Category Archives: Office of Assessment and Accreditation (OAA)

News from the Office of Assessment and Accreditation

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ECU to Participate in Global Day of Giving

image‘Tis the season for giving! In honor of #GivingTuesday, East Carolina University is inviting alumni, friends, parents, students, faculty, and staff to join the movement by giving a charitable gift* on Tuesday, December 2, to the university that is near and dear to our hearts.

Founded in 2012 to inspire a new tradition of generosity, #GivingTuesday focuses on celebrating kindness and giving back. Support a culture of philanthropy at ECU by making a gift on December 2nd and becoming a partner in securing the university’s future for current students and future generations of Pirates.

Your gifts provide scholarships, enrich teaching resources and libraries, offer hands-on learning lessons, support research and the arts, deliver classroom enhancements, and afford study abroad living/learning opportunities – all of which help ECU attract and retain the best and brightest students and faculty.

Help spread the word! Mark you calendar to #GiveTueECU on December 2, tell your friends, and post on social media using the hashtags #GivingTuesdayECU and #GiveTueECU. “I Gave” badges will be available through ECU’s University Advancement and East Carolina Alumni Association’s social media accounts on December 2.

Learn more about the #GivingTuesdayECU movement. Thank you for your support!

Contact us at (252) ECU-GIVE (252-328-4483) or give2ecu@ecu.edu.

*Your gift is tax-deductible to the extent the law allows.

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How the COE is Using Video in its Innovations

The implementation of video has taken a prominent role in the COE PIRATE Code, from Video Grand Rounds (VGR) to ISLES to EDTPA.

Students start by observing the video pertaining to the innovations in the VGR component. The instructors show video clips of actual preK-12 classes in place of observation visits by the students. The videos demonstrate strategies the candidates are to look for when they physically go to classrooms to observe. These videos provide an accurate comprehensive visual picture of the strategies in practice. Then in class, students debrief to ensures they comprehend what they are seeing. For more information, check out the VGR blog post .

The students begin to create their own videos when they participate in ISLES. The final component is showing conditional knowledge of the effective instructional practices when they submit a video demonstrating it. For more information, check out the ISLES blog post.

edTPA is a big aspect of the teacher education program and video takes a prominent role in its completion. Students must submit a video of them teaching to be evaluated. These videos allow the faculty to make sure that students are prepared to move on from the COE and have their own classrooms. For more information, check out the edTPA blog post.

The usage of video and the innovations have gone hand in hand to better prepare ECU COE candidates for their future as teachers

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Junior 2 Teaching Interns and Principal Fellows MSA Students Collaborate

Junior 2 Teaching Interns and Principal Fellows MSA Students Collaborate
Something new and exciting is happening this semester in the COE that you might miss if you are not currently a Junior 2 intern or a Principal Fellow. The two programs are collaborating for the benefit of both student sets, and the process has been extremely promising. First, the interns and Fellows meet and discuss lesson plans and teaching strategies. Next, the Jr 2’s teach a class, while the Fellows observe either in person or by watching a video of the lesson uploaded to Taskstream. The Fellows then evaluate the lesson and provide constructive feedback. This process is repeated across three lessons the interns teach.
The process is valuable to the interns because they get another set of eyes from experienced classroom teachers. The MSA students get the valuable experience of observing and evaluating teachers with a rubric, which will be a fundamental part of their future jobs as administrators, as they must observe their teaching staff and evaluate according to The Rubric for Evaluating North Carolina Teachers:

North Carolina Teacher Evaluation Process

As a Principal Fellow, this experience has been valuable and has taught me some practical lessons. I spent hours watching my intern’s lesson videos, brainstorming constructive advice and writing helpful comments. And this was for an intern who had well-prepared lessons and did a fantastic job. Yet I realize as an administrator I will not have hours to spend on each individual teacher. I can reflect with empathy now on some of my past evaluations, which may have seemed rushed and minimal. A principal with 80 staff members must schedule 80 pre-conferences, observe 80 lessons, and schedule 80 post-conferences. Each teacher should be observed a minimum of three times per year, and ILT’s require even more. Hundreds of hours are required to meet the minimum standards for evaluating and assessing teachers, and to truly help teachers improve, more time will be needed than just the minimum. But for the moment, my responsibility is to one intern and I have the luxury of time. I hope that my feedback will help her to ease into her future as an NC teacher. This experience has definitely been worthwhile for me in my preparation in becoming an NC school administrator.
Elbert Maynard
Principal Fellow

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The Swivl is here.

What is the Swivl?  Swivl is a camera dock with a twist.  Instead of holding your camera still, the Swivl will follow you around the room, tracking you as you move around on stage or in front of an audience.  This device follows the paired mic wherever it goes.  It is compatible with Android and IOS devices.

So who is using it in COE?  Students have begun to use it to record class sessions for edTPA and ISLES.  OAA has been using it to interview faculty and students about Pirate Code innovations.  Why use this instead of a video camera?  It’s ease of set up and video download capabilities.  The device can connect to any Android or IOS device that has the Swivl app.  You place it in the dock, hook up the mic cable, sync the mic, turn on app and you are ready to go.  The Swivl zeros in on the mic and follows it.  You can use it for one speaker or pass the mic for a group.  The quality of the recording ability lets you place it in the middle of a table to record a small group.  If you want to know more or are interested in trying out the Swivl, feel free to contact OAA IT for more information.

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East Carolina University Principal Fellows Program

According to the North Carolina Principal Fellows Program website, The Principal Fellows Program provides a competitive, merit-based scholarship loan to individuals of exceptional academic ability who have teaching or relevant experience and who desire to enter school administration in a North Carolina public school. Through this scholarship loan, fellows have the opportunity to pursue their studies full-time and earn a Master of School Administration (MSA) degree in two years. The program consists of one year of full-time academic study at one of eleven designated colleges in the UNC system, followed by one year of a full-time internship in a North Carolina public school while attending school part-time. Fellows are provided with and must participate in regularly scheduled enrichment experiences to augment their learning opportunities as they prepare for the challenges of being a principal or assistant principal. Fellows must agree to practice as full-time administrators for four years within six years following the completion of their degree as repayment for their scholarship loan.

The opportunity to become a school administrator is an exciting one to be sure. Personally, I am extremely excited to be pursuing a MSA degree because it will give me the opportunity to serve staff, students, parents, and the community in which I will be working to a greater degree than was possible in my role as a classroom teacher. Elbert Maynard, current MSA Principal Fellow, explains this best in his perspective on becoming a school administrator. He stated, “Students are in desperate need of good teachers-those who will challenge them with high expectations in a caring and respectful way, in order to prepare them for the challenges their futures hold. Therefore, why would a teacher leave the classroom to become an administrator? An administrator can do the same thing for a staff of teachers that a teacher does for his/her students. By being a support for teachers, an administrator can influence an entire school. If an administrator can positively influence two teachers, then that administrator doubled the number of students positively affected. If an administrator can positively influence 50 teachers, 100 teachers…the positive effects on students’ lives grow exponentially.”

The program design clearly addresses the idea that individuals would be best served by being able to focus solely on their studies during the first year. According to Elbert Maynard, “Dividing time between a full-time job and studies in an MSA program takes away from both. I would be taking away from my students by dividing my attention between them and pursuing an advanced degree; the reverse is also true as I would be taking away from my potential as a future administrator by not focusing solely on my studies while pursuing the MSA. The Principal Fellows Program is a blessing that allows individuals to focus solely on becoming the best administrator they can be, without taking away from the students those teachers have a responsibility to. Not only that, the Principal Fellows Program has a prestigious reputation of excellence that any MSA candidate would be honored to be a part of.”

East Carolina University has had the largest cohort of fellows among the eleven universities for at least the last four years. This speaks to the attractiveness and success of the university. The MSA program at East Carolina University prides itself on being grounded in service to our surrounding school region. With a focus on servant-leadership, students in the MSA program at East Carolina University are required to complete six Service Leadership Projects where they go into schools within our region to serve as problem-solvers, collaborators, and change agents. The authentic learning received by fellows provides them with the knowledge and confidence they need to further prepare them for the role of principal and assistant principal. We are actually given the opportunity to go into schools and provide assistance and support to staff and students in the role of principal or assistant principal. Elbert Maynard stated he chose East Carolina University because, “ECU is known statewide-even nationwide-as having excellent teacher and administrator programs. Having enrolled in the programs here at ECU, I can report that this reputation is not exaggerated–if anything, it is understated. My courses taken, and my experiences as a GA working with the Office of Accreditation and Assessment, have been more valuable to me than I could possibly quantify with words. Success as an administrator hinges on, in large part, the preparation gained through an MSA program. I can predict confidently that I will be successful as a future administrator due to the excellence of the program here at ECU.” I concur with Elbert’s view about East Carolina University.

Kelvin Shackleford
MSA Principal Fellow
East Carolina University

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A New Model for Student Teaching

Traditionally, student teaching has involved the pairing of one teacher candidate (intern) with one experienced classroom teacher (clinical teacher).  Gradually, the intern takes on more and more responsibility in the classroom until he/she is functioning as the sole instructor.  Lead faculty in the College of Education are examining new models of student teaching in the hopes of finding more effective ways to prepare new teachers.  One of these new models is known as Co-Teaching.

In the Co-Teaching model, the clinical teacher and the intern engage in collaborative planning, instruction and assessment throughout the internship.   This model enables the clinical teacher to provide consistent mentoring while giving interns the time and support necessary to gain the skills and confidence required to teach effectively.  Co-Teachers are always both teaching.  In order for the model to be successful, both the intern and the clinical teacher must be trained in specific co-teaching strategies.

The Co-Teaching model was piloted during the 2012-2013 school year.  Twenty-five interns were placed in 15 classrooms in Pitt and Green Counties.  Initial research shows that the Co-Teaching model provides benefits to the student teacher, classroom teacher and P-12 students.  Co-teaching interns significantly outperformed non Co-Teaching interns in their ability to provide subject-specific pedagogy and to use assessment to inform instruction.  Co-Teaching interns also indicated a higher degree of self-efficacy in their ability to differentiate instruction than that indicated by traditionally prepared interns.   The pilot has expanded to 242 participants engaged in co-teaching including interns, classroom teachers, university supervisors and program faculty.

The Co-Teaching initiative is led by Drs. Judy Smith, Liz Fogarty, Christina Tschida and Vivian Covington.  The practice of and research on Co-Teaching  addresses the focus of NCATE Standard 3:  Clinical and  Field Experiences.

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EPP Dashboards – Diversity (Standard 4)

Following the 2006 NCATE review, significant changes were made to the EPP Professional Studies Core (PSC). The PSC underwent major changes in 2008-09 as part of revisions mandated by the NCDPI concerning initial licensure programs. Revisions were also made in 2009-10 for advanced teacher licensure programs.

Data includes average candidate performance on GE1 (Teacher Leadership Project) and GE2 (Cultural Proficiency). GE1 scores are based on a 3 point scale, and GE2 Scores are based on a 4 point scale.

Data includes average candidate performance on GE1 (Teacher Leadership Project) and GE2 (Cultural Proficiency). GE1 scores are based on a 3 point scale, and GE2 Scores are based on a 4 point scale.

The new PSC requires all initial teacher candidates entering Upper Division in fall 2010 to successfully complete diversity in education coursework, either EDUC 3002 or a CTE approved social science course. More recently, the OAA provides grade reports for EDUC 3002 organized by program area to inform course improvements.  Likewise, in the NCDPI revised programs, all new MAEd candidates admitted in fall 2011 and afterward, are required to complete a Graduate Evidence Portfolio, as well as a Diversity Advocacy project, as part of the required MAEd core course (EDUC 6001).

All candidates in the EPP are required to complete field experiences and clinical practice (internships).  The 38 districts in the LCSN—where ITP candidates are required to complete internship placements—have P-12 student populations averaging 44 percent minority student populations.  Many LCSN districts have high percentages of students eligible for free and reduced lunch. Data from NCDPI on ELL’s is not available, but LCSN partners report the increase in Hispanic populations during the past five years correlates to an increase in ELL students in their districts.

In an effort to align with NCATE/CAEP Standard 4, OAA focused two dashboards on the subject of diversity.  Standard 4 states:

The unit designs, implements, and evaluates curriculum and provides experiences for candidates to acquire and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions necessary to help all students learn. Assessments indicate that candidates can demonstrate and apply proficiencies related to diversity. Experiences provided for candidates include working with diverse populations, including higher education and P–12 school faculty, candidates, and students in P–12 schools.”

These dashboards provide a summary of advanced programs candidate performance on Graduate Evidence 2, Cultural Proficiency (COE_1.9) and a profile of P-12 student populations in placement schools (COE_1.6).

For more information and examples related to Standard 4, please visit the NCATE/CAEP Exhibit Rooms on the COE Office of Assessment and Accreditation’s website.

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What is the Senior Year Internship?

The Senior Year Internship is a required clinical experience for teacher education majors at East Carolina University.  It is a two-semester experience within a public school classroom, under the mentorship and coaching of a specially trained and licensed clinical teacher.  The Senior Year Internship is designed to provide students with opportunities to internalize and apply previous teaching and learning experience, as well as opportunities to teach and grow professionally through observation, planning, teaching, assessment, and reflective work with an effective classroom teacher.

In Senior I, a teaching intern’s first semester, students acclimate themselves to the public school environment by gaining an understanding of policies and procedures, multiple roles of classroom teachers, the diverse needs of the students, as well as the beginning stages of a range of experiences of curricular planning, delivery of instruction, and assessment.

The second semester, Senior II, is an emersion semester of involvement with clinical teachers providing constant feedback to the intern about the teaching and learning process.  In addition, the intern will complete a portfolio to document his or her growth and development as a classroom teacher with support from the clinical teacher and the university supervisor.

The Senior Year Internship is designed to allow students to gain practical experience and attain a level of competency needed for a high functioning novice beginning teacher.  There is a key focus on specific and timely feedback from clinical teachers and university supervisors which is meant to augment the intern’s growth.  The internship is invaluable in that it is practical learning combined with expert coaching from seasoned and trained teachers and supervisors.

Interns are generally able to make smooth transitions into their own classrooms once they are hired because of the depth of knowledge and experience they have acquired in this experience.

For more information regarding the Senior Year Internship, please see the Teacher Education Handbook.

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The Senior Year Internship is a central feature of the initial teacher preparation programs at ECU and aligns with NCATE Standard 3: Field Experiences and Clinical Practice

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ITC in the College of Education

The ITC falls under the leadership of Dr. Diana Lys. It consists of professionals who can help support the integration of technology for teaching and learning.

The mission of the COE Instructional Technology Center is to provide support for faculty, staff and students in the integration of technology for teaching and learning. The ITC supports the development of technology-rich instruction by providing hardware and software, staff development, media production and consulting services to faculty and staff. The Student Lab (Speight 241) is provided to help teacher candidates and practitioners attain the skills needed to integrate technology in their careers as educators.

GOAL I: Provide timely, effective technical support for faculty, staff and students.
  • Respond to user requests within 24 hours of receipt.
  • Upgrade and maintain hardware and software as needed.
  • Set up audio/visual equipment in Speight classrooms as per Classroom Equipment Setup Requests.
  • Improve web presence to increase ease of use.
  • Implement bar-code based inventory system
  • Create a policies and procedures manual for ITC services.
GOAL II: Promote the use of technology in distance instruction.
  • Create a faculty multimedia lab for the purpose of creating media elements for instruction and research.
  • Provide consulting services in instructional design and media development
  • Research emerging technologies and suggest strategies for integration into instruction
GOAL III: Provide professional development opportunities for faculty, staff, and K-12 educators.
  • Conduct workshops, seminars and individual training as needed.
  • Create tutorials, FAQs and other online resources to provide just-in-time training.
  • Collaborate with other college units to leverage professional develop opportunities.
  • Attend conferences, workshops and other professional development events pertaining to educational technology.
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ICYMI: Implementing edTPA in Small Teacher Prep Programs

In small teacher preparation programs, the issue of implementation and scale-up of using a standardized performance assessment, like edTPA, can be challenging.  Peck and McDonald (2013) found one of the most significant outcomes of implementing a standardized performance assessment was faculty-initiated change. In small teacher preparation programs – those with five or fewer faculty and approximately 30 graduates annually – how do faculty lead systemic change in an edTPA implementation with fidelity and rigor?

At the 2013 edTPA Implementation Conference in San Diego, four ECU teacher education faculty shared their experiences and how each is initiating change through their edTPA implementation.

  • Barbara Brehm, Birth through Kindergarten Education
  • Ann Bullock, Middle Grades Education
  • Sharilyn Steadman, English Education
  • Michele Wallen, Health Education

Faculty shared models of communication, the development of common signature assessments, content-specific sticking points, and early successes as part of the session.  These programs proved that big change can be had with a small, committed team of faculty focused on a common goal.

Learn more about their experiences through video interviews posted on the ECU Pirate CODE-edTPA website or on the national edTPA website at 2013 National edTPA Implementation Conference.

edTPA is a teacher candidate performance assessment used in all initial teacher preparation programs at ECU, supporting the EPP’s efforts to meet NCATE Standards 1 and 2.

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