Category Archives: Office of Assessment and Accreditation (OAA)

News from the Office of Assessment and Accreditation

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EPP Dashboards – Assessment System (Standard 2)

Significant changes have been made by the EPP since the NCATE visit in 2006 to refine its key assessments at conversion points throughout its programs: program entry, internship, and program completion. Key assessments are aligned with state and national standards appropriate to program level, content, and support of the EPP conceptual framework.  In the Professional Standards for the Accreditation of Teacher Preparation Institutions, Standard 2 states:

The unit has an assessment system that collects and analyzes data on applicant qualifications, candidate and graduate performance, and unit operations to evaluate and improve the performance of candidates, the unit, and its programs.

The EPP has several dashboards pertaining to measures for NCATE Standard 2:

For more information and examples related to Standard 2, please visit the NCATE/CAEP Exhibit Rooms on the COE Office of Assessment and Accreditation’s website.

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Starfish

Starfish is an early-alert retention tool that works through Blackboard to support student academic success at ECU. Through Starfish, faculty can inform students of their academic performance within a course and connect students to appropriate support resources.
Starfish’s goal is to catch students before it’s too late and offer academic assistance
Starfish has the capabilities to engage students on many levels, but has been used at East Carolina University extensively to allow faculty to express concerns (flags) or offer words of praise (kudos). Some commonly used flags at East Carolina University have been low test/quiz scores, excessive absences, and stopped attending. Some commonly used kudos have been to keep up the good work, off to a good start, and outstanding academic performance.

In the 2013 – 2014 calendar year alone, College of Education faculty gave out nearly 18600 flags and kudos that without a doubt have proved to be very helpful to students. Faculty feedback is extremely important in helping students reach their academic potential and Starfish provides this in a simple, quick form. A specific flag indicates to the student the nature of the problem and this provides them with the opportunity to correct it. Since faculty have taken the time to address a problem, they are obviously more than happy to support a student through correcting the problem. A specific kudo indicates to the student that things are going well and should be motivation to keep things moving in that direction. I have received 2 kudos this semester so far and am motivated to receive more as I continue my graduate studies. Starfish data shows that the number of flags and kudos given by faculty continues to increase from year to year. Therefore, Starfish appears to be here to stay as it proves to be a very helpful tool for faculty and students alike.

Kelvin Shackleford
MSA Principal Fellow
East Carolina University

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Cornerstone – Employee Training Site

What is Cornerstone?  It is the software that East Carolina University uses to offer training opportunities for full-time employees.  Faculty and staff can now log into Cornerstone to find instructor-led training, online training, or complete assigned online training.  Within Cornerstone, employee’s personalized training center provides links to the areas they will use the most: My Training, Your Upcoming Sessions, Online Training in Progress and Browse for Training.

Training is offered from across the campus from various departments, including the College of Education’s educational technology staff.  Employees can search the site for training that fits their interests or needs.

Key Features Within Your Personalized Training Center:

  1. Complete Assigned Online Training: Access the “Online Training in Progress” area and click Launch to access any courses assigned to you.
  2. Register for Instructor-Led Training (ILT): Visit the “Browse for Training” area and click the name of the department or school to view and/or register for upcoming training sessions. Open or print these step-by-step registration instructions. After registration, you will receive an auto-generated email confirmation from ces.mail@csod.com, complete with an Outlook calendar invite.
  3. Access Your Transcript: Visit the “My Training” area and follow the “Click Here for Transcript” link to view your active, upcoming and completed training.

Feel free to log into the site to view the training option: http://www.ecu.edu/itcs/cornerstone/

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Why Does Accreditation Matter? A Student Perspective.

As a student, I can recall several times when professors have shared that the program I am in is “accredited.”  My mental response was “That’s nice.”  I didn’t care.  All I wanted to know was when the next assignment was due, and what I had to do in order to pass that assignment, the class, and then get my degree.  Sure, it is great that my program has been given a stamp of approval by some mystery third party, but all of that is outside my realm of experiences.
Then a friend of mine at another university shared that they had failed their bid at re-accreditation.  When she graduated, her degree would be from a non-accredited program.  I asked her what that meant for her.  She told me that it would be harder for her to find a job because employers would see her degree as having less value than one from an applicant who had graduated from an accredited program.  Some employers might not even consider her qualified, despite her degree.  She had always wanted to move to the New York-New Jersey area, and now she wasn’t sure she could find a job in that competitive market.  New Jersey actually has a law requiring applicants to notify employers if their degree is from a non-accredited institution.  At that moment, I became alarmed.  Does that mean that all of my hard work might come to mean nothing if the program I was in suddenly lost its accreditation?
All of a sudden my immediate focus of passing the current assignment and class seemed less relevant.  After all, my current assignment and class would mean nothing if I couldn’t find a job after receiving my degree.  I was upset for my friend, who had always studied hard to maintain a high GPA so that she could go anywhere once she graduated.  Now her options were limited.  Attending and graduating from an accredited program suddenly became important to me, and I realized how important it was all along.

In today’s world of online universities and degrees, employers are concerned about hiring quality individuals.  In today’s job market, it can be hard to find a job when there are few positions and many applicants.  Employers look to whittle down the applicants they consider, and one of the first filters they use is whether or not the applicant has attended an accredited program.

Don’t let all of your hard work be in vain.  Make sure your program is accredited, or you may have just gone to school for nothing.

Written by:
Elbert E. Maynard
MSA Principal Fellow
East Carolina University

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CAEP Prep: What is the LCSN?

The Latham Clinical Schools Network (LCSN) is a network of 38 public school systems located throughout eastern North Carolina, who collaborate with the EPP at ECU in order to form a school partnership among teacher candidates and faculty.  LCSN provides quality field placements for pre-service teachers with trained clinical teachers in diverse public school settings.

The LCSN is critical to the EPP successfully meeting the expectations of Standard 3, Field Experiences and Clinical Practice, Collaboration between the Unit and School Partners.  Collaboration with the LCSN allows the EPP to strategically and proactively address concerns.  One common issue collaboratively addressed through LCSN was the need for criminal background checks for field experiences (practicum) and clinical practice (internship).

The in-depth collaboration between ECU EPP and LCSN partners leads to synergistic gains for the partners.  For the COE, partnerships from the LCSN support the TQP grant, focused on the clinical practice component.  Instructional Coaching in LCSN member district (Pitt County Schools and Greene County Schools) was an original TQP clinical practice reform, and is also a Pirate CODE innovation.  For LCSN, professional development is provided annually for all clinical teachers who mentor an intern during clinical practice through the fall and spring Clinical Teacher Conference and through other annual conferences, themed workshops, and collaborative professional development opportunities.  These events unite EPP faculty and clinical partners in support of candidates.

Prior to the Site Visit, it is important for our public school partners in the LCSN to know about the EPP’s programs and Pirate CODE.  LCSN representatives serve on the Council for Teacher Education, and are the crucial communication conduit for the EPP to the public schools.

Once the Site Visit schedule is determined, individual faculty, candidates, clinical teachers, university supervisors and other EPP stakeholders may possibly be invited to meet with the Site Visit Team.

Learn more about the Latham Clinical Schools Network: http://www.ecu.edu/cs-educ/oce/Clinical_Schools.cfm

Latham_Clinical_Schools_Network_forPD

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Video Grand Rounds

Video Grand Rounds (VGR) provides teacher candidates with an introductory framework for classroom observations and subsequent faculty-guided discussions. This experience provides a conceptual foundation for their future study in teacher education.

Based on the medical grand rounds model, teacher candidates view video segments of typical classrooms, complete structured classroom observation protocols, and then debrief with faculty regarding the observations.

The common classroom observations provide teacher candidates with a common language to discuss quality teaching throughout their programs. These shared experiences lead to in-depth discussions of best practices.

VGR is currently integrated into the Early Experience course in the Elementary Education, Special Education, English Education, Birth-Kindergarten Education and Health Education programs.

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College of Education’s Professional Development for using Educational Technology

The Office of Assessment and Accreditation(OAA) along with COE IT offers professional development geared toward the faculty and staff in the COE.  The workshops cover training on Blackboard, TEMS, social media and the use of video in courses.  Most sessions are offered on Tuesday afternoons under the theme of “Tech Training Tuesdays”.  The workshops are all offered through ECU’s employee training system called Cornerstone (http://www.ecu.edu/cs-itcs/cornerstone/).  This allows the faculty to track their professional development through out the year.  More information about professional development available to those in the College of Education is available on the COE Professional Development for Faculty/Staff webpage (http://www.ecu.edu/cs-educ/oaa/facultypd.cfm). COE requires that all faculty teaching distance education course have 6 hours of PD a year.

In designing training for faculty and staff The OAA gets feedback from faculty on what they want to see for training options.  One of the biggest complaints that the OAA heard from faculty is that they are tired of the “one and done” model of training workshops. In trying to find a solution to this dissatisfaction OAA has decided to run a professional learning community (PLC) pertaining to social media.  The PLC looks at how social media can be used both in the classroom setting and for developing a personal learning  network.  The PLC will meet multiple time during the fall semester and once during the spring.  The hope of running a PLC is that faculty will look to create their own PLC’s in the future on topics that they find relevant for PD.
Fall 2014 COE Professional Development Flier

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Educator Preparation Program (EPP) Dashboard Project Focuses Data Collection

Data includes the number of university supervisors and cooperating teachers who have been assigned to an initial licensure candidate for the final semester of internship, and the percentage holding a license and/or additional training in their supervision area.

Data includes the number of university supervisors and cooperating teachers who have been assigned to an initial licensure candidate for the final semester of internship, and the percentage holding a license and/or additional training in their supervision area.

Beginning in Fall 2012, the College of Education began collecting and compiling data to be included in the Educator Preparation Program (EPP) Dashboard Project.  The EPP Dashboards cover all educator preparation programs at ECU, including those in and outside the College of Education.  Until this time only university dashboards had been available.  After reviewing the NCATE/CAEP Standards, the COE Office of Assessment and Accreditation decided to focus the dashboards on performance measures, collected at different points throughout the program, for both the undergraduate and graduate levels. COE OAA then schedules the dashboards for updating each summer.  The most recent updates for the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 academic years will be posted on IPAR’s University Dashboard website no later than October 2014.

The data collected and summarized by COE OAA in the EPP Dashboards include:

  • Graduate Evidences 1 and 2
  • edTPA
  • Final Progress Reports
  • Internship Grades
  • Senior I Methods Grades
  • Diversity of Field Experiences
  • Undergraduate Dispositions
  • Average GPA at admittance to the program
  • Cooperating Teacher and University Supervisor Licensure

The EPP Dashboards can be viewed on the University Dashboard website.

 

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CAEP Prep: ECU’s Pirate CODE Process

The ECU Pirate CODE features a set of seven coordinated innovations linked throughout the teacher education curriculum and clinical practice. Each innovation is evolving through a series of carefully planned stages, to institutionalize each innovation in the Department of Elementary Education and Middle Grades Education. Once refined and data analysis proves it an effective model, the innovation is scaled up and implemented in other teacher preparation programs across the EPP.

TIThe stages of the ECU Pirate CODE begin with small scale, squishy pilots and more through a carefully planned set of stages to refine, study, and expand the innovation.

Since the submission and approval of the Pirate CODE, the Research on Practice model has evolved within the unique and complete context of the ECU EPP. The language of the model has morphed into an implementation language from the original descriptors rooted in the R&D research literature. The Pirate CODE TI and model have been presented in multiple venues across the EPP and at the American Educational Research Association (AERA) Division K Research Summit as well as at an invited session to the 2014 AERA Annual Meeting.

#ECU_CAEPisComing

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COE Faculty Engaged at NC-ACTE Fall Forum

NCACTE Logo

On September 25-26, 2014, the NC Association of Colleges and Teacher Educators held its annual fall Teacher Education Forum in Raleigh, NC. 

The Teacher Education Forum is a wonderful opportunity for teacher educators engaged in all aspects of preparation–from recruitment to curriculum, to clinical practice, to induction–to convene annually.

College of Education faculty presenting sessions at the 2014 Fall Forum included:

  • Patricia Anderson (ELMID)
  • Jamin Carson (ELMID)
  • Kristen Cuthrell (ELMID)
  • Laura King (SEFR)
  • Diana Lys (OAA)
  • Linda Patriarca (Dean’s Office)
  • Lora Lee Smith Canter (SEFR)
  • Michael Vitale (SEFR)
  • Karen Voytecki (SEFR)
  • Kathi Wilhite (SEFR)
  • Jennifer Williams (SEFR)

To learn more about NC-ACTE, visit their website.