite part of the day, participants shared that they enjoyed “The freedom and flexibility to engage in meaningful conversation” and “Getting to collaborate with fellow educators…and a relaxed atmosphere in which we could learn something new.”

Teachers were awarded .6 CEU’s for attendance and the conference was offered free to participants due to the generous sponsorships of the ECU College of Education, Taskstream, and the Edcamp Foundation. Doorprizes were offered by Nearpod, Classcraft, Chromville and IPEVO. The conference was organized by the Office of Assessment, Accreditation and Data Management led by Instructional Technology Consultants, Holly Fales and Jason Whited. In addition, Lauren Boucher and Melissa Tedder of Pitt County Schools and Dr. Todd Finley, Associate Professor of English Education assisted with the event.

Daniel Dickerson

Dr. Daniel Dickerson Represents ECU on Fulbright Commission Panel Addressing STEM Study Abroad Partnerships with the Czech Republic

Dr. Daniel Dickerson, associate professor in the Department of Mathematics, Science, and Instructional Technology Education and ECU STEM CoRE (Collaborative for Research in Education) Co-Director, is among a small group of scholars from across the United States selected to sit on a Fulbright Commission sponsored STEM Expert Panel to address university faculty from across the Czech Republic regarding STEM study abroad possibilities. He will join faculty from MIT, Purdue, Michigan, Georgia Tech, and other STEM intensive institutions.

The STEM Expert Panel is part of a capacity building workshop, “Bringing More U.S. Students in STEM to Czech Universities,” sponsored by the Department of State, Office of Global Educational Program, the Fulbright Commission in the Czech Republic in cooperation with Czech universities that offer education in STEM. The workshop will take place in Prague, Czech Republic on April 19-20, 2016 and will be followed by campus visits on April 21-22.

While there, Dickerson will speak to participants during meeting sessions regarding STEM education program development and explore ways to build collaborative efforts with the Czech Republic. Additionally, the US delegation will tour eight Czech universities, attend a reception at the residence of the US Ambassador, and explore innovative ways to enhance global partnerships.

Dr. Dickerson has more than 70 publications, 130 conference presentations, and has been involved in grants as PI, Co-PI, Senior Personnel, or Evaluator totaling over $10 million.

College-Values-Online-Top-Degree-Programs-2016

Information technologies program ranks #2 as best value

ECU’s bachelor of science in information technologies is ranked #2 by College Values Online’s top-10 online technical degree programs for its focus on multiple forms of technology and affordability.

Online Information Technologies, BSBE

What’s different about the Information Technologies degree at East Carolina University? In short, there’s a reason that ECU uses the plural form – “technologies.” Unlike some IT programs, which focus exclusively on computer science and networking, this degree covers an incredibly wide array of technical topics. Electronic Information Processing, Financial Information Systems, Introduction to Virtual Environments, Website Design, and Microcomputer Business Graphics Applications are just a few of the diverse classes you’ll have access to at East Carolina. Along with an affordable net price and course credit for your relevant work experience, the BSBE from ECU is one of the best on this online technical degree ranking.
Net Price: $12,908/yr
Score: 78.80

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Professors Abbie Brown and Steven Schmidt present at SITE Conference

Professors Abbie Brown and Steven Schmidt in ECU’s College of Education each presented research papers at the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education (SITE) Conference in Savannah, Georgia in March. Dr. Schmidt presented, The Development of a Distance Education Faculty Learning Community: Best Practices and Lessons Learned. Dr. Brown presented, Faculty Productivity in the 21st Century: Using Social Media and Network Analysis to Generate and Illustrate Impact. Dr. Brown also presented a poster session, High School Graduates Describe Four Types of Online Identities, which received an award for Outstanding Poster.