Category Archives: Special Education, Foundations, and Research (SEFR)

Dr. Christopher J. Rivera

Publications/Presentations by Dr. Rivera of the Department of Special Education, Foundations, and Research

Dr. Christopher J. Rivera, of the Department of Special Education, Foundations, and Research (SEFR), has had three journal publications and three paper/poster presentations this academic year:

Publications

Hicks, S. C., Rivera, C. J., & Patterson, D. R. (Accepted). Simple steps for teaching prepositions to students with autism and developmental disability. Intervention in School and Clinic.

Ahlgrim-Delzell, L., & Rivera, C. J. (Accepted). Changing the course of literacy instruction: Examining literacy lessons for students with severe intellectual disabilities. Exceptionality, A Special Education Journal.

Rivera, C. J., Mason, L. L., Moser, J., & Ahlgrim-Delzell, L. (2014). The effects of an iPad multimedia shared story intervention on vocabulary acquisition for an English language learner. Journal of Special Education Technology, 29, 31-48.

Presentations

Rivera, C. J. (February, 2015). A single case study: Using a multi-component simultaneous prompting intervention to teach vocabulary to young students with intellectual disability. American Association of Behavioral and Social Sciences. Las Vegas, NA.

Kelley, K. R., Jimenez, B., Pavlu, L. L., Rivera, C. J., & Root, J. (January, 2015). How I can make a difference for individuals with disabilities in NC. North Carolina CEC: Pinehurst, NC.

Rivera, C. J., Weiss, S., & Ferrell, G. (January, 2015). Learning science vocabulary through multimedia shared stories. North Carolina CEC: Pinehurst, NC.

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COE ECU Excels

College of Education Students Honored for Academic Excellence

On February 20, 2015, fifty-two East Carolina University freshmen and full time transfer students with an intended Teacher Education major were honored during the College of Education ECU EXCELS event. This event was a part of the annual ECU EXCELS program that recognizes students who are first time, full-time freshman or transfer students who earned a 3.0 GPA or higher during the fall semester.

There were a total of one hundred and sixty-three guests were in attendance which included both honored students and their guests. Dr. Vivian Martin Covington, Executive Director of Teacher Education, brought words of recognition to the award recipients. Students received a Certificate of Academic Achievement, had an opportunity to interact with College of Education faculty, and were served light refreshments at the event.

The College of Education is delighted to congratulate the following students who attended the ceremony:

  • Ashley Algard
  • Cody Allen
  • Tionne Allen
  • Sarah Ayer
  • Jennifer Barkus
  • Christina Bianco
  • Sarah Bonin
  • Brooke Hill
  • Ryanne Hilliard
  • Bridget Boone
  • Caroline Bousman
  • Jacob Bowlus
  • Kelly Brady
  • Sawyer Brown
  • Meredith Campbell
  • Brittney Carter
  • Caitlyn Carter
  • Maurice Carter
  • Alecia Castellano
  • Alexis Corso
  • Melissa Creekmore
  • Airelle De Leon
  • Rachel Deans
  • Morgan Gerdes
  • Caitlyn Hannah
  • Christa Harris
  • Lauren Heath
  • Kathleen Henderson
  • Lillian Howie
  • Sarah Jackson
  • Cierra Jacoby
  • Michelle Kellett
  • Carly Levey
  • Amanda Lewis
  • Margaret Lombardo
  • Alexandra Marinello
  • Alyssa Mason
  • Kista May
  • Aaliyah McMillian
  • Erin Mullen
  • Kiana Owens
  • Megan Pickering
  • Alicia Ramos
  • Casey Shevlin
  • Emily Smith
  • Mariem Souissi
  • Kaylee Thomas
  • Samaria Trimble
  • Cherelle Vann
  • Jannie Walker
  • Reba Warren
  • Stephanie Whitehurst

Pictures from the event are available at online on the COE Excels Photo Album. Any questions regarding the ECU Excels event for the College of Education should contact Dr. Amy Shannon, Lead Coordinator of Academic Advising, at 252-328-0067 or shannona@ecu.edu.

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From the TRC: TeachingBooks.net

It’s Thursday, and a new edition of From the TRC is published to highlight another service or resource the Teaching Resources Center in Joyner Library has to support the College of Education’s faculty and students. This week, it’s TeachingBooks.net.

Short of inviting an author to speak on campus it can be difficult for children and young adults to feel a connection to or the relevancy of an author’s work. It can be even more difficult to gain insight on the process of creating a book or illustration. This is where a resource like TeachingBooks.net comes in. TeachingBooks.net provides educators an opportunity to add a multimedia dimension to their lessons and their students’ reading experiences.

TeachingBooks-net_logoTeachingBooks.net is more than just a database of books, authors, and illustrators. It is an invaluable resource teachers can use as to supplement existing lesson plans or look for ideas to craft new ones. Users can search by book title, author or illustrator from the front page, or simply browse the collection of meet the author videos and resources by grade level or subject area.

To find strategies for integrating books and resources into specific curricular areas, see the Curricular Uses page. Looking for foreign-language resources?  TeachingBooks.net has resources in Spanish, French, Chinese, Ojibwe, Hmong, Russian and others. Book guides and lesson plans aligned to the ELA Common Core standards are available as well as booklists put together by the North Carolina School Library Media Association, and the North Carolina Children’s Book Award. Additional booklists from other states and those categorized by theme or book series are also at the ready.

Here are a few links to some of the TRC’s favorite authors:

Be sure to check out TeachingBooks.net’s free monthly webinar series.  Upcoming webinars will cover “Culturally Relevant Materials” and “How TeachingBooks is Used in Schools/Districts”. In addition, their on demand video tutorials cover topics such as text complexity and creating your own custom reading list.

Believe it or not, all this is the tip of the iceberg as to what TeachingBooks.net has to offer. If you don’t believe me, maybe you should check them out yourself on their blog, on Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, or by signing up for their newsletter.

Until next time…Dan Z. in the TRC

Many of the ECU students and faculty attending the NC CEC conference in Pinehurst, North Carolina on January 29th and 30th 2015.

SPED Students Attend NC Council for Exceptional Children Conference

On January 29th and 30th 2015, members of ECU’s Student chapter of the North Carolina Council for Exceptional Children (NCCEC) attended the annual state conference in Pinehurst, North Carolina. In addition to attending presentations by experts in the field of special education from across the state, students volunteered to help make the conference possible by: introducing and assisting conference session presenters, helping out with the student scholarship raffle, working at registration booth and lending support to other integral parts of the conference.

In particular, Chelsea Skurow provided substantial assistance to Dr. Stacy Weiss, the state student coordinator, in advance of the conference and organized the student group’s visit to Pinehurst. Jordan McNeil, a graduate student in Special Education, presented at the student poster session on her research on technology assisted language instruction for students with autism. Grace Ferrell, a graduate student in Occupational Therapy, presented a poster with Dr. Chris Rivera on learning science vocabulary through multimedia shared stories. Dr. Melissa Hudson presented her work on differentiating instruction for students with disabilities.

ECU students attending the conference included Ayla Allen, Paige Anderson, Allison Bickford, Madison Bourn, Alecia Casetellano, Caroline Cummins, Kayla Dasch, Grace Ferrell, Katie Foley, Mackinsay Howe, Allison Keen, Victoria Locklear, Jeremiah McCoy, Jordan McNeil, Michelle Nendza, Callie Parker, Chelsea Skurow, Jenna Watral, and Catherine Wooten.

Ms. Ayla Allen (center) received a scholarship from NC Council for Exceptional Children. She is pictured here with NCCEC president Dr. Rose Matuszny (left) and president- elect Dr. Jessica Wery (right), at the state NCCEC Conference on Thursday, January 29, 2015.

NC Council for Exceptional Children Award Scholarship to ECU Student

Ayla Allen, a sophomore pursuing a bachelor’s degree in special education, adapted curriculum, recently was awarded a scholarship from the North Carolina Council for Exceptional Children (NCCEC).

Allen received this award for her dedicated service to students with disabilities through her work with the Student Council for Exceptional Children (SCEC) here at East Carolina University. She has served as Social Chair of the SCEC and helped to organize a variety of fundraising and social events. Through SCEC, she has volunteered in area schools with students with disabilities and been an active member of several community organizations.

Allen supports current and future educators through her work as an Apple Ambassador for ECU where she speaks to and recruits high school students for careers in education and as Vice President for the Student North Carolina Association of Educators.

Photo Caption: Ms. Ayla Allen (center) received a scholarship from NC Council for Exceptional Children. She is pictured here with NCCEC president Dr. Rose Matuszny (left) and president- elect Dr. Jessica Wery (right), at the state NCCEC Conference on Thursday, January 29, 2015.

Dan Zuberbier

Meet Dan Zuberbier: A Great Resource for Students, Faculty, and Educators in Eastern NC

Recently, the Joyner Library made a new addition specifically to benefit the College of Education. Dan Zuberbier was hired as the Education and Instructional Technologies Librarian in the Teaching Resource Center.

Like many academic librarians, Dan Zuberbier didn’t follow a straight path to the profession. While finishing his B.A. in History at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, he was an assistant baseball coach at Edgewood College, a small private college down the street from the UW. “Baseball had been the center of my life for as long as I could remember,” he said. “Since I wasn’t playing ball any more it made sense to try and break into the coaching ranks.” Unfortunately being an assistant coach at an NCAA Division III school wasn’t enough to pay the bills, and he picked up odd jobs to make ends meet.

Eventually, Dan decided he needed a more stable career path. “Working the equivalent of two full-time jobs to pay the bills took the fun out of coaching baseball,” and reflected on what he wanted to get out of a career. “I needed a career that fulfilled my intellectual curiosities, and, at the same time, provided opportunities to develop meaningful relationships with young adults as I had been able to do with my baseball players. Teaching seemed like a natural fit.”

Setting his sights on becoming a high school history teacher, he enrolled in Pima Community College’s online Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Education Program, moved to Arizona to complete his student teaching, and earned his teaching license. Yet, four years later, his career took another unexpected turn. “I was having a hard time building up my students’ research skills, so I reached out to who I thought was our school librarian,” he said. “She kindly informed me she was the library clerk and had no experience teaching students research skills.”

Saying he was surprised his high school, the largest school in the district, didn’t have a certified library media specialist on staff is putting it mildly. To make matters worse, soon after their initial conversation, the library clerk broke her foot and was out of work for a week. Zuberbier stated, “Because she wasn’t a certified teacher-librarian, the school was under no obligation to hire a substitute to keep the library open in her absence. I was speechless.” After being shut out of their library for an entire week, Zuberbier wondered what else his students were missing out on because the school did not have a certified teacher-librarian.

He dove head-first into researching the role a library media specialist should play on a high school campus and petitioned the school board to fund the position. His request was denied. The Superintendent argued that because the school was only four years old, its collection was ‘still so new’ and students had access to so many online resources the school didn’t need a certified librarian. It took another year for Zuberbier’s efforts to succeed, and, in the meantime, he began earning his Master in Library and Information Science (MLIS) through UW-Milwaukee. He was also able to earn his library media specialist endorsement, and became his school’s first certified teacher-librarian.

“Soon after I started my MLIS program, I knew I couldn’t stop being a teacher. But, I also realized I wanted to give myself the opportunity to have an impact on the profession as an advocate for school libraries and through my work as an education librarian,” Zuberbier said. Which is why he considers himself fortunate to be working in East Carolina University’s Teaching Resources Center. “This is my dream job. To not only work with pre-service teachers by teaching them about instructional technologies and what they should expect out of their school library when they enter the workforce, but also serve educators throughout eastern North Carolina is an awesome responsibility.”

Zuberbier is currently working on developing workshops for students and faculty around the basic functions and lesson planning around the use of SMART Boards. He is also looking to collaborate with COE faculty to develop a series of workshops for students that will cover current and emerging K12 instructional technologies that will take place during the Fall semester. He currently resides in the TRC, room 2504, and can be reached through email, zuberbierd14@ecu.edu, or by phone, 328-0406.

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Everyone Has News to Share

In the College of Education, we believe the best way to find out about what is going on in our departments, classrooms, and clubs as well as in the lives of our students, faculty, staff, and alumni is by encouraging them to share their news and events with us.

As one of the larger colleges at East Carolina University, we do our best to cover all that is going on, but we know there is more, and we want to know about it! If there is something newsworthy that you believe the college should share, please let us know about it.

Members of the community can share their news by sending an email to coewebteam@ecu.edu. We are happy to share relevant news stories on our news blog, website, Facebook page and Twitter. Please remember that in order for us to run a story on the website, it must be accompanied by a photo. If you have an upcoming event that would be of interest, we would be happy to share that as well.

ECU faculty, staff, and students are encouraged to use the COE helpdesk to submit their news and other promotion requests. College of Education faculty are invited to attend the upcoming professional development session “Keep Your Department in the Spotlight” on February 25th from 10-11 am to learn about all the tools COE faculty and staff have at their disposal to get the word out.

You know your story better than anyone. Won’t you share it with us?

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First ECU EQUIPPED Scholars Chosen!

Congratulations to Paige Anderson, Alison Bickford, Kathryn Foley, Victoria Locklear, Callie Morton Parker, Morgan Sheehan, Chelsea Skurow, and Jenna Watral.These Special Education Teacher Candidates are pursuing their BS and initial Teaching License in Special Education-Adaptive Curriculum have been chosen as ECU EQUIPPED Scholars. These Scholars will receive tuition, resource and travel support, and induction support during their first three years of teaching in the high need area of Special Education. Each scholar has committed to teaching students with significant cognitive and additional disabilities for a minimum of two years for every year of tuition support.

In the Fall, the US Department of Education awarded the Department of Special Education, Foundations, and Research a 5-year, $1,248,855 grant to prepare 42 new Baccalaureate Special Educators with the initial license in Adaptive Curriculum and 18 MAEd Special Educators with the Advanced License in Low Incidence Disabilities and specialization in Assistive Technology. ECU EQUIPPED: Engendering High Quality Personnel Preparation for Educators Serving Students with Significant Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, supports research on effective teacher preparation and induction, an intensive summer institute aligned with the Graduate Certificate in Assistive Technology for teacher-leaders, mentoring of graduates, and support for tuition, books, materials, and travel to state and national conferences for EQUIPPED scholars.

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Countdown to the CAEP Accreditation Visit

While students are preparing for the spring 2015 semester, the ECU College of Education is gearing up for the CAEP Accreditation Visit scheduled for February 7-10, 2015. Hopefully, everyone is rested, refreshed, and ready for another exciting and productive semester. Please remember that the CAEP Accreditation Visit is just around the corner. There are 26 more days before the visit. Read here for more CAEP Preparation news.

Kelvin Shackleford
MSA Principal Fellow
East Carolina University

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ECU to Participate in Global Day of Giving

image‘Tis the season for giving! In honor of #GivingTuesday, East Carolina University is inviting alumni, friends, parents, students, faculty, and staff to join the movement by giving a charitable gift* on Tuesday, December 2, to the university that is near and dear to our hearts.

Founded in 2012 to inspire a new tradition of generosity, #GivingTuesday focuses on celebrating kindness and giving back. Support a culture of philanthropy at ECU by making a gift on December 2nd and becoming a partner in securing the university’s future for current students and future generations of Pirates.

Your gifts provide scholarships, enrich teaching resources and libraries, offer hands-on learning lessons, support research and the arts, deliver classroom enhancements, and afford study abroad living/learning opportunities – all of which help ECU attract and retain the best and brightest students and faculty.

Help spread the word! Mark you calendar to #GiveTueECU on December 2, tell your friends, and post on social media using the hashtags #GivingTuesdayECU and #GiveTueECU. “I Gave” badges will be available through ECU’s University Advancement and East Carolina Alumni Association’s social media accounts on December 2.

Learn more about the #GivingTuesdayECU movement. Thank you for your support!

Contact us at (252) ECU-GIVE (252-328-4483) or give2ecu@ecu.edu.

*Your gift is tax-deductible to the extent the law allows.