Category Archives: Instructional Technology Education

News from Instructional Technology Education

Miles and Rawls-

COE grant educates students on the science of drug abuse

Tonya Little presentationThe Science Education Against Drug Abuse Partnership (SEADAP) program aims to expose students from 6th through 12th grade to the real-world applications of the scientific method in order to teach them about drug addiction.

Now in its third year, the SEADAP program continues to implement hands-on curriculum educating students about the science of drug addiction and the adverse effects of widely abused substances while exposing students in research activities to increase their interest in STEM careers.

Students are led in the design of their own experiments on planaria, a type of flatworm, with Teachersnicotine, alcohol, and sucrose solutions to conduct investigations from lab manuals that specifically address the National Science Education Standards & Common Core, while building partnerships with medical scientists, addiction specialists and professional educators, to educate the general public about drug abuse.

ECU recently hosted a group of educators from Pitt, Martin and Lenoir county public schools, continuing to expand the SEADAP program into North Carolina’s STEM curriculum.

Rawls with teachersECU is collaborating with Temple University on this project. Dr. Scott Rawls of Temple is the co- principal investigator, and Dr. Rhea Miles of ECU is the co-principal investigator.

Teachers will be working with high school students from Pitt, Martin, and Lenoir counties to conduct research investigations at ECU to study the effect of nicotine, caffeine, alcohol and sucrose on planaria under the direction of Miles in the Department of Mathematics, Science, and Instructional Technology Education in the College of Education.

Teachers will also work with students to study the effects of drug addiction on flatworms through the SEADAP grant.

For more information on the SEADAP Program contact Dr. Rhea Miles at 252-328-9366 or milesr@ecu.edu.

Brown-AERA

Abbie Brown Serves as Panelist at the 2016 AERA Conference in Washington, DC

Professor Abbie Brown was one of four panelists invited to discuss recent trends and issues affecting the field of Instructional Technology at the American Educational Research Association’s (AERA) annual meeting in Washington, DC. The three other panelists were Susan Grajak, Vice President of EDUCAUSE; Larry Johnson, Chief Executive Office of the New Media Consortium, and Robert Reiser, Associate Dean at Florida State University – each of whom regularly collects data about and reports upon innovations in Instructional Technology. Professor Brown’s podcast series (see http://trendsandissues.com ) was cited as a respected resource for  information on current trends in the field.

2016 Spring EdCamp

ECU College of Education Hosts First EdcampECU

The ECU College of Education successfully hosted its first EdcampECU on Saturday, April 23 at Speight and Rivers Buildings. The event drew over sixty participants including  teachers, media coordinators, instructional technology specialists, and school district personnel from across the region and several ECU Faculty members.  EdcampECU followed the unique “unconference” format with sessions being suggested by participants during the conference. Sessions did not have presenters, instead they were organized as discussion groups where educators shared and learned from each other. EdcampECU focused on the integration of technology in the classroom and included topics such as formative assessment tools, Google Apps, project based learning, flipped classrooms, gamification, technology to improve literacy and much more. In addition to the regular EdcampECU sessions, participants joined a lunchtime webinar from teacher and author, Heather Wolpert-Gawron of www.tweenteacher.com who discussed “writing as creating” in her experience teaching ELL students writing with the integration of 3-D printing projects.

Participants brought their own devices to the conference where they followed the live agenda and session notes on Google Docs while highlighting the events of the day via the #edcampecu live twitter feed. In the high energy closing session, referred to as the “Smackdown” in Edcamp tradition, participants drew and a representation of their EdcampECU experience and shared with the group in 30 seconds or less in order to have a chance to win one of several document cameras or devices donated by IPEVO.

EdcampECU participants had rave reviews of the event. When asked about their favorite part of the day, participants shared that they enjoyed “The freedom and flexibility to engage in meaningful conversation” and “Getting to collaborate with fellow educators…and a relaxed atmosphere in which we could learn something new.”

Teachers were awarded .6 CEU’s for attendance and the conference was offered free to participants due to the generous sponsorships of the ECU College of Education, Taskstream, and the Edcamp Foundation. Doorprizes were offered by Nearpod, Classcraft, Chromville and IPEVO. The conference was organized by the Office of Assessment, Accreditation and Data Management led by Instructional Technology Consultants, Holly Fales and Jason Whited. In addition, Lauren Boucher and Melissa Tedder of Pitt County Schools and Dr. Todd Finley, Associate Professor of English Education assisted with the event.

Daniel Dickerson

Dr. Daniel Dickerson Represents ECU on Fulbright Commission Panel Addressing STEM Study Abroad Partnerships with the Czech Republic

Dr. Daniel Dickerson, associate professor in the Department of Mathematics, Science, and Instructional Technology Education and ECU STEM CoRE (Collaborative for Research in Education) Co-Director, is among a small group of scholars from across the United States selected to sit on a Fulbright Commission sponsored STEM Expert Panel to address university faculty from across the Czech Republic regarding STEM study abroad possibilities. He will join faculty from MIT, Purdue, Michigan, Georgia Tech, and other STEM intensive institutions.

The STEM Expert Panel is part of a capacity building workshop, “Bringing More U.S. Students in STEM to Czech Universities,” sponsored by the Department of State, Office of Global Educational Program, the Fulbright Commission in the Czech Republic in cooperation with Czech universities that offer education in STEM. The workshop will take place in Prague, Czech Republic on April 19-20, 2016 and will be followed by campus visits on April 21-22.

While there, Dickerson will speak to participants during meeting sessions regarding STEM education program development and explore ways to build collaborative efforts with the Czech Republic. Additionally, the US delegation will tour eight Czech universities, attend a reception at the residence of the US Ambassador, and explore innovative ways to enhance global partnerships.

Dr. Dickerson has more than 70 publications, 130 conference presentations, and has been involved in grants as PI, Co-PI, Senior Personnel, or Evaluator totaling over $10 million.

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Professors Abbie Brown and Steven Schmidt present at SITE Conference

Professors Abbie Brown and Steven Schmidt in ECU’s College of Education each presented research papers at the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education (SITE) Conference in Savannah, Georgia in March. Dr. Schmidt presented, The Development of a Distance Education Faculty Learning Community: Best Practices and Lessons Learned. Dr. Brown presented, Faculty Productivity in the 21st Century: Using Social Media and Network Analysis to Generate and Illustrate Impact. Dr. Brown also presented a poster session, High School Graduates Describe Four Types of Online Identities, which received an award for Outstanding Poster.

ETRD

Using Critical Incidents of Instructional Design and Multimedia Production Activities to Investigate Instructional Designers’ Current Practices and Roles

Drs. William Sugar and Ken Luterbach recently published the following article, Using critical incidents of instructional design and multimedia production activities to investigate instructional designers’ current practices and roles, in Educational Technology Research and Development. The full citation is below.

Using Flanagan’s (1954) Critical Incident Technique, this study analyzed 106 effective, ineffective and extraordinary instructional design and multimedia production activities discussed by 36 instructional design professionals. This evaluation provided insights into these professionals’ best and not so best practices during the past six months. Prevalent themes emerged from the data analysis with regards to these activities. Six themes emerged from the effective incidents, namely: (a) creating instructional products, (b) providing examples, (c) differentiating instruction, (d) establishing social presence, (e) providing resources, and (f) collaborating with stakeholders. Four themes emerged from the extraordinary incidents, namely: (a) matching methods and media to content and learners, (b) providing organized content, (c) managing a complex ID project, and (d) using theory to inform practice. Six themes emerged from the ineffective incidents, namely: (a) not matching methods and media to content and learners, (b) not supporting student interaction (c) selecting inadequate instructional strategies, (d) not using ID processes, (e) not collaborating with stakeholders, and (f) coping with inadequate technical infrastructure. Results from this study offer an understanding on the interrelationship between instructional design and multimedia production activities and positive (both effective and extraordinary) outcomes in instructional design activities. A comparison of existing instructional design success factors and best practices studies and this study’s results also takes place. Future research directions espouse the value of analyzing little known phenomena in instructional design-related activities and further explore negative or ineffective instructional design practices.

Sugar, W. & Luterbach, K. J. (2016). Using critical incidents of instructional design and multimedia production activities to investigate instructional designers’ current practices and roles. Educational Technology Research and Development, 64(2), 285-312.

Abbie Brown

Professor Abbie Brown Is Keynote Speaker for the Academy of Leisure Studies Teaching Institute

Instructional Technology Professor Abbie Brown made the keynote address for the Academy for Leisure Studies’ biannual Teaching Institute on February 26, 2016. Dr. Brown’s speech “The Networked Instructor: Honoring the Past, Keeping Pace with the Present, Looking to the Future,” focused on the art and science of Instructional Design and the need for educators to both experiment with new ideas as well as make best use of established teaching strategies. For more about this event, visit http://www.academyofleisuresciences.com/academy-leisure-sciences-teaching-institute-2016

Rob Lucas

People Need to Know: Confronting History in the Heartland — New book by Dr. Robert M. Lucas

The book,  People Need to Know: Confronting History in the Heartland by Dr. Robert M. Lucas, Assistant Professor in the Department of Elementary & Middle Grades Education, has just been published by Lang Publishing Company. This book chronicles Dr. Lucas’ engaged research with students and their teacher “as they study the defining event in their community’s history.”  Dr. Lucas presents an approach to teaching and learning in social studies that fully engages students to not only learn about the history of their community, but to contribute something of value to their communities and beyond.

Through his start-up research grant, a Library of Congress grant, and his teaching in the Elementary Education program, Dr. Lucas continues to provide teachers and teacher candidates with a meaningful and dynamic evidence-based approach to teaching history and social studies that enables students to “better understand the complex ethical ramifications of historical work and appreciate why learning matters.” (Note: quotations in both paragraphs are from Vendor’s website, below). To learn more about or secure a copy of the book, go to: http://www.amazon.com/People-Need-Know-Confronting-Counterpoints/dp/1433129787.

Go to the College of Education Research Website to engage in a Blog discussion about Engaged Scholarship and Research

COE Seal - Feature Image

2016 Instructional Technology Scholarship awarded to Donna Currie

Congratulations to Donna Currie, MSITE graduate student and Instructional Technology Facilitator with Wilson County Schools, for receiving the 2016 Instructional Technology Scholarship, which is sponsored by the North Carolina Technology in Education Society.

Dr. Bill Sugar and Dr. Abbie Brown.

Faculty Book Authors

Dr. Marjorie Ringler

Three College of Education faculty members were recognized at the Joyner Library/Academic Affairs Faculty Book Author Awards Ceremony on November 6, 2015.  The event celebrated the accomplishments of faculty who have contributed to the prestige of East Carolina University and the scholarship of higher education through publication of scholarly books between July 1, 2014 and June 30, 2015.

Two faculty members, Dr. Abbie Brown and Dr. Bill Sugar, from the Math, Science and Instructional Technology (MSITE) Department were honored.  Dr. Brown is co-author of, Securing the Connected Classroom (International Society for Technology in Education). Dr. Sugar is author of, Studies of ID Practices (Springer).

Dr. Majorie Ringler from the Educational Leadership (LEED) Department was also honored.  Dr. Ringler is author of, Academic Language Literacy: Developing Instructional Leadership Skills for Principals and Teachers (Rowman & Littlefield).

Dr. Sugar and Dr. Brown are pictured above wearing the medals they received at the event.