ECU’s College of Education inducts 12 into Educators Hall of Fame

Twelve educators and advocates from across North Carolina were inducted into East Carolina University’s Educators Hall of Fame on Jan. 28.

The 18th annual event raised more than $20,000 for student scholarships in the ECU College of Education.

The inductees were Carla Frinsko of Winterville, Dr. Robert C. Hanes of Charlotte, Dr. B. Grant Hayes of Greenville, the late Ruth Barnhill Jackson of Greenville, Gwenlyn Goodson Jeffreys of Greensboro, Peggy Jackson Nelson of Greenville, Dr. Katherine O’Connor of Hillsborough, the late Patricia Peoples of Greenville, Dr. John A Swope of Greenville, Sandra Warren of Snow Hill, Dr. Kathi Wilhite of Tarboro, and Mary Alice Yarbrough of Greenville.

 ECU’s College of Education inducted 12 people into the Hall of Fame on Jan. 28. They include, from left to right, seated, Dr. Katherine O’Connor, Mary Alice Yarbrough, Dr. Kathi Wilhite, Carla Frinsko and Peggy Jackson Nelson, and left to right, standing, Dr. John Swope, Hazel Walker in honor of Patricia Peoples, Sandra Warren, Elizabeth Cousar for Dr. Robert Hanes, and Dr. Grant Hayes, dean of the College of Education. (contributed photo)

ECU’s College of Education inducted 12 people into the Hall of Fame on Jan. 28. They include, from left to right, seated, Dr. Katherine O’Connor, Mary Alice Yarbrough, Dr. Kathi Wilhite, Carla Frinsko and Peggy Jackson Nelson, and left to right, standing, Dr. John Swope, Hazel Walker in honor of Patricia Peoples, Sandra Warren, Elizabeth Cousar for Dr. Robert Hanes, and Dr. Grant Hayes, dean of the College of Education. (contributed photo)

A special guest at the ceremony was Bob Sawyer, retired teacher, ECU alumnus and former Dean’s Advisory Council member, who had the idea for creating the Hall of Fame. Sawyer, an ECU swimmer and charter member of the university’s Sports Hall of Fame, believed that teachers deserved the same recognition as athletes.

Each inductee was sponsored with a monetary gift of $1,000 or more in support of the Educators Hall of Fame scholarship endowment and will be recognized with a plaque on the Hall of Fame wall in the college. Annual interest from the endowment is used to fund merit-based scholarships for College of Education students.

Since 1999, the Hall of Fame has recognized the service and contributions of more than 455 individuals who have impacted the field of education and ECU’s College of Education. The program has raised more than $560,000 toward a goal of $1 million for the endowment.

For more information, contact Terah Archie, director of the Office of Community Relations and Outreach, atArchiet15@ecu.edu or 252-737-1257.

 

 

-by Crystal Baity

ECU’s Faulconer lauded for service to Kinston community

East Carolina University senior Lily Faulconer recently received an award for her service as Miss Kinston-Lenoir County 2016.

Kinston Mayor B.J. Murphy’02 recognized Faulconer, an EC Scholar in the Honors College at ECU, during the 62nd annual pageant on Feb. 4.

At left, ECU senior Lily Faulconer received a service award from Kinston Mayor B.J. Murphy at the Miss Kinston-Lenoir County Pageant held Feb. 4. Faulconer just completed her year as Miss Kinston-Lenoir County. (contributed photo)

At left, ECU senior Lily Faulconer received a service award from Kinston Mayor B.J. Murphy at the Miss Kinston-Lenoir County Pageant held Feb. 4. Faulconer just completed her year as Miss Kinston-Lenoir County. (contributed photo)

“Lily has adopted our community as her own – from making us clean and green to accepting an internship with the Down East Wood Ducks,” Murphy said. “Kinston is a better place today because of her investment of time, energy and passion.”

During her tenure as Miss Kinston-Lenoir County, Faulconer promoted her platform of protecting the environment through community clean ups, presentations to faith and business groups, and work in schools.

Faulconer represented Kinston at the 2016 Miss North Carolina Pageant, where she was awarded the Dana L. Reason Evans Quality of Life Award and an N.C. Electric Membership Cooperative STEM Scholarship.

In Greenville, Faulconer pioneered ECU’s participation in the GameDay Recycling Challenge, a waste reduction competition between colleges and universities. ECU took first place in the American Athletic Conference in 2014 and received recognition in 2015 and 2016.

Faulconer chairs the dean’s student advisory council in the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences and serves as the student representative on the university’s sustainability committee. She is completing an honors internship with the Down East Wood Ducks, the Class A-affiliate minor league baseball team of the Texas Rangers.
Faulconer will graduate in May with dual degrees in political science and multidisciplinary studies. She will pursue a master’s degree in kinesiology concentrating in sports management at ECU before applying to law school with a goal of working in environmental sports policy.

 

-by Crystal Baity

Students and Employers Benefit from 2017 Career Networking Day

Adorned in business attire and armed with updated resumes and talking points, more than 400 students from the College of Engineering and Technology and the College of Business jammed the University’s Murphy Center Thursday, Feb. 9. to network with potential employees and possible references.

The Feb. 9 Career Networking Day broke attendance records, with more than 400 students attending and 55 companies exhibiting at the event. (contributed photo)

The Feb. 9 Career Networking Day broke attendance records, with more than 400 students attending and 55 companies exhibiting at the event. (contributed photo)

The College of Engineering and Technology’s eighth Annual Career Networking Day brought these students together with approximately 150 representatives from 55 statewide companies. Representatives greeted students with company information and business cards. Sidebar conversations, networking tips, and new relationships were the order of things once the event started at 1 p.m.

“The goal of this event, which was the most attended one to date, was not about finding jobs. It was more of a networking event so students can learn how to communicate and sell themselves to potential employers,” said Dr. Leslie Pagliari, associate dean of the College of Engineering and Technology. “We wanted to make sure they were prepared for next month’s spring Career Fair.”

Junior Sarika Merchant speaks to one of the 150 company representatives that exhibited at the Eighth Annual Career Networking Day. (contributed photo)

Junior Sarika Merchant speaks to one of the 150 company representatives that exhibited at the Eighth Annual Career Networking Day. (contributed photo)

And prepared they were.

Sarika Merchant, a junior with the College of Engineering and Technology, made sure her resume was up-to-date and reviewed talking scripts before the event. She also took it upon herself to learn a little about the companies who were in attendance. The benefit from doing this one step, she believes, is strong.

“If you go up to them and say I know about your company and this is what you do, it shows that you have done the research and that you are actually interested,” said Merchant.

Senior Magus Pereira networks with Vidant Health’s Tammy Wilkins during the 2017 Annual Career Networking Day, sponsored by the College of Engineering and Technology. (contributes photo)

Senior Magus Pereira networks with Vidant Health’s Tammy Wilkins during the 2017 Annual Career Networking Day, sponsored by the College of Engineering and Technology. (contributed photo)

To those students who did not attend the annual Career Networking Day, Senior Magus Pereira says they are missing out, “on making the network connections with recruiters. Even if they don’t get the opportunity, they could have gotten their names across to the recruiters and what they’re working on.”

 

It’s Good for the Employers, Too

Students were not the only ones who benefited from this networking event. Employers got a chance to learn more about what graduates from both colleges can potentially bring to their organizations.

“These events are ideal because, as an alumni, I get to give back to the students and the faculty,” said Mark Bray, supply chain director with ACR Supply Company. “As an employer, we have the opportunity

 

-by Michael Rudd, College of Engineering & Technology

New master’s program is designed for practicing teachers

East Carolina University’s College of Education is offering practicing teachers a way to earn their master’s degree in just over a year.

The Department of Elementary Education and Middle Grades Education is seeking 20 outstanding teachers to begin courses this summer focusing on teacher leadership.

Applicants must hold a teaching license to apply. Applications are due April 15.

All courses are online for the six-semester schedule beginning Summer First Session and ending in Summer Second Session 2018. The intent is that students can complete the program while they are teaching, said Dr. Carol Greene, the department’s graduate coordinator.

The practicing teacher master’s degree program follows a recently announced program for new education graduates. Students who will be graduating in May can enroll in a similar yearlong master’s program in leadership. Applications are due April 1 for that group.

To complete an online application, go to http://www.ecu.edu/gradschool/ or contact Carol Greene for more information at greeneh@ecu.edu or 252-328-5316.

 

 

-by Crystal Baity

Providers invited to Women’s Health Conference Feb. 24

Brody faculty member Dr. Sarah E. Smith. (contributed photo)

Brody faculty member Dr. Sarah E. Smith. (contributed photo)

Women not only have unique health needs, but also live longer and make most health care decisions for their families, so keeping women healthy is imperative.

Health care providers who care for women across eastern North Carolina are invited to attend the Women’s Health Conference on Feb. 24 at Eastern Area Health Education Center in Greenville.

This full-day conference will provide information on a broad range of topics relevant to women’s health, such as screening for common psychiatric disorders during well woman exams, polycystic ovary syndrome, HIV, thyroid dysfunction, gynecologic care of transgender and same sex couples, wellness for senior women, and physical therapy for women’s health issues.

This conference is jointly provided by Eastern AHEC, the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, and the Eshelman School of Pharmacy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Dr. Emily Bray (contributed photo)

Dr. Emily Bray (contributed photo)

Program directors are Dr. Sarah E. Smith,clinical associate professor in Brody’s Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Dr. Emily Bray, clinical associate professor in the Department of Family Medicine’s geriatrics division.

This conference has been designed to meet the continuing medical education needs of physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, midwives, pharmacists and others.

Eastern AHEC is a non-profit organization that provides continuing education, professional development and other resources to health care providers and students, serving 23 counties of eastern North Carolina. Eastern AHEC is one of nine centers in the North Carolina AHEC program, which links the state’s universities, community colleges, hospitals and health agencies. The mission of NC AHEC is to meet the state’s health and health workforce needs.
For more information or to register, visit www.easternahec.net.

 

 

-by Jackie Drake, Eastern AHEC

ECU professors ‘rocket back to earth’ during NASA simulation

Three East Carolina University College of Education faculty members spent Jan. 18 at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, learning about simulations for astronaut training and vehicle design.

Daniel Dickerson, Patricia Slagter Van Tryon and Abbie Brown from the Department of Mathematics, Science and Instructional Technology Education toured several NASA project areas: the rapid prototype lab developing and testing controls for the Orion spacecraft; the space vehicle mockup facility that includes full-scale simulations of the International Space Station and Orion; the Human Exploration Research Analog that allows teams to experience spending days and weeks on an isolated space station; and the neutral buoyancy lab containing a massive pool with a replica of a portion of the space station that allows astronauts to practice walking in a weightless environment.

From left to right, ECU faculty members Patricia Slagter Van Tryon, Abbie Brown and Daniel Dickerson stand in front of the Orion vehicle mockup at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. (contributed photo)

From left to right, ECU faculty members Patricia Slagter Van Tryon, Abbie Brown and Daniel Dickerson stand in front of the Orion vehicle mockup at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. (contributed photo)

As part of the visit, Brown and Slagter van Tryon were “rocketed back to earth” through a simulation. Re-entering the earth’s atmosphere – from 200 mph eventually to 20 mph – was made real through intense sound effects and video displays, Brown said.

“We are grateful to the six NASA team leaders who were very generous with their time, providing us with a view of how our country’s astronauts learn to work in space and how space vehicles are designed and developed,” said Brown, professor and interim chair of the department. “It’s something few people get to see at such a detailed level and we are excited to take this information back to our science education and instructional technology students.”

ECU faculty are exploring opportunities for possible collaboration with NASA in the future.

The opportunity to visit NASA came about after Brown attended an Adobe MAX conference last fall and met the creative team developing simulations for NASA astronaut training.

There are approximately 160 graduate students enrolled online in the instructional technology program, which supports K-12 educators, corporate trainers and government and military instructors. For more information, visit http://www.ecu.edu/cs-educ/msite/it/.

 

 

-by Crystal Baity 

ECU celebrates World Anthropology Day

The Department of Anthropology at East Carolina University is celebrating World Anthropology Day 2017 with an Anthropology in the Workplace event Feb. 16 from 6:30-8:30 p.m. on the second floor of the Flanagan Building.

The third annual Anthropology After Dark open house will exhibit laboratories, artifact displays, an Egyptian tomb, Mexican dance masks and three ECU alumni who will discuss how they have incorporated their training in anthropology into their professional careers.

The Anthropology Student Organization (ANSO) will provide food and refreshments following the lecture hour, which starts at 7 p.m.

“This event is one of our more significant public outreach events. We invite the public into our classrooms and labs to help them understand the relevance of anthropology in the 21st century,” said Dr. Randy Daniel, chair of the Department of Anthropology.

To complement the discussion of food wealth and food insecurity, contributions of food, toiletries and paper products will be accepted for donation to the Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina – Greenville Branch.

Parking will be available at the parking lot at the corner of 10th and Cotanche streets.

Anthropology Day is a day for anthropologists to share their excitement about their discipline with the public around them. Anthropologists will share their work around the world. Events and activities in Canada, Morocco, India, Egypt, Mexico, Tunisia and across the United States will build enthusiasm and awareness for current and future anthropologists.

“This is a great time for anthropology,” said Dr. Alisse Waterston, president of the American Anthropological Association. “Today’s anthropologists are making remarkable contributions to human understanding and tackling the world’s most pressing problems.”

 

 

-by Heidi Luchsinger, Department of Anthropology

ECU’S CENTER OF SUSTAINABILITY TO HOLD FIRST SUSTAINABILITY SYMPOSIUM

The University’s College of Engineering and Technology and the College’s Center for Sustainability will hold its first Sustainability Symposium Feb. 20, 2017. The event’s goal is to discuss ways sustainability can be integrated into research and industry practices,

Dr. Tarek Abdel-Salam, event organizer and associate dean of research and graduate studies for the College of Engineering and Technology. (Contributed photo)

Dr. Tarek Abdel-Salam, event organizer and associate dean of research and graduate studies for the College of Engineering and Technology. (contributed photo)

especially those that will benefit eastern North Carolina. It will also promote approaches that adopt and implement inclusive views of the key dimensions of sustainability: environmental, economic and social.

The symposium will be held at the University’s Murphy Center from 8 a.m. – 3 p.m.

“We want to present thought-provoking examples of sustainability ideas, analyses and practices that are available to our region’s farmers and agricultural organizations so they can maintain and grow their businesses and be good stewards of the environment, as

well,” said Dr. Tarek Abdel-Salam, event organizer and associate dean of research and graduate studies for the College of Engineering and Technology.

Pam Swingle of the Environmental Protection Agency will be the keynote speaker. She is the agency’s pollution prevention program manager for the Region 4 Office of Environmental Justice and Sustainability. She is responsible

Pam Swingle, Environmental Protection Agency’s pollution prevention program manager for the Region 4 Office of Environmental Justice and Sustainability. (contributed photo)

Pam Swingle, Environmental Protection Agency’s pollution prevention program manager for the Region 4 Office of Environmental Justice and Sustainability. (contributed photo)

for administering pollution prevention and sustainability programs and providing technical assistance within Region 4’s eight, southeastern states.

Symposium discussions will include:

  1. We know how to do this: Sustainability and Energy: Ged Moody, Appalachian State University, special assistant to the Chancellor for Sustainability
  2. What does food have to do with sustainability?: Rebecca Dunning, North Carolina State University, Department of Horticultural Science
  3. Strategies to protect water resources in agricultural watersheds: Mike Burchell, North Carolina State University, Biological and Agricultural Engineering
  4. The vulnerable food, energy, and water system in the Caribbean: Scott Curtis, East Carolina University, Geography
  5. Soil Conservation and Organic Farming: Kristi Hocutt, sales manager, Triple J Produce
  6. Organic Feasibility: Thomas Moore, food systems coordinator, Carolina Farm Stewards

The symposium will also include a student/faculty poster session, which will cover all areas of sustainability-related research including tourism, water, energy, agriculture and buildings.

This event is supported by the Pitt County Development Commission, College of Engineering and Technology, the Center for Innovation in Technology and Engineering Outreach (CITE), and Phi Kappa Phi.

Breakfast and lunch will be provided.

The registration fee is $35 per person.

To register for the event visit: https://www.enrole.com/ecu/jsp/session.jsp?sessionId=17SUST0220&courseId=17SUST0220&categoryId=ROOT or call (252) 328-9198

 

 

-by Michael Rudd, College of Engineering & Technology

Exhibit preserves history of Sycamore Hill community

Beyond Bricks and Mortar: Revisiting the Sycamore Hill Community,” a photography project that shares the history of the displaced community, has opened at East Carolina University’s Joyner Library.

On display in the Janice Hardison Faulkner gallery through March 26, the exhibit illustrates that a community is much more than the bricks and mortar used to construct its homes. The photographs and narratives featured show how the ties that bind are often found in human connection.

Students, visitors and citizens of Greenville and surrounding areas are invited to visit the exhibit and learn about the predominately African American community that was displaced by a redevelopment project in the 1960s.

According to Joyner Library Director Janice S. Lewis, “The Beyond Bricks and Mortar project furthers the mission of Joyner Library and ECU to celebrate and preserve the life stories, art and images that represent the regional culture of eastern North Carolina. It is particularly timely as the Greenville City Council continues to discuss a planned memorial near the former location of Sycamore Hill Missionary Baptist Church, now part of Town Common. Recent meetings attended by former residents and church members provided an opportunity for us to learn more about the community, its importance, and the need to document its history before more time passes.”

Sycamore Hill Missionary Baptist Church was founded in 1860 and was originally known as the African Baptist Church. The name was changed in the 1880s and referred to the sycamore trees surrounding the church’s location on the corner of First and Greene streets. The large brick church featured in the exhibit’s historical photographs was constructed in 1917 and was a Greenville landmark for half a century. When the Town Common Park was created in the late 1960s, both the church and the vibrant community around it were forced to move.

Houses on West First Street with Sycamore Hill Baptist Church in the background. This area is where Town Commons is now located. (Photo Contributed by Joyner Library Digital Collections)

Houses on West First Street with Sycamore Hill Baptist Church in the background. This area is where Town Commons is now located.
(Photo Contributed by Joyner Library Digital Collections)

“We are honored to help the Sycamore Hill community tell their story and are excited about the possibilities with this project,” said Heather White, assistant director for assessment and engagement at Joyner Library. “It was overwhelming to have such a large participation in the portrait project, which speaks volumes to the strong sense of community and connection this group continues to feel even years later.”

On Dec. 27 and 28, former Sycamore Hill community members and their descendants were photographed as close as possible to the sites of their former homes. Narratives from the former residents and family members about their memories of living in the Sycamore Hill community were collected to accompany the portraits.

Historical images of Sycamore Hill Baptist Church and the surrounding neighborhood from the Joyner Library Digital Collection are also included in the exhibition.

Amber Nannette Harris, who participated with her father in the project, said, “Listening to these stories is a scar for me too. These sacred grounds will forever be home in our hearts,” said Harris. “This acknowledgment is a start of a healing process.”

A public celebration honoring the Sycamore Hill community and recognizing participants in the project will be held 5-8 p.m., March 3 in the Janice Hardison Faulkner Gallery in Joyner Library. The celebration will include a short program at 5:15 p.m. and will be a part of the First Friday Artwalk series with shuttle service by the Jolly Trolley.

After the exhibit closes, the images will be preserved and will continue to be available online as part of Joyner Library’s Digital Collections. The library hopes this project will be the seed for more extensive outreach and collection of regional history, including the history of communities that have been underrepresented in archival collections.
Joyner Library will also hold a Community Scanning Day on March 4 from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. at the Sycamore Hill Missionary Baptist Church, 1001 Hooker Road, Greenville.

If you have historical photographs of the Greenville area or related items that you would like to have scanned, please contact Charlotte Fitz Daniels at fitzdanielsc16@ecu.edu or 252 328-0287.

 

-by Kelly Rogers Dilda, Joyner Library

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