Category Archives: Research and Funded Projects

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ECU to Participate in Global Day of Giving

image‘Tis the season for giving! In honor of #GivingTuesday, East Carolina University is inviting alumni, friends, parents, students, faculty, and staff to join the movement by giving a charitable gift* on Tuesday, December 2, to the university that is near and dear to our hearts.

Founded in 2012 to inspire a new tradition of generosity, #GivingTuesday focuses on celebrating kindness and giving back. Support a culture of philanthropy at ECU by making a gift on December 2nd and becoming a partner in securing the university’s future for current students and future generations of Pirates.

Your gifts provide scholarships, enrich teaching resources and libraries, offer hands-on learning lessons, support research and the arts, deliver classroom enhancements, and afford study abroad living/learning opportunities – all of which help ECU attract and retain the best and brightest students and faculty.

Help spread the word! Mark you calendar to #GiveTueECU on December 2, tell your friends, and post on social media using the hashtags #GivingTuesdayECU and #GiveTueECU. “I Gave” badges will be available through ECU’s University Advancement and East Carolina Alumni Association’s social media accounts on December 2.

Learn more about the #GivingTuesdayECU movement. Thank you for your support!

Contact us at (252) ECU-GIVE (252-328-4483) or give2ecu@ecu.edu.

*Your gift is tax-deductible to the extent the law allows.

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Department of Special Education, Foundations & Research Receives $1.25 Million from Department of Education

The US Department of Education has awarded the Department of Special Education, Foundations, and Research a 5-year, $1,248,855 grant to prepare 42 new Baccalaureate Special Educators with the initial license in Adaptive Curriculum and and 18 MAEd Special Educators with the Advanced License in Low Incidence Disabilities and specialization in Assistive Technology. Drs. Alana Zambone and Christopher Rivera, Co-PIs, in partnership with Dr. Laura King, Director of the College of Education’s Assistive Technology Center, will lead the project, ECU EQUIPPED: Engendering High Quality Personnel Preparation for Educators Serving Students with Significant Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. The project supports research on effective teacher preparation and induction, an intensive summer institute aligned with the Graduate Certificate in Assistive Technology for teacher-leaders, mentoring of graduates, and support for tuition, books,  materials, and travel to state and national conferences for EQUIPPED scholars.

Congratulations

Congratulations to COE MSITE Faculty Dr. Katherine Schwartz and Dr. Rose Sinicrope on Math-Science Partnership Grant Awards

Dr. Katie Schwarz and Lenoir County Schools (LCS) have been awarded a 3-year, $483,000 Math/Science Partnership (MSP) Grant, Lenoir County STEM Learning Community. The project will provide teachers integrated content and pedagogical professional development in K-8 Mathematics and opportunities for teachers to work in Professional Learning Communities (PLC) to increase use of mathematical practices, implement cognitively demanding tasks, use data to make instructional decisions, and connect to real-world applications of mathematics, all with the goal of increasing student performance.

Other key ECU faculty who will be working with Dr. Schwartz, who is from the COE Department of Mathematics, Science, and Instructional Technology Education (MSITE) include Dr. Ron Preston and Dr. Kay Middleton from MSITE, Dr Heather Ries and Dr. Njina Randriampiry from the Department of Mathematics, Dr. Ricky Castle from Engineering. STEM Partnership East and various industries also contributed to the project’s development and play key roles in its implementation. Dr. Guili Zhang of the COE Department of Special Education, Foundations, and Research will serve as project evaluator.

Dr. Rose Sinicrope also of MSITE, will serve as Evaluator for Randolph County Schools’  newly awarded MSP grant, Deepening High School Mathematics Knowledge and Leadership.

Congratulations to Dr. Sinicrope and Dr. Schwartz and her team of collaborators!

For more details, see the story on the WNCT website: http://www.wnct.com/story/26028066/lcps-teachers-learning-how-to-use-stem-curriculum-in-the-real-world

COE Alumni - Teach. Lead. Inspire.

Dr. Robin Hamilton Receives the 2014 Glatthorn Distinguished Dissertation Award

2013 Glatthorn Award Recipient Dr. Robin Hamilton, Mrs. Barbara Glatthorn, and Chair of the Department of Educational Leadership Dr. Art Rouse

2014 Glatthorn Award Recipient Dr. Robin Hamilton, Mrs. Barbara Glatthorn, and Chair of the Department of Educational Leadership Dr. Art Rouse

The Glatthorn Dissertation Award is awarded to the student who has the most outstanding dissertation in the Department of Educational Leadership, as selected by a committee of faculty from the department. The award was established by and is now given in memory of Dr. Allan Glatthorn.

On Tuesday, July 29, 2014 Dr. Robin Hamilton was recognized for her dissertation, “A Comparative Case Study of Kindergarten Transition Practices and The Impact on Children’s Kindergarten Readiness” under the direction of Dr. William Rouse, Jr. which she completed in fall 2013. Mrs. Barbara Glatthorn was in attendance to congratulate and present the award to Dr. Hamilton. Other attendees included faculty and staff from the Department of Educational Leadership and the College of Education and family members of Dr. Hamilton and Mrs. Glatthorn.

OperationLINK

ECU partners in Operation LINK mentoring program

ECU News Services

Tyrrek Grizzle poses with a robot he constructed during the robotics summer camp. The camp is part of an ECU partnership that supports elemementary and middle grades students from military families in eastern North Carolina. (Photos by Jay Clark)

Tyrrek Grizzle poses with a robot he constructed during the robotics summer camp. The camp is part of an ECU partnership that supports elemementary and middle grades students from military families in eastern North Carolina. (Photos by Jay Clark)

Ten-year-old Tyrrek Grizzle took control of his paddle, maneuvering his miniature land mover with ease.

He and a teammate moved his robot across a grid and past an opponent to pick up as many green-colored blocks as possible and dump them in a coordinating green basket. The team that filled the basket with the most blocks in the three-minute competition won.

Grizzle attended an inaugural weeklong robotics summer camp through Operation LINK, an AmeriCorps school-based science, technology, engineering and mathematics mentoring program for elementary and middle grades students in eastern North Carolina. The STEM program, with a special emphasis on students from military families, will transition from an afterschool program to part of the regular school day this fall.

Offered this spring in Wayne County, the program aims to promote positive behaviors and success in school while keeping military youth connected to family. It’s a partnership between East Carolina University, AmeriCorps, military family support networks, veterans groups, community colleges and public schools.

The summer camp, held at Greenwood Middle School in Goldsboro, allowed students to make real robots from designs they developed in their afterschool program.

Amy Perry, left, watches as her daughter, Kayla Perry, works at the Operation LINK afterschool program held this spring in Goldsboro. Amy Perry is a technical sergeant in the U.S. Air Force, where she inspects aircraft for defects at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base.

Amy Perry, left, watches as her daughter, Kayla Perry, works at the Operation LINK afterschool program held this spring in Goldsboro. Amy Perry is a technical sergeant in the U.S. Air Force, where she inspects aircraft for defects at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base.

Counselors and campers used a box kit to construct a robot with up to 650 pieces. A software program developed at Carnegie Mellon Robotics Academy gave the students the ability to control movements.

“We had fourth-graders writing code,” said Michael “Mike” Dermody, associate professor of cinematic arts and media production in the ECU School of Art. Dermody, who grew up in a military family, said “It’s amazing how quickly they adapt. It’s a very tactile and hands-on experience. They go in and test and modify it. There’s lots of activity between the computer itself and the robot.”

For Grizzle, a rising fifth-grader at Tommy’s Road Elementary School, taking his work from the computer lab to create a functioning robot is exciting. “Robots help you in a lot of ways,” said Grizzle. “They help us do things we can’t normally do ourselves.” Grizzle has cousins who serve in the military.

The pilot program will become part of the curriculum this fall at three Wayne County schools with a higher population of children from military families, said Lou U. Rose, Operation LINK coordinator in the ECU College of Education, which has facilitated the program.

“We will be able to impact more kids that way.”

Area teachers observed some of the program activities. “Some will do it as an elective in science and math classes,” Rose said.

“The beauty of this is they can tailor it and run with it and be creative. It brings relevancy in the real world, and maybe will get students interested in science.”

Michael Giddens, an AmeriCorps camp mentor who earned a teaching certificate in middle grades science and math from ECU in May, said students learned to collaborate and work as a team at the camp.

“The energy has been electrifying,” Giddens said. “Keeping them (students) engaged is a challenge in the classroom in the 21st century.”

USAF airman first class Eagan Nadeau pilots one of the student robots.

USAF airman first class Eagan Nadeau pilots one of the student robots.

One old-fashioned value students have learned has been patience, Giddens said, such as when broken robots have had to be re-assembled. Now poised to reach more students, the initial idea for the Operation LINK program was to create a way for military parents to interact with their children – via the web – while the parents were away from home. “It’s (been) a way to keep the child connected,” Dermody said.

Amy Perry’s nine-year-old daughter Kayla and 10-year-old daughter, Alexis, participated in the afterschool program. Perry, a technical sergeant in the U.S. Air Force, inspects aircraft for defects at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base. The Perry family doesn’t have a computer, internet or cable in their home. So the program has helped support her girls’ interests in science and technology. “It works for us,” she said.

Perry said the counselors encouraged her daughters’ unique personalities. “It’s allowing them to have the space to be who they are,” she said. “Respecting others is important.”

Kayla Perry said she enjoyed the computer lab and making a virtual robot. “I like the teachers. All the time they think of cool things for us to do,” she said. “They always come up with these amazing ideas.”

Program activities have helped build relationships between mentors and students, and among students, said Virginia Harris, a retired teacher and military spouse who taught 23 years in several states and overseas.

 Logan Chase, 10, works on programming after a practice session with his robot.

Logan Chase, 10, works on programming after a practice session with his robot.

“I’ve seen changes in the students, being able to work together and learning to follow rules better,” Harris said. “One of the main things they learn is you’re not an island. You have to get along with people in life. I think it’s difficult for little people to work together as a team sometimes.”

To learn more, visit www.ecu.edu/operationlink.

Story courtesy of ECU News Service and Crystal Baity. Photos courtesy of ECU News Service and Jay Clark. The original article can be found here.

Dr. Rhea Miles and Dr. Scott Rawls awarded National Institute of Health Grant

Dr. Rhea Miles

Dr. Rhea Miles, Associate Professor -Science Education, Department of Mathematics, Science and Instructional Technology Education and Dr. Scott Rawls, ECU Alumnus and Associate Professor of Pharmacology in the Center for Substance Abuse Research at Temple University have been awarded a four-year, $1,012,071.00 grant entitled Planarians and the Pharmacology of Addiction: An In Vivo Model for K-12 Education.

The project engages K-12 teachers and  students together with health care professionals, pharmacists, and scientists in the study of the pharmacological effects of addictive drugs and the behavior patterns that emerge during recreational and addictive drug use, using curricula and laboratory activities designed to meet the National Science Education Standards. Congratulations Dr. Miles and Dr. Rawls.

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New COE Secondary TQP Article Published

Drs. Dan Boudah, Lori Flint, Melissa Engleman, and David Gabbard (Department of Special Education, Foundations, and Research), collaborated on a paper entitled School-University Partnership for Implementation of Common Core State Standards, which was recently published in the International Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences. The full text article can be found here in :  Vol. 4 No. 7(1).   http://www.ijhssnet.com/index.php/archives.html

COE Faculty Member Receives $472,000 NC Quest Award

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Dr. Ann Bullock, chair of the Department of Elementary and Middle Grades Education, is partnering with NC Quest to expand the NC New Teacher Support Program.

Dr. Ann Bullock, Chair of the Department of Elementary and Middle Grades Education, received an NC-QUEST award of $472,394 titled Integrating Neuroscience into Mathematics Instruction (INMI). INMI continues the partnership with UNC-GA New Teacher Support Program (NTSP) and extends it to the Harriott College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Mathematics.

The INMI pilot project consists of an intensive scientifically-based professional development program designed to assist beginning teachers to become highly knowledgeable and pedagogically skilled in leading students to mastery of the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics. The INMI pilot project will target elementary schools in Edgecombe County and Hertford County that have been identified as among the lowest performing in the state.

The project will recruit thirty beginning teachers to participate in a year-long professional development program designed to increase their knowledge of the Common Core Standards for Mathematical practice, brain-compatible elements of mathematics instruction, brain-compatible instructional strategies, and whole-brain teaching techniques.

The INMI extends the professional development offerings currently provided by the NC NTSP, which include an institute/boot camp, six days of professional development, and ongoing instructional coaching. INMI teachers will attend an extended summer session at the beginning of the academic year, Saturday sessions and site-based sessions at their schools during the academic year, and a summer session at the conclusion of the academic year.

In addition, participating teachers will receive weekly on-site support from NC NTSP Instructional Coaches and monthly consultations from an ECU mathematics content expert. Through the integration of neuroscience in mathematics instruction, beginning teachers will be better equipped to engage diverse learners, offer effective feedback that leads to deeper understanding, create a rich learning environment that attends to students’ social and emotional needs, and ensure that students’ mathematical achievement is reflective of their true abilities.

MATE Student Wins Teacher-Leader Grant

Tomika Altman-Lewis receives 2014-2015 MET Emerging Teacher-Leaders in Elementary School Mathematics Grant from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. She will be providing professional development for teachers at Burton Magnet Elementary School.

Burton

Mathematically Speaking: Best Practices for Teachers and Students
Tomika R. Altman-Lewis, Burton Magnet Elementary School, Durham, North Carolina

Elementary teachers are faced with the challenge of being “experts” in not just one subject area, but in multiple subjects. Often this results in being a novice in one area; which is especially daunting when we are equipped with the task of developing the mathematical foundation for all higher level mathematics. We are our students first introduction to mathematics in which they either learn to love or loath mathematics. More often than not, professional development is geared toward literacy with little to no emphasis on mathematics. Considering this, the purpose of this grant is to equip fourth and fifth grade elementary teachers at my school with much needed professional development. Teachers will participate in sessions that will expose them to best practices and strategies while deepening their mathematical reasoning and understanding in an effort to more effectively teach our students while allowing me to further develop my math leadership skills.

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ECU Library Science Program Receives $490k Grant

The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) announced that the Library Science degree program in the College of Education at East Carolina University is the recipient of a 2014 Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian (LB21) grant for the project “North Carolina Economically Disadvantaged and Diversity Scholarships.”

The IMLS awarded ECU $492,324 in funding that will support library science recruitment efforts and full-tuition scholarships at ECU for 30 incoming master of library science (MLS) students with the first cohort starting fall 2014. The grant has a matching requirement using non-federal funds for all recipients, bringing the grand total to $657,369.

In addition to tuition costs, the grant will cover university fees and offer a book stipend for the entire degree program until spring 2017. Membership to the North Carolina School Library Media Association is included as well as a travel stipend to attend one of their conferences.

ECU’s location and mission to support eastern NC aligned with the IMLS’s charge to prepare librarians who will work in high-need districts.

“Rural public schools in the economically depressed communities of eastern North Carolina face daunting challenges in recruiting and retaining school librarians,” according to the IMLS’s website with descriptions for each institution receiving the 2014 grant. “East Carolina University and its partner, the North Carolina School Library Media Association, will recruit and educate 30 MLS school librarians from economically disadvantaged and historically underrepresented backgrounds and place them in school library media centers. The project will use the ‘grow your own’ model, focusing on individuals who want to stay and work in eastern North Carolina by completing their degrees in an all-online degree program.”

Reviewers of submission proposals identified ECU’s LS program as one that has the potential to grow the number of enrolled LS students, conduct the necessary research that will support successful recruitment efforts and the education of the next generation of librarians, and enhance curricula within graduate schools of library and information science, as well as programs of continuing education for librarians and library staff, according to the acceptance letter from Maura Marx, deputy director for library science at the IMLS.

“This projHarerJohn_harerject will increase the number of trained, professional media specialists that reflect the diversity of their communities and increase the ability to connect with those diverse populations,” said Dr. John Harer, MLS degree program coordinator in the College of Education at ECU.

IMLS accepted 82 grant proposals from libraries requesting more than $24 million. In total, the organization granted $7.5 million to 23 institutions across the country and the recipients are matching these awards with $3.6 million in non-federal funds. IMLS received 82 applications for the program this year.

“Librarians and staff from all types of libraries, from school media centers to rare book collections to archives, need to be prepared to meet the changing informational and educational needs of their customers and constituents,” said IMLS Director Susan H. Hildreth. “The Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program helps them meet those needs with projects for continuing education, training, professional development, and early career research.”

About the Library Science Program at ECU
The master of library science (MLS) graduate degree program is the largest producer of school-library media-coordinator graduates in the state and is the largest program in the College of Education at ECU. The library science program at ECU has prepared library professionals since 1939 with a high-tech and hands-on emphasis, providing a web-based course of study using new and emerging technologies.

Our online program is especially attuned to the needs of nontraditional students and is designed for students seeking employment as librarians and information professionals in pre-K–12 schools, universities, community colleges, and public libraries.

The program’s mission statement: The master of library science program, reflecting the missions of East Carolina University and the College of Education, prepares library professionals to serve, lead, and partner in their communities.

About the Institute of Museum and Library Services
The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 123,000 libraries and 17,500 museums. Our mission is to inspire libraries and museums to advance innovation, lifelong learning, and cultural and civic engagement. Our grant making, policy development, and research help libraries and museums deliver valuable services that make it possible for communities and individuals to thrive. To learn more, visit www.imls.gov and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

IMLS News Release: Grant Awards Announcement: FY 14 Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program

Click here to view the list of funded projects.