Category Archives: Office of Professional Development and Student Outreach

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Starfish

Starfish is an early-alert retention tool that works through Blackboard to support student academic success at ECU. Through Starfish, faculty can inform students of their academic performance within a course and connect students to appropriate support resources.
Starfish’s goal is to catch students before it’s too late and offer academic assistance
Starfish has the capabilities to engage students on many levels, but has been used at East Carolina University extensively to allow faculty to express concerns (flags) or offer words of praise (kudos). Some commonly used flags at East Carolina University have been low test/quiz scores, excessive absences, and stopped attending. Some commonly used kudos have been to keep up the good work, off to a good start, and outstanding academic performance.

In the 2013 – 2014 calendar year alone, College of Education faculty gave out nearly 18600 flags and kudos that without a doubt have proved to be very helpful to students. Faculty feedback is extremely important in helping students reach their academic potential and Starfish provides this in a simple, quick form. A specific flag indicates to the student the nature of the problem and this provides them with the opportunity to correct it. Since faculty have taken the time to address a problem, they are obviously more than happy to support a student through correcting the problem. A specific kudo indicates to the student that things are going well and should be motivation to keep things moving in that direction. I have received 2 kudos this semester so far and am motivated to receive more as I continue my graduate studies. Starfish data shows that the number of flags and kudos given by faculty continues to increase from year to year. Therefore, Starfish appears to be here to stay as it proves to be a very helpful tool for faculty and students alike.

Kelvin Shackleford
MSA Principal Fellow
East Carolina University

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Teacher Cadet

East Carolina College of Education Hosts Future Teachers for Teacher Cadet Day 2014

2014 Burroughs Wellcome Fund North Carolina Teacher of the Year, James Ford

2014 Burroughs Wellcome Fund North Carolina Teacher of the Year, James Ford

One hundred plus potential teachers from high schools within the East visited the campus of East Carolina University on October 15, 2014 for Teacher Cadet Day. The Office of Professional Development and Student Outreach within the College of Education offered this event to high school students who are enrolled in the North Carolina Teacher Cadet Program.  It is an innovative year-long or semester-block activity-based curriculum for high school juniors and seniors. The course is designed to promote a better understanding and create interest in those students who may consider teaching as a profession. It is an honors program that details many components of the education environment and involves students in content, application, observations and teaching in preschool, elementary, middle school, and high school settings.

While on campus students listened to a keynote address by the 2014 Burroughs Wellcome Fund North Carolina Teacher of the Year, James Ford. Mr. Ford is a world history teacher at Garinger High School with Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools.

Students also attended a Program Fair with representatives from the various program areas in the College of Education, as well as representatives from teacher education programs across campus.  This was followed by informative sessions around the theme of the conference: What’s Your Superpower? I TEACH.  Students participated in sessions on college admissions, career exploration, and options for teacher education. In addition, these prospective teachers engaged in a dialogue with teacher education students in a panel discussion. The visiting students completed their day on campus with a trip to West End Dining Hall and tours provided by ECU Admissions.

Teacher Cadet students from Duplin, Gates, Johnston, Nash, and Wayne counties participated in Teacher Cadet Day 2014. Special thanks is extended to Ms. Christa Monroe for her efforts in organizing this recruitment event.

If the video above does not load, use the following link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAF0H0mD4D0&feature=youtu.be

For more information about the College of Education’s efforts in the area of teacher recruitment, please contact Dr. Laura Bilbro-Berry at bilbroberryl@ecu.edu or 252-328-1123.

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Cornerstone – Employee Training Site

What is Cornerstone?  It is the software that East Carolina University uses to offer training opportunities for full-time employees.  Faculty and staff can now log into Cornerstone to find instructor-led training, online training, or complete assigned online training.  Within Cornerstone, employee’s personalized training center provides links to the areas they will use the most: My Training, Your Upcoming Sessions, Online Training in Progress and Browse for Training.

Training is offered from across the campus from various departments, including the College of Education’s educational technology staff.  Employees can search the site for training that fits their interests or needs.

Key Features Within Your Personalized Training Center:

  1. Complete Assigned Online Training: Access the “Online Training in Progress” area and click Launch to access any courses assigned to you.
  2. Register for Instructor-Led Training (ILT): Visit the “Browse for Training” area and click the name of the department or school to view and/or register for upcoming training sessions. Open or print these step-by-step registration instructions. After registration, you will receive an auto-generated email confirmation from ces.mail@csod.com, complete with an Outlook calendar invite.
  3. Access Your Transcript: Visit the “My Training” area and follow the “Click Here for Transcript” link to view your active, upcoming and completed training.

Feel free to log into the site to view the training option: http://www.ecu.edu/itcs/cornerstone/

Dynamic Dialogue about Diversity panelist

Event Discussed Difficulty Recruiting, Retaining Diverse Educators in Schools

On October 15, 2014, the Office of Professional Development and Student Outreach in the College of Education collaborated with the Office of Equity and Diversity and the Ledonia Wright Cultural Center to offer a Dynamic Dialogue about Diversity event entitled “Diversity in Education.

This event featured a roundtable discussion between the 2014 North Carolina Teacher of the Year, James Ford, and two local educators, Juan Castillo from Greene County Schools and Joey Crutchfield from Pitt County Schools. The discussion integrated the topic of assessment of diversity within the teaching profession. The distinguished panelists shared the African American, Latino American, and Native American perspectives as well as their thoughts on the lack of representation of male educators from these subgroups in the classroom.

The panelist and participants engaged in dialogue about the challenges facing higher education in meeting the need for focused recruitment and retention in teacher education programs of underrepresented populations. The impact of the presence of these subgroups in the classroom as teachers as well as the support found in the schools and school systems that encourage retention in the profession was also intertwined into the conversation.  Additionally, current students and faculty shared how East Carolina University is meeting the needs for the recruitment and retention of diverse populations of students.

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CAEP Prep: What is the LCSN?

The Latham Clinical Schools Network (LCSN) is a network of 38 public school systems located throughout eastern North Carolina, who collaborate with the EPP at ECU in order to form a school partnership among teacher candidates and faculty.  LCSN provides quality field placements for pre-service teachers with trained clinical teachers in diverse public school settings.

The LCSN is critical to the EPP successfully meeting the expectations of Standard 3, Field Experiences and Clinical Practice, Collaboration between the Unit and School Partners.  Collaboration with the LCSN allows the EPP to strategically and proactively address concerns.  One common issue collaboratively addressed through LCSN was the need for criminal background checks for field experiences (practicum) and clinical practice (internship).

The in-depth collaboration between ECU EPP and LCSN partners leads to synergistic gains for the partners.  For the COE, partnerships from the LCSN support the TQP grant, focused on the clinical practice component.  Instructional Coaching in LCSN member district (Pitt County Schools and Greene County Schools) was an original TQP clinical practice reform, and is also a Pirate CODE innovation.  For LCSN, professional development is provided annually for all clinical teachers who mentor an intern during clinical practice through the fall and spring Clinical Teacher Conference and through other annual conferences, themed workshops, and collaborative professional development opportunities.  These events unite EPP faculty and clinical partners in support of candidates.

Prior to the Site Visit, it is important for our public school partners in the LCSN to know about the EPP’s programs and Pirate CODE.  LCSN representatives serve on the Council for Teacher Education, and are the crucial communication conduit for the EPP to the public schools.

Once the Site Visit schedule is determined, individual faculty, candidates, clinical teachers, university supervisors and other EPP stakeholders may possibly be invited to meet with the Site Visit Team.

Learn more about the Latham Clinical Schools Network: http://www.ecu.edu/cs-educ/oce/Clinical_Schools.cfm

Latham_Clinical_Schools_Network_forPD

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College of Education’s Professional Development for using Educational Technology

The Office of Assessment and Accreditation(OAA) along with COE IT offers professional development geared toward the faculty and staff in the COE.  The workshops cover training on Blackboard, TEMS, social media and the use of video in courses.  Most sessions are offered on Tuesday afternoons under the theme of “Tech Training Tuesdays”.  The workshops are all offered through ECU’s employee training system called Cornerstone (http://www.ecu.edu/cs-itcs/cornerstone/).  This allows the faculty to track their professional development through out the year.  More information about professional development available to those in the College of Education is available on the COE Professional Development for Faculty/Staff webpage (http://www.ecu.edu/cs-educ/oaa/facultypd.cfm). COE requires that all faculty teaching distance education course have 6 hours of PD a year.

In designing training for faculty and staff The OAA gets feedback from faculty on what they want to see for training options.  One of the biggest complaints that the OAA heard from faculty is that they are tired of the “one and done” model of training workshops. In trying to find a solution to this dissatisfaction OAA has decided to run a professional learning community (PLC) pertaining to social media.  The PLC looks at how social media can be used both in the classroom setting and for developing a personal learning  network.  The PLC will meet multiple time during the fall semester and once during the spring.  The hope of running a PLC is that faculty will look to create their own PLC’s in the future on topics that they find relevant for PD.
Fall 2014 COE Professional Development Flier

Christa Monroe

2014 Fall Clinical Teacher Conference and the 32nd Annual Mary Lois Staton Reading/Language Arts Conference a Success

The Fall Clinical Teacher Conference and the 32nd Annual Mary Lois Staton Reading/Language Arts Conference were held October 9th, emceed by Christa Monroe, the College of Education’s Lead Coordinator in the Office of Professional Development and Student Outreach.   Jennifer Jones, a K-12 Reading and Intervention specialist was the keynote speaker for the event, motivating audiences with “power strategies to teach like a champion!”

The event was held at the Greenville Hilton, jointly sponsored by the Latham Clinical Schools Network in the Office of Teacher Education and the Department of Literacy Studies, English Education, and History Education, both in the College of Education.  This dynamic symposium brought together clinical teachers, reading coaches, instructional coaches and other educators from throughout eastern North Carolina to participate in quality professional development administered by ECU faculty.

An opportunity for networking and educator engagement followed the event.  The next conference will be held in Fall 2015.

Slideshow: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lt-v1YgeDPU&feature=youtu.be

Video Credit: COE Office of Teacher Education, Photo Credit: Dr. Laura Bilbro-berry


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MSITE Recruits at Teacher Cadet Day

The Fall 2014 Teacher Cadet Day featured the 2014-15 North Carolina Teacher of the Year and had the theme “What’s Your Superpower? I TEACH!” Faculty and students from the Department of Mathematics, Science, and Instructional Technology Education (MSITE) recruited during the Program Fair portion of the agenda. The 100 or so teacher cadets (mostly seniors, with a few juniors) visited tables and discussed programs, all the while getting answers to questions on an education scavenger hunt. At the MSITE table we had brochures, recruitment/advising handouts, rulers, scholarship opportunities, and candy. Part of the draw to the table was an activity – roll a 7 or 11 with a pair of dice and win a bag of M&Ms. There were 20 students who signed up, indicating that they have some interest in mathematics or science teaching.  A special thank you to the MSITE students and faculty who participated: Dr. Ron Preston, Dr. Rhea Miles, Dr. Charity Cayton, Amanda Penwell, Taunya Stevens-Johnson, Jenny Jones, and Rebecca Ray.

Abby Colley

Graduate from Elementary Science Concentration Wins NCSTA Outstanding Student Teacher Award

North Carolina Science Teachers AssociationOn October 13, 2014, Abby Colley received a letter from the Elementary Science Concentration Awards Committee chair notifying her that she was the recipient of the NCSTA Outstanding Student Teacher Award. She will receive her award on November 6, 2014 in Winston-Salem at the NCSTA conference award ceremony. Abby is a well-deserving graduate from the Elementary Science Concentration and is currently teaching 4th grade at Ayden Elementary in Pitt County. It is excellent students like Abby who, through the power of their example, are helping to grow the elementary science program at ECU. Visit our website page to learn more about the Elementary Science Concentration in the Department of Mathematics, Science and Technology Education.

TOP MARKS: Dr. Don Phipps, Superintendent of Beaufort County Schools; Megan Ormond, 2014-2015 BCS Teacher of the Year; Bubs Carson, 2014-2015 Principal of the Year; and Mark Doane, assistant superintendent of Beaufort County Schools at the annual banquet on Sept. 16.

Megan Potter, ’11 MAEd READ graduate, was named the Beaufort County Teacher of the Year for 2014-2015

Mrs. Meredith Megan Potter Ormond, who teaches English at the Beaufort County Early College High School, was named Beaufort County’s Teacher of the Year for 2014-2015 during the annual banquet on Sept. 16. Megan taught at Greene Central High School for nine years and currently teaches English at the Beaufort County Early College High School. When asked about the award, she said, “Winning teacher of the year was certainly an honor. There is no shortage of amazing teachers in Beaufort County so it was humbling to be chosen by my colleagues and the interview board.”

In reflecting on her teaching career, she said that her success in the classroom is due to her supportive administrator and colleagues, a desire to try new teaching strategies and lifelong learning, and engagement in professional development. However, she explained that, “The most important piece is my students. Building relationships with them, creating a classroom culture where everyone feels safe and respected and wants to learn, and having high expectations that are clearly conveyed to students are all core beliefs in my teaching philosophy.”

Megan also described the impact of her undergraduate and graduate studies at ECU: “I never considered going anywhere other than ECU for my preparation as a teacher; I knew it was the best College of Education in the state. I was lucky to have amazing professors as an undergrad like Dr. Sundwall, Dr. Finley, Dr. Muller, and Dr. Wilenz who made me excited to learn about my content and provided me with sound strategies to use in the classroom. The fantastic Teaching Fellows program at ECU instilled in me professionalism and high standards.

My graduate degree in reading education pushed me out of my comfort zone and renewed my love for learning and teaching. I had professors like Dr. Swaggerty, Dr. Atkinson, and Dr. Griffith who were always willing to answer any question and discuss any topic. I felt lucky to work with these wonderful professors so closely and learned so much during my time as a graduate student. I feel like the depth and breadth of my pedagogical knowledge was increased tremendously during that time.”

(Pictured: Dr. Don Phipps, Superintendent of Beaufort County Schools; Megan Ormond, 2014-2015 BCS Teacher of the Year; Bubs Carson, 2014-2015 Principal of the Year; and Mark Doane, assistant superintendent of Beaufort County Schools at the annual banquet on Sept. 16.)