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What is the Senior Year Internship?

The Senior Year Internship is a required clinical experience for teacher education majors at East Carolina University.  It is a two-semester experience within a public school classroom, under the mentorship and coaching of a specially trained and licensed clinical teacher.  The Senior Year Internship is designed to provide students with opportunities to internalize and apply previous teaching and learning experience, as well as opportunities to teach and grow professionally through observation, planning, teaching, assessment, and reflective work with an effective classroom teacher.

In Senior I, a teaching intern’s first semester, students acclimate themselves to the public school environment by gaining an understanding of policies and procedures, multiple roles of classroom teachers, the diverse needs of the students, as well as the beginning stages of a range of experiences of curricular planning, delivery of instruction, and assessment.

The second semester, Senior II, is an emersion semester of involvement with clinical teachers providing constant feedback to the intern about the teaching and learning process.  In addition, the intern will complete a portfolio to document his or her growth and development as a classroom teacher with support from the clinical teacher and the university supervisor.

The Senior Year Internship is designed to allow students to gain practical experience and attain a level of competency needed for a high functioning novice beginning teacher.  There is a key focus on specific and timely feedback from clinical teachers and university supervisors which is meant to augment the intern’s growth.  The internship is invaluable in that it is practical learning combined with expert coaching from seasoned and trained teachers and supervisors.  Interns are generally able to make smooth transitions into their own classrooms once they are hired because of the depth of knowledge and experience they have acquired in this experience.

For more information regarding the Senior Year Internship, please see the Teacher Education Handbook.

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The Senior Year Internship is a central feature of the initial teacher preparation programs at ECU and aligns with NCATE Standard 3: Field Experiences and Clinical Practice

 

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ITC in the College of Education

The ITC falls under the leadership of Dr. Diana Lys. It consists of professionals who can help support the integration of technology for teaching and learning.

The mission of the COE Instructional Technology Center is to provide support for faculty, staff and students in the integration of technology for teaching and learning. The ITC supports the development of technology-rich instruction by providing hardware and software, staff development, media production and consulting services to faculty and staff. The Student Lab (Speight 241) is provided to help teacher candidates and practitioners attain the skills needed to integrate technology in their careers as educators.

GOAL I: Provide timely, effective technical support for faculty, staff and students.
  • Respond to user requests within 24 hours of receipt.
  • Upgrade and maintain hardware and software as needed.
  • Set up audio/visual equipment in Speight classrooms as per Classroom Equipment Setup Requests.
  • Improve web presence to increase ease of use.
  • Implement bar-code based inventory system
  • Create a policies and procedures manual for ITC services.
GOAL II: Promote the use of technology in distance instruction.
  • Create a faculty multimedia lab for the purpose of creating media elements for instruction and research.
  • Provide consulting services in instructional design and media development
  • Research emerging technologies and suggest strategies for integration into instruction
GOAL III: Provide professional development opportunities for faculty, staff, and K-12 educators.
  • Conduct workshops, seminars and individual training as needed.
  • Create tutorials, FAQs and other online resources to provide just-in-time training.
  • Collaborate with other college units to leverage professional develop opportunities.
  • Attend conferences, workshops and other professional development events pertaining to educational technology.
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SEADAP Begins with Outreach to Local Teachers

The Science Education Against Drug Abuse Partnership (SEADAP) Program recently invited educators  and administrators from Pitt and Martin county public schools to participate in four professional development sessions. The participants were provided information to implement lessons based on the research of Dr. Scott Rawls from Temple university related to drug addiction and withdrawal on planaria. Dr. Rhea Miles, SEADAP key personnel and guest speakers from the local community came to East Carolina University to educate and encourage these middle school teachers to implement a curriculum to affect student knowledge about biomedical research.

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Abby Colley–A Pirate Who Does Us Proud

On November 6, 2014  at the NCSTA conference in Winston-Salem Abby Colley received the Outstanding Student Teacher Award.  Abby is a well-deserving graduate from the Elementary Science Concentration and is currently teaching 4th grade at Ayden Elementary in Pitt County. When she was a student at ECU her clinical teacher stated,  “She excelled in the classroom with her passion, creativity, and willingness to collaborate with other teachers…  I have seen her dedication for this field in her lesson planning, success of implementation of goals taught, and her responses to questions asked by her students…She is deserving of this award.”  Congratulations, Abby.  We are proud to have you as one of our pirates!

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ICYMI: Implementing edTPA in Small Teacher Prep Programs

In small teacher preparation programs, the issue of implementation and scale-up of using a standardized performance assessment, like edTPA, can be challenging.  Peck and McDonald (2013) found one of the most significant outcomes of implementing a standardized performance assessment was faculty-initiated change. In small teacher preparation programs – those with five or fewer faculty and approximately 30 graduates annually – how do faculty lead systemic change in an edTPA implementation with fidelity and rigor?

At the 2013 edTPA Implementation Conference in San Diego, four ECU teacher education faculty shared their experiences and how each is initiating change through their edTPA implementation.

  • Barbara Brehm, Birth through Kindergarten Education
  • Ann Bullock, Middle Grades Education
  • Sharilyn Steadman, English Education
  • Michele Wallen, Health Education

Faculty shared models of communication, the development of common signature assessments, content-specific sticking points, and early successes as part of the session.  These programs proved that big change can be had with a small, committed team of faculty focused on a common goal.

Learn more about their experiences through video interviews posted on the ECU Pirate CODE-edTPA website or on the national edTPA website at 2013 National edTPA Implementation Conference.

edTPA is a teacher candidate performance assessment used in all initial teacher preparation programs at ECU, supporting the EPP’s efforts to meet NCATE Standards 1 and 2.

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CAEP Prep: Call for Third Party Comments

The Educator Preparation Provider (EPP) Unit at East Carolina University is hosting an accreditation visit by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) on February 8-10, 2015.

The EPP is inviting interested parties to submit comments addressing substantive matters related to the quality of the professional education programs offered.  When commenting, please be sure to specify the party’s relationship to the EPP (graduate, present or former faculty member, employer of graduates, etc.).

Please use the form located at http://www.ecu.edu/epp as a convenient way to submit comments.

Comments must be submitted no later than November 7 to ensure they are uploaded to NCATE’s Accreditation Information Management System (AIMS) by November 8, 2014. Anonymous comments will not be accepted by NCATE, and therefore cannot be submitted using the form.

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EPP Dashboards – Field and Clinical Experiences (Standard 3)

“The unit and its school partners design, implement, and evaluate field experiences and clinical practice so that teacher candidates and other school professionals develop and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions necessary to help all students learn.”

In an effort to align with Standard 3 of the Professional Standards for the Accreditation of Teacher Preparation Institutions, OAA focused one of the EPP dashboards on candidate assessments upon entering and existing field and clinical experiences.  This dashboard (COE_1.5) shows the percentages of final grades received at the end of the first semester of initial license clinical practice, as well as the final semester of both initial and advanced programs clinical practice.

The EPP faculty are responsible for the design, implementation, and evaluation of field and clinical experiences. Relevant field experiences in diverse schools are designed to be developmental in nature, moving the candidate along a continuum of experiences ensuring readiness for the intensity of clinical practice by extending their ability to analyze data, use technology, and relate to students, families, and communities. Clinical faculty provide regular support for clinical placements via informal feedback and conferencing. Formal observations, completed at designated intervals by university supervisors with direct input from school faculty, ensure collaboration with public school partners on final evaluations. Candidates are also encouraged to reflect on the feedback given to them, to act on the recommendations for improved practice, and to take responsibility for their learning.

Other key exhibits related to field and clinical experiences, which were also noted in Standard 1, include assessments such as the dispositions survey, undergraduate final progress report, and edTPA.

For more information and examples related to Standard 3, please visit the NCATE/CAEP Exhibit Rooms on the COE Office of Assessment and Accreditation’s website.

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ICYMI: Now What? Using edTPA Data to Drive Program Improvement

With edTPA implementations growing nationwide, it is imperative that teacher preparation programs explore meaningful ways to feed that data back to faculty for program and unit improvement.  Key to this work is engaging faculty in edTPA data analysis and examining issues and trends across content areas, program pathways, and portfolio components.  Peck and McDonald (2013) found one of the most significant outcomes of implementing a standardized performance assessment was faculty-initiated change; therefore, creating venues for faculty to engage with, analyze, and dialogue about edTPA data is critical.

At the 2013 edTPA Implementation Conference, ECU faculty—Drs. Diana Lys, Kristen Cuthrell, and Ellen Dobson—highlighted how the large teacher preparation program at East Carolina University uses edTPA data to inform program-level and unit-level decision making.  Presenters shared two models of data use: 1) at the program level with a focus on student learning outcomes and continuous program improvement; and 2) a data summit at the unit level where faculty from across teacher education programs examined collective issues and identified action items for to drive unit improvement.

Conference organizers approached Drs. Diana Lys, Kristen Cuthrell, and Ellen Dobson to interview them about their session and related edTPA experiences. Video clips from these interviews are available on the ECU Pirate CODE-edTPA website or on the national edTPA website at 2013 National edTPA Implementation Conference.

edTPA is a teacher candidate performance assessment used in all initial teacher preparation programs at ECU, supporting the EPP’s efforts to meet NCATE Standards 1 and 2.

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Not One, Not Two, but Many ECU Award Recipients!

At its 44th Annual North Carolina Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCCTM)  Conference held in Greensboro, NC on 30-31 October 2014, ECU was featured mightily during the Awards Ceremony.  Two ECU Mathematics Education faculty, Dr. Ron Preston and Dr. Rose Sincrope were recognized with the highest honor that NCCTM can bestow, the W. W. Rankin Award.  MATE senior, Rebekah Currie, double majoring in a BS Mathematics Education and a BA in Mathematics won the Outstanding Mathematics Education Student from the Eastern Region award.  Several alumni also were recognized as the Outstanding Secondary Mathematics Teacher for their school districts.  Congratulations to:

W.T. Edwards, Columbus Co. – Class of ’11
Jennifer Simmons, Onslow Co. – Class of ’97, current student MAEd IT (Onslow Cohort)
Renea Baker, Pitt Co. – Class of ’92

ECU rises to the top once again!

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Getting Tech Help:

Students and Faculty in the College of Education have two different avenues to get tech help.  They can use East Carolina University’s Information Technology and Computing Services  (ITCS) or COE’s own Information / Instructional Technology Center (COE IT).  Both offer online Help Desk services where students and faculty can submit a ticket to get assistance with a problem.

ITCS should be used for issues that pertain to items that are university-based such as email, One Stop, and malfunctioning equipment such as personal laptops.  Students and Faculty canchoose from a multitude of options to get service:

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The students and faculty within COE have the benefit of being able to use COE IT Help Desk.  This should be used for issues pertaining to COE specific items such as Taskstream and university software.  Here are the students’ options:

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Faculty have these options:

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These two online options enable the students and faculty in COE to get the help they need to be productive and successful.