Feb 042013
 

 

reflector

“The big deal is that we desperately need for students majoring in these subjects because right now America is importing foreign talent (for STEM careers).”

Mary Farwell

biochemistry professor

By Katherine Ayers

Saturday, February 2, 2013

High school students from across eastern North Carolina got a closer look at majors and careers in STEM education at East Carolina University on Friday.

The day highlighted opportunities in science, technology, engineering and math that are available at ECU and included representatives from the departments of biology, chemistry, geography, geological sciences, physics, education, computer science, construction management, engineering and technology systems, as well as the Renaissance Computing Institute.

About 350 students were split into 14 groups of 25 and visited four stations during the event. They had lunch in a dining hall on campus.

Biochemistry professor Mary Farwell, who organized the event, said it is important that students recognize ECU not just as a health sciences university, but one that can help them land jobs after college in other areas as well.

“The big deal is that we desperately need for students majoring in these subjects because right now America is importing foreign talent (for STEM careers),” Farwell said. “ECU is the jewel of the east, we have fantastic programs and students will be thought of as individuals and they can excel here.”

William Tyer, a science teacher from Ayden-Grifton, brought 25 juniors to the event and said it was a great opportunity for local students to realize what a great opportunity ECU provides.

“Many in Pitt County tend to take our local university for granted and their familiarity with the campus gives many young people a false sense that there are greater educational facilities to the west,” Tyer said. “In fact, with the addition of the fledgling engineering program, it’s becoming harder to find a reason to attend any university in the UNC system other than East Carolina.”

Destinee Thatch, a junior at Perquimans County High School, said she ultimately wants to be a radiologist and came to see what other science and technology options there were.

“I’ve enjoyed it,” Thatch said. “It helped me to narrow my career choices.”

Contact Katherine Ayers at kayers@reflector.com and 252-329-9567. Follow her on Twitter @KatieAyersGDR.

via The Daily Reflector.

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