Category Archives: Art

Exhibit celebrates 10 years of study abroad in Italy

Photograph by Jim Abbott

A photograph by ECU faculty member Jim Abbott

“Made in Italy: Italy Intensives,” a celebration of the 10th anniversary of East Carolina University’s study abroad program in Certaldo Alto, Italy, will be on display Feb. 2-22 in the Wellington B. Gray Art Gallery at ECU.

Photographer and ECU faculty member Jim Abbott will give a talk about his large selection of photographs in the show at 5 p.m. Feb. 22 in Speight Auditorium.

The exhibition features work by artists who have taught in the study abroad program. ECU instructors included in the exhibition are metal design teachers Marissa Saneholtz, Tim Lazure, Jennifer Wells, Mi Sook Hur, Cristopher Hentz, Barbara Minor Hentz, Linda Darty and James Malenda; drawing and painting teachers Jill Eberle, Michael Ehlbeck, Catherine Walker-Bailey, Michael Voors and Kelly Adams; photography teachers Dan Bailey, James Henkel and Abbott; book arts teacher Terry Smith; and administrative staff and teaching assistants Stuart Watson, Lucy Clark and Chris Ellenbogen.

Art piece

A piece by metal design teacher Marissa Saneholtz

The gallery is located off of Fifth and Jarvis streets in ECU’s Jenkins Fine Arts Center. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The gallery is closed for all university holidays.

Jenkins Fine Arts Center is handicapped accessible. Individuals with disabilities who require accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) should contact the Department of Disability Support Services at least two weeks before the event at 252-737-1016.

For more information, contact Tom Braswell, interim gallery director, at 252-328-1312, or visit www.ecu.edu/graygallery.

 

-by Harley Dartt, University Communications

Spring 2018 ECU After School Art Classes

Students create interdisciplinary artworks with a variety of two- and three-dimensional media under the instruction of undergraduate art education students, who are supervised by a university art education faculty member.

Pre-Registration:  Jan. 3 – Feb. 10, 2018
Cost: $10.00 per class

Visit epay.ecu.edu/arted for registration information.

If you have any questions please contact the instructor listed below. 

3rd-5th Grade Class:
Tuesday Class begins Feb. 6, Meeting Time: 4:00-5:00 pm.
Contact Person: Dr. Cynthia Bickley-Green at bickleygreenc@ecu.edu
Class meets in Jenkins Fine Arts Center Room 1327
Class doesn’t meet on Mar. 6 and concludes on Apr. 17.

3rd-5th Grade Class:
Wednesday Class begins Jan. 31, Meeting Time: 2:30-3:30 pm.
Contact Person: Dr. Robert Quinn at quinnr@ecu.edu
Class meets at Wahl-Coates Elementary School
Class doesn’t meet on Mar. 7 or Apr. 4 and concludes on Apr. 18.

Multi-Age Inclusive Class:
Wednesday Class begins Feb. 7, Meeting Time: 4:30-5:30 pm.
Contact Person: Dr. Cynthia Bickley-Green at bickleygreenc@ecu.edu
Class meets in Jenkins Fine Arts Center Room 1327
Class doesn’t meet on Mar. 7 and concludes on Apr. 18.

Five exhibits spotlight ECU Material Topics Symposium

From Jan. 5 through Jan. 25, the Wellington B. Gray Gallery at East Carolina University will present the Materials Topics Exhibitions, five shows to be held in collaboration with the ninth annual ECU Material Topics Symposium.

exhibition artwork

The exhibitions will feature artwork by Charity Hall, Sharon Massey, and Joanne Lang and Hailee Manipole. Lang is an ECU graduate student and the others are ECU alumni. (contributed photos)

The symposium will be held Jan. 12-14. ECU hosts the symposium each January for people interested in metal, material or adornment with experience ranging from beginners or hobbyists to professional jewelers and metal artists. This year’s theme is “Deconstruct/Reconstruct.”

A reception honoring the exhibitors will be held 5-8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 5. A special symposium reception will be held 5-7:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 12. The exhibitions and receptions are free and open to the public.

“Vitreous Voices” will be one of three exhibits inside the main gallery. Organized by ECU alumna Barbara McFadyen and retired ECU professor emeritus Bob Ebendorf, it is a juried exhibition of enameled works honoring the tradition that professor Linda Darty started at ECU.

“Spoon” is organized by ECU metal design professor Tim Lazure and is an invitational show of spoons of all shapes and sizes.exhibition artwork

“Ripple Effect 168” is organized by ECU graduate student Adam Atkinson and Everett Hoffman, a graduate student at Virginia Commonwealth University. This collaborative show between the metalsmithing programs at ECU and VCU is meant to foster connections and explore new work directions.

“Smitten Forum” will be located in the African Art Room/Special Collections Gallery at the rear of the main gallery. The work is by a group of invited artists organized by ECU alumna Marissa Saneholtz and Winthrop University faculty member Sara Brown.

On display Jan. 12-14 in the gallery foyer, the “Snail Mail Project Snail Mail Project” is a pop-up enameled decal show based on postcards from Ebendorf. It is organized by ECU alumna Kat Cole and Andrew Kuebeck, assistant professor and area head of the jewelry, metals and enameling program at Kent State University.

The Material Topics Symposium is a student-run event founded in 2009 by ECU alumna Laura Wood. Students and faculty from seven universities participated in the first show, which has grown to attendees from more than 45 institutions from California to Florida.

ECU’s Wellington B. Gray Gallery is located off Fifth and Jarvis streets in the Jenkins Fine Arts Center. Hours are 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday through Friday 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday. The gallery
is closed for all university holidays.

The center is handicapped accessible. Individuals requesting accommodations under the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) should call 252-737-1016 (voice/TTY) at least 48 hours before the event. For more information, call 252-328-1312, visit www.ecu.edu/graygallery or go to https://ecusymposium.wordpress.com/.

 

Contact: Tom Braswell, interim Wellington B. Gray Gallery director, 252-328-1312 or BRASWELLG@ecu.edu 

ECU hosts art sales, concerts to celebrate season

East Carolina University will usher in the holiday season in the coming weeks with planned art sales and concerts.

Beginning Nov. 30, the School of Art and Design will hold its annual Holiday Art Sale at the Greenville Museum of Art, 802 Evans St., Greenville.

Hours are 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Nov. 30, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Dec. 1 and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Dec. 2. A special member preview for Friends of the School of Art and Design and Friends of the Greenville Museum of Art will be held 5:30-8:30 p.m. on Nov. 29.

Hand-blown glass ornaments have been made by ECU glassblowing instructor Mike Tracy for the Dec. 9 holiday sale. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

Hand-blown glass ornaments have been made by ECU glassblowing instructor Mike Tracy for the Dec. 9 holiday sale. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

The annual holiday sale features a diverse range of art pieces created by ECU students from all areas of study including ceramics, drawing, metals, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, textiles and more.

Proceeds from the sale benefit ECU students and student guilds. For more information, contact Angela Franks Wells at wellsa@ecu.edu or 252-737-4639.

On Saturday, Dec. 2, the School of Music will present a free outdoor performance of TubaChristmas from noon until 1 p.m. in front of the A. J. Fletcher Music Building.

ECU instructor Mike Tracy makes one of 500 ornaments planned for the School of Art and Design’s Hand-blown Holiday Ornament Sale.

ECU instructor Mike Tracy makes one of 500 ornaments planned for the School of Art and Design’s Hand-blown Holiday Ornament Sale.

ECU professors Stephen Ivany and Jarrod Williams, ECU students and community musicians will perform traditional Christmas carols especially arranged for a large ensemble of tubas, baritones, euphoniums and sousaphones.

Local musicians who play baritone, euphonium, tuba or sousaphone are invited to participate with a $10 fee to benefit the Harvey Phillips Foundation. Musician registration begins at 11:30 a.m.

Merry TubaChristmas concerts will be presented in more than 275 cities throughout the United States and in several foreign countries this year. Tuba and euphonium players of all ages gather to pay respect to all the great teachers who represent their heritage and lead audiences in holiday sing-a-longs. The warm, rich, organ-like sound of the tuba-euphonium choir has won the ears and hearts of worldwide audiences.

If there is rain, heavy snow or temperatures below 34 degrees, the performance will be moved inside the A. J. Fletcher Music Building. For more information, call 252-328-1693.

That same weekend, the School of Music will hold its annual Holiday Band Concert on Sunday, Dec. 3 at 2 p.m. in Wright Auditorium. The concert is free and open to the public.

Holiday favorites will be performed by the ECU Symphonic Wind Ensemble under the baton of director Scott Carter, culminating with their signature rendition of “Sleigh Ride.”

 

A hand-blown glass ornament takes shape in the GlasStation in Farmville.

A hand-blown glass ornament takes shape in the GlasStation in Farmville.

The program will feature a tribute to military service members and their families performed by ECU faculty members and veterans Douglas Monroe, clarinet, formerly of the United States Air Force Heritage of America Band, and Jarrod Williams, tuba, formerly of the U.S. Naval Academy Band.

Santa is expected to make an appearance. For more information, call 252-328-6851 or email Scott Carter at carterr@ecu.edu.

And on Dec. 9, the School of Art and Design will host a Hand-blown Holiday Ornament Sale from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the GlasStation, 3732-B W. Wilson St., Farmville.

The public sale features hundreds of hand-blown glass holiday ornaments in many different styles and colors, as well as an assortment of other glasswork that has been made at the GlasStation throughout the year.

There also will be glassblowing demonstrations during the sale. For more information, contact instructor Mike Tracy at tracym16@ecu.edu or 757-748-8121.

 

-by Crystal Baity, ECU News Services and Harley Dartt, University Communications 

ECU’s School of Art and Design to host textile exhibit Nov. 1-17

A textile exhibit, “Fold Unfold,” will be on display in the Wellington B. Gray Gallery on the campus of East Carolina University from Nov. 1 through Nov. 17.

An opening reception will be held 5-8 p.m. on Nov. 3 to coincide with Uptown Greenville’s First Friday ArtWalk, which showcases new exhibits and discounts at participating restaurants and shops.

Curators Susan Falls and Jessica Smith will discuss their collaborative research and the development of the project in a gallery talk, “Fold Unfold: When Coverlets meet Op Art,” on Friday, Nov. 17 at 4 p.m. in Speight Auditorium in Jenkins Fine Arts Center.

All events are free and open to the public.

Falls, professor of anthropology, and Smith, professor of fibers, both at the Savannah College of Art and Design, invited more than 100 artists from the U.S. and Canada to weave objects that could be folded and unfolded, and were the size of typical 19th century coverlets. The weavers were asked to consider the patterning of 19th and early 20th century American coverlets but to use a modernist color scheme of black, white and gray.

A slide show and catalog of each coverlet will accompany the exhibition.

Robin Haller, professor of textile design at ECU, has a piece in the exhibit along with other North Carolina weavers Dani Burke, Barb Butler, Cassie Dickson, Melanie Wilder, Deanna Lynch, Laura Magdycz, Gabrielle Duggan and Nicole Asselin.

Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Jenkins Fine Arts Center. The gallery is closed for all university holidays. The center is handicapped accessible. Individuals with disabilities who require accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act should contact the Department of Disability Support Services at least two weeks before the event at 252-737-1016. For more information, visit www.ecu.edu/gray/gallery.

Contact: Tom Braswell, interim Wellington B. Gray Gallery director, 252-328-1312 or BRASWELLG@ecu.edu

 

-by Crystal Baity, ECU News Services

Laupus Library to exhibit relief woodcarving creations

Laupus Library will open the art exhibit “Visions in Wood: Carved Creations,” on Oct. 3 in the Evelyn Fike Laupus Gallery on the fourth floor of the library. On display through Dec. 9, the exhibit showcases a collection of relief carvings by Dr. Leonard “Leo” Trujillo, professor and chair of the Department of Occupational Therapy in the College of Allied Health Sciences at East Carolina University.

The 2017 fall semester exhibit is part of the library’s ongoing “Art as Avocation” series that showcases and celebrates the artistic talents and self-expression of faculty, staff and students from the Division of Health Sciences.

“Laupus has a long history of showcasing the hidden talents of our health sciences faculty in this series,” said Beth Ketterman, director of Laupus Library. “Dr. Trujillo’s work is masterful and our hope is that those who view these pieces will gain an appreciation for his craft and expertise, and reflect on how the process of creation gives us insights into our own humanity.”

Log cabin by Dr. Leonard Trujillo. (contributed photo)

Log cabin by Dr. Leonard Trujillo. (contributed photo)

Trujillo’s work is reflective of a lifetime of learning the art of carving and love for nature. He recounts his desire at an early age to carve figures out of wood to create three-dimensional illusions in his works.

He will sometimes carve a piece only to study a certain aspect of the carving process. Beginning with a solid plank of wood, Trujillo uses mallets and a multitude of gouges, chisels, riffles and sandpaper leaves, to transform the wood into lifelike images of trees, old barns, nature scenes and once in a while, people.

“The hardest part of the carving process is having to stop and prepare the wood for the work that you are about to do,” he said. “That can take days out of actual carving time.”

In 2013, he built his first studio, doing all but the electrical work. Filled with sharpening machines, vacuum systems, special track lighting and carving gouges lined throughout the multi-stage workspace, it’s easy to see this is far from a getaway spot. He also refuses for it to be referred to as a “man cave.”

“I carve because of the pleasure it brings me, and truly take delight in the way people react to my work,” he said.

Presently, Trujillo isn’t competing in carving club shows and competition. “When you work towards winning a ribbon, you lose the pleasure of carving and it becomes work rather than pleasure,” he said.

An opening reception will be held on Oct. 3 from 4:30-6:30 p.m. and will include a presentation by the artist. The event is open to the public.

To learn more about this exhibition series or if you are interested in showcasing your work, visit

www.ecu.edu/laupuslibrary/events/artasavocation.

For more information contact Kelly Rogers Dilda at rogerske@ecu.edu or 252-744-2232.

 

-by Kelly Dilda, University Communications 

ECU’s School of Art and Design to host first art exhibit of academic year Aug. 21-Sept. 23

The School of Art and Design at East Carolina University will host an art exhibit of faculty and graduate student work titled “Is This the World We Created?” beginning Aug. 21.
A reception to honor the artists will be held Friday, Sept. 1, from 5 until 8 p.m. in the Wellington B. Gray Gallery, where the artwork will be on display through Sept. 23.

The exhibit will feature ceramics, graphic design, illustration, drawing, metal design, painting, photography, film, printmaking, sculpture and textile design.

ECU features the largest and most diverse studio art program in North Carolina and is fully accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design with faculty enjoying an international reputation in both the studio arts and scholarly endeavors.

The Wellington B. Gray Gallery is located in the Jenkins Fine Arts Center on the ECU campus.

Gallery hours are 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday through Friday and 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday. The gallery is closed for all university holidays. The center is handicapped accessible.

For more information, contact Tom Braswell, interim gallery director, at 252-328-1312 or visit www.ecu.edu/art/

 

Photos of artwork available by contacting: Tom Braswell, 252-328-1312, BRASWELLG@ecu.edu

NEA grant to fund study on social, economic impact of glassblowing on Farmville

East Carolina University’s College of Fine Arts and Communication has received a $20,000 National Endowment for the Arts grant to research the cultural and economic impact of a glassblowing studio in Farmville.

GlasStation

The GlasStation on West Wilson Street in Farmville (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

The NEA announced the awards June 14. ECU was one of 19 organizations in North Carolina to receive the competitive national funding.

The studio, called the GlasStation, is a former service station in Farmville’s historic downtown repurposed as a glassblowing studio and education center. ECU began teaching academic classes and conducting community outreach programs in the facility in January.

The two-year award will primarily fund research by ECU graduate students in anthropology and economics on the social and economic revitalization impact of the GlasStation on Farmville’s business district. Residents will be asked about the GlasStation, how it affects their sense of identity and community cohesion and quality of life. Researchers will also look at how property is used, sold or rented in the historic business district. Surveys, interviews and observation will help provide data for the research.

First-year graduate student Ronson Schultz rotates a fiery glass object.

First-year graduate student Ronson Schultz rotates a fiery glass object.

The GlasStation is a cooperative community venture between the Farmville Group, a volunteer economic development association interested in growing the local economy through the arts, the Tabitha M. DeVisconti Trust and ECU.

Kate Bukoski, director of ECU’s School of Art and Design, is the lead principal investigator of the study. Christine Avenarius and David Griffiths of the Department of Anthropology and Chun Kuang of the Department of Economics are co-principal investigators. Michael Crane of the College of Fine Arts and Communication also is an investigator.

For more information, visit https://www.arts.gov/news/2017/nea-announces-grants-support-arts-every-us-state-and-jurisdiction or see an earlier news story about the GlasStation.

 

–by Harley Dartt, University Communication

Mathematical sculpture workshop spotlights the math behind art

Applied mathematician and sculptor Dr. George Hart led an April 7 workshop in Jenkins Fine Arts Center at East Carolina University which spotlighted the math behind art.

Hart, an interdepartmental research professor at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, demonstrated how mathematics is creative in unexpected ways.

Dr. George Hart is an applied mathematician and sculptor. (photos by Cliff Hollis)

Dr. George Hart is an applied mathematician and sculptor. (photos by Cliff Hollis)

Twenty-seven students, faculty and staff from across campus as well as teachers from the greater Greenville community assembled two of Hart’s sculptures and designed two of their own.

The event was organized by Dr. Sviatoslav Archava, teaching associate professor of mathematics at ECU.

Workshop participants started by connecting plastic struts and connector balls from a Zometool kit, forming shapes that would prove to be foundational for the sculptures that they would create.

The sculpture “Autumn.” (photos by Cliff Hollis)

The sculpture “Autumn.”
(photos by Cliff Hollis)

The first sculpture, named “Autumn”, was assembled from 60 identical laser-cut wood pieces that were connected using cable ties. Working together, the participants explored the possible ways to connect the pieces, a task that developed spatial perception and visual reasoning. The solution for the sculpture involved two phases. The first phase was a finding a solution to connect three pieces. After that, it was possible to build the sculpture by combining the trio of connected pieces to other trios. Only one way to connect the pieces led to a beautiful structure they were trying to assemble. The following facts about the sculpture were noted by the participants with Hart’s help:

  • “Autumn” may be viewed as an artistic version of a regular dodecahedron, a solid that is formed by 12 regular pentagons.
  • Sixty pieces from which the sculpture is built lie in 30 planes (two in each plane). The 30 planes are the facial planes of the five cubes inscribed in the dodecahedron or, equivalently, of the rhombic tricontahedron.

 

The "Ambagesque" sculpture.

The “Ambagesque” sculpture.

The second sculpture, named “Ambagesque” (from the Latin word for “tangle”), also had 60 pieces, which were laser-cut from colored acrylic sheets. The pieces lie in 20 different planes (three in each plane). Despite the smaller number of planes involved, it was much more difficult to assemble due to the non- edge-to-edge connections and more complicated geometry. On a few occasions, participants needed Hart’s help to find the correct way to proceed.

Assembling the sculptures gave the participants a sense of the mental processes that mathematicians use in their research and the excitement and pleasure of “figuring things out.”

At the end of the workshop, participants designed their own paper sculpture. This involved changing the faces of the rhombic tricontahedron so the altered faces could be glued back together to create a visually appealing form.

Participants went away with an idea of the underlying shapes, the curiosity to look for patterns in complex-looking sculptures they may see elsewhere or design themselves, and having experienced the thrill of exploring the world around them mathematically.

For more information on Hart and his work, visit http://georgehart.com/.

 

 

-by Dr. Slava Archava, Teaching Associate Professor of Mathematics

 

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