Social work celebration: Burwell receives Distinguished Faculty Legacy Award

Dr. N. Yolanda Burwell has received the East Carolina University School of Social Work 2018 Distinguished Faculty Legacy Award.

Burwell will be honored at the school’s annual Alumni and Friends Celebration on Friday, Oct. 26, at the Greenville Hilton. The Outstanding Alumni Award and A Rising Star Award also will be presented at the event. Nominations will be accepted until Sept. 20.

Dr. N. Yolanda Burwell

Dr. N. Yolanda Burwell

Burwell of Zebulon has been a faculty member of the leadership training program of the N.C. Rural Center for 24 years.

She joined the ECU School of Social Work in 1990 as an assistant professor. She taught courses in social work policy, human behavior and macro practice and served as the director of the undergraduate program for four years.

Colleagues said Burwell challenged and motivated students to become excellent social workers “because clients and communities deserved the best. She held them to high expectations, and her legacy is evident through the successful careers of former students.”

Her academic research focused on social welfare history in African-American communities, empowerment strategies and social work in rural communities. She also has conducted numerous training and consultations on teamwork, cultural competence, conflict resolution and communication.

Burwell was active on the local mental health board and the Mediation Center of Eastern North Carolina. In 2005, she joined the North Carolina Rural Economic Development Center as a senior fellow, where she worked for eight years. She studied barriers and incentives for economic opportunities, especially for low-resourced communities and groups.

Burwell received her bachelor’s degree in social work from N.C. A&T State University, a master’s of social work from Washington University and her doctorate from Cornell University.

The event will celebrate the school’s accomplishments, provide networking for alumni and friends, and raise money for the School of Social Work Scholarship Pool to support students in the program. Graduates from ECU’s bachelor of social work program leave with an average of almost $23,000 in debt, while graduate students incur on average about $55,000 in debt.

The event is open to the public. For more information, tickets or to nominate someone for an award, visit https://hhp.ecu.edu/socw/alumni/, email parkeran@ecu.edu or call Virginia Bunch at 252-737-2058.

 

-by Crystal Baity, ECU News Services

Public health student attends Harvard program

An East Carolina University student with an interest in health disparities took classes and conducted research through a prestigious Harvard University program this summer.

Kristin Coleman, a senior public health studies major concentrating in community health with a minor in economics, was one of 15 accepted into the 2018 FACETS program in Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

“I wanted to participate in Harvard’s program because their School of Public Health is one of the top schools in the nation in my field,” Coleman said. “I wanted to have the opportunity to connect with some of the top leaders in public health, network with students from other universities and develop a stronger research skillset.”

Kristin Coleman, a senior public health studies major concentrating in community health with a minor in economics, was one of 15 accepted into the 2018 FACETS program in Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Kristin Coleman was one of 15 accepted into the 2018 FACETS program in Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health. (Contributed photo)

Over six weeks in Boston, Coleman conducted research on delayed health care among low-income populations because of costs, bills and insurance. Working with mentors in the Department of Health Policy and Management, she created a poster to present at the end of the program where she had the opportunity to talk with students and Harvard professors about her research.

While there, she took courses in biostatistics, epidemiology, and social and behavioral sciences. She also learned more about graduate school, took an intensive GRE prep course and attended evening lectures.

“Through this experience, I learned so much about public health from the perspectives of others,” Coleman said. “I learned about what other students in my cohort were passionate about, which ranged from food deserts, access to health care and refugee health. We had so many conversations and everyone wanted to make some impact in the field of public health.”

She said her instructors challenged her to think deeper. “For example, if I answered a question incorrectly, I was asked why I answered it that way and then I was corrected. If I answered a question correctly, I had to explain why it was right. I was taught to go beyond the surface and not just settle for what is given to me, but to think through it,” Coleman said.

Coleman said ECU and her College of Health and Human Performance faculty mentor, Dr. Deeonna Farr, prepared her for the summer program in several ways. “She taught me the nuts and bolts of research, helped me with my summer program applications, and allowed me to grow as a student and researcher,” Coleman said. “ECU has allowed me to grow in other areas which help me make an impact in the world.”

After graduation this spring, Coleman plans to work in health care but ultimately wants to obtain a doctorate of public health. “I want to always learn and never stop growing,” said the Durham native.

 

-by Crystal Baity, ECU News Services

Researcher focuses on military health

East Carolina University’s Angela Lamson recently spent a weekend at the U.S. Department of Defense’s premier scientific meeting, sharing her research with military leaders in the area of integrated health care and the holistic health of military couples.

Lamson, who serves as the associate dean for research in the College of Health and Human Performance, was selected as one of the first ever presenters on military family readiness at the 2018 Military Health System Research Symposium. Her research with military populations has spanned over a decade and included many doctoral and masters level students as collaborators.

Angela Lamson, associate dean for reseasch in East Carolina University’s College of Health and Human Performance, shares her presentation on military family readiness at the 2018 Military Health System Research Symposium.

Angela Lamson, associate dean for reseasch in East Carolina University’s College of Health and Human Performance, shares her presentation on military family readiness at the 2018 Military Health System Research Symposium. (Contributed photos)

Her work has the potential to not only influence how military service members are treated physically, psychologically, socially and spiritually, but provides an integrated health care model that’s applicable to civilian clinicians and patients, who want to put a greater emphasis on the overall health of individuals and families.

“The major point I tried to stress was that your emotional, social and spiritual health are just as important as your physical health,” Lamson said. “We’re showing that a whole-health approach provides benefits to service members and their partners or families.”

Lamson’s research approach takes a look at military service members’ complete health care needs. In the past, research has often focused on the biomedical needs of service members, including physical ailments like muscle and joint injuries. Lamson’s work uses a biopsychosocial-spiritual model that not only assesses a service member’s physical health, but their mental and emotional health as well.

Lamson said that she and her colleague, Meghan Lacks, saw an absence of research involving two populations in the military – dual military couples where both partners are serving in active duty simultaneously and active duty women – that could especially benefit from this model of care. Lamson also partnered with co-researchers Amelia Muse and Erin Cobb.

ECU’s Angela Lamson was one of 10 researchers asked to present on military families at the 2018 Military Health System Research Symposium.

ECU’s Angela Lamson was one of 10 researchers asked to present on military families at the 2018 Military Health System Research Symposium.

“We want to help create and sustain a health care model so that when military personnel and their families see their primary care providers, they feel as though their behavioral health care is just as important as their physical health care,” Lamson said.

This type of care may include protocols, assessments and behavioral health providers trained in integrated care models that address depression, anxiety, trauma, social and spiritual health.

Lamson’s background in medical family therapy led to an interest in military health with individuals, couples, families and military health care providers. She said that over her career, she’s seen a positive correlation between family support and successful health care outcomes.

“Sometimes military personnel may worry about the stigma that comes with seeking mental health care because their job is to be mission ready,” she said. “When we use an integrated health care model, mental health and physical health are seen as co-equals. Clinicians then provide more preventative health care measures throughout every health care visit so that we identify and hopefully prevent problems before they reach a level of concern.”

Lamson said she was moved by the response to her work by those attending the symposium.

“The symposium was eye opening,” she said. “I had participants tell me that ‘no one is talking about this type of care. You’re doing work that no one at this conference has focused on before.’”

Lamson’s work with the Department of Defense began in 2009. After working closely with colleagues across many bases in North Carolina, Lamson submitted a research proposal in partnership with Operation Reentry North Carolina. Over her career, Lamson has secured $117,000 in funding from the Department of Defense and over $3 million in grants related to integrated behavioral health care.

“I’ve been able to realize that this type of research is how I can give back to those who serve our country,” Lamson said. “Research into how we care for our military members can make a huge difference in their lives and in the lives of civilians. There is plenty of work to be done; I’m going to keep moving forward and am excited for future possibilities with researchers who are passionate about strengthening the health of military members and their families.”

 

-by Matt Smith, University Communications

ECU College of Nursing welcomes new students at Lamp of Learning ceremony

The ECU College of Nursing welcomed 122 future nurses on Sept. 6 during a ceremony at the Brody School of Medicine.

Parents beamed while their daughters and sons crossed the stage to receive a gold lamp pin signifying service and light as part of the twice-annual Lamp of Learning ceremony that serves an official welcome to the college’s new Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program.

Nursing students Hanah Terhune, left, and Edirin Tebehaevu pin each other with the gold lamp pin at the ECU College of Nursing’s Lamp of Learning ceremony.

Nursing students Hanah Terhune, left, and Edirin Tebehaevu pin each other with the gold lamp pin at the ECU College of Nursing’s Lamp of Learning ceremony. (Photos by Conley Evans)

The lamp symbol, representing the founder of modern nursing, Florence Nightingale, also appears on the pin that students receive upon graduating. During the ceremony, Dr. Sylvia Brown, dean of the College of Nursing, urged students to reflect on the pin’s meaning when they wear it.

Nursing students Jeremy Wilson, left, and Samantha Williams, affix each other’s lamp pins at the Lamp of Learning ceremony on Sept. 6.

Nursing students Jeremy Wilson, left, and Samantha Williams, affix each other’s lamp pins at the Lamp of Learning ceremony on Sept. 6.

“Think about your role in providing service, not only when you graduate, but also right now as nursing students,” Brown said.

Students also recited the college’s pledge, which includes promises to respect patient confidentiality, to collaborate with other health professionals, to participate in the advancement of the profession and to advocate for patients.

Natasha Walker, a nursing student who grew up in Germany and Georgia, was among those receiving a pin to wear on her purple scrubs.

“I feel like all my work has paid off to get here,” she said. “I know that it’s going to be hard, but it’s all worth it in the end. This is what it was all about, being a nurse.

Admission to the College of Nursing’s BSN program is very competitive. In addition to meeting the university and college requirements, students’ scores on a required national pre-admission exam are taken into account along with their GPA, enrollment status and other factors. Students accepted into the program this fall had an average GPA of 3.8.

Nursing student DaCaria Adams leads the line of nursing students into the auditorium at the Brody School of Medicine for the Lamp of Learning ceremony.

Nursing student DaCaria Adams leads the line of nursing students into the auditorium at the Brody School of Medicine for the Lamp of Learning ceremony.

 

-by Natalie Sayewich, University Communications

Purple Gold Golf Tournament raises $20K for alumni association

The East Carolina University Alumni Association hosted the annual Purple Gold Golf Tournament on Friday, Sept. 7 at the Ironwood Golf and Country Club in Greenville, where 32 teams of golfers played for prizes, pride and tradition. The event raised nearly $20,000 for scholarships, according to the alumni association.

“This is one of our major scholarship fundraisers for the year,” said Heath Bowman, associate vice chancellor for alumni relations. “The timing of it makes it really fun. It’s an exciting game weekend in early fall when alumni return en masse to Greenville. And it’s an event that many people circle on their calendars.”

Golfers hit the links at Ironwood Golf & Country Club Friday, Sep. 7 for the Purple Gold Golf Tournament.

Golfers hit the links at Ironwood Golf & Country Club Friday, Sep. 7 for the Purple Gold Golf Tournament. (Photo by George Crocker)

Ryan Cole ’12 traveled from Syracuse, New York, to play in the tournament with his father, Randy Cole ’85, who made the trip from Stafford, Virginia. It was their first time participating in the tournament.

“We’ve wanted to do it for years,” Ryan Cole said. “I’ve always heard Ironwood is a beautiful course. I also like doing anything alumni related and spending time with my dad.”

For five-time participants Ryan Castillo, Jason Sagadraca, Andrew Sagadraca and Wayne Conner, the tournament has become a yearly tradition – and a chance to dress up. The team, named the Fore Fathers, arrived in matching American flag shorts, shirts and hats, complete with powdered wigs that would make George Washington proud.

“This is how we stand out. We can’t golf so we have to dress up,” Jason Sagadraca joked.

Proceeds from the Purple Gold Golf Open go directly to the ECU Alumni Scholarship Program.

Since its establishment in 2005, the program has awarded 297 scholarships totaling over $432,000.

Kirsten Powell, a senior public health student and alumni scholarship recipient, was on the course Friday chatting with alumni and overseeing the hole-in-one contest.

“It’s really rewarding to be out here,” she said. “This scholarship not only provides funds but opportunities; it’s awesome.”

Winners

1st place gross: ASAP Photo & Camera

  • Carder Frutiger ‘05
  • Stephen Pugh
  • Tyler Braden
  • Eric Miller

1st Place net: Institutional Interiors

  • Mike Baskett ‘77
  • Tim Hill ‘77
  • Roddy Seymour ‘73
  • Scott Seymour

For more information about the alumni scholarship program, visit piratealumni.com/scholarships.

 

-Erin Shaw, University Communications

 

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Four Seasons Chamber Music Festival kicks off 19th season

The Four Seasons Chamber Music Festival will kick off its 19th season on Sept. 27-28 at A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall on the campus of East Carolina University.

Grammy Award-winning violist Kim Kashkashian will join Ida Kavafian, Hye-Jin Kim, Marcy Rosen, Peter Wiley and festival artistic director Ara Gregorian to perform Edward Elgar’s Serenade for Strings (arranged for string sextet), Johannes Brahms’ String Sextet No. 2 in G Major Op. 36 and Pyotr Tchaikovsky’s Souvenir de Florence, Op. 70.

Ara Gregorian, artistic director of the Four Seasons Chamber Music Festival and professor of music at ECU .

Ara Gregorian, artistic director of the Four Seasons Chamber Music Festival and professor of music at ECU (Contributed photo)

The Four Seasons Chamber Music Festival is in residence at the ECU School of Music and will present a full concert season in Greenville and Raleigh, as well as concerts and initiatives in Durham, Greensboro, Charlotte and Southern Shores.

Artists for the Sept. 27-28 season opening will be: Kashkashian, who won the 2013 Grammy Award for best classical instrumental solo and was awarded the George Peabody Medal for outstanding contributions to music in America; Wiley, who has been a cellist for the Guarneri Quartet and the Beaux Arts Trio; violinist Kavafian, an artist of the Chamber Music Society of the Lincoln Center and former member of the Beaux Arts Trio; cellist Rosen, a former member of the Mendelsohn String Quartet; violinist Hye-Jin Kim, who won first prize at the Yehudi Menuhin and Concert Artist Guild international competitions; and violinist/violist Gregorian, a former member of Concertante and the Daedalus String Quartet, and a current member of the Cooperstown Quartet.

“The Season Opening Extravaganza brings a star-studded lineup of artists to Greenville,” Gregorian said. “Our guest artists will thrill the audience and I can think of no better program to kick off our 19th season.”

There are seven concerts in the Greenville concert season, which includes four Classic Series concerts, two Chamber Music Dressed Down concerts and one Four Seasons Features concert. Additional Four Seasons initiatives include Winter Workshop 2019, six Next Generation concerts, Children’s Residency XII and Family Night.

IF YOU GO:

For season and individual ticket information, call the ECU Central Ticket Office at 252-328-4788, or 1-800-ECU-ARTS.

For more information about the festival, go to www.ecu.edu/fourseasons or call 252-328-6019.

Greenville Concert Season

Season Opening Extravaganza: Sept. 27, 7 p.m.; Sept. 28, 8 p.m.; A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall

The Miraculous Bartok: Oct. 12, 7:30 p.m.; The Cupola Building

From the Homeland: Nov. 8, 7 p.m.; Nov. 9, 8 p.m.; A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall

Chamber Music Monuments: Feb. 7, 7 p.m.; Feb. 8, 8 p.m. A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall

Brahms the Mentor: Feb. 22, 7:30 p.m.; Location TBA

Four Seasons Features: Bach and the Violin: March 15, 7:30 p.m.; A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall

Thrilling Season Finale: March 28, 7 p.m.; March 29, 8 p.m.; A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall

Additional Greenville Four Seasons Concerts

Next Generation: Oct. 19, 7:30 p.m., free; A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall

Winter Workshop Concert I: Jan. 4, 7 p.m., A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall

Winter Workshop Concert II: Jan.  5, 7 p.m., A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall

Winter Workshop Concert III: Jan.  6, 3 p.m., A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall

Next Generation: March 16, 7:30 p.m., free; Wright Auditorium

Next Generation: March 17, 3 p.m., free; A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall

Family Night: April 12, 7 p.m., free; TBA

Spring Celebration: May 12, 4 p.m. TBA

Summer Chamber Music Institute Concert I: June 9, 7 p.m., free; A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall

Summer Chamber Music Institute Concert II: June 14, 7 p.m., free; A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall

Summer Chamber Music Institute Participant Marathon Concert: June 15, 1 p.m.; free; A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall

 

Contact: John Holloway, hollowayjo14@ecu.edu, 252-328-6019

ECU mourns the loss of professor, intervention cardiology pioneer

The East Carolina University and Brody School of Medicine community is mourning the loss of longtime faculty member and renowned interventional cardiologist Dr. Joseph Babb, who died in a car accident Thursday.

Dr. Joseph Babb

Dr. Joseph Babb

He was 79 years old.

Babb, a clinical professor in Brody’s Division of Cardiology, joined ECU’s faculty in 1995 and served in several capacities in addition to his professorship, including as director of the medical school’s cardiac catheterization laboratories and as program director for the cardiovascular diseases and interventional cardiology fellowships.

The day after learning of his death, students and colleagues remembered his kind manner and love of sharing his knowledge with students.

Brody nephrology professor Dr. MJ Barchman worked alongside and cared for many patients together with Babb for nearly 25 years.

“Dr. Babb was the epitome of a ‘gentleman and a scholar,’” Barchman said. “He was a highly competent cardiologist, patient teacher and a very kind man. To say he will be missed is a huge understatement.”

Dr. Susan Schmidt, Brody’s associate dean for student affairs, echoed Babb’s impact as an educator, calling him “a long-time student favorite” who represented “the best of ECU Physicians and our Brody faculty.”

Babb, a clinical professor in Brody’s Division of Cardiology, graduated from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore in 1966. He went on to complete an internship, residency and fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School in Boston.

According to the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI), Babb served in Vietnam and at Walter Reed Hospital as a member of the U.S. Army Medical Corps from 1968 to 1972.

In 1981, while an assistant professor of Medicine and Cardiologist at the Pennsylvania State University Hershey Medical Center, Babb reportedly conducted the first coronary angioplasty at Hershey. He later also became the first to perform that procedure in the state of Connecticut while serving as chief of cardiology at Bridgeport Hospital.

Babb joined ECU’s faculty in 1995 and served in several capacities in addition to his professorship, including as director of the medical school’s cardiac catheterization laboratories and as program director for the cardiovascular diseases and interventional cardiology fellowships.

Throughout his five decades in medicine, Babb was bestowed countless awards and honors.

He received the Distinguished Service Award of the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions in 2005, was a past governor of the American College of Cardiology from Connecticut and North Carolina, and was elected by his colleagues a Master of the Society of Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions in 2014. He was also a fellow of the American College of Cardiology and the Council for Clinical Cardiology of the American Heart Association, as well as a past SCAI president.

“Joe Babb was literally the best of the best. The best doctor and the best patient advocate I’ve ever known,” Norm Linsky, SCAI’s executive director from 2001–2015, said in a release. “When he spoke, he commanded the respect of everyone in the room. He knew that he was not advocating for doctors, rather for patient care, patients’ access to care, and a physician’s ability to do what is right for their patients.”

On Sept. 5, the day before his death, the exclusive medical society, Patient Preferred Physicians and Practitioners, announced that Babb had been meritoriously named 2018’s “Patient Preferred Interventional Cardiologist” for the state of North Carolina for his “dedication and excellence in patient care.”

Brody nephrology professor Dr. MJ Barchman worked alongside and cared for many patients together with Babb for nearly 25 years.

“Dr. Babb was the epitome of a ‘gentleman and a scholar,’” Barchman said. “He was a highly competent cardiologist, patient teacher and a very kind man. To say he will be missed is a huge understatement.”

Dr. Susan Schmidt, Brody’s associate dean for student affairs, echoed Babb’s impact as an educator, calling him “a long-time student favorite” who represented “the best of ECU Physicians and our Brody faculty.”

Babb’s students went out of their way to share fond memories of him and thoughts for his family upon hearing of his passing.

“I had the privilege of learning from Dr. Babb during the EKG course this past spring. He shared with us his light sense of humor and passion for teaching during every class session,” said Frank Jefferson, a fourth-year medical student. “My heart aches for his family. Dr. Babb’s memory will live on through the knowledge that he bestowed upon myself and countless other students as we use it to care for our patients.”

Dr. Mark Iannettoni, chair of Brody’s Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, said Babb was “a pioneer and an icon in the field of intervention cardiology.”

“He was a master technician and clinician who regarded his most important responsibilities were his patients, advancing the academic mission of the institution and preparing the next generation of cardiologists to carry on these missions,” Iannettoni said. “His kind and gentle spirit, and concern for his colleagues is the most important lesson he taught us and the biggest loss for the department. We can only hope to be the person Joe Babb was.”

 

-by Rob Spahr, University Communications

MFA alumna honored with Valdosta Presidential Excellence Award for Teaching

Abigail Heuss, who holds a Master of Fine Arts in metal design from ECU’s School of Art and Design, is the recipient of Valdosta State University’s 2018 Presidential Excellence Award for Teaching.

The Presidential Excellence Award for Teaching recognizes a faculty member who employs innovative teaching strategies and demonstrates a strong commitment to student success. Heuss, an associate professor of art, was chosen for consistently creating an active learning environment that encourages collaboration, inquiry, and self-discovery.

“[Abigail] is the most selfless and generous teacher with which I have had the pleasure to work,” said Hollis Barnett, interim head of VSU’s Department of Art and Design. “Her Student Opinion of Instruction (SOI) scores are always among the highest within the department and the university. It is not uncommon for the students to rank her teaching a perfect five on a five-point scale.

“[She] is an organized thinker and focused instructor. She is a natural teacher. Her personality and enthusiasm is infectious for her students and her colleagues.”

Pictured left to right are Valdosta State University President Richard A. Carvajal; Abigail Heuss, VSU associate professor of art; and Dr. Robert Smith, VSU provost and vice president for Academic Affairs.

Pictured left to right are Valdosta State University President Richard A. Carvajal; Abigail Heuss, VSU associate professor of art; and Dr. Robert Smith, VSU provost and vice president for Academic Affairs. (Contributed photo)

Heuss, who specializes in jewelry, metalsmithing, and three-dimensional art, has taught at VSU since 2013.

“This award is such an honor,” she said. “I love my job. I wake up excited to come to work every day, and so it’s really nice to hear that I’ve had an impact on other people’s experiences at VSU as well.

“My goal as a teacher is to inspire and encourage students of all levels to work hard, to take chances by investing something of themselves into the work, and ultimately to become empowered by making art. I work to build an environment where students feel safe to ask questions, take risks, and occasionally fail at things in the short term in order to learn how to research and be active learners.”

Heuss has coordinated several exhibits to allow students to showcase their work and build their resume. She also maintains a website that features student work from VSU’s jewelry and metalsmithing courses.

Heuss redesigned VSU Department of Art and Design’s small metals lab to make it more efficient for her students and purchased updated metalsmithing tools and equipment. She also secured a grant from The Enamelist Society to purchase the necessary materials and equipment to teach enameling in one of her courses.

Her motivation to see students succeed comes from her passion for the art she creates with her students, Heuss said.

“There’s something really empowering about learning how to make things,” she said. “I think about the change in my own life that came about when I figured out that I had that power to take a material, take tools, and turn that material into something that was meaningful to me and to other people. Being able to help somebody else have that same experience is really beautiful to me.”

Heuss’s work has been featured in numerous local, regional, national, and international exhibitions and publications. Many of her pieces have won awards, and she has presented on her craft at multiple conferences.

 

Read more at valdosta.edu.

 

State releases data on lab school performance

Students work at their desks at the ECU Community School.

Students work at their desks at the ECU Community School. (Contributed photos)

On Wednesday, the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction released the first year of data on student achievement at UNC System Laboratory Schools at Western Carolina University and East Carolina University.

State test results show that more than half of the students at Catamount School at WCU met proficiency benchmarks, with 65 percent of students scoring proficient in reading. Students enrolled in the ECU Community School — the overwhelming majority of whom are from economically disadvantaged families — met expected growth targets in reading and math.

The data also reveal clear areas for improvement. The UNC System Office and the UNC Board of Governors Subcommittee on Laboratory Schools will continue to monitor these issues and work towards finding solutions.

“The General Assembly challenged our universities to build new K-12 schools that expand opportunity for some of the state’s most underserved students,” said UNC System President Margaret Spellings. “As first adopters, our lab schools at ECU and Western have stepped up to that challenge with optimism and creativity, and I commend them for their hard work. At the same time, we all know there is much more work to be done to ensure that this next generation of students is well-equipped for college and career, and we stand ready to support the Catamount School and the ECU Community School in their continued efforts to increase student achievement.”

Students enrolled in the ECU Community School — the overwhelming majority of whom are from economically disadvantaged families — met expected growth targets in reading and math.

Students enrolled in the ECU Community School — the overwhelming majority of whom are from economically disadvantaged families — met expected growth targets in reading and math.

“I applaud the leaders, faculty, and staff at Western Carolina and ECU for their hard work in getting brand new schools up and running on a very tight timeline,” UNC Board of Governors member and Subcommittee Chair Phil Byers said. “The parents who have chosen to enroll their children in our lab schools have entrusted the UNC System with a great responsibility. While much of the new data is encouraging, the results also indicate the size of the challenge that our institutions have gladly taken on. Our subcommittee is committed to high expectations for our lab schools, and we will continue to provide whatever support we can to ensure that these first two schools, along with the three that opened this summer, are successful.”

In addition to the Lab Schools at ECU and Western Carolina, three additional schools opened this fall: Appalachian Academy at Middle Fork in Walkertown (Appalachian State University), Moss Street Partnership School in Reidsville (UNC Greensboro), and the DC Virgo Preparatory Academy in Wilmington (UNC Wilmington).

 

-Contact: ECU News Services, 252-328-6481, ecunews@ecu.edu

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