Mar 162013
 

reflector

Christina Peroutka, right, showed the medical residency assignment she received to Johns Hopkins University Hospital after receiving it during Friday's Match Day ceremony at the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University.

Christina Peroutka, right, showed the medical residency assignment she received to Johns Hopkins University Hospital after receiving it during Friday’s Match Day ceremony at the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University.

By Michael Abramowitz

Saturday, March 16, 2013

Students and faculty at the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University participated Friday in the medical school tradition known as “Match Day” with all the expected cheers, laughs and expressions of relief.

The students learned where they will perform their residency training at hospitals throughout the country.

Sixty-nine students participated in Match Day, heading to residencies in 21 separate medical specialties at institutions in 22 states. About 75 percent of the graduates will receive their resident training in North Carolina hospitals, with Vidant Medical Center receiving 14 of the doctors after they graduate in May.

About 58 percent of the students were matched to their preferred residency programs.

Brody’s dean, Dr. Paul Cunningham, was pleased that seven of his students received residencies in general surgery, one more than last year. An additional three students received residencies in urology, a surgical sub-specialty.

“Our students are going to good places,” Cunningham said. “The quality of the programs they match to across the U.S. is important to us, and I believe they all fared very well this year for very competitive slots.”

Among those who believe they could not have fared better was Christina Peroutka, 28, of Greenville, who received a residency in pediatrics and medical genetics at Johns Hopkins University Hospital in Baltimore.

“When I opened my envelope and saw it, I felt awesome,” Peroutka said. “Brody prepares its students very well and does a tremendous job of training good physicians, with the right approach to patient care.”

Peroutka’s parents, Peter Peroutka and Kathryn Langenkamp, were at their daughter’s side when she opened her envelope. Her mother was proud of her accomplishment, but not surprised.

“Johns Hopkins did well to get Christina there,” Langenkamp said.

One of the primary concerns on which ECU and Brody administrators focus their attention is the need for primary care physicians in eastern North Carolina. While 40 of the 69 residencies received were in primary care specialties, there is no guarantee that any will return to the area to practice when they finish their programs.

“The future of health care is somewhat in the balance, and people are concerned now about what health care will look like,” Cunningham said. “I think many of our graduates have a wait-and-see attitude. During our selection process for Brody, we look for people in whom we sense a commitment to North Carolina and especially the rural east.

“I’d be surprised if we don’t see some of our graduates returning to the region.”

Contact Michael Abramowitz at mabramowitz@reflector.com or 252-329-9571.

via The Daily Reflector.

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