Category Archives: SOC Students

School of Communication Career Panel and Fair is Feb. 16

A panel of communication professionals will be available to answer questions from students on February 16 from 1 – 2 p.m. in 244 Mendenhall Student Center. The panel will consist of Michael Aho, an international affairs officer at the U.S. Department of State, Amanda Anderson, a physician recruitment supervisor at Vidant Health, Kelley Deal, dean of marketing at Nash Community College, and Josh Graham, sports director at Inner Banks Media. This is an excellent opportunity to learn more about a variety of communication careers while networking with communication professionals.

The School of Communication Career Fair will follow the panel on February 16 from 2 – 4 p.m. in the Mendenhall Student Center Grand Ballrooms. Professional business attire is required for the career fair and be sure to bring extra resumes. Registration is required for the panel event. Register at

https://epay-banner.ecu.edu/C20694_ustores/web/store_main.jsp?STOREID=86&SINGLESTORE=true

Here is a list of companies and organizations that will be at the fair:

The United Way
WITN
The Daily Reflector
Greenville Fire/Rescue
ECU News Services
The Hope Lodge
ENC Stop Human Trafficking Now
The Association of Mexicans in North Carolina
WZMB
The East Carolinian
TEKsystems
ECU Campus Recreation & Wellness
WNCT
United States Navy Recruiting
American Red Cross
SOC Study Abroad
Washington Daily News
Wilson Tobs Baseball team
SOC Graduate Program
Eastern Radiologists
Vector Marketing
News Channel 12, WCTI

For more information contact Dr. Mary Tucker-McLaughlin, tuckermclaughlin@ecu.edu.

SOC Graduation Recognition Ceremony is May 6 at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium

Congratulations Class of 2016!

The School of Communication Graduate Recognition Ceremony will be held on Friday, May 6th at 8:00pm in Wright Auditorium.

You are required to have tickets for your family and friends to attend. Any remaining unclaimed tickets will be available on Reading Day, April 27th starting at 9 a.m. in Joyner East 102.

On May 6th. graduates should arrive in their caps and gowns by 6:30 pm to check in and line up for processional – First Floor of the Bate Building.

Each graduate, wearing a cap and gown, will be recognized by name and will walk across the stage to receive the congratulations of the faculty members and the Director of the School of Communication.  The School of Communication would recommend graduates dress in business casual under their gowns.

ECU Parking and Transportation will suspend parking permit enforcement the day of graduation.  Graduates and their guest will be able to park in any of the parking lots on the ECU Campus.  However, the University is open on Friday and parking on campus will be limited.  We strongly advise guest to arrive early to ensure they find a parking space and are able to walk to Wright Auditorium in a timely manner.  No parking zones, fire zones, and handicap parking restrictions will be strictly enforced.  Handicapped seating and parking will be provided for guest.  Requests for disability accommodation other than parking or seating should be directed to the Department for Disability Support Services (DSS) at least 48 hours prior to the event. DSS can be reached at 252-737-1016 (voice / TTY). Requests may also be e-mailed to dssdept@ecu.edu.

For friends and family members that are not able to attend, they can watch on a live feed at https://mediasite.ecu.edu/MS/Play/6f7fa137245241d4b9761ead74798cdc1d

 If you have any questions, please contact the Main Office at 252-328-4227.

 

Communication volleyball players seek big turnout for Memphis game. By Emory Saia

The East Carolina University women’s volleyball players are trying to break the attendance record at their next home game and four Communication majors are trying to get the word out.

“It’s really nice to know we have the support of the Pirate community,” said Kaitlyn Branam, a freshman in the School of Communication with a concentration in media studies. “We’re not a well-known sport like football.”

Teammate Kori West said that the team’s attendance record is 1,348. “We want to beat the record at our home game against Memphis,” said West, a journalism student.

A big audience means a better atmosphere, according to player and senior journalism student, Torre Blake. “Knowing we have people behind us cheering us on is an amazing feeling,” she said.

Winning depends on who wants it more and who shows up that day, said Blake.

“We’ve played [Memphis] once before this season,” said Branam. “I think it will be a competitive game. They’re a tough team, but if we work really hard and practice we will pull out a win.”

The ECU volleyball team’s overall record is 11-14 this season.

“A come-up is happening. We’re very excited for the next home game,” said Alex Johnson, a team member and a senior interpersonal communication student. “We can’t wait to beat them for the second time.”

According to Branam, winning any game is helpful to build the team’s program for the years to follow.

“It will be good because we’ve been in a slump. It will boost our confidence,” said Johnson.

“Our goal is to change the stigma of our team, and put our team on the map,” said Blake.

West added, “We can reach our team goal if we beat them again.”

All four players see communication as a strong major to prepare them for a variety of career paths.

Branam plans to intern in order to become a sideline sports reporter after she graduates ECU. “For that profession it takes a lot of experience, I plan to work with local teams and hopefully work my way up,” she said.

West plans to intern with ESPN and ultimately become a reporter with ESPN. “I knew through volleyball that I would be able to know more about sports, which would help with a career in journalism,” West said.

Johnson plans to get her masters in health communication in order to become a pharmaceutical salesperson.

After Blake graduates, she plans to go to New York to work with producers on her music career.

The ECU women’s volleyball game against Memphis is on Nov.13 at 5:30 p.m.

Steps Toward a Better Tomorrow

By Nicole LaDuca

Tomorrow starts here. It is the phrase students, faculty and Greenville locals see signifying the countless number of opportunities East Carolina University offers.

To follow one of the missions of the university, the School of Communication’s journalism faculty have developed a new plan. Dr. Mary Tucker-McLaughlin and Dr. Glenn Hubbard created a rent-to-buy equipment program for journalism students to be implemented in the fall of 2015.
It all started in McLaughlin’s Multiplatform Journalism class after a student asked why journalism students did not have their own equipment if they did not spend money on textbooks for the classes. McLaughlin said a light bulb went off and she started thinking about different ways students could better succeed in the classroom.
Hubbard said once McLaughlin brought a camera rental and buying program to him, he was 100 percent on board and ready to take the necessary steps to make the idea a reality.
McLaughlin said the “rent-to-buy” equipment program will be mandatory for journalism students. They will be required to start the program prior to their sophomore year in order to have the necessary camera equipment on the first day of their first broadcasting class — Video News Production. The equipment includes a camera, microphone, tripod, memory card and a warranty for all of the equipment.
“The great thing about this program is that there are no strings attached,” said McLaughlin. “You can drop out, return the equipment and not pay a fee. If you are in the program for the entire time, at the end of your journalism classes, you will own the equipment.”

The packages range from $40 a month to $90 a month depending on the type of camera the student chooses. Hubbard says he recommends the camera that only costs $40 a month.
“The cheapest package is the best deal,” said Hubbard. “The camera gets you really good image quality, and it is cross compatible. It shoots great still images and great video, so students could use it for more than just broadcasting classes.”

The quality of the cameras is something McLaughlin believes is another advantage. She says being able to shoot still images would be perfect for students who need a camera for other communications classes, such as Copy Editing and Design.
Hubbard and McLaughlin, the two communications professors who focus on broadcast journalism, agree that the positives of the new program far outweigh the negatives that might come with the change.
The School of Communication will be saving between $6,000 to $10,000 every year on cameras and equipment they will no longer have to purchase.
“Right now, there isn’t a camera kit for everyone,” said McLaughlin. “If a student has an interview set up and they go to check out equipment and all of the cameras are gone, they cannot complete their assignment.”

Because professors can only do so much, the biggest gain of all lies within the students’ interest. Hubbard says he is always willing to help motivated students with out-of-class tips or advanced classes to further their career goals.
“I’ve been known to create special classes with independent studies for interested students,” says Hubbard.
McLaughlin also believes the opportunities are endless with this new program. She says the first thing on her to-do list is to inform all of the local news stations about the program, which would give students the opportunity to freelance and be stringers for the different news outlets.
“Local stations will hire students to shoot footage for them, but the catch is that you have to have your own equipment,” said McLaughlin. “With this new program, that wouldn’t be a problem.”

 

With a small investment from ECU’s future journalism students comes a major improvement to the program that is currently in place. And, with this new plan, tomorrow’s achievements can start today.

 

Multimedia newsroom gives students opportunity for hands-on experience in a state-of-the-art classroom

Senior Alex Gajewski knows what he wants to do after graduation. The aspiring sports broadcaster has held internships with ESPN radio, TV stations in Greenville and Charlotte, NASCAR Productions and a professional soccer team.

Equally valuable, however, is the experience he gets weekly on campus at East Carolina University.

“The ECU multimedia newsroom is phenomenal,” Gajewski said in an interview this fall. “I can’t say enough about it. I started getting hands on with the ECU newsroom my junior year and it has helped me tremendously. It really captures what it’s like to work in TV journalism.”

The facility — which includes new computers, three studio cameras, a TriCaster, an audio board, an anchor desk and a green screen — gets students “pretty close” to a real newsroom experience. To learn more, please see this ECU News Bureau feature article.

London Study Abroad Recap of Summer 2014

During summer 2014, Dr. Cindy Elmore and Ms. Barbara Bullington led a successful study abroad program to London. The focus of the program was International News and allowed 20 students to gain access to the BBC, The Guardian, Bloomberg, NPR, and Amnesty International. In addition to exploring multiple avenues of international news resources, the students had the opportunity to experience a new and diverse cultures.
Jordan Mitchell, a Communication major and Film Studies minor here at East Carolina University, created a video as part of an Independent Study documenting the London study abroad experience.

Students venturing across the pond for School of Communication first study abroad to London

Study Abroad in London

Junior communication major Caitlin Arneson is counting down the days until summer school.

But she won’t be in spending six weeks in a classroom in the Joyner East building. Instead, she’ll be earning six credit hours in London, one of the world’s leading global cities. She is one of 20 communication majors who will participate in the School of Communication’s first Summer Study Abroad to London.

The program follows last summer’s successful School of Communication Study Abroad to central Europe, in which communication students traveled to Poland, Slovenia and Hungary, taking courses in Intercultural Communication and English for Global Communication.

Arneson, who is from Northern Virginia, also was a student in that program.

She said she decided to enroll in a second study abroad program because she “absolutely loved” the Poland program. “So when I heard that there was another opportunity this summer, I decided I couldn’t miss it,” Arneson said. “Studying abroad gives class a whole other dynamic . . . Field trips and real life experiences are so much more in depth and relatable than any textbook could ever be.”

The London study abroad program will include courses in feature writing and international news communication. During their two weeks in London, students will visit the BBC (British Broadcasting Corporation), Bloomberg News, al Jazeera-London, the British Parliament, a contract magazine publishing house, the Guardian newspaper, and more.

Students will live two-to-a-room in apartments in the Kensington Olympia area of the city. This will enable them to save money by preparing some of their own meals in their own kitchens. The apartments also have washers and dryers and Internet.

The cost for the trip, which includes tuition for six credit hours, two weeks’ accommodations in London, local transit in London, two group dinners, the BBC and Parliament tour fees, insurance and Internet, is $1,958 per student.

Arneson, an aspiring journalist, says she hopes to learn more about both English culture and journalism while on the trip.

Communication faculty members Cindy Elmore and Barbara Bullington are leading the program.

Student’s goals and determination net internship with Charlotte Bobcats

Madison Briner with Michael Jordan

By Amber Brandau

Sports fanatic and School of Communication student, Madison Briner, initially had a stressful and frustrating experience getting an internship for Fall 2013 until she came across an open position with the Charlotte Bobcats.

“I remember last summer I spent hours and hours applying to internships across the country,” Briner said. “I went on multiple interviews, but no offers. It was incredibly frustrating.”

Briner’s perseverance and self-awareness eventually paid off when she became the Event Presentation intern for the Charlotte Bobcats. She applied for the internship after reasoning that the position fit her active and social personality.

“Each day there was something new and exciting to experience,” Briner said. “You can market and plan all you want, but what happens in the game is uncontrollable and unplanned, which I think is exciting.”

Not only did Briner leave her internship with invaluable hands-on experience, but she also left with advice from the senior vice president. Briner said she was blown away by his knowledge and willingness to help the interns.

“It was a lot of work, I met a lot of people, and I enjoyed every second of it,” she said. “I worked hard to get the internship, and I worked hard while I was there. It is important to dream big, but you have to do the little things to get there.”

(See a full Q&A profile of Madison Briner’s internship experience, written by School of Communication intern Amber Brandau.)

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