Category Archives: Partnership East

CAEP Prep: Welcome to the Pirate CODE

Pirate CODEThe College of Education is one of only a few teacher education institutions nationwide to receive approval from the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP) to implement a transformation initiative called Pirate CODE (Continuum of Developing Expertise) as the framework for its spring 2015 CAEP accreditation visit.

Pirate CODE brings seven research-based teacher education assessment initiatives that have previously operated independently throughout the college under one umbrella to strengthen and develop teacher candidates.

CAEP chose ECU’s transformation initiative because it “provides research on teacher education and elements of teacher education programs that lead to the preparation of effective teachers who help students learn,” said Deborah Eldridge, the senior vice president of CAEP, in her letter announcing the selection.

caepStudents enrolled in the college’s elementary education and middle grades education programs begin working with the first component of Pirate CODE during their sophomore year and experience different components throughout their junior and senior years. Each component is designed to improve and assess teacher preparedness using different but complementary methods.

Learn for about the ECU Pirate CODE online.

#ECU_CAEPisComing

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CAEP Prep: ECU Conceptual Framework

Conceptual Framework

The East Carolina University Conceptual Framework is a guiding document for the programs within the Educator Preparation Provider (EPP) unit at the institution. It applies to all programs which prepare candidate to work in PK-12 school settings and all faculty who contribute to those programs. The current ECU Conceptual Framework was approved by the Council for Teacher Education in 2005.

“Aligned with the mission statements of East Carolina University, the College of Education, and the Educator Preparation Provider unit, the conceptual framework represents the vision that drives the work of all administrators, faculty, and candidates. Through our commitment to excellence through partnership, our efforts to prepare reflective education professionals dedicated to democratic principles and practices, including the empowerment of all learners in all aspects of educational decision-making, define the core of this vision. The conceptual framework is responsive to the changing needs in education and allows for adjustments in the unit’s priorities without altering the entire framework. Current priorities include enhanced emphasis on the areas of diversity, assessment, technology, and research.”

Follow this hyperlink for more information on the ECU Conceptual Framework.

#ECU_CAEPisComing

CAEP Prep: Call for Third Party Comments

caepThe Educator Preparation Provider (EPP) Unit at East Carolina University is hosting an accreditation visit by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) on February 8-10, 2015.

The EPP is inviting interested parties to submit comments addressing substantive matters related to the quality of the professional education programs offered.  When commenting, please be sure to specify the party’s relationship to the EPP (graduate, present or former faculty member, employer of graduates, etc.).

Please use the form located at http://www.ecu.edu/epp as a convenient way to submit comments.

Comments must be submitted no later than November 5 to ensure they are uploaded to NCATE’s Accreditation Information Management System (AIMS) by November 8, 2014. Anonymous comments will not be accepted by NCATE, and therefore cannot be submitted using the form.

College of Education Welcomes New Pirate Educators!

The College of Education welcomed 86 State Employee’s Credit Union (SECU) Partnership East students and approximately 245 incoming freshmen during summer orientations in June, July, and August 2014.

SECU Partnership East allows students to graduate with a four-year degree from East Carolina University (ECU) by completing their first two years at one of the partnering community colleges and then taking ECU courses online. At the beginning of the second summer session, there were 10 new elementary majors. This fall, 62 elementary majors and 14 special education-general curriculum majors will begin completing their degree.

2014 SECU PE Orientation

College of Education SECU Partnership East students participate in orientation.

 

The Academic Success Center worked with approximately 245 students attending the ten orientation sessions throughout the summer. Academic Success Center staff assisted 216 intended education majors through one-on-one appointments. Of these, approximately 116 intend on majoring in elementary education, 12 in English education, 21 in history education, 10 in mathematics education, 8 in middle grades education, 9 in science education and 40 in special education.

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Professional Advisor Caroline Hill meets with an incoming College of Education freshman in the Academic Success Center.

 

The Academic Success Center anticipates additional advising appointments during the first weeks of classes.

$2.2 Million Gift to Fund Teacher Education in Rural Communities

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ECU graduate Judy Oglesby took part in the Partnership East program, which helped her earn a teaching degree without having to move out of her hometown. She is pictured above with her children, 12-year-old Melanie at left and 14-year-old Trace, in front of the school where she teaches. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

The first time Judy Oglesby considered going to college, she was 36-years-old “staring divorce in the face” and trying to figure out how she would support her two children moving forward.

A simple act got her interested in teaching – her son’s kindergarten teacher noticed the skill she exhibited as a volunteer at the school. A year of encouragement led her to enroll at Halifax Community College and, two years later, at East Carolina University.

Oglesby was part of the College of Education’s Partnership East program, which allows students to complete the first two years of an education degree at one of 20 participating community colleges in eastern and central North Carolina before transferring to ECU. All ECU teacher preparation classes can then be taken online and part-time.

The aim is to provide students with access to high-quality degree programs close to home, so that they might remain in those communities to teach after graduation. And that’s what Oglesby has done – graduating in 2010 and now teaching second grade at Belmont Elementary in her hometown, Roanoke Rapids.

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Oglesby said the Partnership East program was a benefit for the entire family.

“It was a saving grace,” Oglesby said of the program. “It turned things around for my family.”

A generous gift from the State Employees’ Credit Union Foundation ensures more non-traditional students like Oglesby will get that same chance. The Foundation awarded East Carolina University’s College of Education $2.28 million July 17 to continue educating aspiring teachers in rural areas.

The donation funds scholarships for Partnership East students in their senior year, during which they cannot work because they are completing full-time internships in the classroom. More than 225 students are currently enrolled at ECU through Partnership East. The $2.28 million gift will be distributed to students over the next five years.

Partnership East students earn a bachelor of science in elementary education, middle grades education or special education. More than 75 percent of program graduates are teaching in North Carolina and 94 percent of those are in eastern North Carolina.

“This serves the dire need we have for teachers in poor, eastern rural communities,” said ECU Provost Dr. Marilyn Sheerer, who is also a member of the SECU Foundation board. “It’s really exciting that the State Employees’ Credit Union is willing to do this.”

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Oglesby graduated from ECU in 2010 and now teaches second grade at Belmont Elementary School in her hometown of Roanoke Rapids.

Sheerer recused herself from the foundation’s Partnership East vote, but was on hand to answer last-minute questions. Kendra Alexander, major gifts officer for the College of Education, also played a key role in connecting the university and the foundation.

“State Employees’ Credit Union has a huge footprint in eastern North Carolina, and serving people in that area has always been an aim,” said Mark Twisdale, executive director of the Foundation. “It is difficult to find a project that spreads a net as wide in that area as Partnership East. This connects us with the community college system, public schools and East Carolina University.

“It’s not just sending money,” he added, “but giving people an opportunity they wouldn’t have had otherwise.”

Oglesby said it’s given her children new opportunities, too. They don’t doubt that they’ll go to college because they watched her do it, she said.

“We are all so indebted to the State Employees’ Credit Union for its support of our Partnership East Pipeline Teacher Preparation Program,” agreed Dr. Linda Patriarca, dean of the College of Education. “The gift helps us to fulfill our mission and commitment to prepare high quality teachers for the region – especially for those rural communities.”

The SECU Foundation promotes local and community development by primarily funding high impact projects in the areas of housing, education, health care and human services.

For more information about Partnership East, contact program coordinator Laura Bilbro-Berry at 252-328-1123 or bilbroberryl@ecu.edu or visit http://www.ecu.edu/cs-educ/partner_east/.

By Kathryn Kennedy
ECU News Services

Wells Fargo supports ECU Partnership East program

Wells Fargo has given $75,000 to East Carolina University’s College of Education to support the Wells Fargo Partnership East Program. The gift will support 47 students and provide five stipends of $750 based on a competitive application process.

Partnership East works with community colleges and public schools in eastern North Carolina with a focus on preparing well-trained professional teachers. The program has graduated 343 students, with 78 percent teaching in North Carolina.

Since 2002, Wells Fargo (and formerly known Wachovia Foundation) has given the College of Education $1,525,000 in support.

For more information about the Wells Fargo Partnership East program, contact Laura Bilbro-Berry, assistant director of Teacher Education and lead coordinator for the Wells Fargo Partnership East program, at bilbroberryl@ecu.edu.

from ECU News Service

Adult Learners Help East Carolina Solve the Teacher Shortage Crisis

undefinedFor 16 years Kathy Jones ’06 worked as a teacher’s aide at schools in rural Pamlico County and drove a school bus every day, as aides are required to do. But this fall she will walk into the classroom not as an aide but, finally, as the teacher. It will be a moment of deep pride for her and another validation of East Carolina’s groundbreaking approach to solving the state’s chronic shortage of classroom teachers.

For the full story, see “Look Who’s Teaching Now” in the Fall 2006 edition of East Magazine.

Wachovia Gives $1.25 Million for Teacher Education

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Marilyn Sheerer, left, dean of the College of Education at ECU, thanks David Parker, Wachovia’s regional president for Eastern North Carolina, during a check presentation ceremony thanking Wachovia for a $1.25 million gift to the university to help ECU educate more classroom teachers.

East Carolina University has received a $1.25 million gift from Wachovia to combat the shortage of teachers in Eastern North Carolina through a partnership with community colleges.

The gift, the largest corporate donation ever received by ECU, will provide scholarships and infrastructure improvements for Partnership East, which joins university and community college resources to educate teachers throughout the region.

“Education is one of Wachovia’s top priorities,” said David Parker, Wachovia’s regional president for Eastern North Carolina. “We are so pleased to be able to partner with East Carolina University to help grow our base of highly-qualified teachers who are committed to living, teaching and improving education in our region.”

Marilyn Sheerer, dean of the College of Education at ECU, said that when the Partnership East programs are fully operational, at least 100 new teachers are expected to graduate from community college sites each year. “These graduates, for the most part, will be individuals who have grown up in the rural areas and plan to continue to live there,” Sheerer said.

“We are tremendously excited about the advantages that the Wachovia gift will provide,” Sheerer said. “The scholarships will allow us to reach more students who want to be teachers and that is the primary purpose of this effort. Partnerships allow us to accomplish more than any of us could do alone, and Partnership East, which brings together ECU, the UNC system, North Carolina community colleges and now the private sector, is an outstanding example of this principle.”

wachovia students

Education students participating in the first 2 years of course work from Pamlico Community College will have the opportunity to complete their last two years at the Coastal Consortium hub site located at Craven Community College.

Through Partnership East, centers or “hubs” have been established at Craven, Edgecombe and Wayne community colleges with a fourth proposed at College of the Albemarle in Manteo. Each hub also serves nearby community colleges.

Aspiring teachers are able to take all their course work at the hub. The first two years are taught by community college instructors, and the last two years are offered by ECU faculty members, either face-to-face or through distance-education. Because the students do not have to move or commute to ECU to complete their university degrees, they face fewer disruptions in their lives.

Molly Corbett Broad, president of the 16-campus University of North Carolina, said “Partnership East offers a wonderful example of how UNC campuses across the state can collaborate effectively with community colleges both near and far to boost the supply of high-quality teachers in our public schools. In supporting this critical effort, Wachovia is making a visionary investment in the future of eastern North Carolina.”

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Students from partnering community colleges in the Coastal Consortium come together at Craven Community College to take classes from East Carolina University.

Martin Lancaster, president of the North Carolina Community College System, said, “When the private sector partners with education, great things happen. Thousands will benefit from this investment. The community colleges involved in Partnership East are proud to play a role in one of the best collaborative efforts in the state designed to educate our future ‘homegrown’ teachers.”

North Carolina’s projected enrollment growth in public schools is the fourth largest in the nation and the state will need up to 80,000 new teachers in the next 10 years. That is roughly equal to the number of teachers in classrooms in the state today.

From ECU News Service