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Ann Rhem Schwarzmann Production Center

So where does a Teacher Candidate go to create materials for their classes?   Joyner Library’s Teaching Resource Center houses the Schwarzmann Production Center to assist Teacher Candidate with preparing classroom materials for their internships.

The Schwarzmann Production Center is located on the second floor of Joyner Library in the Teaching Resources Center, and is available for use when the TRC service desk is open. The center is designed to assist in the creation and preparation of materials used in lesson units, classrooms, and presentations. Staff is available to assist patrons with any equipment operations in the center.

The Production Center contains the following equipment:

Artwaxer
Award Maker
Badge-A-Minit button maker and cutter
Comb Binder
Ellison Die-Cut Center with over 900 patterns
Laminator
Light Box
Poster Maker
Vinyl Letter Cutter
The center also houses computer workstations with scanners and access to a color printer. Educational software available in the room includes: Button Builder, Kid Pix, Adobe Design Premium CS5, Timeliner, and Math Type. Learn more about Die Cutting

Take a Tour of the Production Center (video)

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Joyner Library’s Teaching Resource Center

Established in 1988, the Teaching Resources Center (TRC) contains children and young adult materials, K-12 North Carolina state adopted textbooks, multi-media, kits, and reference resources. The department primarily serves students enrolled in teacher education programs and educators in eastern North Carolina.

Our Mission
The mission of the Teaching Resources Center is to facilitate teaching and learning initiatives by providing resources and services to educators at all levels.

Our Goals
To serve as a model resource center by:

Developing and maintaining a birth to 12th grade collection
Conducting reference and instruction
Providing outreach to area schools and educators
Supporting educators with technology and equipment in the Ann Rhem Schwarzmann Production Center
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Teaching Resources Center Collections materials;

Biographies: Biographies in the TRC’s collection are used by elementary, middle and high school age students.

Big Books: The TRC offers a wide selection of Big Books.  A Big Book is an enlarged version of a beginning reading book, incorporating very large print and pictures. Big Books are educational tools often used to instruct groups of emergent readers.

Children’s Award Book Collection Plan: The Teaching Resources Center automatically acquires various Children’s Award Books each year.

Easy Fiction/Picture Books: Easy Fiction Books are illustrated stories that are written for birth to grade 2 children.   The TRC’s picture book collection includes copies of Caldecott Medal award winners and honor books as well as other prominent children’s award books.

Mixed Media Collection: The TRC’s Mixed Media collection contains read-a-longs, CDs, MP3s, audio cassettes, flashcards, and other media used by K-12 students and educators.

Nonfiction Books: The Nonfiction collection contains materials for birth to grade 12 readers. Titles in the TRC’s nonfiction collection correspond to the content areas of the Common Core Standards and the North Carolina Essential Standards, as well as informational topics of interest to school-aged children.  Additionally, the TRC’s collection of folktales and poetry are located within this collection.  The TRC’s nonfiction collection includes copies of prominent children’s award winning books including the Outstanding Science Trade Books for Students K-12 award winners.
Professional Collection: The Professional Collection contains teaching materials and other valuable resources for K-12 educators. The collection includes books pertaining to classroom activities, lesson planning, bulletin boards, and instructional methods.

Reference Books: The non-circulating reference collection contains reference materials for elementary, middle and high school age students as well as professional reference materials for educators.

Review Center: The TRC serves as a review center for publishers of children’s materials and invites educators, including pre-service teachers, to review and evaluate the titles within the collection.

Ronnie Barnes African-American Resource Collection: The Ronnie Barnes collection contains children’s books written by and/or about African-Americans.  The collection contains many award winning books, including Coretta Scott King award winners and honor titles.

Teaching Aids: The tactile objects in the Teaching Aids Collection are used by educators to reinforce learning and teach new skills. These objects are often referred to as manipulatives.

Textbooks: The TRC collection contains both North Carolina State Adopted K-12 Textbooks and supplementary K-12 textbooks.

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UCEA convention 2014

Student Videos Screened at National UCEA Annual Convention

One of Dr. Martin Rearon’s favorite assignments when he teaches ethics invites participants to story board, script, cast, and create a short video to illustrate either a positive or a problematic instance of ethics in educational leadership. In spring 2014, the participants in LEED 6909 formed four groups and created four seven-minute videos. The videography and editing services were professionally supplied by Mike Myles and Sam Saunders of ECU’s Media and Technology Services, and they both worked with the participants in each video to edit them to the seven minutes stipulated by the assignment.

The quality of the acting contributed to the impact of the multiple points that each of the videos made about ethics in education. Consequently, he sought the participants’ permission to submit all four videos for blind review for possible screening at the Film Festival conducted in conjunction with the Annual Convention of the University Council for Educational Administration (UCEA, http://ucealee.squarespace.com/). Mike and Sam worked with him to edit the assignment videos to meet UCEA’s five-minute requirement. Two of the four videos were accepted by the reviewers, and the other two were just below the cut-off. The two videos accepted for screening are Double Standard and Who’s to Blame.

  • Double Standard was directed by Heather Gray,  and included Denise Adler, Nydra Jones, Donna Moore, and Susan Agrue.
  • Who’s to Blame was directed by Scott Pagona and included Jennifer McClure, DeeDee Barrett, and Cynthia Sego.

The films were screened on Friday and Saturday, Nov 21 and 22, 2014, at the UCEA Annual Convention in Washington, DC (http://ucealee.squarespace.com/annual-convention-2014/).

Congratulations to the directors and casts of the two accepted videos, and many thanks to Mike Myles and Sam Saunders for their professional services.

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Pirate CODE from A-Z (Part One)

A
academic language – language used in academic settings and for academic purposes to help students acquire and use knowledge.

B
beginning teacher – a teacher in the first three years of his or her career.

C
co-teaching – a teaching technique in which two instructors deliver instruction to a group of students.

D
dispositions – the attitudes, perceptions and/or beliefs that form the basis for behavior.
Dispositions for teaching include professional demeanor, professional commitment, and professional interactions.

E
edTPA – a national performance assessment used to determine if a teacher candidate is ready to teach.
The edTPA was designed by the Stanford Center for Access, Learning and Equity (SCALE).

F
feedback – a reaction or response to a particular process or activity; evaluative information derived from such a response.
G
grouping – refers to students working together to accomplish a common goal or purpose; also known as cooperative learning.
Think-Pair-Share and Jigsaw are two grouping strategies covered in ISLES.

H
handbook – the document that provides instructions for teacher candidates in developing their edTPA portfolios.
The edTPA handbooks are subject-specific, yet have a similar structure regardless of content area.

I
instructional coach – an educator who is hired to specifically work with teacher candidates during their internship.

J
jigsaw – a cooperative learning strategy that involves placing students in both a “home” group and an “expert” group; students complete a task in their expert group, and then share what they have learned with the members of the home group.

K
knowledge – the fact or condition of knowing something with familiarity gained through experience of association.
An effective teacher needs both content and pedagogical knowledge.
• content knowledge – knowledge about the actual subject matter to be learned or taught; actual subject matter such as language arts, mathematics, and music.
• pedagogical knowledge – knowledge about the processes and practices or methods of teaching and learning.
L
learning segment – a set of 3-5 lessons (or hours of instruction) that build upon one another toward a central focus.
Teacher candidates plan, instruct and assess a learning segment as part of the edTPA.

For next week – M-Z

 

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edTPA

The edTPA is a preservice assessment process designed by educators to answer the essential question: “Is a teacher candidate ready for the job?” The edTPA was designed by teacher educators at the Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning and Equity (SCALE). SCALE is also known for developing the Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT) and the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) performance assessment.
Unlike other pre-service teacher assessments, the edTPA has a performance component wherein teacher candidate plans, teaches and assesses a 3-5 hour sequence of lessons known as the learning segment. The learning segment is taught in an actual P-12 classroom during the candidate’s student teaching period, or internship.
The College of Education was invited by SCALE to participate in the pilot of edTPA in spring 2011. Since then, the assessment was analyzed during an extensive two-year field test. In November 2013, SCALE released its report on the validity of the assessment. The assessment is now nationally available and is required for licensure in several states. (For more information, see http://edtpa.aacte.org/faq#51 .) According to SCALE, “the long-term expectation is that institutions of higher education, state education boards and professional standards boards throughout the United States will adopt edTPA as a mandatory requirement for the award of an education degree and/or for teacher licensure.”
During the 2013-2014 academic year, all of the teacher preparation programs in our EPP unit included the edTPA as part of the senior year experience. Over 500 portfolios were submitted and evaluated by trained ECU faculty, university supervisors and inservice teachers. The edTPA is not yet a requirement for licensure in North Carolina; however seven UNC institutions have incorporated the edTPA (at least in part) in their teacher preparation programs.
For more information about the edTPA, visit the SCALE website at https://scale.stanford.edu/teaching/edtpa

The edTPA addresses NCATE Standard 1 – Candidate Knowledge, Skills and Professional Dispositions. Data collected from the edTPA address Standard 2 – Assessment System and Unit Evaluation.

 

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ECU to Participate in Global Day of Giving

image‘Tis the season for giving! In honor of #GivingTuesday, East Carolina University is inviting alumni, friends, parents, students, faculty, and staff to join the movement by giving a charitable gift* on Tuesday, December 2, to the university that is near and dear to our hearts.

Founded in 2012 to inspire a new tradition of generosity, #GivingTuesday focuses on celebrating kindness and giving back. Support a culture of philanthropy at ECU by making a gift on December 2nd and becoming a partner in securing the university’s future for current students and future generations of Pirates.

Your gifts provide scholarships, enrich teaching resources and libraries, offer hands-on learning lessons, support research and the arts, deliver classroom enhancements, and afford study abroad living/learning opportunities – all of which help ECU attract and retain the best and brightest students and faculty.

Help spread the word! Mark you calendar to #GiveTueECU on December 2, tell your friends, and post on social media using the hashtags #GivingTuesdayECU and #GiveTueECU. “I Gave” badges will be available through ECU’s University Advancement and East Carolina Alumni Association’s social media accounts on December 2.

Learn more about the #GivingTuesdayECU movement. Thank you for your support!

Contact us at (252) ECU-GIVE (252-328-4483) or give2ecu@ecu.edu.

*Your gift is tax-deductible to the extent the law allows.

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How the COE is Using Video in its Innovations

The implementation of video has taken a prominent role in the COE PIRATE Code, from Video Grand Rounds (VGR) to ISLES to EDTPA.

Students start by observing the video pertaining to the innovations in the VGR component. The instructors show video clips of actual preK-12 classes in place of observation visits by the students. The videos demonstrate strategies the candidates are to look for when they physically go to classrooms to observe. These videos provide an accurate comprehensive visual picture of the strategies in practice. Then in class, students debrief to ensures they comprehend what they are seeing. For more information, check out the VGR blog post .

The students begin to create their own videos when they participate in ISLES. The final component is showing conditional knowledge of the effective instructional practices when they submit a video demonstrating it. For more information, check out the ISLES blog post.

edTPA is a big aspect of the teacher education program and video takes a prominent role in its completion. Students must submit a video of them teaching to be evaluated. These videos allow the faculty to make sure that students are prepared to move on from the COE and have their own classrooms. For more information, check out the edTPA blog post.

The usage of video and the innovations have gone hand in hand to better prepare ECU COE candidates for their future as teachers

 

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Abby-Colley-award

Abby Colley – A Pirate Who Does Us Proud

On November 6, 2014  at the NCSTA conference in Winston-Salem Abby Colley received the Outstanding Student Teacher Award.  Abby is a well-deserving graduate from the Elementary Science Concentration and is currently teaching 4th grade at Ayden Elementary in Pitt County. When she was a student at ECU her clinical teacher stated,  “She excelled in the classroom with her passion, creativity, and willingness to collaborate with other teachers…  I have seen her dedication for this field in her lesson planning, success of implementation of goals taught, and her responses to questions asked by her students…She is deserving of this award.”  Congratulations, Abby.  We are proud to have you as one of our pirates!

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CAEP Prep: What is the ECU Provost’s Council?

First established in 2006, the ECU Provost’s Council on Teacher Education unites educator preparation efforts at the University. Coming out of the Teachers for New Era movement, the original focus of the Council was developing collaboration between teacher education and the arts and sciences. Today, the Provost’s Council’s focus has broadened to include all educator preparation programs at ECU, yet still centers on collaboration across the campus to prepare candidates.

The Provost’s Council on Teacher Education includes the Provost, the deans of the colleges which house Educator Preparation Provider (EPP) programs, the dean of the ECU Graduate School, and key faculty and administrators in the College of Education, including the Executive Director of Teacher Education and the Director of Assessment and Accreditation.

Educator preparation programs at ECU reside in the following colleges:

  • College of Allied Health Sciences
  • College of Fine Arts and Communication
  • College of Human Ecology
  • College of Education
  • College of Health and Human Performance
  • Harriot College of Arts and Sciences

The Provost’s Council meets quarterly to address EPP issues related to accreditation, enrollment, funding, and planning. More information is available on the Provost’s Council and EPP Leadership and Authority webpage.

The Provost’s Council is evidence of how the EPP at ECU meets NCATE Standard 6: Unit Governance and Resources.

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Junior 2 Teaching Interns and Principal Fellows MSA Students Collaborate

Junior 2 Teaching Interns and Principal Fellows MSA Students Collaborate
Something new and exciting is happening this semester in the COE that you might miss if you are not currently a Junior 2 intern or a Principal Fellow. The two programs are collaborating for the benefit of both student sets, and the process has been extremely promising. First, the interns and Fellows meet and discuss lesson plans and teaching strategies. Next, the Jr 2’s teach a class, while the Fellows observe either in person or by watching a video of the lesson uploaded to Taskstream. The Fellows then evaluate the lesson and provide constructive feedback. This process is repeated across three lessons the interns teach.
The process is valuable to the interns because they get another set of eyes from experienced classroom teachers. The MSA students get the valuable experience of observing and evaluating teachers with a rubric, which will be a fundamental part of their future jobs as administrators, as they must observe their teaching staff and evaluate according to The Rubric for Evaluating North Carolina Teachers:

North Carolina Teacher Evaluation Process

As a Principal Fellow, this experience has been valuable and has taught me some practical lessons. I spent hours watching my intern’s lesson videos, brainstorming constructive advice and writing helpful comments. And this was for an intern who had well-prepared lessons and did a fantastic job. Yet I realize as an administrator I will not have hours to spend on each individual teacher. I can reflect with empathy now on some of my past evaluations, which may have seemed rushed and minimal. A principal with 80 staff members must schedule 80 pre-conferences, observe 80 lessons, and schedule 80 post-conferences. Each teacher should be observed a minimum of three times per year, and ILT’s require even more. Hundreds of hours are required to meet the minimum standards for evaluating and assessing teachers, and to truly help teachers improve, more time will be needed than just the minimum. But for the moment, my responsibility is to one intern and I have the luxury of time. I hope that my feedback will help her to ease into her future as an NC teacher. This experience has definitely been worthwhile for me in my preparation in becoming an NC school administrator.
Elbert Maynard
Principal Fellow

 

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