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ECU hosts design thinking sessions for education professionals

The College of Education hosted two design thinking workshops. Local K–12 educators, high school students and ECU faculty attended a workshop to confront important challenges in higher education and design innovative solutions on Monday, March 21.

Design ThinkingThe next day, local K–12 educators were taken through the full cycle of design thinking in a short timeframe. The activity focused on the fundamental values of human-centered design: a bias toward action, a culture of iteration and the importance of rapid prototyping. The latter portion of the session will uncover the results of the activity and tie them back to the day-to-day challenges.

As a new way to problem solve, companies like IDEO and Google are embracing design thinking, according to Militello.

“This workshop may affect our professional students in profound ways because it provides them with a tool set for managing change in schools which is not generally provided in preparation programs,” said Militello. “In making the case for design thinking, we’re asking school leaders to admit that the answers to modern challenges they face don’t yet exist; that off-the-shelf solutions or strategies that neighboring schools employ are not going to meet the unique needs of the communities they serve.”

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Dr. Nash presenting during the COE’s design thinking workshops.

Dr. John Nash, associate professor of educational leadership studies at the University of Kentucky and the founding director of the Laboratory on Design Thinking in Education, or dLab, will facilitate the sessions on both dates. He’s also a director at the Center for Advanced Study of Technology Leadership in Education, or CASTLE, at the University of Kentucky.

Nash is a specialist in the design and prototyping of innovations in education. He teaches a range of courses on design thinking, school technology leadership, and school reform. His current research agenda focuses on the methods to design and prototype of innovations in education.

The events are sponsored by the Wells Fargo Distinguished Professor in Educational Leadership, Dr. Matt Militello.

Design thinking is a creative strategy for dealing with old and emerging problems. This approach differs from the traditional scientific method by considering known and unknown parameters to seek alternative solutions in an iterative manner.

“The intent of the Wells Fargo Endowment in Educational Leadership is to build capacity for local school educators,” said Militello. “Design thinking is a way to build capacity for these educators and for those who train them. ECU’s College of Education is well positioned to be at the forefront of technologies and innovations that can best assist our school educators. This series is another example of this type of forward thinking work.”

 

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SEFR Faculty Present at SITE Conference

Dr. Jennifer B. Williams (Associate Professor, Special Education) and Dr. Chan Evans (Associate Professor, Special Education) participated in the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education (SITE) conference in Savannah, GA on March 25, 2016. Their presentations highlighted teaching and assessment elements that are integral to East Carolina University’s special education undergraduate online program: edTPA Assessment in Distance Education – Implementation, Results, and Lessons Learned in a Special Education Program; and Distance Education Program Use of Multiple Means of Assessment – Embedding Technology Components throughout a Special Education Program. The edTPA presentation was part of a Best Practices round table discussion with teacher trainers and practitioners from Canada and Southeastern USA. Proceedings will be published later this year in LearnTechLib, the Learning & Technology Library.

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Counselor Education Program welcomes Ashley Cannan

The Counselor Education Program is happy to add Ashley Cannan to the team! Mrs. Cannan is a Licensed Professional Counselor in the State of North Carolina and a Registered Play Therapist-Supervisor with the Association for Play Therapy. Ashley received her Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Samford University in Birmingham, AL and a Master of Arts in Community Counseling, with a specialization in Play Therapy, from the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, AL. Since 2001, Ashley has worked with children, adolescents and their families across a variety of settings including non-profit agencies, an inpatient residential treatment facility, a local management entity for mental health services and private practice. In her former practice in Atlanta, GA, Ashley specialized in seeing children ages 3 through 10 for a variety of issues including anxiety, depression, grief/loss and emotional regulation difficulty. Since moving from Atlanta in 2013, Ashley and her family have enjoyed the change of pace Greenville offers. She’s excited about joining ECU’s Counselor Education. Welcome aboard, Ashley!

Ashley Cannan, LPC, RPT-S, NCC
Ragsdale 223-A
East Carolina University
cannana16@ecu.edu

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The 2016 Latham Clinical Teachers’ and Mary Lois Staton Reading/Language Arts Conference

The 2016 Latham Clinical Teachers’ and Mary Lois Staton Reading/Language Arts joint conference was held on March 15, 2016 at the Hilton Hotel in Greenville, NC.

The theme of the event was “Myth Busting: Why it’s A Great Time to Be in Education.” Dr. Brian Housand, Associate Professor in the Elementary Education and Middle Grades Education Department in the College of Education was the featured Keynote Speaker for the 2016 conference.
Sixteen engaging sessions on a variety of topics gave more than 200 conference participants a chance to learn about new concepts and strategies to use during classroom instruction. The conference is designed and provided to support Latham Clinical Teachers’ professional development and is one of the ways the College of Education gives back to teachers and schools in the Latham Clinical Schools Network which is comprised of 564 schools within 41 counties throughout Eastern NC.

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Gamma Chapter Celebrates PI DAY!

On March 14, 2016, Dr. Ron Preston met with the Gamma Student Chapter, Mathematics Education Club to celebrate Pi Day.

Dr. Ron Preston speaking to the Gamma Student Chapter of the Mathematics Education Club.

He shared history and humor related to pi. Attendees also participated in several pi related mathematical tasks appropriate for middle and high school mathematics. Everyone left for the evening with expanded knowledge of pi, as well as resources for their future classrooms. Next year Pi day falls on a Saturday, so be sure to celebrate on 3-14-15 at precisely 9:26 am and 53 seconds (pi = 3.141592653….)!!

The next Gamma Chapter meeting will be Wednesday, April 20, 2016, for the “Through the eyes of Autism” meeting. Please join us and bring a friend!

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Using Critical Incidents of Instructional Design and Multimedia Production Activities to Investigate Instructional Designers’ Current Practices and Roles

Drs. William Sugar and Ken Luterbach recently published the following article, Using critical incidents of instructional design and multimedia production activities to investigate instructional designers’ current practices and roles, in Educational Technology Research and Development. The full citation is below.

Using Flanagan’s (1954) Critical Incident Technique, this study analyzed 106 effective, ineffective and extraordinary instructional design and multimedia production activities discussed by 36 instructional design professionals. This evaluation provided insights into these professionals’ best and not so best practices during the past six months. Prevalent themes emerged from the data analysis with regards to these activities. Six themes emerged from the effective incidents, namely: (a) creating instructional products, (b) providing examples, (c) differentiating instruction, (d) establishing social presence, (e) providing resources, and (f) collaborating with stakeholders. Four themes emerged from the extraordinary incidents, namely: (a) matching methods and media to content and learners, (b) providing organized content, (c) managing a complex ID project, and (d) using theory to inform practice. Six themes emerged from the ineffective incidents, namely: (a) not matching methods and media to content and learners, (b) not supporting student interaction (c) selecting inadequate instructional strategies, (d) not using ID processes, (e) not collaborating with stakeholders, and (f) coping with inadequate technical infrastructure. Results from this study offer an understanding on the interrelationship between instructional design and multimedia production activities and positive (both effective and extraordinary) outcomes in instructional design activities. A comparison of existing instructional design success factors and best practices studies and this study’s results also takes place. Future research directions espouse the value of analyzing little known phenomena in instructional design-related activities and further explore negative or ineffective instructional design practices.

Sugar, W. & Luterbach, K. J. (2016). Using critical incidents of instructional design and multimedia production activities to investigate instructional designers’ current practices and roles. Educational Technology Research and Development, 64(2), 285-312.

BS Mathematics Education students (clockwise from far left) Megan Taylor, Carson Gombatz, Sarah Marsh, and Kaylin Carlton look for an assessment app on their phone during one conference breakout session.

ECU Hosts North Carolina Council of Teachers of Mathematics Eastern Region Conference

Mathematics teachers from K-12 and university settings gathered Saturday, 19 March 2016, on the campus of East Carolina University for the Eastern Region Conference of the North Carolina Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCCTM). As the host institution, ECU was very well represented by university faculty, graduate students, undergraduate students, and alumni.

The conference keynote address was delivered by Fran Arbaugh of Penn State University. The concluding keynote, given by Kitty Rutherford, was an update from the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. In between, there were 34 breakout sessions, given over breakout periods. Program chair for the conference was Katie Schwartz. Other ECU mathematics education faculty presided, presented, provided breakfast or lunch, or supervised Gamma Chapter members (mathematics education student organization).

ECU student involvement included undergraduates who co-presented and 19 presentations by graduate students from the leadership classes – these sessions involved 35 presenters, most of whom are in the graduate HS Cohort. Two more sessions were done by graduate students who are part of the Lenoir Mathematics-Science Partnership (MSP) grant.

The conference, which included breakfast, lunch, and some very nice give-aways (particularly mathematics education books), was provided to the 135 participants at no charge by NCCTM, the Lenoir MSP, and faculty donations. Each participant received 0.5 continuing education unit.

Pictured above: BS Mathematics Education students (clockwise from far left) Megan Taylor, Carson Gombatz, Sarah Marsh, and Kaylin Carlton look for an assessment app on their phone during one conference breakout session.

Dean Grant B. Hayes

MEASURING IMPACT: The College of Education embarks on three-year assessment plan

By Jessica Nottingham
University Communication

East Carolina University’s College of Education is under new leadership and on a crusade for excellence.

Dr. Grant Hayes, who has been dean and distinguished professor in the College of Education since August, opened his first faculty and staff meeting asking tough questions: “What does the ECU College of Education want to be known for?” and “what can students get here that they cannot get elsewhere?”

To help the college answer these questions, department chairs are charged with working with faculty to increase the impact, performance and visibility of their work.

“Grant is resourceful and prepared,” said Dr. Art Rouse, chair of the Department of Educational Leadership. “From the time he interviewed and then came to ECU as dean, he could see that the college has major impact on the region, but it was not being told or seen by our various stakeholders.”

Before his appointment at ECU, Hayes served as interim dean of the College of Education and Human Performance at the University of Central Florida, where he held numerous leadership positions. His experience as a professor of counselor education, music teacher and administrator spans more than 27 years. He earned his doctoral, master’s and educational specialist degrees from the University of South Carolina, and his bachelor’s degree in music education from Limestone College.

To read the full article, please click on the following link:
Measuring Impact: College of Education embarks on three-year assessment plan

Jennifer Mabe

ECU alumna named WITN Teacher of the Week

Jennifer Mabe, a teacher at Pitt County Schools Early College, was recently named WITN Teacher of the Week. Mabe graduated from East Carolina University in 2004 with a B.A. in Communication/ Public Relations. She received her B.S. in Secondary Math Education from ECU in 2010.

Please follow the link to learn more about Jennifer.

http://www.witn.com/home/headlines/WITNs-Teacher-of-the-Week-371509371.html?device=tablet&c=y

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College of Education to host first Edcamp.

ECU’s College of Education will be hosting the first EdcampECU on Saturday, April 23, on the ECU main campus. EdcampECU is an “unconference” designed to provide FREE participant-driven professional development for P-12 educators with a focus on educational technology. Teachers, specialists, administrators and district personnel that are ready to share, collaborate and learn about educational technology are encouraged to attend. Participants can have an active role at edcamp by proposing a session topic, voting on proposed topics, choosing what sessions to attend and how they want to participate in each session (sharing ideas in a session or facilitating a session). Each session will have a collaborative Google Doc for educators to share their discussion, link resources and learn from others. Breakfast and lunch will be provided on-site to allow attendees to continuously participate in throughout the event. Register for Edcamp ECU today at bit.ly/edcampecu. For more information contact COE Instructional Technology Consultants, Holly Fales (heathh@ecu.edu) or Jason Whited (whitedj@ecu.edu) in the Office of Assessment, Accreditation and Data Management.