Study Abroad in Israel- More than an educational experience!

September 8th, 2013

Study Abroad in Israel- More than an educational experience!

Eric Walters

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(Photo by Author)

            Where should I even begin? This trip was designed to be a field school for archaeologists and conservators alike; yet, it was more than just a field school. Study abroad in Israel was an educational, professional, and personal trip for me. I was able to expand my educational boundaries restricted by text books, gain an understanding of what it takes to be an archaeologist or conservator, but most importantly I was able to broaden my horizons by challenging myself to venture on this expedition.

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(Photo by author)

            Year after year I sat in classrooms reading about the history of countries located in parts of the world I couldn’t fathom going too. However, in the summer of 2013, I found myself in a place where the history was endless and the evidence was there to prove it- Israel! After everyone had arrived we were all ready to handle artifacts from time periods unimaginable. Within the first couple of days we had begun walking in the ruined fortifications that were thousands of years old. These ancient ruins included Israel’s fifth largest port city and ancient coastline defense, a fortification known as Ashdod (see photo above). In addition, we walked through the world’s oldest arched gate, which was used for defensive purposes, known as the Canaanite Gate (see image below). These were only two of the many locations we visited! Before I realized I found myself on a century old Kibbutz, a Jewish settlement, which was something I had never heard or read about. Furthermore, to my surprise, while residing on the Kibbutz I was rooming with one of the lead archaeologists of the area Dr. Jeff Blakely.

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The Canaanite Gate

(Photo by author)

        It couldn’t get any better than this! I prepared my list of questions to gain more insight as to what it took to become a professional archaeologist. I wanted to use my time wisely and find out how someone like me could follow in the footsteps of someone such as Dr. Jeff Blakely. While on the Kibbutz I was able to preserve eleven artifacts from various time periods including a chalice from the 10th century. I learned how to properly examine, handle, clean, and preserve all types of artifacts. The day came when we departed the Kibbutz only to find ourselves working in the labs of the Israel Antiquities Authority, the I.A.A. It was here that I was able to reconstruct and preserve a 10th century Roman oil lamp. While working on the oil lamp I couldn’t help but think about the various preservation labs we had visited. I began comparing the conditions of the facilities such as the ability to control atmosphere conditions, the equipment, and the ability to store artifacts. All of the facilities, except the Kibbutz, were able to properly control the atmosphere with air conditioning and equipment which was of a higher standard. Here, we can clearly see how the availability of funds can affect both archaeologists and conservators while out in the field or in a permanent structure such as a lab.

Untitled 4 The I.A.A Conservation Lab

(Photo by author)

          As I come to a close I think it is important for anyone interested in studying abroad to know what it takes to commit to such an adventure. For me, it was standing on my own two feet in the real world as I experienced a lot of firsts! This trip was my first time out of the country, my first field school, my first hostel experience where I roomed with people from around the world at the same time, spoke to people in a foreign country in a foreign language acting as a translator in one scenario, and my first time being alone in the world without family or friends down the street to hold me up when I was weak. This trip gave me almost an entire month of self-reflection which had an effect on my life that words can’t even begin to describe! I realized some personal strengths and equal amounts of weaknesses. Just as important, I was able to see another culture that was similar to mine but so different on so many levels. However, being able come back home holding my head high knowing I accepted such a challenge and completed it successfully was worth everything I experience while on this trip to Israel!

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(Photo by author)

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Israel Summer Study Abroad: A Blog of Beginnings

September 8th, 2013

Israel Summer Study Abroad: A Blog of Beginnings

 Emily Holley

                  The summer program in Israel was an adventure full of firsts for me. Aside from the trips I was too young to remember, this was the first time I’ve ever been out of the country. The international terminal at my airport was a mystery until now, the flights to Paris and Istanbul were nothing but a distant wish. This trip to Israel was an amazing experience and everything a first-time traveler could have hoped for. We saw so many important historical and cultural sites and artifacts. As a student of anthropology and history and a Christian, all of the places we visited and all of the things we saw had an impact on me at a personal level as well.

The most memorable of all the many things we did for me was the tour of the holy sites in Jerusalem. As a religious person, those places were mind-boggling. To think that entire basis of my religion was centered on this rock, this altar, this place, and I get to see it and touch it. It made a lot of the theoretical and intangible aspects of my faith real and alive. That is something you only get to experience once in your life.

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                  Scientifically, the trip was more than educational, it was enlightening. We took tours of the conservation labs in famous facilities like the Tel Aviv Museum of Art and the Israeli Antiquities Authority. Observing and working with conservators in their element gave me just a taste of what it would actually be like to do this kind of work. We were set up in a field lab on a Kibbutz that revealed the real world conditions and obstacles that conservators are faced with. These are important things to learn and understand about the field and they are things I will take with me on my next steps toward my education and career.

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                  While this trip was brimming with huge learning experiences and deep personal revelations, a lot of the things that made this trip what it was, were simple and mundane. Tasting an authentic Israeli falafel, or getting a movie ticket and fortune cookie written in Hebrew, or even just seeing the sun set from over the Mediterranean were all just as important experiences. They are experiences I am grateful to have had the chance to feel and will stay with me always.

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Thoughts on a Study Abroad in the Holy Land

September 8th, 2013

Thoughts on a Study Abroad in the Holy Land

Samantha Sheffield

            Jerusalem is an experience unlike any other.  It is half major tourist attraction and half actual religious experience.  The faithful are everywhere.  But so are the tourists.  Religious symbols are sold on everything from key chains to carpets.  Want a Hand of Fatima keychain? Or how about a star of David embroidered on a Yamakah? Not Jewish who cares – you can take it as nifty souvenir.  The streets are narrow and lined with shop stalls and the noise decibel is set to a steady roar.  There are stairs everywhere and the stones are so polished from centuries of walking that are very slippery if you are wearing flat-soled shoes.  The beauty of the old city is dampened by the crush of people and that odor that clings to all cities – the combination of exhaust, sweat, trash and urine.

While we stayed in the Christian Quarter, the idea of the city being divided into quadrants: Muslim, Christian, Jewish, and Armenian is not as clear-cut as the name nor maps suggest.  They blend into one another a great deal and seeing Jewish people walking in the Muslim quarter or vice-versa is a very common sight.  The Muslim quarter however is much older and less well kept but that is because of the political situation and not a reflection of the population at all.  We never had a poor experience or a rude encounter.  Which is even more incredible when you take into account that we were there during Ramadan so they were forbidden from eating during the day.  I don’t know about other people but I tend to get grumpy when I haven’t eaten!

On our approach into Jerusalem I was the navigator – which was okay – if they actually used street names that were printed on the map.  Everything is abbreviated at best, and at worst it is the slang.  Our hostel had a terrace and gorgeous views of Jaffa Gate, the Church of the Holy Sepulcher.  We capped off our first night in Jerusalem by going to eat an Armenian restaurant – one of the highlights of the trip was eating all the new food.

Our first full day was spent at the Israeli Antiquities Authority.  They receive all the artifacts from all the digs around the country.  They are the national repository so they conserve, preserve, document and store: metals, pottery, organics, and anything else they come across.  Emily and I were assigned the negatives from the period of the British Mandate (pre-1948).  We had to remove them from their packaging and re-label and re-package.  It was pretty mundane but very important and we got to look at some amazing dig sites and artifacts.  One of the most amazing things I’ve ever been able to do in my life so far was to see and handle the original glass plate negatives of the Dead Sea Scrolls.        There are many things about Israel that are similar to the United States: the prevalence of English, beautiful beaches, big cities, lots of places to spend lots of money, but in Israel there is always a thread of unease.  The political situation is very different than what we as Americans are exposed to at home.  There is not outright danger of bodily harm, usually; it is more insidious it is psychological conditioning of an us versus them mentality.  Everything from art museums to where and how people live is to distinguish those who belong from those that do not.  Even in the museums when they are referencing pre-1948 when present-day Israel was called Palestine they do not call it Palestine they call it Eretz Israel.

I greatly enjoyed my trip to Israel it is a beautiful country with many wonderful people.  I encourage people to go there and see for youself.

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Conservation Advising FAQ’s

September 3rd, 2013

Conservation Advising FAQ’s

Susanne Grieve 

Students interested in cultural heritage conservation at ECU are typically enrolled in a masters program through the Department of History or Department of Anthropology. We often have students from other disciplines as well interested in doing research related to preservation.

To determine how conservation can fit into your curriculum, you are strongly encouraged to contact your program graduate studies director:

Department of History: Dr. Carl Swanson

Department of Anthropology: Dr. Christine Avenarius

They will be able to best advise you on how the conservation courses fit into your overall academic program and on thesis related questions!!!!

If you are interested in having a part of your thesis on conservation, you are encouraged to contact Susanne Grieve at GrieveS@ecu.edu to begin discussing ideas!

 1) What do professors look for when reviewing prospectuses?

Professors evaluate the thesis proposal as a whole until. In the beginning you should clearly demonstrate your research question. Where is the argument? What are you trying to hypothesize? Your thesis should somehow contribute to the body of research in your profession. Above all, make sure you have a clear research question identified! You also need to be able to demonstrate how your project fits into the bigger picture.

ECU History Website: “A thesis is an examination of a well-defined historical subject that relies chiefly on primary sources, published or unpublished, to form an argument.  It should possess some degree of original thought on the topic, or in its approach to that topic. The thesis should not be a compilation of detail or a simple narrative. Instead, it should pose an argument. It should be expository rather than descriptive.”

Refer to your Departmental Graduate Student Handbook for details on how to craft a prospectus. Here are some additional resources:

ECU Anthropology Graduate Student Guidelines (Please note Anthropology graduate students are expected to defend their thesis prospectus at the end of the first spring semester (May of your first academic year).

 

 2) What components should my thesis proposal have?

  • Title Page: List your title (which should indicate what your thesis is intending to cover), your name, date submitted, and committee.
  • Table of Contents
  • Research Proposal: 1-2 paragraphs maximum, this is where you highlight your thesis question and your argument
  • Introduction: What are you researching? Why is it important? How will it contribute to the field?
  • Historical Background
  • Research Proposal
  • Literature Review and Reference Literature: What resources are you going to use to do this research? What will be your primary sources?
  • Conclusion
  • Works Cited: List the references you have cited in your proposal.
  •  Appendix: Chapter Outlines, Timeline to Completion,

Be sure to use headings to organize your proposal and don’t forget to include images or tables to demonstrate your points.

 

3) What is the purpose of the thesis?

The thesis is meant to demonstrate that you have acquired the skills of the profession and that you can conduct an independent research project. It is also a good demonstration of your writing and research ability.

 

4) Is a thesis necessary?

The Department of Anthropology offers a non-thesis option for students. If you are remotely considering doing a PhD program, I highly suggest you complete a thesis. Even if you are not interested in education past a master’s degree, employers are looking for people who have good writing skills and your thesis is one way of demonstrating that ability. With that said, we are in a new era of employment and universities and employers may judge your professional work based on the amount of peer reviewed literature you have contributed to the field (ie: journal articles, publications, etc.). If you are planning to produce publishable work during your academic training then a thesis may not always be necessary. In conservation, having either publications or a thesis (or both!) will benefit you greatly if you plan on working at a museum or university.

 

5) Does my thesis have to include archaeology or history related topics?

If you are getting your degree in the Department of History or Department of Anthropology for public history, maritime studies, or archaeology, I highly suggest having some component of your thesis relate to your main field of study. There are many theoretical considerations in each of these fields that apply to those topics.

 

6) Like what?

Archaeology Theory

  • Site formation processes
  • Ethics of Recovery
  • In Situ Preservation

Public History Theory

  • Interpretation and Display
  • Value Systems

 

7) How long should my thesis be?

Refer to your Departmental Graduate Student Handbook, but generally the thesis should be between 80-120 pages.

 

8) Is a doctorate possible/necessary in conservation?

While a master’s degree is considered to be terminal degree in the field, there are a few universities that offer conservation specific doctoral programs. These often require you to have several years of experience for a research based degree or that you attend their masters program before entering the doctorate. A few examples of programs are the University of Melbourne and University College London. Check with the requirements of the programs to see if you would qualify.

9) Can I expect to leave the ECU program as a conservator?

The goal of our courses is not to produce conservators, but to expose students to the complexities of archaeological conservation through theory and practical experience. We will work on building up your portfolio during your time at ECU and meeting your interests and goals in conservation. There are several dedicated masters programs in conservation that will ensure you have employability once you graduate. These programs often require 400 hours of prior lab experience and Organic Chemistry training. For a list of universities that are dedicated conservation programs, please see the AIC website on Conservation Training Programs.

 

10) Do I have to focus on archaeological materials?

No, absolutely not! We work with a variety of institutions, museums, private citizens and organizations that have diverse collections of historical objects, family heirlooms, contemporary artworks decorative art, and folk art as well as archaeological materials. The laboratory was founded to work with maritime archaeological materials and while our strength is in treating these types of objects, we apply conservation methods to a variety of material types.

 

11) What courses can I take at ECU that relate to conservation?

There are four main courses offered in the Department of History that are cross listed with Anthropology:

  • HIST6840 Introduction to Archaeological and Museum Artifact Conservation
  • HIST6845 Advanced Archaeological and Museum Artifact Conservation
  • HIST6855 Principles of Archaeological and Museum Artifact Conservation
  • HIST6860 Archaeological Museum Conservation Methods Internship

We also offer material culture courses that are theory based:

  • HIST3993 Approaches to Historical Objects
  • HIST6825 American Maritime Material Culture

Please see the ECU online catalog for more information on the course offerings.

 

12) How many hours are required for the internship?

3 credit hours=140 hours on site

6 credit hours=280 hours on site

9 credit hours=420 hours on site

 

13) What official paperwork do I need to be aware of for completing my thesis?

After your prospectus is completed and approved by your committee, you will need to complete an approval form provided in the Department of History Graduate Student Manual. Also be sure to check the dates for when you need to have your thesis components submitted and defended at the ECU Thesis and Dissertation website.

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An Ode to Fieldwork

August 26th, 2013

An Ode to Fieldwork

Taryn Ricciardelli

             Although professional discourse often dissuades us from thinking that archaeology and conservation share any similarities, ECU’s recent conservation field school in Israel showed me that both of these specialties have the same, ultimate goal. We want artifacts to be expertly handled and preserved so that researchers in the present and the future can glean all possible knowledge from objects which others might see as trash, or land which others might see as a development opportunity. Archaeologists and conservators want the history of objects to mean something to the public. We want adequate storage for the multitudes of cultural objects connected to self-identity, and we want the story of our past to continue developing, so that we can feel connected to our ancestors (or learn from their mistakes). We want the opportunity to travel– to learn from others whose perspectives might offer new insights into our own individual and professional growth. But most of all we want artifacts to get the respect and attention they deserve, both in the field and in the lab.

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         Photograph 1. Dome of the Rock seen from the Jaffa Gate Hostel

            The conservation field school in Israel was what all successful field schools are: one part good planning and three parts good luck. No matter what you expect from a field school going in, you should always mostly expect the unexpected. Working in the field, in both archaeology and conservation, requires you to become comfortable with flexibility. A constantly changing environment, a limited amount of tools (or budget), and a variety of artifact materials make work especially exciting, while play is no less of a shocking experience. There are new smells at every turn, colors you never thought imaginable blur your vision, you start waking up to the cultural sounds of a very distinct people. In other words, your senses are completely overwhelmed from start to finish, and your history starts to mingle with others’ histories. It’s common knowledge that for a traveler, you can never go home again. The explanation behind this is that everywhere becomes home.

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 Photograph 2. The Mediterranean as seen from Ashqelon

            The biggest challenge for those first starting fieldwork is understanding that fieldwork is both mentally and physically strenuous. The climate is never perfect. Almost all landscapes have hills to climb. Artifacts are heavy. Shovels cause callouses, or in the case of a conservator, your neck and eyes hurt after scrutinizing one artifact for six hours. You are constantly thinking and researching and asking yourself, “What the hell is that?” And, yes, the first week makes you reconsider your career choice. But once you get over the shock of constantly being in motion or the nuisance of changing your schedule fifty times to accommodate new surprises, you start realizing that you love being exhausted at the end of the day. You love eating bugs for the first time and meeting people who are genuinely interested in what you do. I admit it, I personally like the chaos. Chaos breeds new experiences in a way that planned trips never can. Professionally, chaos creates the perfect venue to meet new, exciting people. In Israel, we had a chance to learn from wonderful archaeologists and conservators alike. And, although they might not agree that we met amidst chaos, there were certainly plenty of loose artifacts to invoke the idea that we were all heading in the right direction.
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 Photograph 3. Chelsea Freeland, Samantha Sheffield, and author holding up the arch of Ashqelon

            Israel was an ideal place for an archaeologist’s first fieldschool with a conservation focus. I saw more artifacts in one place than I have ever seen in my life. Israel’s history is so deeply rooted in archaeology that its cultural attributes are highly valued, and, therefore, most artifacts are either on display or being conserved by the Israel Antiquities Authority (henceforth referred to as the IAA).   The IAA sees every artifact from both private and public archaeological sites pass through their office. Every prehistoric pottery sherd, every Roman glass piece, every waterlogged coin is conserved by a specialist and put in storage. This is incredibly different from American archaeology, in which artifacts are not required to be conserved by a central party, and so are spread out among universities and researchers across the country. There are benefits and downsides to both systems, but in both countries artifacts play a central role in politically-charged conversation. In other words, archaeology and conservation are relevant fields, and they remind us that people do care about their history and what is becoming of their material heritage.

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Photograph 4. The Negev Desert

             If you choose to go into archaeology or conservation, remember that we all want the same things. We love artifacts and the reconstruction of the people behind those artifacts. We want to represent cultures fully and accurately, while still embodying their humanity. If you want to be in archaeology or conservation, my advice is to love fieldwork for what it is. You probably have an addiction to adventure, and, even though you will complain, even your worst days in the field will be productive and inspiring. How else can a professional know they have reached the pinnacle of their career unless they have had the experience of cleaning one artifact for four hours and then having a colleague (or professor) lean over them and say calmly, “Have you started cleaning that yet?”

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Photograph 5. Author sitting next to Petrie’s old archaeological tunnels in the Negev

 

Note: All photos are by the author and should not be reproduced without the author’s permission.

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Preservation in Israel-Summer Abroad

August 12th, 2013

Preservation in Israel-Summer Abroad

Chelsea Freeland        

Israel was #19 for me.  The more countries I visit, the easier it is to think I’ve seen everything at least once.  Israel has Roman and Hellenistic ruins, like Italy and Greece.  It has international wars in its recent past, like Serbia.  Like Morocco, all the signs are trilingual.  But I found Israel to be a stand-out trip: somewhere I couldn’t group with my other experiences.

Israel is a good country to visit to learn about history: Israel’s history, world history, and your own story.  I saw the world’s first piece of artwork.  I went to the Holocaust Museum.  I stood at the Western Wall with women from every country imaginable.  Overall, it was an immensely entertaining, educational, and memorable trip.

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Author at Western Wall, Jerusalem.

(Photo by Samantha Sheffield)

 Because the purpose of the study was conservation-oriented, I also learned about Israel’s cultural heritage in a way not usually presented to the public.  There’s something to be said for seeing Islamic glass in a museum, and actually meeting the conservator who attempts to piece the vessels back together.  I found that conservation in Israel is a somewhat developing field.  Most conservators we met at the Israeli Antiquities Authority are not academically trained as conservators, but rather as chemists or artists.  Those who do receive formal degrees do so in other countries, notably Italy.

I don’t envy the task of the Israeli Antiquities Authority conservators who work with everything from the recent past to some of the oldest human remains in the world.  The pottery assemblage alone is simply mind-blowing.  Because the IAA receives and records all artifacts found during excavations in Israel, they are responsible for the documentation, conservation, and storage of thousands of artifacts each year.  The amount of talent present in that office is amazing, particularly given the volume and variety of artifacts.

Our field experience in Ruhama gave me my first taste of an on-site lab set-up.  Strikingly different than my sterile chemistry labs, it gave me the first-hand knowledge that you do the best you can for the artifact with the materials given.  The experience convinced me that rescue conservation, with limited resources and a quick turn-around, is extremely important, even if frustrating.  Equally as important, I know now that I have a good understanding of the variety of conservation conditions and can be prepared for new experiences throughout my career.

As I write this, I’m sitting in my airplane seat, about to land in Chicago.  While also craving Israeli chocolate cake and some strawberry mango juice, I look forward to the next time that I can visit Israel.  Of all my travels, I think this will be the hardest to catalogue, hardest to document, and hardest to share when I get home.  How can I explain what it felt like looking at the Dome of the Rock from the Mount of Olives?

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Mount of Olives, Jerusalem.

(Photo by author)

How do I explain how badly an invasive-species jellyfish sting hurts?  How can I look at Caesarea and just say, “I went snorkeling and we saw some columns?”  My pictures do justice to nothing, but certainly not to the splendor that is the “Holy Land.”

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Caesarea Harbor.

(Photo by author)

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Public Conservation – Why Should We Care?

April 4th, 2013

Public Conservation – Why Should We Care?

Kelci Martinsen

 

The fourth and final blog in this series will focus on conservation and the public. In order to understand what public conservation is, we can look at the definition of a similar subject; public archaeology. K. Kris Hirst (2010) states that public archeology is the relationship between archaeologists and the public. Public archaeology allows for academic findings to be presented to the public in an informational and entertaining format. From this definition, we can conclude that public conservation is the transfusion of information from conservators to the public.

Public conservation allows for the public to understand why conservation is important and also allows for the public to develop a connection with the artefacts being displayed. In order to create a relationship between the public and the work of conservators, physical and electronic displays are made available to the community. The exhibits can include but are not limited to websites, television programs, museum displays and possibly laboratory tours. The displays are often informative. They tell the story behind an artefact and often explain the way in which the object was processed by conservators.

A major, beneficial result of public conservation is the public’s increased interest in conservation. By educating the public about conservation, the public is better able to understand what conservators do and consequently develop an interest in conservation. With conservation becoming more popular, funding can increase. An increase in funding can allow for greater quantity objects to be conserved and can also allow for artefacts to be treated with better quality methods. With conservation becoming a more well-known profession, the amount of certified conservators can increase. This increase of conservators is advantageous for artefacts because with more labour available, more objects can be treated.

The public’s increased interest in conservation can also be a disadvantage if public conservation is not done properly. A display should never completely explain the treatment process of an object to the general public. The protection of specific conservation techniques is important because if these methods were not protected, members of the community would ultimately attempt to conserve their own artefacts. This would be potentially hazardous to the amateur conservator as well as to the object itself.

Overall, public conservation is still in its development and can be extremely beneficial to the growth of conservation science but it is important to monitor the way by which information is provided to the public so as to ensure that the artefacts themselves as well as credibility of the profession are protected from irreparable damage.

Works Cited

Hirst, K. K. (2010). Public Archaeology is … Retrieved 03 04, 2013, from Society for American Archaeology: http://www.saa.org/publicftp/public/forArchaeologists/outreach_PAis.html 

 

General Conservation

Hired! The job market and outlook for Conservation jobs

March 27th, 2013

Hired! The job market and outlook for Conservation jobs

 Hannah Piner

Every student has to worry about getting a job upon graduation; this is no different for the conservation student. Finding a job can be difficult and frustrating, no matter the profession, but for a career that only employed 11,900 people in 20101, how should students maximize their chances of getting a job?

Most employers like seeing, both, a knowledge and education in an associated field and real world experience on their potential candidate’s resumes. In conservation this could include: internships at a conservation lab, previous job experience as a museum technician, volunteer work with collections, or experience in a museum or art gallery, as well as a bachelor’s or master’s degree in museum studies, anthropology, history, public history, art, chemistry, or library science. About thirty-three percent of the conservators with jobs have a bachelor’s degree and about thirty nine percent have a master’s degree, while only nine percent have a doctorate degree2. The lack of doctorate degrees in the field could show that most employers see no need for a PhD, when a master’s student can do the same job for less salary.

Median salary for a conservator was $37,120 in 2009, with a range between $23,000 and $68,0003. Most likely federal jobs have better benefits for their employees, while large or famous museums probably pay a higher salary; this is not the average museum though. The majority of accredited museums, in the United States, have a budget between one and 2.9 million dollars annually and are non-profit or privately owned and funded, and have between six and fifteen staff members4. With such small budgets and small staffs, the average museum cannot often afford to hire someone with a PhD, and are probably looking for an employee who can fill many job positions within their museum.

The conservation field is expected to grow 6.7 percent between 2010 and 2020, but, because this is such a small field, this is only 800 jobs in ten years5. Most conservators will have to volunteer or intern before they find jobs and these jobs will likely be in museums, and some will be in colleges and universities as well6.

Considering these statistics and projections, the conservation student should be prepared to move wherever there is a job, they should be prepared to start at a salary of 20 to 30,000 dollars, and should be looking for medium sized museums and libraries, as well as some colleges and universities. The more experience the applicant has, the higher their chances, and building professional relationships with museum personnel and conservators all over the country is a necessity. One way to do this is to join professional groups like the American Institute of Conservators (AIC) and the American Alliance of Museums (AAM), as well as any local or state run professional groups.

 

[1] “Conservators and Museum Technicians”. <http://www.iseek.org/careers/careerDetail?id=1&oc=100385&title=>. Copyright 2013 iSeek Solutions. Viewed 3/1/2013.

2 Ibid.

3 U.S. News: University Directory. “Museum Technicians and Conservators”. <http://www.usnewsuniversitydirectory.com/careers/museum-technicians-and-conservators_11873.aspx#.UTZWKY5WRUQ>. Copy write 2013 U.S.News University Connection. Viewed 3/1/2013.

4American Alliance of Museums. “Statistics”. <http://www.aam-us.org/resources/assessment-programs/accreditation/statistics>. Viewed 3/1/2013.

5 “Conservators and Museum Technicians”.

6 U.S. News: University Directory.

General Conservation

Connecting With the Public: The Importance of Conservation

March 27th, 2013

Connecting With the Public: The Importance of Conservation

Kate Clothier

The driving factor behind conservation, in my opinion, is the desire to create a connection with the past for current and future generations. Maintaining this link to the past is pivotal in keeping the information and knowledge of older societies from being neglected and ultimately forgotten. Once the past is forgotten it is near impossible to regain the lost knowledge, take for example the Library of Alexandria. The library had been filled with texts and writings that explained ancient knowledge and societal information. It was the most extensive library of its time and the amount of information it possessed was insurmountable. In a tragic accident, the library was burned down and the information within it was lost to the world.

Preserving the past is not enough. The information gathered must be made accessible to the public or else it is as good as being lost. Not only does the information need to be widely accessible but it has to be presented in a manner that is safe for the artifact while maintaining historical accuracy. It is in this step that conservation becomes a key component in the preservation, the knowledge and know-how of the conservator guiding the presentation to the public. The National Park Service (NPS) is one such example of a successful marriage between conservation projects and public outreach. This blog will explore how the NPS works together with conservators in order to create a successful public outreach program.

The unique aspect of the National Parks is that they are geared more towards public interaction. Museums are also geared towards the public but in a very different aspect. There, people go into rooms filled with pieces of history that have been gathered over years to represent different events and view them from afar. At the National Parks, people have the opportunity to go to the actual site and experience the history themselves, interacting with the environment and site. The National Park Service keeps these sites going because “History is a part of who we were, who we are, and who we will be” (National Parks Service 2013. “Discover History” National Park Service: U.S. Department of the Interior, Accessed: Web. 4 Mar. 2013) and the conservator is charged with keeping the site well preserved. By having the conservator working with the sites it allows NPS to watch the site and artifacts and monitor their health.

When the conservator is working with the National Park Service they have to take several different factors into account. Unlike museum conservation, which is also very viable and important, most of the NPS sites are outdoors. This means that the conservator has a new set of problems to face. They cannot control the relative humidity, the temperature, or light exposure. Instead, the conservator must alter their approach to preserve and conserve the site to fit the given environment. For example, preserving wood that is going to remain outdoors at a NPS site would probably not benefit from a sucrose treatment. This treatment would attract insects and have a higher possibility of becoming moldy because the conservator could not control the ecological factors. Therefore, the conservator must make the artifact and site able to withstand their environment without experiencing further deterioration. That being said, the conservator must also make the judgment call of whether an artifact should remain at the site. If it cannot be properly protected and runs the risk of complete deterioration then steps to properly protect it will have to be taken.

This is just one of many working examples where the presence of conservators benefits the public outreach concerning history. These sites offer a chance to preserve the historical significance of a site in addition to creating a place for the public to interact. Public interest and concern is key in assuring that the information will not be lost over time. By the conservator working with the National Park Service it opens up the accessibility to history that might otherwise not be available. The balance between keeping a site open for the public and safe from the wear and tear of the public can be a thin one. By knowing the environment of the site and a general history of it, as well as the type of public interaction, the conservator serves as the backbone of the site. With the use of good, well-rounded conservators, the National Park Service and the public should see the maintenance of sites for years to come, and the preservation of our shared historical connection.

 

National Parks Service 2013. “Discover History” National Park Service: U.S. Department of the Interior, Accessed: Web. 4 Mar. 2013

 

General Conservation

Learning from the Past at Tuzigoot National Monument

March 25th, 2013

Learning from the Past at Tuzigoot National Monument: Early Conservation Efforts Gone Awry

 Sara Kerfoot

            Conservation is exciting. A properly trained conservator has the chance to stop the deterioration of artifacts and structures. This talent allows both conservators and archaeologists to discover human stories. Not only are stories being rediscovered but also artifacts are put in a state of preservation. By preserving an artifact or site, future generations have an opportunity to share in the story and to use future technologies to uncover more of the past.

The art of conservation, however, has not been perfected. Each object that has been put under a conservator’s protection is part of a learning curve of discovery. This means that with time and practice, conservation efforts become more productive in their goal through the trial and error of past conservation projects. This is not to say that conservators are blindly experimenting with solvents and tape in order to restore something to its original prestige. In fact, it is saying quite the opposite. The whole mentality of conservation has undergone quite the change in maturity since its origins. The point is not that these people were bad conservators to begin with, in fact, it can be quite sure that these people had the best intentions for the artifacts. It is with time that conservation efforts can be seen as positive or negative, despite the scientific effort that went into the original conservation project (Godfrey 1990; Jakes 1992). Efforts now, are broadly to preserve. Restoration has become less popular because it is impossible to understand the intentions of the original crafter (Caple 2003; Sease 1996). True, some original efforts were “bad,” but with these original follies, it is possible to understand the limitations of various conservation projects.

A valuable example in the growth of conservation efforts can be seen at Tuzigoot National Monument, located in Cottonwood, Arizona. Louis R. Caywood and Edward H. Spicer excavated the pueblo in 1933-1934 (Caywood 1935). They were graduate students at the time of the excavation, and workers from the Federal Emergency Relief Agency’s Civil Works Administration assisted them (Arizona Ruins 2012).  This was a massive project, once the work was done and the reports turned in, Franklin D. Roosevelt allowed Tuzigoot Ruins to be a U.S. National Monument on July 25, 1939 (NPS 2013).

After excavation, the monument was left exposed. The pueblo is predominately made from limestone, the mortar that holds it together is from river sediments, ash and other natural binding materials. Without the Sinagua (peoples that lived at Tuzigoot) to do annual maintenance on the pueblo, it was understood that weathering would soon erode this structure away. So in order to counter-balance nature, workers covered the mortar with Portland cement in order to hold the monument together.

Portland cement was an incredibly popular preservationist tool used all throughout the American Southwest in the 1920s. This was because it was “cheap, easy to mix and apply, could be tinted to match any color and is incredibly strong” (Guebard 2013). Preservationists of the time were very concerned about the wall stability, so they did what they thought was best to conserve the integrity of the wall. The issue is that today, with the knowledge of what long-term effects negatively impact Tuzigoot’s walls, the Portland cement is being removed.

The archaeologists at the park have learned that Portland cement is negatively impacting Tuzigoot for a number of reasons. Some of them are: differential erosion, mineral formation and water retention (Guebard 2013).

Portland cement is considerably stronger than the original, non-synthetic mortar. This causes differential erosion. The cement is much harder than the sediment mortar, so when windblown sediments blow across the monument, it erodes the softer materials and leaves the Portland cement as is. Since some of the structure is being eroded away and other parts are staying intact, this leaves the structural integrity at risk. The softer parts of the pueblo can become voids within the larger context of the additives; this can cause a collapse. These are effects that preservationists can see today, so in order to fix the issue the Portland cement is slowly being chipped away. In place of that particular synthetic mortar, they now mix 10 percent Portland cement with 90 percent sand which creates an even erosion pattern (Guebard 2013).

 

worker patching

(NPS worker removing original Portland cement)

            Another issue with the harder Portland cement is that it does not “breathe” as well as natural materials. This is an issue because when it rains, water stays retained in the walls rather than drying quickly. Moisture inside the walls can deteriorate the interior structures; it is much better for the structure if after a rain storm the water evaporates quickly. When stones remain wet, they are more likely to succumb “to cracking and breakage caused by expansion/contraction, freezing/thawing and mineral depletion (continued wet/dry cycles may leach minerals from stone, causing them to become weak)” (Guebard 2013). Another issue is that Portland cement has soluble minerals in the mixture that can hurt the monument. They include: chlorides, carbonates, and nitrates. This has the potential to deteriorate the softer stones used in the structure. Once again, these are impacts that are only seen with time. Conservators’ efforts of the past are being dealt with currently in order to maintain structural integrity (Guebard 2013).

There are other issues that Portland cement brings, such as negatively reacting with UV light and changing it’s aesthetic make-up to non-natural colors such as purples and blacks, but this is not affecting the structural integrity of the wall so it will not be addressed here. Conservators have learned a lot through trial and error, Tuzigoot’s Portland cement issue is a prime example of that. In order to deal with the situation, Tuzigoot’s head archaeologist, Matt Guebard says, “When possible, we use only natural materials to avoid unintended interactions between synthetic materials and the environment” (Guebard 2013).

Conservation is a relatively new field, and it is still learning. There may be mistakes along the way, but publishing projects allows for a group learning curve to be achieved. With each project, professionals are getting closer to permanently maintaining features of past cultural heritage.  Conservators must thoroughly be aware of past conservation efforts in order to grow as a profession.

References: 

Arizona Ruins. 2012. Tuzigoot, Hatalacva & Bridgeport. <http://www.arizonaruins.com/tuzigoot/tuzigoot.html>. Accessed 3 March 2013.

Caple, C., 2003, Chapter 4.2: History of Conservation. In: Conservation Skills: Judgment, Method and Decision Making, pp. 50-58.

Caywood, Louis R, and Edward H. Spicer. 1935. TUZIGOOT-The Excavation and Repair of a Ruin on the Verde River near Clarkdale, Arizona. U.S. Department of the Interior. < http://www.nps.gov/history/history/online_books/berkeley/caywood-spicer/intro.htm>. Accessed 3 March 2013.

Godfrey, I., and N. Smith. 1990. Conservation of Degraded Rope from Maritime Archaeological Sites. In: AICCM Bulletin, Vol 16, No 3, pp. 93-108.

Guebard, Matt. February 2013. Chief of Resource Management, Park Archeologist at: Montezuma Castle National Monument and Tuzigoot National Monument. Email Correspondence.

Jakes, K. and J. Mitchell. 1992. The Recovery and Drying of Textiles from A Deep Ocean Historic Shipwreck. In: Journal of the American Institute for Conservation, Vol 31, No 3, pp. 343-353. Electronic Resource.

NPS. 2013. Tuzigoot National Monument. Department of the Interior. <http://www.nps.gov/tuzi/index.htm>. Accessed 3 March 2013.

Sease, C. 1996. A Short History of Archaeological Conservation. In: Roy, A. and Smith, P. (eds.) Archaeological Conservation and its Consequences, pp. 157-161).

General Conservation

Case Study: Spirit Cave Man

March 20th, 2013

Skeletons in the Closet:

A Blog about Ethical Handling and Storage of Human Remains in the Conservation Community

Case Study: Spirit Cave Man

Eva Falls

            Throughout the previous three blogs I have covered legalities, handling, and display issues surrounding human remains.  Now, let’s examine a case study where human remains ownership was contested in court. 

            Spirit Cave Man, the oldest North American mummy to date, was excavated in 1940 by SM and George Wheeler in Spirit Cave, Nevada.  When archaeologists decided to do extensive testing on the remains in the mid 1990’s, the Fallon Paiute-Shoshone Tribe claimed Spirit Cave Man as one of their ancestors and tried to reclaim the remains under NAGPRA.  This petition did halt invasive testing until the matter could be investigated.  Because the remains date to around 9419 BCE, Spirit Cave Man is extremely far removed temporally from the present day tribe.  The tribe’s stance was that they have been in this area since the beginning of time according to their oral histories.  Archaeological evidence does show a long continuous occupation at the site, but the Bureau of Land Management ruled in 2000 that there was insufficient evidence for tribal affiliation. The remains are currently owned by the government.  (Gregory 2007)

As of 2006, the courts have decided to send the case back to the Bureau of Land Management for further review (Friends of America’s Past 2009).  This particular mummy will remain tied up in legal battles for the foreseeable future.  Conservators must be vigilant to ensure the storage, handling, and records keeping for Spirit Cave Man are up to date as possible and are being handled in a professional and sensitive manner.  It is the conservator’s duty to ensure the remains are in the best possible condition whenever the courts and the Bureau of Land Management make their final decision.

Works Cited

Gregory, Cheryl A. 2007. “Spirit Cave Man: A Body of Contention.” Human Remains: Guide for Museums and Academic Institutions. Cassman, Vicki, Nancy Odegaard, and Joseph Powell ed. AltaMira Press. Lanham: 256-258.

 Friends of America’s Past. 2009. “Spirit Cave Man.” < http://www.friendsofpast.org/spirit-cave/> Accessed: 3/4/2013.

General Conservation

Conserving the Future

March 20th, 2013

Conserving the Future: Determining Significance in the Digital Age

Caitlin Zant

            The issue of conserving digital material is a subject that does not seem imperative to today’s discussions on the ethics of conservation, but in our digital world as more media and data is stored in digital formats, ethical and interpretative questions must begin to be discussed. Along with the basic methodological issues surrounding digital media and data stored in “the cloud”, conservators must begin to discuss possible interpretive issues that will present themselves in the future. All of these questions and issues boil down to one basic question: How do future conservators determine significance in digital media?

            Today, conservators have to discuss the issue of significance and determine the importance of an object of material culture before beginning the process of cleaning and restoring/preserving and artifact. This helps determine the order in which objects are conserved. Essentially, conservators have to determine which objects are “high priority” and why. Besides these initial details, other questions have to be asked in order to determine this: What academic values does an object have? What cultural value does it have? Who is funding your efforts, and what are their motives for conservation? These questions, along with many more, must be asked when beginning the process of conservation (Nason, 1987). How then, do these questions and issues transfer to the future of conservation in a digital age?

            While many of these beginning steps in the process of conservation will most likely still be relevant, many more questions will certainly arise. Our world today is so digitally geared, the sheet volume and digital information available to future conservators will likely be overwhelming. Today, everyone has access to an infinite amount of digital media. With Facebook, Tumblr, Flickr, Twitter, Instagram, blogs, wikis, and discussion boards on line, information is shared across the internet at an incredible rate. Anyone and everyone can post information online or store information on USB drives, in “the cloud”, and in any other type of digital media. When attempting to determine significance, how does the conservator gather an idea of what is important to conserve? Today, we do not consider what someone shares on Facebook important or significant information, but would this type of information be considered important pieces of cultural heritage to our future society? 

            This brings up the question: what is cultural heritage? Since we are moving into an increasingly digital world, not only will important government documents be saved for archivists, but it is possible that information produced by the masses will be available for conservators to preserve. This brings an exciting thought to the future of conservation. If a methodology for preserving this digital media is developed, it is potentially possible for future conservators to gain a better understanding of our cultural identity.

            Today we rely on objects and artifacts that have survived intact enough to provide information about societies of the past, but many times, these objects can skew our perceptions of the past. Conservators can only work with what they are able to conserve, and researchers use these objects to interpret certain sites or societies of the past. Because of the degradation of different materials, some objects are not preserved enough to even show a record of existing (Caple, 2003). Without these artifacts, certain areas of a society’s cultural heritage cannot be preserved; a true picture of the society as it actually existed cannot be determined. In the future, with the sheer amount of digital information being stored today, future conservators potentially have the opportunity to gain a more complete understanding of our cultural heritage than we have of many of the societies that have come before us. This also demonstrates the importance of determining significance of digital media. In order to make conservation of digital media manageable, a method of determining significance must be addressed.

            While similar to questions today’s conservators face, future conservators will have to face an entirely new realm of ethical issues, and questions revolving around determining the significance of digital information in order to begin conserving it. Though these issues do not seem very significant today, these are questions that will have to be answered in the near future. Although this article asks more questions than it answers, it brings to light questions and concerns that will need to be breached in the future. Maybe today we will not answer these questions; maybe we cannot yet. Regardless, as a community, conservators will have to discuss these questions soon. In one hundred years, what really will be left for our digital conservators to conserve? Will it give them an accurate picture of our world today?

Citations

Caple, C, (2003). Chapter 2: Reasons for Preserving the Past. In: Conservation Skills: Judgment, Method and Decision Making, pp. 12-23.

Nason, J., (1987). “The Determination of Significance”. In: Material Anthropology, pp. 47-51.

“Saving Our Data from Digital Decay” (2010). ScienceDaily. Nov. 23, 2010. Accessed Feb. 19, 2013. <http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101116072749.htm>.

 

General Conservation

Reverence and Objectification

March 20th, 2013

Reverence and Objectification

The Issue of Conserving and Incorporating Human Remains Within the 9/11 Museum

 Jeremy Borrelli 

            Within archaeology, conservation, and museum curation one of the most difficult decisions that must be made is what to do with human remains when uncovered. This has been an on-going ethical issue for the field that resulted in the passing of laws such as the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) of 1990. It is often the case within archaeology, however, that the remains are hundreds, if not thousands of years old and it is the ancestral ties between contemporary Native Americans and their predecessors that facilitates their claim to the remains. What about modern remains?

After completing four years of undergraduate study at a school merely forty minutes from New York City (NYC) I grew to love the big city. As a native of upstate New York, with relatives who live in NYC the events that happened on September 11, 2001 are especially poignant for me. As I continued to visit the city in recent years I watched as the World Trade Center (WTC) Memorial was slowly being built. One of the issues surrounding that memorial is what to do with the 9,041 bone fragments that have been recovered from the fallen towers. These fragments belong to the 1,123 unidentified victims from the tragedy. The bones and what little tissue remained were dehydrated for preservation by the medical examiner who is still sorting through the pieces trying to find matches, which has not been accomplished since 2009 (Hartocollis 2011). Now, officials from the Memorial are planning on placing those remains behind a wall with a sentimental quote for visitors to pay their respects at. This has gained some support, but has also sparked debate amongst many of the victim’s families who do not want their loved ones displayed as a tourist attraction.

The ethical issues surrounding the display of WTC victims have to do with notions of memorialization and objectification. Brooks and Rumsey (2008) argue that displaying bodies can serve as connection of the past with the present, the dead with the living, while also rendering them ambivalent: as both persons and things (261). This is reflected in the arguments presented on the side of the victims’ families who do not want the remains used as a lure for tourists. Because these were actual human remains and not just material culture, they add to the effect it has on visitors to those museums. The question is where to draw the line between material culture or cultural remains versus human remains.

As it becomes commonplace to investigate more recent events, and subsequently uncover more recently deceased remains, there is an increased chance that descendents, relatives, or other direct stakeholders in those remains will need to have a say in what happens to the remains. In the case of the WTC Memorial and museum, the actual event the people lost are still very much in the minds of those stakeholders. To use the bodies in a museum context is unwarranted in this case. Instead, the remains should be separate from the museum in a setting more akin to Arlington Cemetery, which is treated as hallowed grounds. These issues raised from the case of the WTC Memorial are incredibly complex and are relevant to all who deal with human remains on a regular basis.

Reference

Brooks, M., and C. Rumsey. 2007. The Body in the Museum. In Human Remains: Guide for Museums and Academic Institutions, ed. V. Cassman et al. AltaMira Press. Lanham: 261-289.

Hartocollis, A. For 9/11 Museum, Dispute Over Victims’ Remains. The New York Times, April 1, 2011. http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/03/nyregion/03remains.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1& (Accessed 02/16/2013).

For more information on NAGPRA visit: http://www.nps.gov/nagpra/

General Conservation

Ethical Conservation Concerns

March 20th, 2013

Ethical Conservation Concerns

Alyssa Reisner

            There are many ethical considerations within the discipline of conservation. One such consideration involves the publication of unprovenanced archaeological objects. Some archaeologists think that these objects should never be published or cited in print because it “indirectly supports illicit trafficking of antiquity” (Argyropoulos, Charalambous, Polikreti, & Simon 2011:214).  Others, however, believe that “conservators’ technical and/or scientific study of such material helps to fight against criminal activity by identifying fakes and forgers” (Argyropoulos et. al. 2011:214). 

            Today, the illicit antiquities trade is considered to be one of the largest illegal businesses worldwide (Argyropoulos et. al. 2011). Falsified documents made to demonstrate authenticity are not often questioned or are hard to expose, and this often results in illegitimately obtained items being displayed in privately or publicly funded museums (Argyropoulos et. al. 2011). Conservators use scientific studies of objects in order to obtain results that may authenticate them or “increase their monetary value through publication” (Argyropoulos et. al. 2011).

            These outcomes seem to warrant a set of standards or an ethical code to be drafted and ultimately ratified concerning ethics of the practice of conservation. In 2011, it was noted that “research and publication in conservation currently do not provide ethical reviews when studies involve such problematic material in order to ensure scientific integrity of the results” (Argyropoulos et. al. 2011).

With every controversial topic, there are pros and cons of each opinion involved, and it is important to consider the different viewpoints. Though it is important to discourage illicit antiquities trafficking, it is also important to identify authenticity from forgery. Possibly, ethical standards could be established to try to safeguard against antiquities trafficking. Although the questionable practice of publishing information concerning unprovenanced objects may continue, there could also be information published about the importance of prohibiting illicit trafficking of antiquities. Perhaps a system could be introduced in order to verify whether documents certifying authenticity are genuine. Bearing all of this in mind, it seems important to set ethical standards concerning research and scientific publication of information regarding cultural objects.

 References

Argyropoulos, Vasilike, Dimitris Charalambous, Kyriaki Polikreti, and Stefan Simon. “Ethical Issues in Research and Publication of Illicit Cultural Property.” Journal of Cultural Heritage. 12. no. 2 (2011): 214-219.

 

 

Ethics and Theory

Conservation Conversation: Friedrich Rathgen’s Contributions to Archaeological Conservation

March 6th, 2013

Conservation Conversation: Friedrich Rathgen’s Contributions to Archaeological Conservation

Taryn Ricciardelli

            Friedrich Rathgen of Berlin (1862-1942) is largely credited as the first archaeological conservator. He was the director of the Chemical Laboratory of the Royal Museums of Berlin, and was one of the first scientists to work in a museum laboratory. Rathgen’s primary contribution to archaeological conservation was his use of the scientific method and core scientific principles to propose treatments for artifacts. He meticulously documented the systematic methods he used on individual materials, including those for stone, bronze, and plaster: materials which were mostly unstudied (scientifically) at the time. Rathgen was also responsible for creating a better relationship between curators and conservators; until his involvement, there had been limited communication between the two professions, and there were often tensions over the artifacts themselves (Gilberg 1987).

Rathgen’s talents did not just extend to archaeological artifacts, but features as well. He was interested in preserving monuments and their stone blocks-he applied various solutions to the outside of buildings and, through the processes of repetition and analysis, he was able to come to conclusion about the source of the material. In a way, Rathgen was also one of the first to practice experimental archaeology, as much of his research was concentrated on constructing past lifeways in order to understand materials within their own contexts. Rathgen benefitted from the use of an exclusive lab and equipment, however, he often had trouble identifying his samples because of unexpected consequences arising from new treatments.

Up until the 70s, Rathgen was ignored outside of Germany as the father of conservation, but, due to his methodological documentation, the records of his successes and experiments have become some of the most important records we have of early conservation.

 

Gilberg, Mark. “Fredrich Rathgen: The Father of Modern Archaeological Conservation.” Journal of the American Institute for Conservation. 26(2): 105-120.

General Conservation

Ethical Conservation Concerns

March 6th, 2013

Ethical Conservation Concerns

Alyssa Reisner

            There are many ethical considerations within the discipline of conservation. One such consideration involves the publication of unprovenanced archaeological objects. Some archaeologists think that these objects should never be published or cited in print because it “indirectly supports illicit trafficking of antiquity” (Argyropoulos, Charalambous, Polikreti, & Simon 2011:214).  Others, however, believe that “conservators’ technical and/or scientific study of such material helps to fight against criminal activity by identifying fakes and forgers” (Argyropoulos et. al. 2011:214).

Today, the illicit antiquities trade is considered to be one of the largest illegal businesses worldwide (Argyropoulos et. al. 2011). Falsified documents made to demonstrate authenticity are not often questioned or are hard to expose, and this often results in illegitimately obtained items being displayed in privately or publicly funded museums (Argyropoulos et. al. 2011). Conservators use scientific studies of objects in order to obtain results that may authenticate them or “increase their monetary value through publication” (Argyropoulos et. al. 2011).

These outcomes seem to warrant a set of standards or an ethical code to be drafted and ultimately ratified concerning ethics of the practice of conservation. In 2011, it was noted that “research and publication in conservation currently do not provide ethical reviews when studies involve such problematic material in order to ensure scientific integrity of the results” (Argyropoulos et. al. 2011).

With every controversial topic, there are pros and cons of each opinion involved, and it is important to consider the different viewpoints. Though it is important to discourage illicit antiquities trafficking, it is also important to identify authenticity from forgery. Possibly, ethical standards could be established to try to safeguard against antiquities trafficking. Although the questionable practice of publishing information concerning unprovenanced objects may continue, there could also be information published about the importance of prohibiting illicit trafficking of antiquities. Perhaps a system could be introduced in order to verify whether documents certifying authenticity are genuine. Bearing all of this in mind, it seems important to set ethical standards concerning research and scientific publication of information regarding cultural objects.

References

Argyropoulos, Vasilike, Dimitris Charalambous, Kyriaki Polikreti, and Stefan Simon. “Ethical Issues in Research and Publication of Illicit Cultural Property.” Journal of Cultural Heritage. 12. no. 2 (2011): 214-219.

 

 

General Conservation

The Dilemma of Reversibility

March 4th, 2013

The Dilemma of Reversibility

Kelci Martinsen

 The third installment of this conservation blog will leave factors affecting the understanding of an artefact and instead focus on a dilemma that can affect the longevity of an artefact’s life.  The quandary being discussed is the reversibility of a treatment applied to an object. Reversibility is a major principle in a conservator’s work. It is widely accepted and predominantly viewed as a mandatory in the treatment of any object.  In “Overview of conservation in archaeology; basic archaeological conservation procedures,” the University of Texas A&M states that in order for a treatment to be reversible, the treatment must have the ability to be undone at a future time.

Using a treatment that is reversible is extremely important because it allows previously treated objects to continually be preserved. Reversibility assumes that no treatment is ever final so it is important for conservators to frequently reexamine treated artefacts and determine whether retreatment is necessary. Therefore, as technology progresses, so does the science of conservation. In the future, there will most likely be superior conservation methods developed, which will be less hazardous to the objects being treated. In order to use future techniques on all objects, both treated and untreated, the treatments that conservators use now must be reversible so that previous treatments will not react with new treatments. Therefore, the probability that a change in treatment will negatively affect the structure of the artefact is reduced.

The theoretical idea of reversibility does not create any issues but problems arise when reversibility is applied in a real world situation. Scholars have stated that it is impossible for any treatment to be completely reversible because a conservator cannot feasibly remove every molecule of the previous treatment that was applied. Consequently, there will always be a minute amount of treatment that is not reversible. The only solution to this problem is for a conservator to remove as much of the previous treatment from the artefact as possible, so that any interaction between the past treatment and the future treatment will be diminished.

Overall, reversibility is an important factor to consider in the preservation of artefacts because using reversible treatment methods allows for the science of conservation to progress and improve, which can help to lengthen the life of an artefact.  

Works Cited

Rogers, B. A. (2004). The Archaeologist’s Manual for Conservation: A Guide to Non-Toxic, Minimal Intervention Artifact Stabilization. New York: Springer.

 University of Texas A&M. (n.d.). Overview of conservation in archaeology; basic archaeological conservation procedures. Retrieved 02 19, 2013`, from Centre for Maritime Archaeology and Conservation: http://nautarch.tamu.edu/CRL/conservationmanual/File1.htm

General Conservation

March 4th, 2013

The Conservator’s Role in the Illicit Antiquities Trade

Lucas Simmonds

                When discussing the ethics of archaeological conservation, one topic that often finds its way to the forefront is the conservation of irresponsibly or illegally recovered artifacts. The complexities of this issue have been summed up well by Catherine Sease, a conservator who has been involved in court cases dealing with illegally recovered artifacts from Cyprus. Arguing vehemently against the damages that are caused by the illegal antiquities trade and those involved with it, intentionally or not, Sease contends that any reputable conservator must have nothing to do with objects of any questionable provenance, illegal or not (Sease, 1997). Rejecting any notion that the information gained from conserving an illegally recovered or unprovenanced artifact is still valuable, she writes that, “it is better to lose some data than to actively contribute to the wanton destruction of the archaeological record” (Sease, 1997: 56).

                While arguments such as that made by Sease are most certainly noble in their conception, they represent a fundamentally flawed view of the causes of the illegal antiquities trade and the ways in which it can and should be combatted. Of course, in a perfect world, when every conservator stopped treating illegally recovered artifacts, the trade would grind to a halt. Unfortunately, however, in reality, there are, and will always be, “black market” conservators who will pick up the slack. Much like the trade in ivory, drugs, and other illegal commodities,  the market is created and driven by the illegal status placed on those commodities, and the actions of those as high up on the supply chain as conservators, will have little effect on the market as a whole. A conservator boldly taking a stand by not treating illegally recovered artifacts is analogous to a doctor refusing to treat a patient who has overdosed on an illegal substance, while it may be noble in concept, taking a stand against the illegal market itself, it only hurts the object whose treatment has been refused. If real change is to be affected on the illegal antiquities market and the illegal recovery of antiquities, the demand for antiquities must be met by a legal and regulated market based on ethical archaeological principals.

                For all of the archaeological community’s talk about the value of artifacts and the need to excavate them properly, the fact remains that most artifacts, after documentation, are either returned to a storage location on site, or are put into long term storage, never to be seen again. At a time when both concerns of storage space and an illegal antiquities market are raging, the solution would appear to be quite simple. The regulated sale of artifacts from storage would serve both to alleviate storage concerns, as well as cutting into the market of illegally recovered antiquities. A system whereby registered artifacts are sold through licensed dealers, in combination with a system for tracking the ownership of artifacts after their sale, would profit museums and archaeological administrations, while still keeping track of the artifacts whereabouts so that further study could be conducted when needed. In an extreme example, GPS trackers could be inconspicuously attached to artifacts offered for sale so that they may be tracked at all times after the sale.

                While this paper does not claim to present a comprehensive plan for such a system, I would nevertheless resolve that it is only through a regulated and legal antiquities market that the problem of the illegal and irresponsible recovery and sale of artifacts can be finally solved. Much like the illegal alcohol market has all but disappeared since the lifting of prohibition, so could such a controlled system for the sale of antiquities phase out the illegal antiquities market. While conservators will still have to wrestle with such ethical dilemmas as outlined by Sease as long as an illegal antiquities market exists, they should also recognize that in refusing to treat illegally or irresponsibly recovered artifacts they may be taking the moral high ground, but they are not moving any closer to a solution to the problem of antiquities trafficking.

 Sease, Catherine. 1997. Conservation and the Antiquities Trade. Journal of the American Institute for Conservation 36 (1): 49-58.

General Conservation

The Benefits of Teaching Conservation

March 4th, 2013

The Benefits of Teaching Conservation

Kate Clothier

East Carolina University (ECU) is unique in that it offers introductory courses in conservation methods to students who may not pursue it as a profession. This raises a question by the conservation community of whether conservation methods should be taught to non-conservators, specifically archaeologists. The fear is that teaching archaeology students conservation techniques they will try to use them on artifacts rather than going to a more qualified conservator, potentially damaging the artifact.  It is my belief that this fear is unfounded and that teaching conservation to archaeologists will actually help communication.

The conservator is a very vital part of the archaeological excavation. It is the conservator’s job to protect the artifacts that the archaeologist removes or exposes during the excavation process. Depending on the artifact, preservation and conservation methods may take longer than expected. This in turn can cause some communication problems between the archaeologists and the conservator. The archaeologist wants to gather information from the object as soon as possible but some treatments require the object to be removed from the site for a long duration. This is one aspect of where having some knowledge of conservation methods can help. If the archaeologist is aware of some basic conservation methods for different materials they can better understand the time frame to be expected. This will help promote a better understanding between the conservator and the archaeologist and relieve some tension on site concerning the conservation process.

Perhaps the most important aspect of teaching this course it helps the researcher understand their limits. When an artifact is found, often times the first instinct is to mechanically clean it and scrape away dirt or other debris. Taking a course in conservation informs the researcher that the dirt and debris left on artifacts can actually be clues that should not necessarily be removed. Different elements interact with the environment in unique ways. If the artifact is given to a conservator before everything has been removed it will give the conservator a chance to analyze how the material is breaking down, leading to a better course of action for the artifacts protection.

Having working knowledge of conservation methods and techniques can lead to better communication between conservators and archaeologists. This translates into better artifact care. Both professions go out of their way to protect the history they are working with and can benefit each other by coming together. By offering courses in conservation to its students, ECU is allowing future conservators, historians and archaeologists a chance to learn a common language and lessen the gap between the studies. This will benefit research of the future and promote a more interdisciplinary approach.

Hamilton, Donny L. 1997.  “Basic Methods of Conserving Underwater Archaeological Material Culture”. Nautical Archaeology Program, Department of Anthropology, Texas A&M University, Accessed: Web. 18 Feb. 2013

General Conservation

Conserving “the Cloud”: Preserving Cultural Heritage of the Digital Age

March 1st, 2013

Conserving “the Cloud”: Preserving Cultural Heritage of the Digital Age

 Caitlin Zant

             Conservation of historical materials has been in existence in one form or another for centuries. The act of preserving cultural heritage has existed almost as long as humans have had an interest in their own past. The traditional idea of a conservator is someone who is interested in primarily historical objects found in archaeological sites; items that can help uncover lost information about the past. To us, as modern individuals, these objects are usually ancient books, manuscripts, ruins, bones, and other tangible pieces of cultural heritage. But the conservation of cultural heritage no longer is reserved for objects centuries old. As we enter an ever-increasing digital age, we come across the issue of the conservation of digital information. While it is not a major issue for today’s conservators, the conservation of digital media is an area within the field that will soon have to be breached, but the question remains: will conservators be ready to handle digital conservation?

            While it is not a pressing topic in the field of conservation today, a method of preservation for digital media will need to be discussed within the coming century. Though we are surrounded by digital information, there is little to no scholarly work being done in the field of conservation on this topic. Researchers in the field of Software and Information Technology have begun to discuss this potentially problematic issue, but it is a topic that seems so far out of the realm of traditional conservation, that it is something conservators have yet to consider (Schilke and Rauber, 2010). Audio and visual materials have now existed for over one hundred years and many are in need of conservation, and the field must develop new methods of conserving this type of cultural heritage. But as technology moves into an ever digital era, how do future conservators deal with this? As technology develops, old materials are soon obsolete. The 8 tracks of thirty years ago are no longer compatible with today’s iTunes and iPods, just as floppy disks cannot be read in most modern computers. How do conservators approach trying to preserve data stored on these obsolete objects?

            This concern becomes even more pressing as one thinks about the amount of digital data in use today. With more and more data being saved to “the cloud”, saved in pixels or being streamed instantly across the internet, there is less of a paper trail for conservators to physically treat in order to preserve cultural heritage. What happens in one hundred years when a future conservator discovers an old USB drive on an archaeological dig? How are they to handle this? While you can save multiple copies of data to different sources, computer hard drives and the computers themselves will one day become historical objects that serve as a defining piece of today’s cultural heritage. The question boils down to how long can this technology be maintained? Technology changes and advances at a rapid pace. Already cassette tapes, CD’s, floppy disks and VHS tapes are close to obsolete. In fifty to one hundred years, today’s digital technology could go the same way, but with data saved in “the cloud”, there will be no tangible material left to conserve.

            We have information from hundreds of years ago due to the preservation of ancient works, but these are tangible objects. What happens when there is no physical object? How do you conserve something that is not physically there? This is a question conservators must begin to address in the near future in order to begin preserving our future cultural heritage. Perhaps conservation will have to undergo a dramatic change, pairing with computer scientists and information technology specialists instead of archaeologists. Regardless of what the future of digital information brings, conservators must be ready to adapt to new ways of preserving and conserving cultural heritage for future generations.      

Citations

 “Saving Our Data from Digital Decay” (2010). ScienceDaily. Nov. 23, 2010. Accessed Feb. 19, 2013. <http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101116072749.htm>.

Schilke, S.W., and Rauber A., 2010. “Long-term Archiving of Digital Data on Microfilm”. International Journal of Electronic Governance, 3 (3): 237-253.

General Conservation

Schrödinger’s Cat: Important Cultural Artifacts or Boring Junk

March 1st, 2013

Schrödinger’s Cat: Important Cultural Artifacts or Boring Junk

Jeneva Wright

I once knew an architect who, when applying for a new project, delivered his proposal in a box entirely filled with mud. His premise was that the visceral act of extracting the building concept from wet earth was critical to his artistic vision for the design. While the image of a wealthy client rolling up his sleeves to mine for a project bid has comedic value, the architect’s statement and method of expression has always impressed me. To me, this was a literal hands-on experience of art—but to another, this experience could be little more than a ruined manicure. Things are important to people, but we experience and value them in different ways. In this case, the choice of using a tangible experience to convey an artistic expression carries many similarities to historical museum display. The importance and interpretation of an object, however, varies greatly to the individual.

A tangible and perceptible link to an otherwise long-forgotten past can arguably present more impact and educational opportunities than any other historical experience. Objects matter in human cultural consciousness, whether revered or ignored, beautiful or utilitarian—and many reveal information that can redefine, strengthen, or reject what we know of history. Yet, curators and resource managers face many difficult choices in selecting which pieces are most worthy of display and conservation. Budget constraints, public interest, and the collective cultural remains of millennia of human history present a wide array of options on what pieces (and thus, what and whose history) to display and preserve.

For example, East Carolina University houses over 650 artifacts in their African Art Collection. Donated over the last sixteen years, the collection includes artifacts originating from across the African continent, spanning an unknown number of years, tribal groups, and proveniences. Only a handful of these artifacts are on display at any given time, rotating through the university’s Ledonia S. Wright African-American Cultural Center and Wellington B. Gray Gallery. ECU’s online Museum Without Walls exhibit also displays these objects; however, many of the pieces have no information listed on their significance (East Carolina University, 1998). 

ECU’s African Art Collection has tremendous inherent value in that it is a window into cultures that had little or no primary written histories; these objects are the historical record for their creators. But we might also ask why these artifacts, so minimally exhibited for the use of ECU students with so little presented or known information, have been displayed, conserved, and stored, using space and budget that could be reserved for local history or art? Is it their exotic origins, or a nod to the multi-cultural heritage of ECU’s student body, or is it merely that they were donated? How often are they used by the ECU students for study or enjoyment, and how much awareness has been raised on their availability to the larger public community? Has their full potential been maximized? To whom do they matter, why are they important, and what can we seek to learn from them? What has not been displayed in their place? In short, one individual might instantly derive value from this collection—but another might be uninterested, frustrated at the lack of available object information, or prefer relics of local history.

Historical resource managers must therefore constantly evaluate the direction for their collections. The huge opportunity presented by a visitor-artifact experience balances the potential negative consequences of neglecting other pieces. Moreover, even though different individuals will derive value and benefit from disparate objects, conservators must still decide which pieces to prioritize, and cultural resource managers must choose which pieces to accession and display. Thus, to some, my friend’s architectural achievement was the culmination of intense artistic process—but for a future resource manager, it is just as easily a muddy old box.

 References:

East Carolina University. 1998. African Art Collection http://web.lib.ecu.edu/africanart/aahome.htm (accessed 02/18/2013).

General Conservation

Shake your Money Maker: Human Remains on Display

February 28th, 2013

Skeletons in the Closet:

A Blog about Ethical Handling and Storage of Human Remains in the Conservation Community

“Shake your Money Maker:  Human Remains on Display”

Eva Falls

            Museums face challenging concerns everyday such as: ‘How do we keep the doors open and the lights on?’  ‘How do we keep people coming here?’  ‘How can we compete with amusement parks and roller coasters?’  A time tested crowd pleaser (in the western world) since the Enlightenment has been the display of complete or partial human remains.  Everyone loves an Egyptian mummy, right?  Human remains can be political symbols, personal connections to the past, high price commodities, religious relics, research materials, and the list goes on.  Problems arise when cultural approaches to human remains differ.  There is no ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ answer to displaying human remains.  Museum curators, exhibit designers, and conservators have to be extremely careful and sensitive when deciding what should or should not be on display for the public.

The display of human remains in a museum setting, as we think of it, is closely tied to the scientific revolution and colonial exploration.  People were fascinated by people and things that were different than the ‘known’ plants, animals, and people.  Museum displays were for the strange, the macabre, and the exotic.  In the scientific community, doctors were discovering the way the body and diseases worked and demanded bodies for their research.  Bodies became commodities used for profit.  This way of thinking led to larger establishments curating large collections of human remains from around the world.  Over the years more marginable groups’ wishes have been acknowledged (ex. NAGPRA), but there is still an obvious power dynamic.  Who actually owns the body?  Should the wishes of the individual take precedent or the wishes of the family, the group, or the public?  These are all challenges faced by conservators. (Cassman, Odegaard, and Powell 2007)

Most bodies in museums are presented as objects for study.  The western way of thinking linearly and secularly helps distance people from the remains they are viewing, temporally and geographically.  People are separated physically and sensually from the remains by glass cases.  At the same time, thinking of bodies as objects can be seen as separating the viewer from acknowledging our own mortality.  One way some institutions help the public connect to remains as individuals is by naming them. Some places also do reconstructions (though highly interpretive) of skeletal remains, so it is easier for the public to acknowledge the humanity of the remains.  (Cassman, Odegaard, and Powell 2007)

Today, museums and conservators have become more culturally sensitive to the wishes of more marginal groups and the various interests surrounding bodies in their collections.  It is an effective way to encourage interest in exhibits and connect the public to their own past.  Conservators in particular should assist museums that choose to have human remains on display presenting them in safe, lasting, yet emotionally accessible ways.

 Works Cited

Cassman, Vicki, Nancy Odegaard, and Joseph Powell ed. 2007. Human Remains: Guide for Museums and Academic Institutions. AltaMira Press. Lanham: 261-283.

General Conservation

Tricky Situations: The Role of a Conservator during Ownership Battles

February 26th, 2013

Tricky Situations: The Role of a Conservator during Ownership Battles

 Sara Kerfoot

            Since the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) passed in 1990, the dynamic between Native Americans and archaeologists has changed drastically. “NAGPRA provides a process for museums and Federal agencies to return certain Native American cultural items — human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, or objects of cultural patrimony — to lineal descendants, and culturally affiliated Indian tribes and Native Hawaiian organizations” (NPS 2012).  The majority of the public agrees in appropriate treatment of the dead; this thought extends to Native American ancestors (McManamon 1994). Therefore, scrutiny after excavation, without permission, has fallen out of favor. It is Federal law that all Federal agencies and private museums that have been funded by Federal dollars must comply with NAGPRA. The pressing issue is not archaeologists refusing to comply with the law, but the action those conservators and archaeologists must take when multiple Nations are declaring ownership of excavated human remains and funerary goods. The conservators have to make a choice on what actions they should or should not take while waiting for legal battles to be solved.

            NAGPRA ensures that a greater amount of respect is shown towards Native American groups. This Federal law has required that greater amounts of communication transpire between American Indians, all Federal Museums, and government archaeologists. Museums must create inventories for all cultural items that are subject to NAGPRA; after the inventory has been made, they must be sent to all potential lineal decedents and Indian tribes (McManamon 1994).

            There are complications. Human remains and grave goods that have been found today do not necessary have a direct connection to today’s contemporary tribes. This is an issue because ancient nations do not all exist; many tribes have changed and integrated into other nations. At one point, there may have been one prehistoric American Indian group, but with time, people moved and dispersed across the country. This is an issue because when Federal agencies release inventory lists, multiple groups may lay claim to a single artifact. An example of this can be seen in Arizona, specifically at Montezuma Castle, Tuzigoot, and Montezuma Well. There are various grave goods and human remains that are originally from the Sinagua people. However, there are no Sinagua people today; it is best inferred that they integrated with Hopi and Yavapai peoples (NPS 2013). This leads to battles in who is allowed rights to the funerary remains.

            Today’s archaeologists must adhere to strict rules when dealing with all potential burials, however, archaeologists of the past had very few guidelines and many of them brought up anything that caught their interest. Burials are not as likely to be excavated today from professional archaeologists; however, today there are many cultural items in museum collections that are in the process of being returned.

            Conservators and curators have a duty to hold on to artifacts and human remains until the legal issues have been sorted. There are a variety of materials that can be associated with burials, ranging from linens, ceramics, food remains, and bones. Since each Nation wants a different outcome for the cultural items, it can be hard for conservators to know what to do This could be a tricky situation depending on the mentality of the Nation; some may be interested in preserving an artifact, while others may be more interested in reburying it. This could become complicated for the conservator, who of course, is interested in the life history of the artifact and has a time window when an artifact may be preserved or begin to deteriorate. A conservator may not know if they are solely supposed to stabilize an artifact from further deterioration or if they should begin to mechanically clean an artifact and slowly reveal some of the artifact’s basic characteristics. Some nations feel violated when their past is uncovered by people not of their heritage, whereas others enjoying seeing a physical connection to their own ancestry regardless of who discovered it. It can also be difficult if a collection has been broken up in multiple museums (Iverson 2008). Ceramics found in the desert are fairly easy to conserve but organics, such as cotton and yucca woven cloth needs to be preserved in a stable environment. An issue is that many Nations do not want these specific cultural items to be preserved; yet they do not want them to deteriorate until they have had the items returned to them for reburial.

            The best action for conservators to take that are faced with the shifting ownership of cultural items is to have open communication. There needs to be an agreement between Federal agencies and various American Indians tribes so that no group becomes alienated with the conservation practices while the court discussions proceed.

            Conservators are obviously interested in preserving the past in order to uncover the story of humans, however just because they have the ability to discover the facts does not mean they should uncover the past. This is easier said than done, at least from a curious person’s perspective, and admittedly, conservators and archaeologists are curious people. To not analyze artifacts that hold answers to the past that have been left in front of them can be very difficult. The best way to deal with this situation is to work with tribes in order to find a happy medium for all groups. American Indians understand that burials and grave goods have information about the past that the public is interested in their story. It is possible to have a compromise, such as the conservator continuing treatment of the artifacts, so long the artifacts remain in a stable condition and all actions done to the artifact are non-invasive and reversible. There can be workable scenarios, such as photographing all artifacts and human remains for further study. These photos would have the caveat of not being seen by the public and solely used for research purposes. 

            In order to have good working relationships between Federal agencies and American Indians, many cultural collections may be repatriated. To date, 38,671 individuals, 998,731 associated funerary objects, 144,163 unassociated funerary objects, 4,303 sacred objects, 948 objects of cultural patrimony and 822 objects that are both sacred and patrimonial have been repatriated since the passage of NAGPRA (NPS 2012). This has been hard for archaeologists and conservators but it has created better relationships with American Indian groups because it shows that researchers are doing their best to respect Native American practices. Better relationships have the potential to allow for more research to occur in the future.

            Conservators are knowledgeable on the deterioration of various organics and inorganics. This knowledge allows them the insight in how they should proceed in attempting to preserve artifacts. Conservators today have to be concerned with more than artifact conservation; they must be updated on current events and artifact ethics before they proceed with any work done to an artifact. Today, the popular trend in conservation is preservation, not restoration. This allows the artifact to keep more of its original integrity. This mentality has the potential to forge better relations with American Indian groups since their cultural collections are not being manipulated in a way that was unintended.

            While various groups battle over human remains and grave goods in court, conservators must forge open communication so people can benefit from the past’s insights. They must do their best to not alter the artifacts original substance while trying to conserve it and if they lose their cultural collection in court, they must be willing to accept that as a respectable decision. 

References:

Iverson, Anne, 2008. Tuzigoot National Monument: NAGPRA Report. In: Western Archaeological and Conservation Center. < http://www.cpcesu.nau.edu/current/documents/TUZINAGPRAreport.pdf>. Accessed 17 February 2013.

McManamon, Francis P., 1994. Changing Relationships Between Native Americans and Archaeologists. In: Forum Journal March/April Vol. 8. No. 2. National Trust for Historic Preservation. <http://www.preservationnation.org/forum/library/public-articles/changing-relationships-between-native-americans.html>. Accessed 17 February 2013.

National Park Service, 2012. Frequently Asked Questions. In: National NAGPRA. U.S. Department of the Interior. <http://www.nps.gov/nagpra/FAQ/INDEX.HTM>. Accessed 17 February 2013.

National Park Service, 2013. Montezuma Castle National Monument Arizona. In: Discover Our Shared Heritage Travel Itinerary. National Park Service and U.S. Department of the Interior. < http://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/cultural_diversity/Montezuma_Castle_National_Monument.html>. Accessed 17 February 2013.

 

General Conservation

The Role of Context in Conservation

February 21st, 2013

The Role of Context in Conservation

 Emily Holley

            Context in archaeology is defined as the physical position and the surrounding set of objects and physical attributes that affect the interpretation and meaning of the object in question (SAA, 1996) . An artifact’s context is usually determined in reference to three primary attributes. It consists of its immediate matrix, which is the material surrounding the artifact, its provenience, the horizontal or vertical position, and its association with other artifacts and materials in the same matrix. Context is extremely important to the archaeological process for determining the significance of every object recovered. But what does context mean to conservators?

            Context, to the conservator, has the same value that it does to the archaeologist. Keeping an object in its original environment as much as possible, helps to retain its meaning and value. Once the significance is established, the conservator can judge how best to proceed with treatment of the material. For example, the discovery of a Native American projectile point is fairly common, but the context of the object can help to interpret more about the artifact. If the projectile point was found embedded in the rib bone of a bison, one can infer more about the scenario that brought the point there. Context can help a conservator to tell more of the object’s story and determine where to go from there.

            The American Institute for Conservation (AIC) has a code of ethics and guidelines for professional conservators. More than a few points in the code of ethics are in regard to respecting the integrity and cultural significance of an object. Context is a major aspect of determining its integrity. Without knowing the context of an artifact, an archaeologist or a conservator cannot know the truth of the object. The guidelines state, “All actions of the conservation professional must be governed by an informed respect for the cultural property, its unique character and significance, and the people or person who created it.” (AIC, 1994). It is through the context of the object that this respect is even possible.

AIC. 1994. Code of Ethics and Guidelines for Practice. http://www.conservation-us.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=page.viewPage&pageID=858&nodeID=1 (Accessed January 26, 2013).

SAA. 1996. What is Archaeology? http://www.saa.org/ForthePublic/Resources/EducationalResources/ForEducators/ArchaeologyforEducators/WhatisArchaeology/tabid/1346/Default.aspx (Accessed February 12, 2013).

 

General Conservation

Past as Propaganda, Part Two: Archaeological Cleansing in Athens

February 19th, 2013

Past as Propaganda, Part Two: Archaeological Cleansing in Athens

Chelsea  Freeland

 Athens is a model city for the study of Classical antiquity.  Its whitewashed marble overwhelms the casual visitor in the bright Mediterranean sunlight.  Athenian tourism caters to those craving the beauty and classical design from the height of Greco-Roman culture.  Athens, however, exists in a bubble that tends to exclude its other 2,000 years of history.  Where are the Byzantine and Ottoman structures?  What about Greece’s history as a German-occupied state in World War II?  This history takes a back seat to the power and prestige afforded to Athens by the dominance of the Classical Age.

The Acropolis, the main focal point of Athenian tourism, changed dramatically in the years following Greek independence.  Nationalist archaeologists removed its Ottoman character and scrubbed it down its 5th century BCE roots (Athanassopoulou 2002: 273-274).  Athanassopoulou states that “archaeology plays an important role in establishing national identities and creating collective memories or imagined communities” (2002: 276).  This assessment goes a long way in explaining why the “archaeological cleansing of the Acropolis” occurred during the years immediately following the war of Greek independence in the 1830s; Greece was creating a national identity by building on its Periclean heritage.

The decision to emphasize Classical roots over Ottoman heritage no doubt springs from the wave of Philhellenism that became prevalent in 19th century Europe.  Greece was not only building a foundation for itself, but for all of Western Civilization (Athanassopoulou 2002: 291).  Is it right to ignore these other foundations of Greek history?  To clear the Parthenon of its Ottoman Mosque?  To pretend that it never happened?  The answer is no.

The Acropolis hill contains two Roman monuments; the rest of the buildings and statues date from the height of Athenian power in the 5th and 4th centuries BCE.  That Roman history is important as well.  There was a mosque inside the Parthenon under the Ottomans (Athanassopoulou 2002: 278).  There are Byzantine churches scattered throughout Athens, but you won’t find any in the city center.  The Venetians used the Acropolis as a fortress when they took control of Athens in 1684.  These pieces of history should have been preserved as well, but they are noticeably absent from the cultural landscape of Athens.

Athens has a rich cultural history: the original melting pot of people and ideas.  It is a shame that a visitor to the city will most likely not be exposed to the wide range of uses that the Parthenon had, or even be able to see Byzantine and Ottoman artifacts or monuments.  It is a testament to Greek pride in its Classical roots that this history has been given top billing to the exclusion of others.  This is not to say there aren’t museums in the city that can shed some light on this, or that you won’t find any trace of the Ottoman legacy in this European capital.  It does mean that you won’t see any on the Acropolis, and this “alternative history” will always be shown as less important in the overall scheme of the Greek story: a spot that it has been relegated to, but does not deserve.

 Athanassopoulou, Effie K. 2002. An “Ancient” Landscape: European Ideals, Archaeology, and Nation Building in Early Modern Greece. In: Journal of Modern Greek Studies, Vol 20, pp. 273-305.

General Conservation

Artefacts from Mars and others from Venus: The Affect of Gender Roles in Conservation

February 19th, 2013

Artefacts from Mars and others from Venus: The Affect of Gender Roles in Conservation

 Kelci Martinsen

 This week’s conservation blog will continue to analyze factors that may affect the understanding of an artefact by exploring the significance of gender roles in a society. Gender roles are incredibly important to the organization of a civilization or culture because they help to define the customs that are upheld by a society. The customs of a culture influence the function and production of that culture’s artefacts. Therefore, through proper investigation, objects are able to reflect the gender roles of a society.          

The job of a conservator can be extremely difficult at times because a conservator is required to be objective in the treatment of each and every artefact. This means the conservator cannot let his or her own cultural customs influence the way the artefact is documented and understood. There are many diverse cultures that have very different gender roles from those belonging to Western culture. Gender roles include not just female or male but also androgyne, a presence of both genders, as well as agender, neither male nor female.  If a conservator does not take the gender roles belonging to the society that produced the artefact into account, the conservator may misinterpret the function of the object and this, in turn, could negatively affect the treatment used on the object.

The gender roles of the object’s owner can also affect the treatment of the artefact. Many cultures determine the significance of the object based on the standing of the object’s owner and therefore, it is extremely important that an artefact is treated in a way that respects the customs of the object’s culture. For example, if an artefact originally belonged to a woman and was primarily used by women, some cultures would prefer a woman conservator to work on the object even if her techniques may not be as proficient as her male colleague.  This could severely affect the treatment of the artefact but the customs of the society should be respected. In order to remedy the solution, a different, more skillful female conservator could perform the conservation of the object.

Overall, gender roles can have a significant affect on the conservation of an object and conservators should not let it interfere with the wellbeing of the artefact. However, A conservator does need to recognize and respect the gender roles of the artefact’s society in order for that object to be fully understood and, consequently, displayed properly to the public.

Work Cited

The British Museum. (n.d.). Gender Identity. Retrieved 02 04, 2013, from British Museum: http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/themes/same-sex_desire_and_gender/gender_identity.aspx

General Conservation

Handle with Care

February 18th, 2013

 

Skeletons in the Closet

A Blog about Ethical Handling and Storage of Human Remains in the Conservation Community

“Handle with Care”

Eva Falls

            A conservator works with a variety of materials from metals, to paintings, to books, to ceramics, to textiles, but skeletal remains are in a category of their own.  They can hold a variety of meanings to the various groups interacting with them.  To scientists, they are a window into the past.  They tell a story about how people moved across the landscape, interacted with the environment around them, and help trace diseases.  For descendent communities, they tell the story of their ancestors and can carry the spirit of the deceased.  The conservator is put in a very delicate position.  Often there are several groups that may have extremely different stances on proper handling and care of human remains.  Finding that middle ground and compromising with interested parties is one of the most challenging issues facing conservators. (Weiss 2008)

Some important rules for conservators when handling skeletal remains:

-Avoid invasive or destructive techniques.  Invasive techniques can include pesticides, adhesives, consolidation, cleaning, screws, and wires.  It is easy for conservators to think they are being helpful, but some of these can be extremely destructive.  REVERSIBILITY should always be the goal.

-Documentation is crucial.  Everything that is done to the remains should be properly documented.

-Finally, always handle the remains with the utmost care, as gently as possible.  Conservators should be in a mental state, acknowledging they are handling the remains of conscious individuals.  (Cassman, Odegaard, and Powell 2007).

Everyone can agree human remains are different than other artifacts and should be treated with respect.  How that translates to the actual physical handling is a whole other matter.  Conservators should be culturally conscience at all times.  At the same time, conservators have to take into consideration their own knowledge of what is best for the long term treatment of remains, and the legal ramifications of their actions- a delicate dance on the ethical tightrope.

References

Cassman, Vicki, Nancy Odegaard, and Joseph Powell ed. 2007. Human Remains: Guide for Museums and Academic Institutions. AltaMira Press. Lanham: 77-81.

Weiss, Elizabeth. 2008. Reburying the Past:  The Effects of Repatriation and Reburial on Scientific Inquiry. Nova Science Publishers, Inc. New York: 49-83.

General Conservation

Preservation, Restoration, and the “Authentic” Meaning of Archaeological Material

February 18th, 2013

Preservation, Restoration, and the “Authentic” Meaning of Archaeological Material

 Jeremy Borrelli

A fundamental issue at the heart of heritage management is the debate between restoration, preservation, and the authenticity of objects from the past. This topic is broad and can be applied to a range of materials, so for the purpose of this discussion I will focus specifically on archaeological artifacts recovered during excavation. What happens to artifacts after they are brought up from the ground or from the sea floor, including where and how those artifacts are to be conserved and ultimately displayed for public use is an important facet of any research design. Once excavations have been completed, the archaeologist must work with conservators and curators to decide what to do with the recovered material. One problem these professionals must answer is whether or not to preserve the artifacts as they are or to restore them to what they might have originally been? This brings in questions of authenticity and what it means to be “authentic” when it comes to archaeological material?

            To begin it is necessary to define preservation and restoration when it comes to cultural heritage. The office of the Secretary of the Interior defines the preservation of historic architecture as “the act or process of applying measures to sustain the existing form, integrity, and material of a building or structure…” (Murtagh 1997, 19). When applied to archaeological artifacts this definition essentially remains the same: to sustain the existing form of the object, as it was when recovered. However, it is often the case that historic sites or building are “restored” rather than preserved. This term indicates the recovery of the form and details of a site or artifact as it appeared at a particular period of time by either adding or removing earlier or later work done to the artifact throughout the course of its life (1997, 20). This would include such acts as the replacement of broken features on a recovered statue or ceramic. What links restoration and preservation is the desire for authenticity; for something to be real, or true. The “authentic” has been the focus of much debate for over 50 years among heritage managers around the world (Starn 2002). What exactly is authentic will vary person-to-person depending on the context of recovery, their personal background, and what the artifact might be.

As an archaeologist, however, it is important to recognize “the value of historical truth” (Muñoz Viñas 2005, 190). Whatever state the artifact is in at the moment it was recovered, whether it is damaged, broken, etc. is all a consequence of the life history of that artifact. Archaeologists are not generally concerned with the restoration of an artifact to anything approaching its original appearance because they can tell more about an object if it is worn, well used, and broken, than if it is in pristine condition (Rodgers 2004, 7). The historical evolution or process of events that culminated in the artifact appearing in a given way is illustrative of how that artifact was used, who used it, why they used it, and what values they placed on it. Restoration hides the true nature of an object, in fact, masking its authenticity and real historical value. Conservators often employ minimum intervention, where the conservation process “consists of the least amount of intervention required to achieve its goals” (Muñoz Viñas 2005, 189). This idea implies that conservators should essentially strive to freeze the artifact in its current state, therefore allowing the natural evolution of the artifact to come to the fore, rather than restoring it by utilizing modern interpretations of how the object might have been used. Ultimately what is important is the story of the artifact and the people that used it. By emphasizing preservation over restoration for archaeological material, archaeologists allow that story to come to life.

 

Muñoz Viñas, S. Contemporary Theory of Conservation. Burlington, MA: Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann.

Murtagh, W. 1997. The Language of Preservation. In Keeping Time: The History and Theory of Preservation in America. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons. 15-24.

Rodgers, B. 2004. Archaeologist’s Manual for Conservation : A Guide to Non-toxic, Minimal Intervention Artifact Stabilization. New York, NY: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Starn, R. Authenticity and Historic Preservation: Towards an Authentic History. History of the Human Sciences 15(1): 1-16.

General Conservation

Can’t Buy Me Love

February 18th, 2013

Can’t Buy Me Love: Tourism Dollars, Cultural Property Management, and Activism

Jeneva Wright

On my first trip to Paris, I decided to visit the catacombs. As a claustrophobe with a vivid imagination, the winding underground tunnels were challenging, but manageable. The careful stacks of remains displayed more macabre market appeal than educational interpretation, but they caused me no distress—until I watched a group of American tourists grab several human skulls. After playing around with the bones, one man nonchalantly dropped them to the ground. I do not know what appalled me more: the desecration of human remains or ancient history, but I ran for the exit, revolted.

Cultural heritage needs people. National parks, landmarks, and museums all compete for audiences, frantically trying to get people in their doors, vying against the magnetic pull that alternate entertainment sources assert on our society. Even when an individual opts to prioritize intellectual engagement over the mindless buzz of sitcom shows, museums still must compete for that person’s attention—after all, they can visit the Louvre online, watch a documentary from their computer, or download a book to read on their tablet. Even if they get off their couch, the museumgoer still has their pick of which venue to choose and which collection to support. In many ways, our museums, deposits of cultural heritage artifacts, are just like every other for-profit business: reliant on money, marketing, and superb collections to keep their doors open.

            It remains also that the use of capitalistic formulas (more traffic=more money=successful museum) can also have disastrous consequences. The prioritization of public approval can influence which pieces are accessioned, lead to dramatized exhibits derailing academic integrity, and can endanger the artifacts themselves. As Caple succinctly states, “Those who care for historic buildings and artefacts have a love-hate relationship with visitors” (2003:22). The finances associated with visitor management are an inescapable reality for cultural heritage managers. There is yet another element, however, the primary reason for cultural heritage’s significance: its ability to teach people about their past. 

            If those tourists had been educated about the significance of the human beings who lined the Paris catacomb walls, would they have shown respect or interest, and thus acted like more civilized human beings? If education has the potential to improve the human condition, then we must consider conservation to be a form of activism. This concept conceivably strengthens the case for public education and outreach beyond its financial benefits, even when weighed against the evident threats that such interactions pose to artifacts. Perhaps that is why UNESCO, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, denotes cultural heritage as a fundamental human right (UNESCO). We as conservators have an obligation to try, to the best of our abilities, to convey that heritage and preserve an object’s integrity, so that we might continue to educate the public—and just maybe, better our species in the process.

 References

Caple, C., 2003, Conservation Skills: Judgment, Method and Decision Making, pp. 22.

Logan, W., 2012, “Cultural Diversity, Cultural Heritage and Human Rights: Towards heritage management as human rights-based cultural practice.” International Journal of Heritage Studies. 18. no. 3, pp. 231-44.

 

 

General Conservation

Conservation Conversation

February 18th, 2013

Conservation Conversation: Heritage Sites and Identity, A Review of Theoretical Approaches

 

Taryn Ricciardelli

             I recently read an intriguing article from 1994, written by Rghei and Nelson, entitled “The Conservation and use of the walled city of Triopli”. In this article, Rghei and Nelson argue that a change in a conservator’s theoretical perspective can help save heritage sites which are slowly decaying because of cultural change (in this example, Tripoli), and can also give structures a productive use-life in order to boost cultural connection to the site.

            In the past, the Madina ofTripoli was the center of cultural events and had an incredible amount of historical and social significance. However, as Rghei and Nelson explain, businesses have recently shifted away from using heritage sites as event centers, and many structures have become part of low-income housing which do not have the resources to keep the site in repair. In fact, many of these historic areas do not have proper drainage or sewage; this has largely taken place since the wealthy have stopped patronizing cultural centers, and moved outwards to larger cities.

            Rghei and Nelson explain that when North American and European historic sites are in danger of becoming isolated, policies are created to conserve and preserve historic areas. However, most sites in North America and Europe are truly saved by what Rghei and Nelson call a “culture-dependent approach”. This perspective sees heritage sites not as museum exhibits, but as actual living entities, which should be completely incorporated within a culture’s identity. Rghei and Nelson offer solutions to the “selective approaches” some traditional Islamic cities have taken, in which sites are seen as part of a distant past, not as an integral piece to present cultural affiliations. These solutions range from economic incentives to live and work in historic sites to efforts from the government to encourage conservation and conservation education.

            I personally commend the culture-dependent approach, in which sites become more than just objects and a presentation of the past. I believe archaeological and historical sites in North America can be much more than just exhibits; they can be teaching tools, connections with the distinct cultures and social groups essential to American history, and as sites for future research questions. I think Rghei and Nelson were a bit premature in praising North America and Europe for using cultural heritage sites as more than exhibits, but recognizing the need for growth and development is not always negative. America should embrace the idea of truly interactive site-conservation, in which even subregions can find a deeper connection with the artifacts that form a major part of their identity.

Taryn

Courtesy of Nader Al-Gadi

Works Cited

 Rghei, Amer S. and J.G. Nelson. 1994. The Conservation and use of the walled city of Tripoli. The Geogrpahical Journal 160(2): 143-158

General Conservation

Controversial Conservation

February 18th, 2013

Controversial Conservation

 Kara Fox

            There is currently a deadlock between cultural heritage advocates and commercial entities in the field of maritime archaeology. This deadlock exists in response to the ethical problems relating to the means and motive behind treasure-hunting operations and commercial involvement. While this conflict obviously affects archaeological policies, it also extends to the field of conservation. As stewards of historical and cultural heritage, should conservators be expected to uphold the same ethical policies as archaeologists? Do the different objectives of these fields influence their ethical obligations? Is the responsibility of the conservator owed to the artifact at hand, or to the field in which they are assisting?

            Over the last ten years, the field of maritime archaeology has struggled with the problem of treasure hunting and salvage. This problem has stemmed from unscientific excavation methods destroying archaeological evidence and commercial entities selling priceless artifacts to the highest bidder. As a public entity, museums have been the forefront of archaeological policies such as accession, exhibitions, and conservation. In the article “The Archaeology Bylaw and Associated Considerations,” Dr. Paul Johnston fervently stands up against the display of salvaged artifacts in maritime museums. He discusses the bylaw history, which resulted in the adoption of this ethical statement by the Council of American Maritime Museums,

“CAMM member institutions shall adhere to archaeological standards consistent with those of the American Association of Museums/International Congress Museums (AAM/ICOM), and shall not knowingly acquire or exhibit artifacts which have been stolen, illegally exported from their country of origin, illegally salvaged or removed from commercially exploited archaeological or historic sites” (Johnston, CAMM, The Archaeology Bylaw and Associated Considerations).

However, according to the American Institute for Conservation, “The primary goal of conservation professionals, individuals with extensive training and special expertise, is the preservation of cultural property.” This goal brings up an obvious question, should the primary concern of a conservator differ from that of an archaeologist? Personally, I am undecided on this issue. As cultural and historical stewards, archaeologists and conservators ought to be preserving the authenticity of the past. Is accurate stewardship possible when “tainted” or unethical artifacts are discounted? Is history only valid and acceptable when acquired through ethical means?

            These questions are difficult to answer, which is why this controversial matter has yet to be resolved. However, the answer to unethical archaeology and conservation is not passively sitting by and ignoring the situation. All history should be recognized, recorded, and studied regardless of its nature, origin, or method of discovery. And as stewards of the past, we should do everything in our power to accomplish this.  

 

References

Johnston, Paul. “CAMM, The Archaeology Bylaw and Associated Considerations.” CAMM Archaeology Committee. Date unknown.

“Code of Ethics and Guidelines for Practice.” About AIC, accessed February 4, 2013. http://www.conservation-us.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=page.viewPage&pageID=858&nodeID=1

 

 

General Conservation

Conservation and Maritime Artifacts: Is It Worth It?

February 18th, 2013

Conservation and Maritime Artifacts: Is It Worth It?

Caitlin Zant

             The conservation of maritime artifacts has become an increasingly important part of the growing field of Maritime Archaeology. Unlike terrestrial sites, maritime archaeological sites are usually much more dynamic and require additional consideration when attempting to conserve artifacts. When the field of Maritime Archaeology first began, the common archaeological method used was a complete excavation of the ship and all artifacts. This process left archaeologists and conservators the arduous duty of figuring out what to do with waterlogged artifacts. Artifacts that have been underwater have been exposed to currents, and in the case of oceanic sites, have been saturated with salts. Upon bringing these objects to the surface, the archaeologists and conservators have had to discover different ways of desalinating artifacts and gradually removing water so they do not shrink and crack upon drying. This potentially long and expensive process has still not been perfected, specifically for waterlogged wood.

            Polyethylene glycol (PEG) has been the preferred method of conserving waterlogged wood, but now, conservators and archaeologists are beginning to find that PEG is not necessarily the best method of conservation. An expensive process, PEG soaking can take years of work in order to saturate the waterlogged wood, and recently, conservators have been noticing the limits of PEG, including microbial growth on the surface of PEG saturated wood have been discovered (Björdal and Nilsson, 2001). With the expense and difficulty of conserving and preserving waterlogged wood on land, archaeologists have begun to favor in situ preservation of maritime sites and artifacts. While this is a much less expensive and simpler alternative to full excavation, what does this mean for conservators and public outreach concerning maritime heritage?

            One of the most well known instances of PEG in conservation is the conservation of Vasa in Sweden. It took conservators working on Vasa nineteen years to soak the ship in PEG and another nine years to dry the wood to prevent any shrinking or cracking. Despite this, the glycol still has not fully saturated the wood. This only adds to other issues with the conservation of Vasa, including the buildup of sulfur in the timbers (Hocker, 2010). Although this is an important part of Swedish maritime heritage, the cost of continued conservation continues to increase, as does the amount of effort it takes to preserve the ship. This brings up the question, is all of this work really worth it? This question truly addresses the core issue behind gaining more funding for conservation projects; is the result worth the cost and effort to conserve?       

  vasa

The hull of Vasa

Credit: Karolina  Kristensen

            Conservators at work on the Mary Rose have run into a similar issue. After years of soaking the ship in PEG and carefully regulating the relative humidity of its storage, sulfur is beginning to accumulate in the timbers of the warship (Damian, Fors, Jones, and Sandström, 2005). Conservators are fighting a continuing battle to discover the source of these sulfates and to discover ways to combat it for the conservation of this important piece of English maritime heritage.

 mary rose

The hull of Mary Rose         

Credit: The Mary Rose Trust

 

mary rose 2

 A conservator working on Mary Rose  

Credit: The Mary Rose Trust

            In situ preservation is beginning to be used more and more in place of excavating entire sites, but what does this do to museum collections? If objects are studied, recorded and left on the ocean floor, they are being preserved, but they remain out of reach of the public. Public outreach is a major topic in the field of maritime archaeology, but I believe that this topic must be addressed in the field of archaeological conservation, especially with the conservation of maritime artifacts. This type of preservation has a direct impact on the work of conservators and the idea of preserving the past for the public to see. With most artifacts remaining underwater, this leaves them out of reach to a majority of the public. So how does this effect conservation? How do you preserve cultural heritage for the public and gain public interest when the artifacts cannot be seen? Although this does not answer these questions, bringing them up as something that needs further discussion is an important part of the future of the conservation of maritime artifacts.

 

Citations

Björdal, C. G. and T. Nilsson. 2001. “Observations on Microbial Growth during Conservation Treatment of Waterlogged Archaeological Wood” In “Studies in Conservation”, Vol. 46, No. 3, pp. 211-220.

Damian, E., Fors, Y., Jones, M. and Sandström, M., 2005. “Sulfur Accumulation in the Timbers of King Henry VIII’s Warship Mary Rose: A Pathway in the Sulfur Cycle of Conservation Concern”. In: “Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America”, Vol. 102, No. 40, pp. 14165-14170.

 Hocker, E., 2010. “Maintaining a Stable Environment: “Vasa'”s New Climate-Control System”. In: “APT Bulletin”, Vol. 41, No. 2/3, pp. 3-9.

 Photo Sources

 Kristensen, K.,  Swedish National  Maritime  Museums.

The Mary Rose Trust.

 

 

 

General Conservation

Customs and Conservation: Totem Poles

February 18th, 2013

Customs and Conservation:  Totem Poles

Alyssa Reisner

            Western cultural ideals seem to favor the preservation and maintenance of material culture, yet other cultures may favor the natural decay or intentional destruction of certain types of cultural material as influenced by their own customs and traditions. Other aspects of material culture may not be able to be properly represented in a museum, as their significance seems to come from not only being preserved, but from being in a certain location. Some types of totem poles exemplify this positional significance. Totem poles are sculptures carved from trees, often by the people of indigenous North American cultures. There are different types of totem poles, each having their own significance. Some of these poles include house frontal poles, house portal poles, memorial poles, mortuary poles, and shame poles (Stewart 1993).  Though preserving totem poles in museums certainly seems beneficial as it allows future generations to view and learn about important aspects of other cultures, there is a question of whether it can be considered worth the loss of the significance held by the actual location and intended use of the original totem pole.

            One example of this sort of complication can be shown through the shame pole. The shame pole “was carved for a chief who wished to ridicule or shame another—often his rival” (Stewart 1993:25).  The pole stood to bring attention to some long-standing unpaid debt or misdeed that was thought to be worthy of ridicule or scorn, and when restitution was made, the pole would be taken down (Stewart 1993). These poles are now thought to “exist only in museums” (Stewart 1993:25).  Shame poles were not meant to stand forever, as they were taken down once the conflict was settled; so, is the preservation of a pole meant for this purpose necessarily ethical?

            There seemingly are at least two different ways to answer such a question. No one solution appears to be necessarily better than another, but all viewpoints should be considered. It is important for future generations of other cultures to learn about this type of totem pole, and from this point of view, the preservation of shame poles seems to be beneficial and significant. Though, if the culture that initially created the shame pole does not think that it should still be standing, it could be more beneficial not to preserve the pole. It is always possible, however, that future generations of the culture that created the totem pole could want the shame poles to be preserved in order to have a link to their heritage. The preservation of objects that were not initially meant to be saved or maintained is a complex subject that requires extra consideration. If the totem poles are preserved in a setting such as a museum, the public, perhaps along with the people of the culture in question, are due additional explanation. 

References

Stewart, Hilary. Looking at Totem Poles. Vancouver, British Columbia: Douglas & McIntyre, 1993.

General Conservation

A King is Revealed. What Happens Next?

February 18th, 2013

A King is Revealed.  What Happens Next?

William Sassorossi

           A University of Leicester (United Kingdom) archaeological team recently released results indicating the recovery of the late King Richard III, who passed away in battle in the late 15th century.  The skeletal remains were located using historical archival research of primary battle and burial accounts along with maps from the time period.  Using these tools, doctors using mitochondrial DNA from the skeletal remains were able to compare results with surviving family descendants to make a positive identification (Levine, 2013).  Prior to this testing, marks including scars from knives and larger weapons, indicating a violent death, were found on parts of the skeleton.  Also, a defined curvature of the spine all help identify the skeleton as King Richard III.

            To keep within the higher ethical standards archaeologists must adhere to, this information must be published and peer reviewed.  At this moment, this is still in the process.  Once completed, if the evidence holds true, a very interesting chapter in English history will be competed.  But what do future plans hold for the King?  Will there be work to conserve his remains for display for tourists or will there be a proper burial and interment?  At this moment, it seems the later will be the course, the remains currently in the care of the Leicester Cathedral.

            But consider the alternative.  A piece of English history has been uncovered and a great deal of information could be gleaned from the remains.  With the enormous financial undertaking already spent on this project, it could be useful for future endeavors to possibly profit from the discovery.  Creating a museum, to include other artifacts from this period for display, would both increase public knowledge of King Richard III as well as possibly fund future research projects.  The conservation of the bones as well as other artifacts found could greatly increase public awareness to a subject that many seem not to understand.

            Ethical treatment of the remains is a given. What is done with the remains may have lasting impacts on considerations for future projects.  A display of King Richard III’s remains may be considered unethical by some, but given the history of his gruesome demise, it could also be a nobler resting place among those interested in seeing him.  Donations and museum ticket sales would increase revenue for future projects at the University of Leicester, and the continuation of increasing the knowledge base of the public should be a primary goal of all those involved.

Levine, Alden Maler. 2013. “Skeletal Sleuthing Team Uncovered Royal Remains and the Story Behind Them,” http://www.cnn.com/2013/02/04/world/europe/richard-iii-body-science/index.html?hpt=hp_t1, Accessed February 4, 2013.

General Conservation

What is worth conserving: Preventative conservation today or Conservation tomorrow

February 14th, 2013

What is worth conserving: Preventative conservation today or Conservation tomorrow

 Hannah Piner

There are two types of preservation methods that can be applied to objects: interventive, which interacts with and potentially changes the artifact in conserving it; or preventative, meaning conserving artifacts by doing everything but interacting with it, mostly by changing its environment. Both have their benefits and their failures, but, once the object becomes historically or archaeologically relative, which one is better suited for future analysis of the artifact using science and for future historical interpretation?

Cost becomes a problem no matter when the object is conserved; if it is conserved using preventative measures there are upkeep costs, if the treatment is interventive then there is the cost of time and treatment. Which of these is more cost efficient depends on the condition of the artifact and the financial state of the museum or patron. It is initially less expensive to use preventative conservation, because the artifact does not have to be handled, cleaned, or otherwise tampered with. If the artifact is in bad condition (i.e. is cracking, corroding, or flaking away), however, the cost of interventive conservation will only increase with the degradation of the objects condition.

Another part of preventative conservation is keeping objects from today, that are in good condition, so that they can be used as teaching tools and artifacts for future generations. This way a museum would have a concrete history of the object and could keep it in working order, however, we do not know significance of every object in use today and deciding what is significant enough to keep is subjective. There also needs to be a large storage area to house the objects that are in this limbo period of use and historical significance.

Preventative conservation is also popular because so many scientific methods are destructive to the artifact; with more advancements in the field come new and better ways to study artifacts that have not been tampered with.

This is contrasted with interventive conservation, where artifacts have survived and (in most cases) outlived their technological descendants. These artifacts are relevant upon discovery, and can be n a variety of conditions, from excellent to poor. These objects have had years to interact with their environmental surroundings uninhibited and unprotected. They are rotted, corroded, disintegrated, and in pieces. The conservator must spend time and money to restore this artifact to a stable condition. Unfortunately, stability and aesthetic authenticity are not always the same. Often times an artifact will look very different after burial or submersion. The object will, also, most likely never be able to be used for its original and intended purpose again.  This makes the artifact an excellent teaching tool, but takes away its functionality.

I would argue that interventive conservation is more logical overall. This allows the artifacts more immediate stability, which in turn provides the object  a longer life and provides researchers with easier access, because it is more accepted for people to access and touch stable artifacts. Preventative conservation, on the other hand, should be used on artifacts that are originally in excellent condition and are low risk for becoming unstable. This is also a decent option for organizations that do not have the money to interventively conserve an artifact right away.

The view on preventative conservation is changing. The more the field grows and the more advanced science becomes the more it is accepted to leave artifacts like they are, but interventive conservation is still the most accepted and practiced form of conservation.

 Caple, Chris. Conservation Skills: Judgment, Methods, and Decision Making. New York: Routlege; 2000.

 

Ethics and Theory, Museum Studies

Out of the Ivory Towers and Into the Field: A Glowing Example of Public Conservation at Montezuma Well

February 14th, 2013

Out of the Ivory Towers and Into the Field: A Glowing Example of Public Conservation at Montezuma Well

 Sara Kerfoot

            Conservation is a science. There are specific consequences if conservation is done poorly; a lack of knowledge can be devastating to artifacts and sites. Not everyone has the opportunity to go through training that would adequately prepare an individual to properly handle and preserve artifacts from future deterioration, but not all conservation work needs to be done in a lab. There are certain aspects of conservation that the public has an opportunity to take part in given the right direction. Montezuma Well is an exemplary case of when public outreach and conservation can work together to create an ongoing example of cultural heritage. Montezuma Well National Monument has an active thousand-year-old irrigation system and uses the public to help maintain it.

            One of the National Park Service’s main goals is to preserve cultural heritage for future generations. Conservation is the act of preserving nomenclatural resources; conservators are not always conserving pieces of waterlogged wood and broken ceramics, they are stewards to heritage and in some cases that heritage is still active. Montezuma Well National Monument in Camp Verde, Arizona is a huge sinkhole; human modification can be seen in cliff dwellings and an active thousand-year-old irrigation ditch (National Park Service 2013). The ingenious Sinagua people of the Verde Valley created this canal; it pumps 1.5 million gallons of water from the sinkhole (Montezuma Well) every day at a constant 74 degrees Fahrenheit (National Park Service 2013). The site, as a whole, is protected and preserved by the park service. The maintenance crew, the park archaeologists, and park rangers work together to survey this ancient ditch on a daily basis; the maintenance crew preserves the site by ensuring the water flow is not obstructed by flora and fauna, they also patch leaky areas. Professionals preserve the integrity of the irrigation canal, but it is not limited to them.

montezumas well Irrigation System at Montezuma Well (Credit: Author)

              Since the irrigation system is still active and brings water to residents in the Verde Valley, each year this ancient water supply is re-directed to the river during winter. During winter, plants and debris encroach upon the area where flowing water runs during the spring and summer months. It takes hundreds of hours to clear out the rooted plants and debris before re-directing the canal back to its original path. One of the ways the park manages this huge feat is by enlisting volunteers to help with the project. Since 2004, the Volunteers of Outdoor Arizona (VOAz) hold an event where they clear weeds and remove calcium and travertine deposits from the ditch. Each year around mid-April, for one weekend, these volunteers help anywhere between 300 to 500 working hours (VOAz 2012). Their dedication and effort, with the park’s assistance, is a valuable component to the park’s goal of preserving cultural heritage. In order for the public to understand conservation, they need to have opportunities to get involved with conservation. Programs that allow for an interested public to participate in conservation work are integral for creating a learning environment. Public outreach is necessary for the discipline of conservation to thrive.

            Archaeologists and conservators are uncovering a story. But if the story is still going, professionals have a duty to not put a “no touch” sign on it and bar it from public access. There are multiple cases when conservators must protect an artifact so it survives, however, that is not the case for everything re-discovered. As tempting as it is to allow conservators to preserve all aspects of cultural heritage, that is not a feasible task. And in some cases, it may not be a desired role for a conservator. Where the public can play a role in conservation, they should. It allows for the public’s knowledge to grow and for them to create a connection enough to have care and concern for a site. The only way to safely do this is to create a link between the public and conservators.  As long as there is a strong enough connection to cultural heritage, it will continue to be preserved.

 References

 National Park Service, 2013. Exploring Montezuma Well. In: Montezuma Castle National Monument, Arizona. National Park Service. <http://www.nps.gov/moca/planyourvisit/exploring-montezuma-well.htm>. Accessed February 2, 2013.

 Volunteers of Outdoor Arizona, 2012. Montezuma Castle Conservation Work. In Volunteers of Outdoor Arizona. < http://www.voaz.org/projectreport.aspx?projectid=12>. Accessed February 2, 2013.

Public Outreach

The Conservation of Heavily Visited Cultural Heritage Sites

February 14th, 2013

The Conservation of Heavily Visited Cultural Heritage Sites

Lucas Simonds

             While visiting the site of Butrint in Albania over the summer, I was disappointed to discover that one of its most stunning features, a mosaic pavement on the floor of a Byzantine period baptistery, was being kept out of sight due to conservation concerns. Like many heavily visited sites, the baptistery pavement would be prone to the wear and tear of thousands of tourist’s feet, and for the sake of preservation, the Butrint management had resorted to the rather inelegant solution of covering over the mosaic with sand. While I was upset at the thought of only seeing the mosaic through a faded picture on a nearby sign, I was reminded also of the ever present danger to such works of art, as a young couple jumped over the fence surrounding the mosaic area to have their picture taken among the columns of the baptistery.

At Butrint, as at many other heavily visited cultural heritage sites, conservators have to walk the fine line between preserving cultural heritage and displaying it to the public, for whom it is being preserved. In situations such as this it is difficult to devise a single best practice, as each site has not only different deterioration factors, but different amounts of funding available for preservation work. While the sand covering the mosaic at Butrint certainly serves as a functional barrier to the effects of trampling tourists, sites with more available funding are able to employ more labor intensive methods. At the Lascaux caves in France for instance, where carbon dioxide produced by visitors had begun to degrade the cave paintings within ten years of their opening to the public, a replica of the original caves has been made nearby to allow tourists to experience the cultural heritage without damaging the fragile original work (Dupont et al. 2007, 526). Similarly, at Pompeii in Italy the famous mosaic of Alexander the Great has been removed to the museum in nearby Naples, and replaced by an exact replica on-site. These replica solutions allow for greater access to cultural heritage by tourists while also protecting them from both those, like the couple I saw in Pompeii, who ignore barriers and trample over ancient floors without a thought, and from the inadvertent damage caused merely by the presence of tourists, such as the situation in the Lascaux caves. Although this is an effective method for both presenting and preserving cultural heritage to the general public, it also removes the key element of genuineness from the experience. While the lack of genuineness may not be a concern of the average tourist, I personally felt its absence when viewing the Alexander mosaic, and I am sure informed visitors to most sites would have a similar experience.  

            Unfortunately, authenticity is only one of the many factors which weave into the complex web of the conservation of cultural heritage on heavily trafficked sites. While the experience of the visitor must be taken into account, as it is for them that our heritage is being preserved, the preservation of the object has to take precedence, as without that, the site would not be worth visiting. Yet, as mentioned, the replacement of fragile artifacts with replicas only serves to lessen the experience for a large portion of the visitors. Even worse, however, are the simple solutions, such as that employed at Butrint, which eliminate any sort of personal encounter with cultural heritage, and are bad for all types of visitors. What then, should be done to preserve cultural heritage, while also allowing it to be viewed by as many as is reasonable?

            In an article on the conservation of rock art, Janette Deacon stresses both the complex nature of conservation on heavily visited sites, and the need for detailed management plans for such sites, which encompass all of the intricacies involved. This would include assessments of the advisable visitor capacities for each area of the sites, as well as considerations of more natural deterioration factors. More importantly, however, she advises the use of tour guides to prevent the many sorts of damage that can result from tourists interacting with the site (Deacon, 2006). While this may again cut into the enjoyableness of the experience; I certainly would have found a guide at Pompeii to be a damper to my exploration; the fact remains that staff on the ground near sensitive areas will the most effective control of visitors in that area by far. Signs can be ignored and barriers can be jumped, but an employee will be able to stop any reasonable visitor from doing something that they should not.

            As mentioned, the preservation of cultural heritage in highly visited sites is far from being a straightforward or simple issue. Natural deterioration factors such as weathering must be taken into account, and sometimes the only solution may be to remove an object, such as a mosaic, to a more controlled environment. Whenever possible, however, I believe it would be best to leave original objects on site. Of course this still exposes our heritage to the damage, both intentional and unintentional, caused by tourists, but strategic placement of staff or mandatory tour guides, can stop any reasonable visitor from touching things they shouldn’t. While this may be a more expensive solution, the fact that it can allow for genuine artifacts to remain on site makes it worthwhile when possible.

 

Deacon, Janette. 2006. Rock Art Conservation and Tourism. Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory 13(4): 379-399.

Dupont, Joelle, Claire Jacquet, Bruno Dennetiere, Sandrine Lacoste, Faisl Bousta, Genevieve Orial, Corinne Cruaud, Arnaud Couloux, and Marie-France Roquebert. 2007. Invasion of the French Paleolithic Painted Cave of Lascaux by Members of the Fusarium solani Species Complex. Mycologia 99(4): 526-533.

Ethics and Theory ,

Working Together in the Field: Compromise and Communication between Conservators and Archaeologists

February 14th, 2013

Working Together in the Field: Compromise and Communication between Conservators and Archaeologists

 Hannah Smith

            Having the split personality that I do as a student of both archaeology and conservation, I’ve seen the unintentional divide that exists between conservators and archaeologists. In so many cases, this divide is due to a lack of understanding of what a conservator really does, as well as how to communicate what would be the best course of action to preserve a collection. That process encompasses the entire time from the moment the artifact leaves the ground to when it leaves the conservation lab. As a result, better communication is needed – on both sides – so that the history that is embodied by excavated artifacts can be preserved in the best way possible. Part of this communication needs to include demystifying what a conservator does, as well as how archaeologists can work with conservators to make both sides’ jobs easier.

            Much of the work conservators do takes place in an environment that is very different from where archaeologists work. The equipment needed and the vocabulary used to describe conservation can also prove to be a gap in a non-conservator’s knowledge. Once someone understands how and why a certain treatment is done and what the terms used to describe it are, it’s no longer so foreign. To that end, conservators should make an effort to show archaeologists more of what they do, while still cautioning that treatment shouldn’t be undertaken without proper training.

Because artifacts deteriorate so quickly, care must be taken from the very moment that the artifacts are uncovered on the site. Of course, the ideal situation includes a conservator working with the archaeologist before the excavations begin, and continuing through until everything is cleaned, stabilized, and safely stored or displayed (Singley 1981). But rarely does the ideal situation become reality. More often, artifacts sit in storage for a long time before a conservator can assess and treat them. Therefore, it is necessary for conservators to keep an open line of communication with the archaeologists in the field as to how best to clean, package and store their artifacts (Singley 1981). This means that there needs to be more information available to those outside of the field of conservation as to how to manage the basic needs of artifacts – those of stability and protection. While there are plenty of sources of information and supplies available, we need to bring those sources to the attention of archaeologists. We also need to account for the fact that not every project will have unlimited funds, so less expensive, but still appropriate, options for collection management should also be explained to our colleagues.

            Before an artifact can be stored, however, it needs to be cleaned, and each type of material has different needs. The cleaning methods needed for ceramics, for example, are different than those for metals (Singley 1981). A basic understanding of these methods will greatly improve the conditions that artifacts are in after excavation. Dirt left behind can provide an environment that allows decay to begin or continue, especially if the environment the artifact is housed in is unstable (Cronyn 1990). And while many archaeologists know the basics of cleaning artifacts, changes in best practices may have occurred since they were in school. By communicating well, conservators can keep archaeologists abreast of the changes that are occurring in our field, which will help collections survive to provide more information to future generations of conservators and archaeologists alike.

 Cronyn, J. M. 1990. Elements of Archaeological Conservation. New York, New York: Routledge.

 Singley, Katherine A. 1981 Caring for Artifacts After Excavation – Some Advice for Archaeologists.  Historical Archaeology 15(1): 36-48.

Archaeological Conservation

Conservation: Using Others Mistakes to Avoid Our Own

February 14th, 2013

Conservation: Using Others Mistakes to Avoid Our Own

Kate Clothier

Conservation involves multiple fields coming together in order to better protect and understand artifacts. A combination of archaeology, chemistry, even biology can all be called upon at the same time by the conservator whilst they are working on the said object. Since conservation efforts require so many different fields of knowledge, the conservator must be aware of what is going on in other fields. By expanding their gaze, information can flow easier and benefit their effort. The information that can be gained from other fields is not limited strictly to data concerning decay or material makeup, but it can also involve ethical questions.

One such question is where to draw the line at examining artifacts. What is meant by this is how much of an object are we willing to remove and potentially destroy in order to gain information.  Conservators must walk a fine line in determining what is acceptable to “sacrifice” for the good of the entire collection. For example, taking a few coins from a collection of over a thousand and then breaking them down (as in removing a section of it or cutting into the coin) to better understand their process of decay. However, once those coins are broken down, they can no longer be part of the collection.  How is it decided what is ok to take away from the collection since it will no longer be available for future use? In conservation the size of the collection and the potential benefits of ‘sacrificing’ the object are weighed out before anything irreversible is done. This helps to ensure that what is lost is not more than what will be gained.

A prime example of the damage that can be done if the cost vs benefit ratio is not properly followed is highlighted in a University of Arizona Environmental department article concerning the Prometheus Bristlecone pine. A geology researcher eager to get results concerning glacial features decided rather than taking a small sample from the Bristlecone pines to gather his information he would cut an entire plant down for more immediate results. Soon after he cut down one of the Bristle cone pines, it was learned that the plant selected was the oldest tree alive, dating nearly 5000 years old (UA Communications, 2013. “Keepers of Prometheus: The World’s Oldest Tree.” University of Arizona Research & Discovery in Environment & Sustainability, Accessed: Web. 5 Feb. 2013). The article explains that the same results could have been gathered from the plant, dubbed Prometheus, if the researcher had followed the approved methods of dendrochronology by taking small samples of the core, which would not have hurt the plant. This would have allowed future researches the chance to monitor and learn more about the plant survival strategy in addition to the plant yielding the needed information for the geologist in his glacial research, but there was no way to undo what had been done.

This same concept can be applied to the conservation world. The conservator must be careful in what they select to break down and examine in an irreversible way. If the object is one of a kind then it cannot be treated in the same manner that something like a large collection of coins would be treated, or else future information can be lost, similar to what happened with the Prometheus Bristlecone pine.  Taking small core samples can yield useful information without damaging the entire collection. It can explain the material makeup of the object, why or why not it is decaying, what type of decay is happening, and what the best method to protect the object would be. Looking into other fields and the mistakes they have made can help emphasize why conservators need to be so diligent and practical in their art. The information and materials they work with is one of a kind.

 

Ethics and Theory, Science ,

A Fine Balance: Presenting Conservation to the Public

February 6th, 2013

A Fine Balance: Presenting Conservation to the Public

Stephanie Croatt

 

            In the conservation field’s struggle to become more visible and better understood by the general public, there exist some difficulties in how to present the profession to the layperson. It seems that museums may be the key to this dilemma. Museums are often viewed as places for learning and offer the perfect venue for seeing the end results of conservation. Examples of museums that have made attempts to give visitors a glimpse of how conservators stabilize and prepare objects for display and how the museum environment is specially designed and maintained to ensure the objects’ well-being include:

 

 

The discussions of conservation in each of the museums above exhibit a variety of methods of attracting the public’s attention and eliciting thought about conservation. It seems that the three most effective devices by which museums can present conservation to the public are making the information accessible to the viewer, offering concrete and hands-on examples, and cutting romantic stereotypes of the field.

 

            That conservation is a very technical field with its own extensive set of jargon is undeniable, and presenting the key concepts and techniques to the layperson in an intelligible way is a sizeable task. Nonetheless, museums should strive to unpack the language and ideas for the average person. Adding layers of information that go from simple to more complex might be a good way of adding detail and complexity for viewers who want more information or detail about a certain idea or technique. Having trained “facilitators” that can discuss elements of the exhibit in more detail or give out bibliographies for further research might also be an effective way of deepening the subject for those that are interested and not overwhelming those who are not interested in more detail (Podany and Maish 1993, 102).

 

            In addition to making the ideas easy to understand, having concrete examples and hands-on activities may help to reinforce the main message of a certain part of the exhibit, as well as engage visitors who are otherwise not attracted to reading. In their exhibition, entitled Preserving the Past, Jerry Podany and Susan Lansing Maish included interactive opportunities for visitors. One such hands-on activity invited visitors to reassemble broken pottery sherds and then identify the vessel from a chart of Greek vessel shapes (Podany and Maish 1993, 104). Such interactive opportunities allow the public to experience some of the techniques used in conservation, and may excite the interest of more visitors.

 

            Hands-on opportunities that allow the viewer to follow the step by step procedure to conserving artifacts may also work to dispel unrealistic and romantic perceptions of conservation. Indeed, simplifying language for the layperson sometimes leads the exhibit creator to draw analogies between the conservator and the noble doctor, or present before and after photographs that may give the public a false notion about the realities of conservation (Podany and Maish 1993, 105). While sometimes attractive, the romantic view of conservation tends to lead the public to think that the conservator’s job is to swoop in and permanently save objects from certain deterioration. This perception tends to lead discourse away from the sometimes mundane reality of the field and the ideas of reversibility and minimal intervention, which are the main tenets of conservation.  

 

            Although it may seem that any public education about conservation is good, there are certainly pitfalls that can lead the public to misunderstand the field. Pitfalls may be avoided by making information accessible to the visitor, offering hands-on activities, and by dispensing of romantic notions of conservation. While these extra steps may increase the expense of creating and running exhibitions focusing on conservation, it is well worth the cost because a public that is better informed about the importance and realities of conservation is a public that is better prepared and more willing to fund conservation projects in the future.

 

References

 

Podany, J.C. and S.L. Maish. 1993. Can the Complex Be Made Simple? Informing the Public about Conservation through Museum Exhibits. Journal of the American Institute for Conservation 32(2): 101-108.

Ethics and Theory, Museum Studies , , ,

Study Abroad-Israel 2013

February 6th, 2013

Summer Abroad 2013

Program Itinerary and Academic Schedule

July 7-July 27, 2013

Ever wondered what it would be like to travel to the Middle East? Curious to see first-hand the sights described in the Bible? Maybe you are interested in gaining valuable field experience in archaeological conservation? Join us as we travel through Israel to Tel-Aviv, Haifa, Jerusalem, Tel-el Hesi, Ashkelon, and Ashdod. Our 20-day journey will take us to active archaeological excavations, the Israel Antiquities Authority, and several local and national museums.

 

Title: Preservation of Cultural Heritage in Israel

Program Location: Tel-Aviv, Haifa, Jerusalem, Tel-el Hesi, Ashkelon, Ashdod

Program Overview: The preservation of cultural heritage is critical to societies internationally in order to retain personal identity, cultural history, and experiences of the past for the future. This process includes the conservation of built heritage, archaeological sites, material culture, and artworks that are inherent in modern society. This study abroad experience allows students to visit historic and archaeological sites that are critical to our understanding of culture within the human race. Students will gain real world experience in archaeological site preservation techniques by visiting active sites and gain insight into the preservation challenges that archaeologists are facing with material culture from a maritime and terrestrial environment. Israel offers a diverse range of cultural experiences that will enrich student’s exposure to Middle Eastern cultures and experience a variety of lifestyles and customs that are unique to the area. Students will work closely with local conservators and gain hands on experience in field conservation techniques that benefit site interpretation.

 

Credit Hours Possible: 9 CH

 

Graduate Courses Offered:

HIST6992: Directed Studies in History, 3CH

HIST5005: Field Methods in Archaeological and Museum Artifact Conservation, 6CH

 

Undergraduate Courses Offered:

HIST4533: Directed Studies in History, 3CH

HIST5005: Field Methods in Archaeological and Museum Artifact Conservation, 6CH

 

Primary Faculty Director:

Susanne Grieve

Director of Conservation

East Carolina University

252-328-4407

GrieveS@ecu.edu

 

Cost: $3721.20 (w/out airfare)

 

For More Information on ECU Summer Abroad Programs, visit: http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/summerabroad/.

 

Frequently Asked Questions: (Currently Being Updated):

1) Do I need a visa to travel to Israel?

2) What paperwork do I need to have for traveling?

  • A valid passport that doesn’t expire within 2013.
  • Complete the STEP form.

3) Is it safe to drink the water?

4) What kind of food is there? What if I have a specific dietary concern?

  • Please let the trip leader know if you have any allergies or dietary needs. Most restaurants and eateries have a variety of food options including vegetarian. It is important that you are open to a variety of food options as they can be limited while working in the field. Israel is a melting pot of food. The trip leader is a vegetarian and can attest that the food across the country is delicious! For more ideas on food, check out Israel Food Guide or Wikipedia.

5) Is is safe to travel to the Middle East?

  • While there is conflict occurring in Middle Eastern countries, Israel can be considered relatively safe to travel in. The trip will be canceled in the event of conflicts escalating in Israel to the point that it is no longer safe for Americans. This decision will not based on news headlines or popular media commentary, but rather travel advisories by the Department of State. Please review the current information on Israel for updated information: Israel, the West Bank, and Gaza.

6) Will we be near any of the current conflicts?

  • Israel is located between Egypt, Syria, and Lebanon which have experienced recent conflicts. The Gaza strip and West Bank area are also known to have associations with armed conflict and it is important to be diligent in your awareness of current events and personal safety. We will not be traveling into these areas. The closest we will travel to the West Bank will be Jerusalem for three days and the furthest South we will go is Ruhama.

7) What kind of clothes should I bring?

  • We will be continually on the move, so it is important to wear clothes that are comfortable and easily transported. While we are working in the field, its important that you have clothes that can get dirty and that also protect you from the sun. In July, temperatures reach 75F to 95F during the day with anywhere from 70-90% humidity. The sun is very strong in Israel and you should bring clothes that keep you cool, but also protect you from sunburn. Good places to buy one or two good key pieces are at REI or other outdoor shops which can also give you advice on clothing. Also, bring your swimsuit!

8) What will the temperature be like?

  • Israel is part of a Mediterranean environment. Averages temps can be found at The Weather Channel. It can easily reach 100+F when working in the field.

9) Is this a religious tour?

  • No, this program is for those interested in material culture that has been produced by prehistoric and historical societies. We will be visiting the sites that are described in the Bible which is interesting for those who are both religious and non-religious. Attendees on this trip absolutely must be open to other viewpoints and religions.

10) My parents are concerned about my safety, what should they know about traveling there?

  • It is understandable that you or your family would be concerned about traveling in Israel and the Middle East. Parents are welcome to contact the trip leader if they have any specific questions. We will cancel the trip if we feel that the attendees will be in any possible danger. There is always some degree of risk when traveling overseas, but we will do everything we can to minimize that risk. With that said, it is important that students can take personal responsibility and be able to take direction.

11) What experience does the trip leader have?

  • Susanne has been traveling internationally since she was 12 years old. She has visited, both individually and in groups, Alaska, Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, Hawaii, Canada, Virgin Islands, Haiti, Bahamas, Costa Rica, Mexico, England, Scotland, Amsterdam, Cyprus, Israel, Namibia, and South Africa, She participated in leading a group of graduate and undergraduate students around South Africa in conjunction with other faculty. The other professionals that we will interact with on the program also have extensive experience in leading groups in Israel.

12) Is it expensive to purchase food or othr items in Israel?

  • Much like other countries, it will depend on what cities you are in. Food will be covered in the study abroad fees, and will be of similar quality that you would have while traveling (sandwiches for lunch and hot meals for dinner). There are lots of great areas for shopping and opportunities to indulge in the local culture. For an idea of costs, check out Numbeo.

13) Do I need to be an ECU student to attend?

  • No, students from other universities can enroll as well. Please contact the ECU Study Abroad office for more details.

14) What is the itinerary?

  • Specific sites to be visited are still being confirmed. More details will be provided here. Some of the activities will depend on the desires and experience of the attendees.

15) What is expected from me as far as coursework?

  • Students will be expected to actively participate in discussions as well as provide a research paper at the end of the semester. This paper will directly contribute to the sites we visit or conduct conservation treatments with. Students will also give presentations on a specific aspect of Israel before departing. More details will be provided.

16) Can I take more than one Directed Study?

  • Yes, please refer to your advisor for more information on how these courses will fit into your curriculum.

17) Does the recent activity in Israel and Gaza affect the program?

  • At this point, we are not canceling the trip due to the fact that events change very quickly in this area. It is important to stay up to date on the events in Israel and we will be watching for new develoments closely. A great deal of the activity could be due to upcoming elections in January. We will make a final determination in the Spring.

18) Will I recieve a refund if the trip is cancelled?

  • Yes, you will recieve a full refund if the trip is cancelled.

19) What kind of housing will we be in?

Since we will be traveling across the country side, we will stay in variety of housing options including hotels and hostels. The excavation site we will visit in Ruhama will use a kibbutz as a base. See their website for images and more: http://www.orhanruhama.co.il/.

General Conservation, Research and Experiments , ,

Displaying the Dead: Disrespecting or Honoring the Past?

February 4th, 2013

Displaying the Dead: Disrespecting or Honoring the Past?

Kate Clothier

Going to museums has always brought me happiness. After spending countless hours lost in their different exhibits I would come out feeling more connected to the past cultures and curious to learn about the different societies on display. This interest led me to become an avid history reader and museum patron. When I was older I was shocked to learn that there was one specific controversial issue surrounding museum exhibits internationally. The ethics of displaying human bodies. Should museums be able to put the deceased on display for the public and who has the rights to the bodies once they are discovered?

I was always torn on the answer to these questions. For me, the people on display spurred reverence and curiosity, for others the displays served as symbols of disrespect to our ancestral heritage. This division of thinking persists today and was even the subject of ethical debate at the 2010 conference of the International Council of Museums (ICOM)- Committee for Conservation conference. Large nationally recognized organizations are facing the ethics of displaying the deceased in attempt to find common ground but the debate rages on. There is no ‘cure all’ for the questions at hand.

It has been suggested that the direct descendants should get the finally say on whether the bodies should be on display, but what if there are no direct descendants? Who then has the right to decide? Where is the quest for information on the human past to stop and, would we dig up cemeteries for knowledge? To me, the best solution is to stick to the ethical guidelines created by organizations like the ICOM in reference to past societies and what they left behind (Brajer, I. 2010. “Human Remains in Museums.” International Council of Museums- Theory and History of Conservation Working Group, Accessed: Web. 21 Jan. 2013). These bodies can offer us insight to the past that would otherwise be unknown and can even spark interest the societies themselves, as was the case for me. I believe the bodies should be treated with upmost respect and if a direct link to a current society is found or known of, those people should get the final say in whether the body can be displayed or not. The ethics surrounding human remains being put on display is sure to persist for many years to come and museums will continue to be at the forefront of this debate.

 

 

Ethics and Theory, Museum Studies , , ,

Conservation Conversation: Conservation Within the Discipline of Anthropology

February 4th, 2013

Conservation Conversation: Conservation Within the Discipline of Anthropology

Taryn Ricciardelli

Archaeologists have always been a problem for the field of anthropology. They are crass and red-faced, most of them, dirty, but, if we want to be frank, archaeologists travel, drink, and crunch numbers with the best of them. They are scientists and theorists as much as they are shovel-bums; sinking into labwork just as quickly as they hurry into the field. In essence, archaeologists fall in love with past societies and imaginary individuals. They can start from the most basic material remains and uncover the beautiful, complex connections that make human beings so fascinating. But as archaeology continues to expand, recognize new specialties, and delve into even more intricate forms of questioning, the conservation of artifacts, both on-site and off, becomes an essential part of the discipline. I sense that soon there will be discussions similar to the debate surrounding archaeology since the rise of processualism: is conservation a subspecialty or its own discipline? Should archaeological conservation become part of the discipline of anthropology? Is archaeological conservation directly related to the study of people and how people behave? My argument would be that, yes, the conservation of artifacts can tell an important diachronic, and truly cultural, story about the people behind the objects.

Marcel Mauss wrote in The Gift that objects possess the spirit of the maker, which is then manifested in different ways through the acts of giving and receiving. As a distinguished cultural anthropologist writing about egalitarian societies, Mauss invested strong social value into all human-made objects. Although the context is different in archaeology, I still find that Mauss gives a lot of credence to why archaeologists do what they do. They find objects in order to understand the people associated with them, to highlight humanity, finding (or disproving) patterns on a larger scale. Conservators are not solely focused on the object, either. The intrinsic spirit of the object is what drives the conservator to conserve, and it is that intrinsic spirit which comes from the maker of the object, the culture surrounding the artifact, and the life history of the object (conditioned by the conservator’s culture) after it has been excavated.

Some archaeologists might argue that conservators are constantly in labs, tucked away from the field, pouring over chemical analysis and not worrying about the larger social and cultural implications of the objects they are saving. However, this accusation largely arises from a lack of communication between archaeologists and conservators, which, in my opinion, should end immediately. As Singley (1981) acknowledges, misinformation on either the archaeologists’ or conservators’ part (about the other) can lead to inherent problems in the object’s long-term survival and also in the analysis of the culture of the artifact. If archaeological conservation were part of the anthropological discipline, much of this misinformation could be avoided. Archaeologists would be required to learn at least the basics of conservation, and conservators would be required to learn some archaeological methods supplemented by some anthropological theory. Although I can hear the groans and the indignant outbursts from the scientists in the room, anthropological theory is largely underrated in the sciences, yet it offers a unique perspective that is beneficial to developing research questions and understanding artifact patterns, excavation techniques, and, hopefully soon, conservation techniques. All in all, conservation is about humanity. (Now whether more conservators or anthropologists disagree with this statement, I am not sure, but the comments section is below.) Whether or not conservation ends up in anthropology, it is the cooperation and understanding of conservation and archaeology that is most beneficial to the progress of anthropological academic research.

 

Works Cited

Mauss, Marcel. 2000. The Gift. W.W. Norton & Company.

Singley, Katherine R. 1981. Caring for Artifacts after Exacavation— Some Advice to Archaeologists. Historical Archaeology 15(1): 36-58.

Archaeological Conservation, Ethics and Theory ,

Is Conservation its own field or a subfield of Archaeology?

February 4th, 2013

Is Conservation its own field or a subfield of Archaeology?

Hannah Piner 

            Conservation sprung from the need to protect and conserve our past; it is hard to say that conservation came from archaeology, or any other major discipline specifically. It is the daughter of art, history, archaeology, architecture, and museum studies, just to name some of the influential fields. With advances in technology, artifacts come from a wider variety of places (family homes, private collections, archaeological sites) and with advances in science there are new ways to study these artifacts.  Virtually every advance made creates a new subfield of conservation in the American Institute for Conservation: object, wood, paper, painting, etc.

Even if one eliminates many of the subfields of conservation, and focuses solely on object conservation, it is hard to say that object conservation is merely a subfield of archaeology. Often, conservators do not work in the field with the archaeologists which eliminates the conservator from a majority of an archaeologists work. Instead the conservator spends most of their time in the lab after the artifacts are brought out of the site. Archaeologists may employ the conservator, but conservators are still left out of the process until the archaeologist has gathered all possible visible information and has to call on the conservator to preserve or reveal data that has become hidden by concretion and dirt. This puts a wedge between the two fields and, purposely or accidentally, separates two fields that should work very closely together.

The conservator also has to deal with the wants and needs of other museum professionals.  The reasoning and logic of a museum curator (for example) will be very different from the reasoning and logic of an archaeologist. The archaeologist wants to collect data and research what the artifacts mean. The museum curator, on the other hand, is more interested in using artifacts to demonstrate to the public information about the past. Curators are looking for aesthetic or educational qualities that may not be in the forefront of the archaeologists mind. An objects conservator has the difficult task of balancing these two goals. Their goal is to use the artifact for research and educate the public. The conservator has a responsibility to take an object and stabilize it while keeping the integrity and originality of the artifact for the continuing education of future generations, while answering research questions.

When working with archaeological materials, none of these three fields could survive alone. They work together and must rely on the research and knowledge of each other to gain the most information. Archaeologists have to carefully excavate the artifacts out of the ground. Museums and curators present these findings to the public. And conservators bridge these two, add research and data, and conserve and preserve the artifacts for future generations.

Archaeological Conservation ,

Cultural Heritage: A Reasonable Right?

February 4th, 2013

Cultural Heritage:  A Reasonable Right?

Alyssa Reisner

When one is asked to think of what qualifies as a human right, images of necessary means of survival, such as water, food, and shelter, are often conjured.  However, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) states that cultural heritage qualifies as “an essential human right” (Logan 2012).  This may seem like a simple declaration, but it actually carries larger implications. To further explore this assertion, one must consider what exactly qualifies as “cultural heritage.”  UNESCO also states that cultural heritage has changed meanings throughout time. It once only referred to “monumental remains of cultures,” but the definition has now been expanded to include different categories, such as ethnographic, intangible, and industrial heritage (UNESCO 2008). The concept of intangible heritage has been paid special attention, as it includes languages, traditional music, dramatic arts, and philosophical and spiritual systems that are the base of creations.

The concept that our cultural heritage, including intangible heritage, is a human right may seem simple enough and therefore acceptable to many people. This heritage may be the way that certain cultures identify themselves; it could be the foundation upon which they build their beliefs, lifestyles, and infrastructure. However, one could also find problems related with the sort of unwavering stability that these pillars of culture imply.

Maintaining a collective cultural heritage is indeed important, as a group often needs to maintain a sense of identity and cohesiveness. These aspects are important for a society to survive and prosper. However, if these feelings are overly or solely emphasized, it can lead to a sense of xenophobia or ethnocentrism. As a species, all humans have certain aspects in common, and, while it is important for a group to be cohesive and have a strong identity, it can become counterproductive when these different cultural groups with strong individual cultural heritages clash. While it is important to recognize and learn from the past, it is also important to move forward and not only focus on the differences but the vast similarities between groups of people. Overly idolizing the past can create a barrier to moving forward if not seen from an open-minded point of view. While certain disciplines may focus more on learning about and from tribalism of past and more traditional times, the future involves more globalization and therefore more cohesiveness between different cultures and groups of people, so it is important to not only focus on the past but also on the present and future.

Another important aspect to consider is that material or intangible aspects of past cultural heritage cannot be understood in the present in the same manner as the original producers intended. Sociological theorist Fredric Jameson refers to a loss of historicity in postmodernity; he claims that “we cannot know the past” and that “all we have access to are texts about the past, and all we can do is produce yet other texts about that topic” (Goodman, Ritzer 2004:475). He claims that this leads to the “random cannibalization of all styles of the past” (Goodman, Ritzer 2004:475). Though this view may seem somewhat extreme, it is still worth consideration. While knowledge of the past is undeniably valuable, with this sort of distortion due to modern interpretation should it necessarily be considered a right?

A contrasting opinion in this debate could argue that cultural heritage is so important for people to feel solidarity in a group and grounded with their identity that it should be considered a right and that great measures should be taken to preserve and / or conserve all types of cultural heritage. Author C.S. Lewis stated that “friendship is unnecessary, like philosophy, like art…it has no survival value; rather it is one of those things that give value to survival” (Lewis 1960). Could cultural heritage be one of those things that might not be necessary for living yet give meaning to having life? The question about whether cultural heritage should be considered a human right seems impossible to clearly answer. The best answer is one that balances both points of view, a compromise between the extremes. While overemphasizing the importance of cultural heritage could lead to undesired outcomes, conservation of cultural heritage has significance. Though it is important to consider all viewpoints and disadvantages concerning the topic, people desire and deserve to have a connection to their past, culture, and identity, and preserving cultural heritage in its many forms is one means to achieve this sort of stability.

 

References

Goodman, Douglas, and George Ritzer. Modern Sociological Theory. Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2004.

Lewis, C.S. The Four Loves. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc., 1960.

Logan, William. “Cultural Diversity, Cultural Heritage and Human Rights: Towards heritage management as human rights-based cultural practice.” International Journal of Heritage Studies. 18. no. 3 (2012): 231-44.

UNESCO. 2008. Culture. http://portal.unesco.org/culture/en/ev.php-URL_ID=2185&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html. (accessed 01/19/13).

Ethics and Theory ,

Come Fly Away

January 30th, 2013

Come Fly Away

 Katie Parrish

            Something that is very important to me and my background is the military.  I was raised as a military brat and have moved all over the world at times.  So naturally, I would want to do a blog post that would reflect that kind of life style that I have come to call normal.  One topic that I have come to know since being a military brat is that of airplanes. My dad was in the Air Force for 24 years and could tell you pretty much whatever you wanted to know about any kind of military plane out there.  The topic of my post today is what happens to the planes since the time that they had been used in our military when they become too old for actual military combat.  Where do these retired planes go when they are no longer being flown?  Are these planes being taken care of when they are not being used?  Is the military trying to preserve their military culture by keeping these planes preserved?

            From the conversations that I had with my dad, not many planes that have retired,  make it past retirement (Parrish, 2013, private conversation/interview).  Typically when a military grade plane is no longer active in service, it would be placed in an air plane graveyard.  Some of the planes could be stripped down for parts for other planes, or they could even be placed into museums like the Air and Space Museum in Washington D.C.  There are also other cases when the military will take away all the militaristic components to the planes and then sell them for the public and sometimes overseas (Treadway, 2013, private conversation).  Other planes that have since been retired, they can be maintained to go to different air shows around the country; those that are used in these kinds of air shows would have to be maintained to the same standards as planes that are still in service only if they are planned to be flown, otherwise, they are mostly used for show purposes for the public to come in and see the planes.  Some of the more interesting planes that have been retired in the most recent years are:

  • P-51 Mustang: World War II
  • B-52: Mostly flown in Vietnam, a revised form of this plane can be seen being flown for the military today, but it is not the same.
  • SR-71: A Cold War era spy plane.
  • F-117: one of the military’s first stealth spy planes.

Conservators at the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum have recently tried to conserve a H Ix V3, known as the batwing, which proved to be difficult.  It had been degraded over time and had a very delicate body which made it time sensitive to try and keep it safe( Smithsonian Air and Space Museum, 2011, Preserving and Displaying the ‘Bat-Wing Ship’).  This example is just something of what a conservator would have to go through to conserve a beaten up military plane.

            If you were to drive onto an Air Force base today you are more than likely to see  models of planes, new or retired, displayed all around the base. I suppose that this would be a form of preserving a great deal of the military’s material culture.  The preservation of many of these retired planes can be very interesting, and they are a great teaching tool for the future to see how technology has changed and affected different kinds of warfare. 

 B52

  Image 1: B-52

 F117

  Image 2: F-117

 P51

  Image 3: P-51 Mustang

 SR71

  Image 4: SR- 71

Bibliography

General Conservation

Ownership and the Reasons for the Conservation of Cultural Heritage

January 30th, 2013

Ownership and the Reasons for the Conservation of Cultural Heritage

 Jeremy Borrelli

            One of the most frequently asked questions I receive from family and friends is why do archaeologists do what they do? This is a central theoretical question all members of the field inevitably ask themselves and leads to much debate within the discipline. The most useful answer describes members of the anthropological community as stewards or ‘interpreters’ of culture and cultural heritage. But what about the people whose culture is being ‘interpreted’?

In an article discussing the politics of cultural heritage management in Australia, Smith (2000) argued that as scientific experts, archaeologists were often seen by governments as the `rightful’ body of people to act as stewards for heritage, disregarding Aboriginal and other interest groups (311). Aboriginal control of their own heritage was dismissed by policy makers in favor of a body of ‘experts’ who made claims to objectivity and the production of value-free knowledge. In this case the author leads the reader to question the role archaeologists play in management strategies for cultural heritage, and how stakeholders have been incorporated into those strategies.

            This issue plays into the managerial debate between governments, stakeholders and international organizations like the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) that recognizes cultural heritage as an essential human right (Logan 2012:235). Archaeologists and the conservators who maintain and preserve cultural heritage are needed to play a key role in the management of cultural heritage as they are trained to manage that material for a broader audience. It is important not to overlook the reasons why these people are employed, which is to serve as the intermediary between different cultures. To own one’s cultural heritage is a human right, and it is part of the ethical guidelines for all people who make their living dealing with culture to respect those rights of the people whose culture is being displayed or examined. The role of the archaeologist is then to find the balance between respecting the rights of cultural heritage and interpreting or presenting that heritage in a way that makes sense to others while maintaining minimal deviations from what that culture means to those who participate in it. Archaeologists, conservators, and all who deal in culture are trained experts in managing this balance and should be used to do so. Therefore, the use of these professionals by governments or international organizations is justified so long as the archaeologist remembers their role as mediators between cultures and adheres to the ethical principles that govern the discipline.

Ethics and Theory

Past as Propaganda, Part One: Nazi Artifacts in Museums

January 30th, 2013

Past as Propaganda, Part One: Nazi Artifacts in Museums

Chelsea Freeland

             Christopher Caple briefly discusses the inclusion of Nazi war memorabilia in his book, Conservation Skills: Judgement, Method and Decision Making.  He uses the notion as an example of the dangers of using the past as propaganda, asking if the artifacts “celebrate their views or remind of the dangers of a totalitarian regime” (20). 

             When I visited the Heeresgeschichtliches Museum in Vienna, I was struck by the images of Nazi propaganda throughout the World War II hall: not because I felt they didn’t belong there, but because I had never seen anything like them before.  As a war museum, rather than a history museum, the Heeresgeschichtliches has less of responsibility to the overall history of Austria and Vienna, instead focusing on the Thirty Years’ War, the Napoleonic Wars, and the two World Wars.  In this context, Nazi propaganda greatly explains how and why Austria came under German rule early in the conflict, making it an integral part of Austrian war history.

             What about other places in Europe, or even across the world?  Is it important to include Nazi propaganda in a museum of a country that did not experience the Holocaust, or does it detract valuable time and energy away from a more tragic chapter in world history?  Caple asks two questions in his book:

  1. Should they [Nazi artifacts] be collected and preserved as a record of the period and what happened at that time?
  2. Should they be displayed and brought to the attention of people? (2003: 20)

These are difficult questions, particularly for museums in Europe.  Coming from a background in history, I would argue that collecting and preserving artifacts for future generations, regardless of their sensitive nature, is an important job of museums in general.  Whether or not they place those artifacts on display, is another question entirely.

            For countries in Europe, particularly those directly affected by Nazi occupation, these artifacts are a part of their country’s heritage.  They form an integral part of the story of World War II that many people forget, or choose to ignore, giving precedence instead to the tragedy of the Holocaust.  An interesting point to make is that Nazi artifacts and memorabilia are part of the story of the Holocaust as well. 

            For me, the jury is still out on what priority these artifacts should have in a museum.  Should museums withhold limited resources from these types of sensitive artifacts, simply because of their nature?  How do curators decide what percentage of their museum to use for these artifacts?   Are they less important to display because they represent a chapter in history the world would like to forget?  Genocide memorials and exhibits across the world speak to this last question.

            As a world traveler, I remember being shocked that the first, and last, place I saw that much Nazi memorabilia was in Austria.  There were posters, plaques, journals, clothing, and pamphlets: all painstakingly preserved to show part of the story.  I will tell you that they made a huge impact on how I viewed the German conquest of Austria and the subsequent events of World War II.  I believe that is the goal of the museum: to expose the public to things they have never seen or thought about before, and in doing so, give them a broader historical experience.

References

Caple, C, 2003, Chapter 2: Reasons for Preserving the Past. In: Conservation Skills: Judgment, Method and Decision Making, pp. 12-23.

 

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The Appreciation of an Artefact and the Different Lenses of Value

January 30th, 2013

The Appreciation of an Artefact and the Different Lenses of Value

Kelci Martinsen

               When working with material culture, it is important to consider the various values that can be placed on artefacts, both by professionals and the public. The meaning an artefact has to someone can be based on many different factors including the object’s economic value, historical value, and artistic value. The value of an object is very subjective and one object is able to have many different meanings to various people. Professionals such as archaeologists and conservators strive to understand the importance an artefact had to a culture. But, conservators and archaeologists often need to balance their own values that they place on an object with the cultural reasons for valuing the same object.

               The public and professionals that work with artefacts, such as conservators and archaeologists, tend to value objects in different ways. The public is more likely to place an emotional value on an artefact than a conservator. Emotional values are based on sentiment and memories and objects that are given an emotional value evoke feelings from the viewer. An heirloom is an example of an object with emotional value. Those members of the public that decide to have an artefact conserved based on the object’s emotional value are often attempting to protect their own cultural history.  In contrast, as Elizabeth Pye (2000) in Caring for the Past, suggests, conservators often value objects for their material heritage which includes historic values, artistic values, scientific values, cultural values as well as values based on condition. Conservators also value an object based on the artefact’s authenticity. The authenticity of an object is very important because it determines whether an object is able to be used to make conclusions about the culture that produced the artefact. Art conservators value an artefact for the skills and techniques that were used to produce an object. Finally, archaeologists and conservators also base their appreciation of an object on its age and rarity and both of these factors can be used later to determine which artefacts are placed on display in museums.

                Additionally, artefacts are appreciated for their worth by both the public and conservators. Although, these separate groups focus on an object’s economic value for very different reasons. The public appreciates an artefact’s economic value for the sheer monetary worth of the object as well as the status that comes with owning an expensive artifact. However, archaeologists and conservators often deem the economic value of an artifact necessary in order to obtain insurance for the object. The public also determines the worth of an object based on the artefact’s utility.  Those artefacts that are no longer useful lose their value to a member of the public. In contrast, conservators and archaeologists often value objects that have been disposed of and therefore, do not base their appreciation of an object on its use.

                Most often, the interpretation of value is translated though exhibition and display of the material culture. Artefacts, which represent aspects that were valued by the culture of origin, should be selected for display. If a professional were to choose an object based on his or her own valuation system, the display would not properly educate the public.  Professionals need to extremely careful when displaying artefacts because when an artefact is displayed improperly, the public develops incorrect assumptions about the artefact’s culture.

References Cited

Pye, E. (2000). Caring for the Past: Issues in Conservation for Archaeology and Museums. London: Maney Publishing.

Ethics and Theory , , , ,

Skeletons in the Closet

January 30th, 2013

Skeletons in the Closet:

A Blog about Ethical Handling and Storage of Human Remains in the Conservation Community

Eva Falls

I was shocked that when I visited the AIC (American Institute for Conservation) website’s ethics page, there was hardly any mention of the complex and sensitive concerns that surround the treatment of human remains.  Just a call for conservators to obey applicable laws:

“The conservation professional should be cognizant of laws and regulations that may have a bearing on professional activity. Among these laws and regulations are those concerning the rights of artists and their estates, occupational health and safety, sacred and religious material, excavated objects, endangered species, human remains, and stolen property.” (AIC 1994)

This four part series will discuss the conservator’s role in the treatment and storage of human remains in museum and archaeological settings, as well as the ethical implications.  This is also a call for the AIC to use stronger language and address the treatment of human remains specifically in their code of ethics.

“Laying Down the Law”

             In order to discuss how conservators should approach human remains in accordance with the AIC’s code of ethics, it is important to be aware of the laws and regulations already in place in the United States.  The most influential piece of legislation that has affected the treatment of human remains would have to be NAGPRA (Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act) that was passed in 1990 (McGowan and LaRoche 1996).  This law was passed in response to Native American activist groups that demanded the return of their ancestors’ remains that were being stored in universities and museums across the country.  NAGPRA forces these institutions to catalog their collections and determine whether they are affiliated with a recognized tribe (Owsley and Jantz 2001).  That tribe can then determine the fate of the remains, most choosing reburial.

            This law was initially met with serious criticism by some members of the academic community, especially physical anthropologists that believed they were being robbed of valuable research.  It has politicized osteology and led to lengthy and expensive court battles (Rose et al. 1996).  The law does not protect African American cemeteries and other minority groups, nor does it protect Native American groups that have not been federally recognized (McGowan and LaRoche 1996).  Sometimes anthropologists cannot determine the tribal affiliation in cases such as Kennewick Man where the remains are extremely old.  This can and has led to contentious court battles over these remains (Owsley and Jantz 2001).

            Of course, this law has not actually led to the end of the world in the academic community.  NAGPRA has had some positive results and contributions.  It has provided funding and jobs for physical anthropologists to analyze collections, as well as funding for better storage facilities. Collections that have not been looked at in decades are now being closely examined using new techniques.  It has actually led collaboration and a new level of trust between academia and many Native American groups.  Anthropologists now have access to oral traditions, and Native Americans are participating in more archaeological projects than ever before. (Rose et al. 1996)

           Of course, the big question is: what has this to do with conservation?  Conservators should be assisting archaeologists and physical anthropologists in determining the proper care, handling, and storage of human remains as ethically as possible (which I will visit in the next installment).  They can add their expertise to the interdisciplinary teams that work with human remains in collections across the country.  Conservators can be advocates for the remains themselves.

 

Works Cited

AIC. 1994. Code of Ethics and Guidelines for Practice.

http://conservationus.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=page.viewPage&PageID=1026&E:\ColdFusion9\verity\Data\dummy.txt. (Accessed 01/21/2013).

McGowan, Gary S. and Cheryl J. LaRoche. 1996. The Ethical Dilemma Facing Conservation: Care and Treatment of Human Skeletal Remains and Mortuary Objects. Journal of the American Institute for Conservation 35(2): 109-121.

Owsley, Douglas W. and Richard L. Jantz. 2001. Archaeological Politics and Public Interest in Paleoamerican Studies: Lessons from Gordon Creek and Kennewick Man. American Antiquity 66(4):565-575.

Rose, Jerome C., Thomas J. Green, and Victoria D. Green. 1996. NAGPRA:  Osteology and the Repatriation of Skeletons. Annual Review of Anthropology 25: 81-103.

 

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