ITCS employee named Inclusivity Award winner

Lisa Barry, a member of the East Carolina University Information Technology and Computing Services (ITCS) department, was one of four women who received the Internet2 Inclusivity Award at the annual Internet2 Global Summit in San Diego earlier this month.

Barry is a network analyst at ECU and is responsible for administration of enterprise-level network services including firewalls, VPN systems, intrusion detection and prevention systems.

Lisa Barry, Internet2 Inclusivity Award winner

Lisa Barry, Internet2 Inclusivity Award winner. (contributed photo)

Internet2 is a nonprofit technology community that was founded by the nation’s leading higher education institutions. The group serves more than 300 universities in the U.S. The Inclusivity Award is a scholarship awarded to women in the information technology field to encourage and support their professional growth.

“As soon as I read the purpose of the Internet2 Inclusivity Award was to support emerging information technology professions by providing an opportunity to build the knowledge capital of their institutions and help diversify technology, I knew Lisa was a worthy candidate,” said Andy Anderson, director of ECU ITCS network services.

The recipients of the award have access to mentors and a network of women IT and technology professionals and participate in discussions about the latest innovations and best practices for their campuses.

“The Internet2 Inclusivity Scholarship was designed to celebrate and promote women working within the information technology field. It is an honor not only to receive the scholarship but also to represent ECU at the Global Summit in San Diego,” said Barry. “Participating in the summit is a wonderful way to bring back new ideas and technologies to our university. Opportunities such as this allow us to grow and expand the efforts ITCS is putting forth to promote research and ensure ECU becomes the next great national university.”

In addition to Barry, Gladys Andino of Purdue University, Stephanie Collins from Virginia Tech and Manisha Kanodia of the University of California were named recipients of the award.

“The value of Lisa attending this conference has already become evident.  She gathered a tremendous amount of information related to Internet2 services that support research and we are in the process of determining which may be a good fit for ECU,” said Anderson.

 

-by Jamie Smith, ECU News Services

Health and Human Performance inducts six to the Wall of Fame

Six people were inducted on April 20 to the East Carolina University College of Health and Human Performance Marvin and Joyce Johnson Wall of Fame.

The inductees were Linner Griffin and Robin McManus, who were both inducted posthumously, along with Jannis Shea, Thom Skalko, Jerry Tolley and Odell Welborn. Welborn died May 10.

Griffin, professor emeritus at ECU, served on the ECU faculty from 1990 until her retirement in 2013. She served in a variety of roles including associate professor of social work and associate dean for graduate studies, interim dean of the School of Social Work and Criminal Justice, and associate provost for academic program planning and development.

McManus was an instructor in the Department of Human Development and Family Science and lead teacher in the infant classroom of the child development laboratory, now known as the Nancy Darden Child Development Center. She helped secure the center’s accreditation by the National Association for the Education of Young Children and a five-star child care license.

Shea’s teaching career spanned 37 years including two stints as acting chair for the Department of Child Development and Family Relations and as assistant to the dean for Helen Grove. She taught the first introduction to marriage and family course offered in home economics and every child development and family science course before the family therapy program was established. She served on the committee that developed the ECU code of operations and designed and helped implement the first interdisciplinary minor in gerontology at ECU.

The following people were recently inducted to the College of Health and Human Performance Marvin and Joyce Johnson Wall of Fame: from left, Jerry McManus representing the late Robin McManus, Bobby Griffin representing the late Linner Griffin, Thom Skalko, Jannis Shea and Jerry Tolley. Inductee Odell Welborn is not pictured.

The following people were recently inducted to the College of Health and Human Performance Marvin and Joyce Johnson Wall of Fame: from left, Jerry McManus representing the late Robin McManus, Bobby Griffin representing the late Linner Griffin, Thom Skalko, Jannis Shea and Jerry Tolley. Inductee Odell Welborn is not pictured. (contributed photo)

Skalko served as a professor at ECU from 1996-2017 including as chair of the Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies from 1996-2004. He directed the ECU Horizons Day Treatment program, providing intervention for youth with severe emotional and behavioral disorders. Skalko collaborated with educators in South Africa to establish the country’s first degree in recreational therapy.

Tolley has been an active member of the college’s Dean’s Advancement Council for decades and a longtime supporter of ECU athletics. A track and football athlete at ECU, Tolley coached football at Elon College, where he led the team to national titles in 1980 and 1981. He held academic and administrative positions at Elon University and served as associate vice president of Laboratory Corporation of America. He is a nationally known sports author and serves as the mayor of Elon.

Welborn, faculty emeritus at ECU, coached the Pirate wrestling, track and football teams between 1960 and 1992. He led the football team after Coach Clarence Stasavich had a heart attack in 1963. Welborn posted an undefeated record as interim head coach and continued as an assistant after Stasavich’s return, helping the Pirates win two consecutive bowl games. He was inducted in the ECU College of Education’s Educators Hall of Fame in 2010. He taught health, physical education, driver education and traffic safety for decades.

The inductees joined 30 outstanding men and women already recognized on the College of Health and Human Performance Wall of Fame, which is on the first floor of Rivers Building.

The wall was established with a $50,000 donation in 2015 in honor of Joyce Johnson in support of the Department of Human Development and Family Science.

Marvin and Joyce Johnson met in the early 1950s at ECU where Marvin majored in physical education and Joyce in home economics. Marvin Johnson was drafted into the Korean War and Joyce Johnson completed her degree. Following the war, they were married and raised their family in Atlanta.

Funds from the inductions help students in a variety of ways from membership fees for professional organizations and development to academic programming and events for outstanding seniors.

Angela Lamson, associate dean for research in the college and professor of human development and family science, served as master of ceremonies for the event.

 

-by Crystal Baity, ECU News Services

ECU’s Harriot College recognizes exceptional staff

The Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences Staff Council hosted its second annual Staff Awards and Recognition Ceremony May 11 in Harvey Hall. The event honors all dedicated THCAS staff members and recognizes the hard work they engage in on a day-to-day basis.

“Our college has the best staff at ECU,” said Dean William M. Downs. “We could not lead in all the categories in which we lead without them. I am really proud of this group.”

•Julie Marik, Chris Bonnerup and Chastidy Ridley were honored with Harriot College’s 2018 staff excellence awards and professional development grant at a special ceremony May 11.

Julie Marik, Chris Bonnerup and Chastidy Ridley were honored with Harriot College’s 2018 staff excellence awards and professional development grant at a special ceremony May 11.
(Photos by Rob Taylor)

During the ceremony, two staff members received Staff Excellence Awards, and one staff member received the Professional Development Grant. The awards acknowledge administrative or technical staff within the college who show exemplary professionalism and go above and beyond the requirements of their position, while the grant is awarded to a person who is actively pursuing career advancement within his or her field.

Julie Marik, research specialist in the Department of Biology, who serves as greenhouse manager and BIOL 1201 and 2251 lab coordinator, was awarded the Senior Staff Excellence Award. Chastidy Ridley, lead administrative support associate in the Department of Political Science, was awarded the Junior Staff Excellence Award. Chris Bonnerup, advanced research specialist in the Department of Physics and engineer for the ECU Accelerator Laboratory, was awarded the Professional Development Grant.

“I feel very fortunate to work with such a wonderful group of people every day, and I appreciate all they do for me,” said Marik, who is an alumna of ECU (’07) and has worked at the university for 10 years. “I work with a great group of fellow staff and amazing teachers and researchers who are doing very cool science.”

Ridley also is an ECU alumna (’14). She has served as the lead administrative associate in the Department of Political Science for nearly two years and worked with the staff in the Department of Biology from 2015-2016.

•Gift baskets from the THCAS Staff Council were given to the three award winners.

Gift baskets from the THCAS Staff Council were given to the three award winners.

“I am humbled that I have colleagues who think so highly of me. It is always great to have reassurance that you are doing your best, and I feel awards like this do just that,” said Ridley. “Working within the college, I have gained great relationships and friendships. I also enjoy that I now get to supervise student office assistants, as I was once one myself. I find it rewarding that this comes full circle.”

Prior to the ceremony, many colleagues provided words of praise in their nominations of the candidates.

“Julie brings to her challenging position a remarkable combination of professionalism, expertise, strong work ethic, creativity, positive attitude and a desire to help and serve,” wrote a supporter of Marik. “Julie truly exemplifies our Pirate motto, Servire.”

Another nominator wrote, “Julie’s dedication to undergraduate success is evident by her excellent mentorship of TAs and her willingness to take on pedagogical changes to the laboratory courses she oversees.”

A colleague of Ridley’s commented, “Chastidy Ridley is a prime example of the Pirates that we like to see coming from East Carolina University. She was a dedicated student and student worker, and now we are fortunate to have her as a staff member for THCAS. She works tirelessly to ensure that her chair, faculty and students are assisted.”

“Ms. Ridley comes to work each day with a positive attitude and works to help raise the spirits of others around her,” commented another colleague. “She makes it clear she cares about others and will go out of her way to help students and faculty in any way she can.”

Door prizes donated by campus and community organizations were raffled off to attendees of the event.

Door prizes donated by campus and community organizations were raffled off to attendees of the event.

Bonnerup, winner of the professional development grant, began his career with ECU in 2004 as a research instructor in radiation oncology at the Brody School of Medicine. He moved to Harriot College’s Department of Physics in 2013.

“I’m very thankful for the college to offer these funds, as specialized training and continuing education opportunities are not readily available in Greenville,” said Bonnerup.

Bonnerup will use his $1,200 grant to attend this year’s annual Symposium of Northeastern Accelerator Personnel in Madison, Wisconsin. The conference focuses on the interest of the people who use, build, maintain and repair particle accelerators for academic research and commercial purposes.

“This year’s meeting happens to be a great time to attend, in that the itinerary will include a VIP tour of National Electrostatics Corporation, the manufacturer of the ECU particle accelerator,” said Bonnerup. “The venue is also a great opportunity to meet with highly experienced users of these machines, discuss problems they have experienced and techniques to address and solve them. I hope to bring these skills and techniques back to ECU and use them to provide enhanced engineering and user support for the ECU accelerator lab.”

 

-by Lacey L. Gray, University Communications

ECU Club Baseball to defend World Series title

East Carolina University’s Club Baseball team will defend its National Club Baseball Association World Series title in Holly Springs. ECU is ranked No. 1 in the country, but was given the No. 2 seed in the tournament and will open play against Penn State at 2:45 p.m. on May 25.

The Pirates won the 2017 NCBA World Series championship with a 1-0 win over Central Florida in 10 innings and makes its sixth World Series appearance since 2011. The ECU club team won the title in 2011 and 2017.

ECU advanced to the World Series by claiming its fifth straight Mid-Atlantic Regional Championship, defeating the University of Maryland 15-8 in Martinsville, Virginia, and is once again strong favorites to defend the title.

“After losing 18 seniors and all three starting pitchers from last year’s team and with only two starters returning in the lineup, I am pretty excited and proud of the success we had this year,” said Ben Fox, head coach of the ECU Club Baseball Team. “This is something we have never experienced in the history of our program. The last time we won the World Series it took us two years to get back. So to be going back after losing so many guys, to defend our national championship makes me extremely proud of my team and coaching staff, all their hard work and dedication has paid off.”

Following last year’s championship run, Tanner Duncan became the first ECU club baseball player to sign a Major League Baseball contract. Duncan is currently pitching with the Houston Astros organization and will be pitching against the Kinston Wood Ducks at Grainger Stadium May 29-31.

The World Series success and individual player success have drawn significant recognition for the club baseball program.

“It has allowed us to gain some national publicity that most people would never think a club baseball team would get,” said Fox. “Especially with Tanner being successful and moving up the minor league ranks and the National Championship last year. I think it shows that our program is a legitimate option for high school baseball players all across the country that don’t get the opportunity to play at the next level.”

Other teams joining ECU in the 2018 NCBA World Series include top seed Oregon, Florida State, Grand Canyon University, Wisconsin, Iowa State, Penn State and Texas A&M.

Visit www.clubbaseball.org to follow ECU through the World Series. For additional information, contact Justin Waters with ECU Club Sports at 252-737-2713 or watersj@ecu.edu.

 

  1. Contact: Justin Waters, ECU Club Sports, watersj@ecu.edu

T-shirt sales benefit Aces for Autism

ECU Dowdy Student Stores and their vendor, Perfect Promotions & More of Apex, presented a check on May 21 for $2,250 to Aces for Autism, a not-for-profit treatment and educational center in Greenville. The center provides doctor-prescribed therapies to help individuals with autism reach their full potential.

The money was raised through sales of Aces for Autism basketball T-shirts at Dowdy Student Store, the Health Sciences Bookstore and Minges Coliseum during basketball season. The ECU Pirate basketball team has been very involved in raising awareness of Aces for Autism programs.

ECU Dowdy Student Stores and vendor Perfect Promotions & More of Apex present a check to Aces for Autism. (Contributed photo)

ECU Dowdy Student Stores and vendor Perfect Promotions & More of Apex present a check to Aces for Autism. (Contributed photo)

“We are so grateful for this contribution,” said Kyle Robinson, board president of Aces for Autism. “We provide financial assistance to help with treatment for about 30 families right now, and this money will help support that effort.”

Clients of the program range from 16 months to 14 years of age, Robinson said.

Presenting the check were Dowdy Student Stores Director Bryan Tuten, Associate Store Director Bob Walker, Merchandise Manager John Palmer, Interim Associate Vice Chancellor for Business Services Kevin Carraway and Perfect Promotions Vice President of Sales Stephen McFadden, who is an ECU alumnus. On hand to receive the check were Kyle Robinson, ECU basketball operations and Aces for Autism board president; Margaret Turner, Aces for Autism board treasurer; and Brian Overton, ECU director of player development.

Dowdy Student Stores are university-owned and operated bookstores and sell shirts benefitting a variety of causes throughout the school year. Past recipients have included organizations supporting childhood cancer, breast cancer, ALS and campus military programs.

“I’m extremely grateful that our customers and Pirate Nation continue to step up and support these causes by buying these T-shirts that support such worthy local causes,” Tuten said.

 

-Contact: Karen Simmons, 252-737-1311 or simmonska@ecu.edu

“The Robert Morgan Papers” on exhibit in Joyner Library

Sen. Robert Burren Morgan

Sen. Robert Burren Morgan (Photos contributed by Joyner Library)

Joyner Library is currently exhibiting “The Robert Morgan Papers,” a selection of materials from the Senator Robert Burren Morgan Collection, on the fourth floor of Joyner Library. Morgan, a United States Senator for North Carolina from 1975-1981, has also served as North Carolina’s attorney general, and later as director of the State Bureau of Investigation.

On display through Nov. 30, items from the collection include political campaign posters for a United State Senate race, letters from John Wayne, Gov. Jimmy Carter and an array of photographs and papers.

Papers, letters, and photographs chronicle Morgan’s successes and challenges throughout his political career.

Papers, letters, and photographs chronicle Morgan’s successes and challenges throughout his political career.

An April 8 opening reception was held for donors, friends and family and other supporters of Morgan and the collection.

Guests attended an April 8 opening reception and exhibit viewing.

Guests attended an April 8 opening reception and exhibit viewing.

A special announcement about the creation of the Senator Robert Morgan Research Award was also presented during the event. The one-time $1,000 research award will be granted to any ECU graduate or undergraduate student who uses the Robert Morgan Collection as the main primary source for either a traditional paper or digital scholarship piece. Entries will be accepted through May 2019 with the winning entry selected by an appointed committee.

View the complete Senator Robert Burren Morgan digital collection at https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/collection/robertmorgan.aspx.

 

-Contact: Heather White at whiteh@ecu.edu for more information. 

Remains of a possible 1619 Dutch privateer identified in Bermuda

East Carolina University archaeologists working in partnership with the National Museum of Bermuda (NMB) have announced that they may be one step closer to linking an unidentified shipwreck site to the nearly 400–year-old story of a stranded Dutch privateer or pirate ship.

The wooden sailing ship, described by the fifth Bermuda Governor Nathaniel Butler as a Dutch pinnace traveling from the Caribbean, reportedly grounded on the rocks of Bermuda’s western reef in 1619. Islanders rescued the Dutch and English crew of down-on-their-luck buccaneers, and they were repatriated within a year; the ship itself was reportedly left to wind and weather, disappearing with the next Atlantic-borne storm.

ECU maritime studies professor Bradley Rodgers and a team of students have mounted the first scientific exploration of an unidentified shipwreck site in Bermuda. (Photo credit National Museum of Bermuda)

ECU maritime studies professor Bradley Rodgers and a team of students have mounted the first scientific exploration of an unidentified shipwreck site in Bermuda. (Photos contributed by the National Museum of Bermuda)

New archaeological evidence, however, suggests that Bermudians may have secretly lightered the cargo ashore and floated the ship off the reef, hiding it in a shallow bay to salvage arms, lumber and hardware — essential commodities for an isolated but burgeoning colony.

The wreck site may represent one of the earliest colonial-built, Dutch vessels discovered in the Americas, and the earliest and perhaps only fully archaeologically documented privateer/pirate vessel, according to Dr. Bradley Rodgers, ECU professor of maritime studies. Combined historical and archaeological studies will continue and could reveal new details about life in the 17th century, wrecking practices and the early settlement period in Bermuda.

In 2008, Rodgers examined a wreck located in a quiet harbor at the west end of the island, a short distance from the Dutch pinnace’s last known position on the reef. He recognized the wreck to be an early and significant vessel type. In May 2017, Rodgers returned with a team from ECU, and along with NMB, mounted the first scientific exploration of the site, archaeologically examining, mapping and recording the exposed sections of the wreck.

The remains are well known to locals, but their origins are not.

“The ship remains appear to be early and significant, and archaeological evidence demonstrates unmistakable traits of northern Dutch design, techniques that have not been used in four centuries,” Rodgers said.

It was not uncommon during the 17th century to salvage ships in the west end of Bermuda, he said, out of sight of customs officials in the east end, to avoid taxes or levies on the goods and materials retrieved. “Salvage marks are plentiful on the disarticulated wreck, and though many of the fasteners and planks have been removed, many of the timber remains are in great condition,” he said.

Students record timbers on the site of an unidentified shipwreck site in Bermuda. (Photo contributed by the National Museum of Bermuda)

Students record timbers on the site of an unidentified shipwreck site in Bermuda.

There is much work to do to complete the analysis of the shipwreck, according to Rodgers, as it takes “extensive archival research, archaeological analysis and funding to fully verify the find, and it is one of the more confusing wreck sites we have ever studied — it has been completely taken apart down to the fastenings.”

However, the team has documented enough of the site to identify ship construction techniques matching those described in Dutch treatises of the 17th century. In addition, the wood has been identified as greenheart (Ocotea reodiei), a New World timber historically harvested in Dutch trading territory in South America, and the few artifacts seen reflect Dutch northern European heritage from the early 17th century.

Further investigation should shed more light on life in 17th century Bermuda and its early settlement, especially pertaining to the salvage of ships in distress.

“The economics and impact of salvage in the early settlement of Bermuda has not yet fully been explored by academics and can provide a fascinating window into how the first Bermudians survived on an isolated island,” said Elena Strong, NMB executive director.

“Bermuda’s rich underwater cultural heritage, which is protected by law, is not only a valuable cultural tourism asset, but also comprises a tangible archive of the interaction of African, American and European cultures over five centuries,” she said. “Over the past 40 years, research on these wrecks has yielded considerable data informing historical narratives about the lives of the people who depended on these vessels to ferry goods and people to various ports along the Atlantic littoral.”

 

-Contact: Bradley Rodgers, professor of maritime studies, ECU, rodgersb@ecu.edu, and Elena Strong, executive director, National Museum of Bermuda, director@nmb.bm

ECU takes third in NASA rover challenge

Five College of Engineering and Technology students recently competed and won third place in the 2018 Human Exploration Rover Challenge. The April event, which was held in Huntsville, Alabama, was sponsored by Marshall Space Flight Center and U.S. Space & Rocket Center.

According to a NASA news release, the competition challenged high school and college teams to design, build and test human-powered roving vehicles inspired by the Apollo lunar missions and future exploration missions to the moon, Mars and beyond. This year’s competition challenged teams to complete 14 obstacles and five tasks throughout a half-mile course, with a six-minute supply of “virtual” oxygen.

From left, Morgan Watkins, Dr. Tarek Abdel-Salam (advisor), Andrew Grena, Jameson Morris and Evan Diener (sitting). Not pictured: Tanner Guin. (Contributed photos)

From left, Morgan Watkins, Dr. Tarek Abdel-Salam (advisor), Andrew Grena, Jameson Morris and Evan Diener (sitting). Not pictured: Tanner Guin. (Contributed photos)

ECU competed against 64 colleges and universities in the Human Exploration Rover Challenge.

ECU competed against 63 colleges and universities in the Human Exploration Rover Challenge.

The obstacles simulated the terrain found throughout the solar system, and the tasks challenged teams to collect and return samples, take photographs and plant a flag. Teams had to decide which tasks and obstacles to attempt or bypass before their clock expired.

ECU’s team competed against 63 other universities and colleges. They were the only team to complete the entire obstacle course. The team included juniors Evan Diener, Andrew Grena, Tanner Guin, Jameson Morris and Morgan Watkins. Dr. Tarek Abdel-Salam served as the faculty advisor.

“The goal was for these students to take what they learned and apply it to future competitions,” said Abdel-Salam.

Students in the team are members of the college’s American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The team’s participation in the competition was made possible by the North Carolina Space Grant.

This year marked the second time an ECU team participated in the event.

ECU juniors from the College of Engineering and Technology built a human-powered roving vehicle that had to handle simulated terrain found throughout the solar system.

ECU juniors from the College of Engineering and Technology built a human-powered roving vehicle that had to handle simulated terrain found throughout the solar system.

 

-by Michael Rudd, University Communications

Conference promotes diversity, inclusion

Keynote speaker Derrick Jefferson, an academic librarian at American University in Washington, D.C. presented to a crowd of 125 attendees. (Photos contributed by Joyner Library)

Keynote speaker Derrick Jefferson, an academic librarian at American University in Washington, D.C., presented to a crowd of 125 attendees. (Photos contributed by Joyner Library)

A recent conference at ECU aimed to promote a better understanding of diversity and inclusion among paraprofessional library staff across the state.

Joyner Library’s 14th annual Paraprofessional Conference, “Navigating the Path to Diversity,” was held May 11 for school, public and academic library staff, who aren’t professionally licensed librarians.

The conference provided 125 attendees an array of sessions and presentations focused on the concept that libraries should be inclusive environments that make their many resources available to all individuals in the communities they serve.

It also offered guidance on how library staff might better navigate their roles and responsibilities in creating safe environments by embracing concepts that promote an understanding of diversity.

“I think for really inclusive organizations to come into fruition, people are going to have to back down a little bit and listen,” said keynote speaker Derrick Jefferson, an academic librarian at American University in Washington, D.C. “Really listen. Then listen to more people. And it’s going to take a lot of talking, and a lot sharing, and a lot of conversations. I think that’s when we begin breaking down walls.”

David Hisle presented an iPad photography application and challenged participants to a self-guided tour of the library.

David Hisle presented an iPad photography application and challenged participants to a self-guided tour of the library.

For many individuals and communities, a library may be the only free source of computer and Internet access, classes and events, and special support for the disabled. Libraries also offer facilities where academic and civic groups can congregate around various local and national topics.

Attendees participated in a raffle for the chance to win amazing door prizes, announced at the end of the conference.

Attendees participated in a raffle for the chance to win amazing door prizes, announced at the end of the conference.

“Libraries aren’t just books, but a pulse for the neighborhood,” said Jefferson, who earned a master’s in library information sciences from Louisiana State University. As a graduate student he also worked as a Project Recovery scholar in New Orleans, using grant funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to help rebuild libraries and educate library science students after the devastating storms of 2005.

Jefferson recommended social media as a good resource for library paraprofessionals to stay up-to-date on the diversities within their communities. He said Twitter in particular can be an excellent resource for libraries to connect with people in the real world in real time.

“You have to remember when you took your very first breath in this world we live in, the mold was broken. You are exactly who you are meant to be. Don’t forget that,” he said. “How you represent your organization matters. How we keep that growing more powerful than any fear is by working together. From the strength we possess as a group, to each of us on a microscopic level – we can make change.”

Joyner Library’s SHRA Assembly sponsored the event, with additional funding provided by the ECU’s Office for Equity and Diversity and the Master of Library Science Program.

 

-by Kelly Rogers Dilda, University Communications

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