Category Archives: Office of Teacher Education (OTE)

News from the Office of Teacher Education

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Countdown to the CAEP Accreditation Visit

While students are preparing for the spring 2015 semester, the ECU College of Education is gearing up for the CAEP Accreditation Visit scheduled for February 7-10, 2015. Hopefully, everyone is rested, refreshed, and ready for another exciting and productive semester. Please remember that the CAEP Accreditation Visit is just around the corner. There are 26 more days before the visit. Read here for more CAEP Preparation news.

Kelvin Shackleford
MSA Principal Fellow
East Carolina University

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Dr. Robin Hamilton

Alumna is Southeast Regional Principal of the Year

Dr. Robin Hamilton of Parsley Elementary School has been named 2015 Southeast Regional Principal of the Year by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI). Hamilton is a recent graduate of the College of Education’s Educational Leadership program.

The news was delivered to Dr. Hamilton at a surprise ceremony and reception this morning, Friday, January 9, 2015. In attendance were New Hanover County Board of Education members, NCDPI officials, New Hanover County Schools (NHCS) Senior Staff, Parsley Elementary School staff and students, and Dr. Hamilton’s family. Dr. Sandra Sheridan, retired assistant superintendent of Human Resources, was the keynote speaker for the event.

“I love being a principal. I am humbled and so surprised by this honor,” Dr. Hamilton said.

This past June, Dr. Hamilton was named New Hanover County’s Principal of the Year, and was then chosen out of other top principals from 13 counties in Southeastern North Carolina to be named 2015 Regional Principal of the Year. She will now go on to compete against seven other principals for the honor of State Principal of the Year in May of 2015.

While earning her doctorate, Hamilton was also the recipient of the 2014 Glatthorn Distinguished Dissertation award.

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Alumna is NC Regional Teacher of the Year

North Carolina’s Northeast Regional Teacher of the Year is Jami Dickerson ’08, a third grade teacher at Eastern Elementary in Greenville. The announcement was made during a special ceremony at the school on December 9. Dickerson qualified for the honor after being named the 2013-2014 Pitt County Teacher of the Year in March.

“I’m honored; it’s very humbling,” said Dickerson, who is in her fifth year of teaching. “It’s also mind-blowing. I still can’t believe it happened. It’s been a long process, but it’s gone by fast. I’m excited for things to come.”

Read more at http://piratealumni.wordpress.com/2014/12/22/alumna-is-nc-regional-teacher-of-the-year/.

 

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COE Awarded Grant to Bring New Pitt County Teachers Back to Graduate School

By Crystal Baity
ECU News Services

East Carolina University wants to entice new teachers in Pitt County to become students again.

ECU’s College of Education has received a $60,000 grant from the BelleJar Foundation that will help pay for 12 first-year teachers in high-need schools to get their master’s degrees in a collaborative effort with Pitt County Schools.

Seven teachers have enrolled in graduate school at ECU, and officials are recruiting to fill the remaining slots at Belvoir Elementary, C.M. Eppes Middle, HB Sugg/SD Bundy Elementary and North Pitt High.

High-need schools typically have more beginning teachers, double-digit teacher turnover rates, and a large number of students who receive free and reduced lunch.

“We want to touch as many teachers as we can,” said Dr. Judy Smith, ECU associate professor of elementary education and middle grades education. “We are preparing effective teachers and we want to retain those teachers in eastern North Carolina.” The program, Collaborative Teaching Communities, is aimed at giving new teachers “the time and support necessary to gain skills and confidence required to teach successfully, particularly in high need settings,” according to the grant summary.

Those in the program will be part of professional teaching teams. The teams will include one master teacher, two ECU undergraduate co-teaching student interns and two novice teachers (first to third year teachers). The program builds on a successful co-teaching model piloted in the ECU College of Education.

For the full article, please visit the ECU News Services Article Preparing Effective Teachers.

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Counselors Connect with the College of Education

On December 10, 2014, twenty-nine high school guidance counselors from eastern North Carolina were hosted at an event sponsored by East Carolina University’s College of Education. The event entitled, Counselor Connections: Each One-Reach One, served as an opportunity for these education professionals to gain up-to-date information about the university and its teacher education programs. These 29 educators represented the following school districts: Beaufort, Craven, Cumberland, Edenton-Chowan, Edgecombe, Elizabeth City-Pasquotank, Greene, Hertford, Johnston, Lenoir, Martin, Pamlico, Pitt, Roanoke Rapids, and Wayne.

Invitations were issued to each high school within the Latham Clinical Schools Network which comprises 39 counties within eastern North Carolina. At the event, the counselors received information from Admissions regarding the processes involved for applying to ECU. The Honors College provided details about this unique opportunity for academically talented students. The attendees were also given a crash course by the Financial Aid Office about updated applications processes.

In addition to the aforementioned presentations, the College of Education shared detailed information about the College of Education scholarship opportunities and teaching faculty from the areas of Mathematics, Science, and Instructional Technology Education, Special Education, and Middle Grades Education talked with counselors about these high-need area programs. The central focus of the Each One, Reach One event was to assist counselors with information about applying for college, but also to encourage them to prompt students to consider education as a career choice for the future. Recruitment packets, along with College of Education scholarship information, were given to each attendee for use back at their high schools.

The counselors in attendance were encouraged to recruit high school juniors and seniors to attend the upcoming College of Education Recruitment Day to be held on campus January 24, 2015. Information about our Education Living and Learning Community and 2+2 degree completion programs through State Employees’ Partnership East was also disseminated to participants in an effort to spotlight the many opportunities for interested students.

The College of Education was delighted to host this event to provide timely and beneficial information to guidance counselors from the eastern region of our state.

For more information about recruitment efforts for the College of Education at East Carolina University, please contact Dionna Manning, at manningd@ecu.edu or via phone 252-328-5453 or contact Laura Bilbro-Berry, at bilbroberryl@ecu.edu or via phone at 252-328-1123. For information about the variety of educational opportunities may be found at www.ecu.edu/becomeateacher .

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Nancy Darden Child Development Center

The mission of the Nancy Darden Child Development Center in the Department of Child Development in the College of Human College is: 1) to serve as a model training facility for students majoring in Birth through Kindergarten Teacher Education (BK), Child Life, and Family Community Services; 2) to provide early education and high quality care for preschool children (ages 3 months to kindergarten from a broad cultural and economic mix); and 3) to provide research opportunities for university students and faculty. NDCDC provides supervised observation and participation opportunities from observing in the observation booth to full practicum experiences for the methods courses. Volunteers and students are cooperatively supervised by CDFR faculty, the NDCDC director, and NDCDC Lead Teachers. The NDCDC holds a five star rated child care license from the Division of Child Development, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, and is fully accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC). The Infant and Toddler classrooms meet developmental day status and may serve children with special needs.

All research conducted in the NDCDC is approved by the University, Medical Center Institutional Review Board, and the NDCDC Research Committee. Research activities are carried out under the direction of the Director of Research and Program Development for the NDCDC. Strict confidentiality is maintained

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Lucretia Smith – Ready to Start her Career as an Elementary School Teacher

As a child, Lucretia Smith’s favorite game was playing school with her two sisters, and she was always the teacher.

“Teaching is something I’ve always wanted to do,” said Smith, whose grandmother predicted her future career path. “I love kids. If there’s a child in need, I am there to the rescue.”

She’s been preparing herself ever since second grade, when she started working with children with disabilities. “I really enjoyed helping the special education teachers,” said Smith.

“By spending time with those students, it taught me that not all people are alike. I treasured helping those who were not able to do the same things that I could.”

Since then, Smith has been an active volunteer and dedicates her spare time to helping both children and adults with disabilities through the Greenville Special Olympics. She has also tutored at the Little Willie Center and been a club leader at the Boys and Girls Club.

“It is very hard for me to back down from doing volunteer or service work because I like giving my time to make someone smile,” she said.

East Carolina University will award Smith with her degree in elementary education on Dec. 19, but one crucial test almost forced her to switch her major.

“It took me a long time to pass the Praxis, which is a test that all education majors have to take,” said Smith. “I was always just two or three points away from passing with the required score of 522.”

But this didn’t hold Smith back for long. After encouragement from her father and advisor, Paige Everett, she persevered. Smith took the test for the final time and passed with a score of 523. “It only takes one point,” she said.

Smith is completing her senior internship in a fifth grade classroom in Greene County, where she spends over eight hours a day teaching English, language arts, math, science and social studies.

After graduation, Smith plans to start teaching right away. With already two elementary school teaching job offers and more interviews lined up, she is anxious to teach in her own classroom. “I’m ready to spread my wings,” she said.

For the full story, please see Lucretia’s entire Pirate Profile

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Throwback Thursday-CAEP Prep: ECU’s Pirate CODE Process

The ECU Pirate CODE features a set of seven coordinated innovations linked throughout the teacher education curriculum and clinical practice. Each innovation is evolving through a series of carefully planned stages, to institutionalize each innovation in the Department of Elementary Education and Middle Grades Education. Once refined and data analysis proves it an effective model, the innovation is scaled up and implemented in other teacher preparation programs across the EPP.

TIThe stages of the ECU Pirate CODE begin with small scale, squishy pilots and more through a carefully planned set of stages to refine, study, and expand the innovation.

Since the submission and approval of the Pirate CODE, the Research on Practice model has evolved within the unique and complete context of the ECU EPP. The language of the model has morphed into an implementation language from the original descriptors rooted in the R&D research literature. The Pirate CODE TI and model have been presented in multiple venues across the EPP and at the American Educational Research Association (AERA) Division K Research Summit as well as at an invited session to the 2014 AERA Annual Meeting.

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Joyner Library’s Teaching Resource Center

Established in 1988, the Teaching Resources Center (TRC) contains children and young adult materials, K-12 North Carolina state adopted textbooks, multi-media, kits, and reference resources. The department primarily serves students enrolled in teacher education programs and educators in eastern North Carolina.

Our Mission
The mission of the Teaching Resources Center is to facilitate teaching and learning initiatives by providing resources and services to educators at all levels.

Our Goals
To serve as a model resource center by:

Developing and maintaining a birth to 12th grade collection
Conducting reference and instruction
Providing outreach to area schools and educators
Supporting educators with technology and equipment in the Ann Rhem Schwarzmann Production Center
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Teaching Resources Center Collections materials;

Biographies: Biographies in the TRC’s collection are used by elementary, middle and high school age students.

Big Books: The TRC offers a wide selection of Big Books.  A Big Book is an enlarged version of a beginning reading book, incorporating very large print and pictures. Big Books are educational tools often used to instruct groups of emergent readers.

Children’s Award Book Collection Plan: The Teaching Resources Center automatically acquires various Children’s Award Books each year.

Easy Fiction/Picture Books: Easy Fiction Books are illustrated stories that are written for birth to grade 2 children.   The TRC’s picture book collection includes copies of Caldecott Medal award winners and honor books as well as other prominent children’s award books.

Mixed Media Collection: The TRC’s Mixed Media collection contains read-a-longs, CDs, MP3s, audio cassettes, flashcards, and other media used by K-12 students and educators.

Nonfiction Books: The Nonfiction collection contains materials for birth to grade 12 readers. Titles in the TRC’s nonfiction collection correspond to the content areas of the Common Core Standards and the North Carolina Essential Standards, as well as informational topics of interest to school-aged children.  Additionally, the TRC’s collection of folktales and poetry are located within this collection.  The TRC’s nonfiction collection includes copies of prominent children’s award winning books including the Outstanding Science Trade Books for Students K-12 award winners.
Professional Collection: The Professional Collection contains teaching materials and other valuable resources for K-12 educators. The collection includes books pertaining to classroom activities, lesson planning, bulletin boards, and instructional methods.

Reference Books: The non-circulating reference collection contains reference materials for elementary, middle and high school age students as well as professional reference materials for educators.

Review Center: The TRC serves as a review center for publishers of children’s materials and invites educators, including pre-service teachers, to review and evaluate the titles within the collection.

Ronnie Barnes African-American Resource Collection: The Ronnie Barnes collection contains children’s books written by and/or about African-Americans.  The collection contains many award winning books, including Coretta Scott King award winners and honor titles.

Teaching Aids: The tactile objects in the Teaching Aids Collection are used by educators to reinforce learning and teach new skills. These objects are often referred to as manipulatives.

Textbooks: The TRC collection contains both North Carolina State Adopted K-12 Textbooks and supplementary K-12 textbooks.

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UCEA convention 2014

Student Videos Screened at National UCEA Annual Convention

One of Dr. Martin Rearon’s favorite assignments when he teaches ethics invites participants to story board, script, cast, and create a short video to illustrate either a positive or a problematic instance of ethics in educational leadership. In spring 2014, the participants in LEED 6909 formed four groups and created four seven-minute videos. The videography and editing services were professionally supplied by Mike Myles and Sam Saunders of ECU’s Media and Technology Services, and they both worked with the participants in each video to edit them to the seven minutes stipulated by the assignment.

The quality of the acting contributed to the impact of the multiple points that each of the videos made about ethics in education. Consequently, he sought the participants’ permission to submit all four videos for blind review for possible screening at the Film Festival conducted in conjunction with the Annual Convention of the University Council for Educational Administration (UCEA, http://ucealee.squarespace.com/). Mike and Sam worked with him to edit the assignment videos to meet UCEA’s five-minute requirement. Two of the four videos were accepted by the reviewers, and the other two were just below the cut-off. The two videos accepted for screening are Double Standard and Who’s to Blame.

  • Double Standard was directed by Heather Gray,  and included Denise Adler, Nydra Jones, Donna Moore, and Susan Agrue.
  • Who’s to Blame was directed by Scott Pagona and included Jennifer McClure, DeeDee Barrett, and Cynthia Sego.

The films were screened on Friday and Saturday, Nov 21 and 22, 2014, at the UCEA Annual Convention in Washington, DC (http://ucealee.squarespace.com/annual-convention-2014/).

Congratulations to the directors and casts of the two accepted videos, and many thanks to Mike Myles and Sam Saunders for their professional services.