Author Archives: Kristin Zachary

ECU’s Country Doctor Museum celebrates 50th anniversary

East Carolina University’s Country Doctor Museum marked its 50th anniversary in Bailey on Dec. 8 with an event that celebrated the museum’s founders and its future.

The museum is the oldest in the United States devoted to rural health care history. A group of volunteer female community leaders and physicians – led by Dr. Gloria Flippin Graham and Dr. Josephine E. Newell, both North Carolina physicians – founded the museum in 1968 in an effort to honor and preserve rural medical history.

Dr. Gloria Flippin Graham, co-founder of The Country Doctor Museum and friend Janet Williams attend the 50th anniversary celebration held on Dec. 8 in Bailey, North Carolina.

Dr. Gloria Flippin Graham, co-founder of The Country Doctor Museum and friend Janet Williams attend the 50th anniversary celebration held on Dec. 8 in Bailey, North Carolina. (Contributed photos)

Over the years, the museum’s collections have grown to include artifacts from the 19th and early 20th centuries and the fields of nursing, pharmacy, homeopathy and transportation.

In 2003, the museum was donated to the ECU Medical & Health Sciences Foundation and since then, the Laupus Health Sciences Library has managed it as part of its History Collections.

Beth Ketterman, director of the Laupus Health Sciences Library, said the relationship between the museum and the library is mutually beneficial for many reasons.

“Not the least of which is the ability to share the passion for preserving the legacy of country doctors and other health care providers who have given so much to ensure that the people of this rural part of our state could receive care,” Ketterman said. “We do this through interpreting artifacts, preserving the written record and providing educational experiences to the public.”

Dr. Gloria Flippin Graham is surrounded by a variety of museum patrons and other guests and receives special recognition for her efforts to preserve rural medical history in Bailey.

Dr. Gloria Flippin Graham is surrounded by a variety of museum patrons and other guests and receives special recognition for her efforts to preserve rural medical history in Bailey.

The event was attended by community members and featured free museum tours, birthday cake, live music by Drybread Road and a ceremony recognizing special guests, including Dr. Gloria Flippin Graham.

“Governor Roy Cooper kindly issued a proclamation recognizing the 50th anniversary of the museum which speaks to the visionary founders of the museum, as well as the leaders at East Carolina University who shepherded the museum into the ECU community,” said Annie Anderson, the museum’s director.

Ketterman praised the museum for continuing to build off the hard work of its founders and early employees.

“Our team has extended the reach of the museum beyond Bailey, with permanent and pop-up exhibits on the ECU campus, and at regional institutions of learning like Campbell University and Wake Tech. Many of the museum’s artifacts are now digitized and available for discovery by anyone in the world with access to the internet,” she said.

Museum employees also partner with area schools to educate children about the evolution of rural medicine and collaborate with community members to record local oral history.

For the guests who travel to Bailey to visit the museum, Ketterman said it “serves as a touchstone for memories of rural physicians, home remedies and community spirit.”

“The vision and hard work of the museum founders, and the continued hard work and dedication of the current museum employees, ensures that the museum will continue to be a valued educational and cultural resource in our region for another 50 years and beyond,” she added.

The museum is located at 7089 Peele Road in Bailey. Tours of the museum are guided and begin each hour on the hour from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Group tours are available. For more information about the museum, visit http://www.countrydoctormuseum.org.

 

-by Kelly Rogers Dilda, University Communications

Anthropology students recognized through national competition

This semester, East Carolina University anthropology students participated in a nationwide competition known as the Community Action Project. Administered by the Center for a Public Anthropology, the competition involved more than 3,500 students from 25 schools across the United States.

As their entry into the competition, students wrote editorial pieces on the topic of climate change. The articles were evaluated by peers from other universities throughout the country.

Nine ECU anthropology students received award-winning recognition of their editorial pieces on the topic of climate change. Pictured left to right are Chris Capone, assistant professor of anthropology Dr. Cynthia Grace-McCaskey, Kaitlyn Lee, Elizabeth Lyttle and Gayle Yoder.

Nine ECU anthropology students received award-winning recognition of their editorial pieces on the topic of climate change. Pictured left to right are Chris Capone, assistant professor of anthropology Dr. Cynthia Grace-McCaskey, Kaitlyn Lee, Elizabeth Lyttle and Gayle Yoder. (Contributed photo)

“No matter what part of the world you are from, it affects you in some way,” said ECU anthropology student Gayle Yoder.

Another entrant, Kaitlyn Lee, said, “It was important for me because I’m from the beach and it is just something that I’ve grown up learning about.”

Nine ECU students were selected as award winners and received special certificates for their writing. Winners include Chris Capone, Christina Dougherty, Kaitlyn Lee, Elizabeth Lyttle, Autumn Saski, Logan Stevens, Allyse Williams, Ashley Yeager and Gayle Yoder.

“I thought it was really cool being able to connect with people around the world, especially about a dispute that’s as important as this,” said Capone.

ECU students also reviewed other students’ submissions.

“It was interesting to see that this person clearly believes the opposite of what I think, but they make a convincing argument for it,” Lyttle said.

Yoder said, “It is a common issue that people deal with in their daily lives, so it was interesting how people from different backgrounds dealt with that issue.”

Dr. Robert Borofsky, director of the Center for a Public Anthropology, praised Dr. Cynthia Grace-McCaskey, ECU assistant professor of anthropology and assistant scientist with the Coastal Studies Institute, who taught the students.

“Professor Grace-McCaskey has played an integral part in public anthropology’s online student community, showcasing the ability of East Carolina students to learn effective writing skills while being active global citizens,” Borofsky said. “She demonstrates how combining technology with cultural concerns in academic courses positively engages students to participate in the broader world beyond their academic setting while gaining the skills needed for a productive, active life after graduation.”

Read the winning ECU student editorials

Find out more about the Community Action Project

 

-by Lacey L. Gray, University Communications

Course partnership promotes student success and future employment

Dr. Amanda Haberstroh, librarian liaison in Laupus Library.

Dr. Amanda Haberstroh, librarian liaison in Laupus Library. (Contributed photos)

A course being offered in Spring 2019 will provide students a strong foundation in research skills and public health content that will benefit them across a wealth of disciplines as well as in their employment after graduation.

HLTH 4050: Research Skills in Health Information will be taught by Dr. Joseph Lee, assistant professor in the College of Health and Human Performance’s Department of Health Education and Promotion; and Dr. Amanda Haberstroh, librarian liaison in Laupus Library. The course covers skills that are vital to student success and is beneficial to students in disciplines across the Health Sciences Campus.

“This course covers important pieces of health literacy and evidence evaluation and will give students strong skills in the PubMed/MEDLINE database,” Lee said. “It’s a one-credit class and would be a great course for any student interested in attending graduate school or for future health profession skills. It would also be a great course for students early in their career at ECU who are interested in research.”

The class will meet from 1­–1:50 p.m. on Wednesdays.

The value in the course is based not only in its content but in its unique teaching arrangement.

Dr. Joseph Lee, assistant professor in the department of health education and promotion for the College of Health and Human Performance.

Dr. Joseph Lee, assistant professor in the department of health education and promotion for the College of Health and Human Performance.

“This partnership between a librarian and faculty members in Health Education and Promotion as equals really highlights the importance of the interdisciplinary skills that our students need,” Lee said. “Employers want our students to have expertise in health literacy, information literacy and concrete searching skills combined with public health content expertise. We’re excited to continue the course with Laupus’s support and Dr. Haberstroh’s expertise.”

Leah Cordova, MLIS, in Joyner served as the embedded liaison librarian for past sections of HLTH 4050 and was instrumental in creating this course. The teamwork has resulted in instructional topics that improve students’ competencies in finding and evaluating information and evidence-based practice.

Students have echoed that sentiment; some who have completed the course said that it expanded their knowledge on research and “made a difference in my current classes.” Others said the course encourages discussion, during which they ‘learned to apply course material in practical ways.”

HLTH 4050 helps bridge gaps between what students are learning and processing and how to think critically in terms of seeking out knowledge through research.

“We know these information literacy skills are incredibly important for our public health students and to their future employers,” said Dr. Don Chaney, chair of the Department of Health Education and Promotion, “and our partnerships with Joyner and Laupus combine our faculty’s public health expertise with librarians’ expertise in health literacy, evidence-based searching and information skills.”

Graduate student awarded yearlong national fellowship

Chris Thaxton

Chris Thaxton (Contributed photo)

An East Carolina University graduate student is one of 66 from across the United States awarded a 2019 John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship.

William “Chris” Thaxton, who will graduate with a master’s degree in biology in May, earned bachelor degrees in biology and chemistry from ECU in 2016 as an EC Scholar.

The Knauss award, presented by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Sea Grant, recognizes students who are completing masters, juris doctor or doctor of philosophy programs with a focus or interest in marine science, policy or management.

The 40th class of Knauss Fellows will begin work in February.

Thaxton, who grew up in La Grange, will be moving to Washington, D.C., for his fellowship year where he will work on ocean and natural resource policy for Sen. Brian Schatz from Hawaii.

“I love science, but my real passion is using science to find the balance between the needs of people and nature,” Thaxton said. “All of my experiences so far have been mostly ‘doing’ science. The Knauss Fellowship is an intense, yearlong introduction into how science is actually used in federal policy.”

Thaxton said he is especially passionate about the topic of climate change and how sea level rise will impact coastal development.

“There is a lot of confusion, fear and uncertainty surrounding the topic,” Thaxton said. “Science can either relieve or exacerbate these issues depending on how it’s communicated. North Carolina’s peculiar history with sea level rise policy piqued my interest in the subject as an undergraduate, and I’m excited at the opportunity to see firsthand how climate-related issues are being discussed at the federal level.”

Thaxton first learned about the Knauss Fellowship while completing a 10-week Hollings Scholar internship with NOAA four years ago.

He credited ECU’s Dr. Tim Runyon and Dr. Rebecca Asch in helping mentor his interests and research.

In the future, he would like to work as a legislative staffer on Capitol Hill, expanding the skills he expects to develop as a Knauss Fellow.

For more information, visit https://www.seagrant.noaa.gov/News/Article/ArtMID/1660/ArticleID/2691/Sea-Grant-Announces-2019-Finalists-for-Knauss-Fellowship-Program.

 

-by Crystal Baity, ECU News Services

Cole Dittmer contributed to this story.

 

School of Dental Medicine offering free screenings, exams

The ECU School of Dental Medicine is providing free dental screenings and select X-rays now until Feb. 28, 2019, for patients 18 years or older who are interested in participating in a Dental Board Examination for graduating students.

Fillings and/or cleanings approved for the exam will be delivered to patients free of charge on Friday, March 1, 2019, or Saturday, March 2, 2019, at the school in Greenville.

Those selected at the screening to be a Dental Board Examination patient must be available all day, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., on one of those days to receive the filling and/or cleaning recommended at the screening. Fourth-year dental students will deliver the care.

Screening appointments last about an hour and must be scheduled in advance. Please call 252-737-7850 to make a special dental board screening appointment.

Patients who are not accepted for the Dental Board Examination are invited to become comprehensive care patients at the school. To schedule a regular appointment, please call 252-737-7834.

All dental appointments are held at the ECU School of Dental Medicine located in Ledyard E. Ross Hall, 1851 MacGregor Downs Road, Greenville (second floor). Please bring a photo ID and a list of medications you currently take.

 

 

A one-on-one meeting with then-vice president George Herbert Walker Bush

ECU’s Dr. David Edgell shares his memories of a private meeting he had with President George H.W. Bush when he served as vice-president under President Ronald Reagan. Edgell is a professor of hospitality leadership in the College of Business’ School of Hospitality Leadership and worked for the U.S. Department of Commerce in the late 1980s.

ECU Professor Dr. David Edgell, former senior executive director of U.S. Travel and Tourism Administration, reads from the prepared statement that he read on behalf of Vice President George H. W. Bush to attendees of the International Conference of Tourism in the 1990s.

ECU Professor Dr. David Edgell, former senior executive director of U.S. Travel and Tourism Administration, reads from the prepared statement that he read on behalf of Vice President George H. W. Bush to attendees of the International Conference of Tourism in the 1990s. (Photos by Rhett Butler)

In the spring of 1986 I was invited by the Deputy Chief of Staff for Vice President George H. W. Bush to a meeting with the vice president in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building across from the White House. At the time, I was a young executive in the U.S. Department of Commerce working on trade and tourism policies. I anticipated that the meeting would include several individuals but learned, to my surprise, it was a one-on-one meeting with the vice president to discuss, among other topics, trade and tourism policies. Naturally, I was both awed and excited but was quickly put at ease by the Vice President Bush’s friendly and warm demeanor. I was a bit nervous and anxious, but he set me at ease. I also remember the informality of the meeting such that I almost forgot to whom I was speaking. Vice President Bush was aware of my role in helping to develop and work toward passage of the National Tourism Policy Act of 1981 (it was the third piece of legislation signed Oct. 16, 1981, by President Ronald Reagan).

My conversation with the vice president gradually moved toward a discussion of trade and tourism relations with Canada where the United States had a trade office in Ottawa and a regional tourism office in Toronto. At that time, the U.S. had an excellent working relationship with Canada on trade and tourism policy matters. Shortly after this meeting, I was asked to work on a special trade in tourism agreement titled “A Cooperative Tourism Research Agreement Between the Government of Canada and the United States of America” which was signed for the U.S. by Vice President George Bush June 11, 1986, in Vancouver, Canada. To my delight, the Vice President’s Office prepared a glass-framed official copy of the “agreement,” including the pen the vice president used to sign the “agreement,” and then presented it to me (it proudly occupies a special wall in our home).

A gift from Vice President George H. W. Bush to Dr. David Edgell.

A gift from Vice President George H. W. Bush to Dr. David Edgell.

The tourism research agreement became somewhat of a precursor to the “Canada-United States Free Trade Agreement” (FTA) signed for the United States by President Ronald Reagan Jan. 2, 1988. The FTA, for the first time in U.S trade agreement history, included provisions on the “services industry.” The FTA laid the groundwork for the “Tourism Policy and Export Promotion Act of 1992” signed by President George Herbert Walker Bush on Sept. 30, 1992, and the “North American Free Trade Agreement” (NAFTA) which included the United States, Canada and Mexico. NAFTA was signed by U.S. President George H.W. Bush, Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney, and Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari Dec. 17, 1992.

At the ECU’s College of Business, we build leaders. VP Bush, in my view, had excellent leadership qualities. He was certainly a committed public servant having served as a congressman, ambassador to China, head of the CIA, etc. He was both a good communicator, listener and innovator. In short, he was a good decision-maker.

 

-by Dr. David Edgell, professor of hospitality leadership

ECU best for vets in recent ranking

East Carolina University is a top college for veterans in a variety of programs, according to recent rankings by College Factual, a source of data analytics and insights on college outcomes.

ECU was third out of 56 colleges reviewed by College Factual in its 2019 Best Colleges for Vets in North Carolina analysis. This puts ECU in the top 5 percent of all schools in the state for veteran friendliness, the organization said.

ECU also is ranked 55 out of 1,820 schools for veterans among all colleges and universities reviewed by College Factual.

The rankings were developed to highlight schools that offer quality outcomes in a specific major while also offering support and resources to help veterans and active-duty military students thrive, the organization said.

In all, ECU is listed as a top college in categories ranging from veteran friendly to best of the best in the following program areas: public health, management information systems, physiology, teacher education subject specific, music, physical education, biology, computer information systems, psychology, fine arts, liberal arts, communication, nursing, social work, finance, criminal justice, business administration, hospitality management, and human development and family studies.

For more information, go to www.collegefactual.com.

 

-by Crystal Baity, ECU News Services

Roaming through a unique outdoor concert

If you missed it the first time through, “Ponder: Outdoor Concert” will allow you to experience music in a different way on Friday, Nov. 30. The brass ensemble will play around Lake Laupus on East Carolina University’s Health Sciences Campus beginning at 3 p.m. The nearly 40-minute concert is the product of ECU assistant music professor Dr. Travis Alford.

ECU music professor Dr. Travis Alford plays the trumpet during the outdoor performance of his composition “Ponder.”

ECU music professor Dr. Travis Alford plays the trumpet during the outdoor performance of his composition “Ponder.” (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

Alford is a 2005 graduate of ECU’s School of Music and wrote this piece in 2012 when he was a graduate and doctoral student at Brandeis University in Massachusetts. He said it was written based on composer George Frideric Handel’s “Water Music” and was first performed around a fountain at Brandeis. While Alford said the name “Ponder” is an open-ended title, his wife came up with the name as a play on words since the music was composed to be played around a body of water.

ECU senior Joshua Poyner plays the tuba during “Ponder.” About 32 brass musicians were spread out around the Cupola for the performance.

ECU senior Joshua Poyner plays the tuba during “Ponder.” About 32 brass musicians were spread out around the Cupola for the performance.

The first performance at ECU did not take place around the fountain, but instead on the mall around the Cupola. Nearly three dozen brass performers – including trumpets, French horns, euphoniums and tubas – spread out along the mall for the piece. Each performer was also given a hand percussion instrument, like a temple gong, to play as well. As the music was performed, those walking through campus could stop and listen, or walk right through the performance.

“This was nice. I felt like the audience could be right in the middle of the music,” Alford said.

A bonus to walking through the performers was the chance to listen to different aspects of the music.

“All of the different melodies will kind of merge together in one area. So, I think that it’s a really cool idea,” said tuba performer and ECU music student Joshua Poyner. The performers were a mixture of ECU students and faculty.

“Wherever it’s performed, I want to allow people to just sort of stop and listen to the sounds around them to sort of experience the piece,” Alford said. “More than just listen to it – to experience the sights and smells and sounds of just being in the space.”

 

-by Rich Klindworth, ECU News Services

ECU joins national enterprise risk management task force

East Carolina University was recently selected to join several prestigious higher education institutions as a charter member of the new Higher Education Advanced Practice Enterprise Risk Management Group.

The group was formed by Yale University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and is focused on best practice sharing among institutions with recognized, respected and mature enterprise risk management (ERM) programs.

Tim Wiseman, ECU’s assistant vice chancellor for enterprise risk management, made two presentations to the group at its annual meeting at Yale.

“The inclusion of ECU in a group of advanced higher education top tier practitioners is an honor, and recognizes the dedicated efforts of ECU leaders over the past decade to develop a solid approach and framework for holistic enterprise-wide risk and opportunity management,” Wiseman said. “Sound ERM practices, when fully embraced and exercised, lead to better risk-informed decision making, institutional value preservation and creation, and stewardship of resources.”

Other members of the Higher Education Advanced Practice ERM Group include Boston University, CalTech, Carnegie Mellon University, Cornell, Duke University, Emory University, Harvard, Indiana University, Johns Hopkins University, MIT, Northwestern, Penn State University, Princeton, Stanford, Syracuse University, Tufts, University of California, University of Cincinnati, University of Illinois, University of North Carolina Greensboro, University of Pennsylvania, University of Rochester, University of Texas System, University of Virginia, Washington University in St. Louis, and Yale.

ECU also has been helping the UNC system in the development of an ERM framework and facilitated two workshops this year for other UNC institutions working to develop ERM programs.

Enterprise risk management is an approach to managing all of an organization’s key business risks and opportunities with the intent of maximizing the shareholder value or stakeholder satisfaction.

“Being a part of this advanced practitioner group allows us to share best practices and gain insight into current and emerging risks in higher education institutions and proactively employ risk treatments to minimize potential negative consequences of risks and to make better risk-informed strategic decisions,” Wiseman said.

 

-by Jules Norwood, ECU News Services

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