Category Archives: awards

Professor receives History Award Medal from National Society Daughters of the American Revolution

East Carolina University professor of anthropology Dr. Charles R. Ewen has received the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution History Award Medal. Linda Gill, Edward Buncombe Chapter representative of the NSDAR, presented Ewen with the medal at a reception in his honor on March 20 in ECU’s Joyner Library.

“This is extraordinary. I am honored to be recognized by the DAR for my work in historical archaeology,” Ewen said. “I consider all my work to be public and am grateful to find that the public appreciates what I do.”

Dr. Randy Daniel, chair of the Department of Anthropology; Dr. Charles Ewen, professor and recipient of the DAR History Award Medal; and Linda Gill, chapter representative of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution.

From left, Dr. Randy Daniel, chair of the Department of Anthropology; Dr. Charles Ewen, professor and recipient of the DAR History Award Medal; and Linda Gill, chapter representative of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution. (Contributed photos)

According to the society’s website, the medal is given to an individual or group whose study and promotion of some aspect of American history – on the regional or national level – has significantly advanced the understanding of America’s past.

“This National Office takes great pleasure in granting permission to award the DAR History Award Medal to Charles R. Ewen,” wrote Virginia Hudson Trader, historian general of the NSDAR, in a letter approving the award.

Ewen thanked the DAR and those in attendance for recognizing his work in historical archaeology.

Ewen thanked the DAR and those in attendance for recognizing his work in historical archaeology.

“Dr. Ewen is certainly a worthy recipient of the DAR History Award Medal,” said Dr. Randy Daniel, chair of the Department of Anthropology. “Apropos of this award, Charlie’s work in historical archaeology in North Carolina has undoubtedly advanced the understanding of America’s past both at a regional and national level.”

Ewen’s research interests focus mostly on historical archaeology, specifically the contact and colonial periods. However, he has worked on many archaeology sites from prehistoric villages to Civil War fortifications and 20th-century homesteads.

“Perhaps best known is his scholarship of the archaeology of piracy and the fate of the fabled Lost Colony of Roanoke,” Daniel said. “Charlie’s advocacy of the importance of American history, as can be seen and touched in the archaeological record, is always inspiring.”

Ewen serves as director of the Phelps Archaeology Laboratory at ECU. In addition, he teaches courses to undergraduate and graduate students and directs many hands-on field sessions.

The DAR was founded in 1890 and boasts nearly 200,000 members and 3,000 chapters across the United States and abroad. Their members dedicate themselves to historic preservation, promotion of education and encouragement of patriotic endevour. The national headquarters is located in Washington, D.C. To learn more about the DAR, visit https://www.dar.org.

 

-by Lacey L. Gray, University Communications

Hunter Whittington named 2019-2020 Newman Civic Fellow

Hunter Whittington

Hunter Whittington

Hunter Whittington, a sophomore at East Carolina University, is one of 262 students nationwide selected as a 2019-2020 Newman Civic Fellow by Campus Compact, a Boston-based nonprofit organization working to advance the public purposes of higher education.

Whittington is an ECU Honors College student from Clayton majoring in political science and economics. He has been involved with the Student Government Association, the Pre-Law Society and the Center for Leadership and Civic Engagement.

He became interested in politics while still in high school, when he started working on voter outreach during the 2016 election. Since then, he has conducted research on millennial voter turnout, organized voter registration drives, worked to keep polling places open on campus and advocated for student voter rights, according to his personal statement on the Newman Civic Fellows website.

Whittington “is a student leader, exhaustive in his efforts to raise awareness for and increase the level of civic engagement on our campus,” said ECU Chancellor Cecil Staton. “Currently, he is working to create a coalition of college students and local residents to foster a spirit of civic engagement in our community and raise awareness for local issues by giving constituents the tools to fight for the issues they care about.”

The Newman Civic Fellowship, named for Campus Compact co-founder Frank Newman, is a one-year experience emphasizing personal, professional and civic growth for students who have demonstrated a capacity for leadership and an investment in solving public problems.

Through the fellowship, Campus Compact provides a variety of learning and networking opportunities, including a national conference of Newman Civic Fellows in partnership with the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the U.S. Senate. The fellowship also provides participants with access to apply for exclusive scholarship and post-graduate opportunities.

“We are proud to recognize each of these extraordinary student leaders and thrilled to have the opportunity to engage with them,” said Campus Compact President Andrew Seligsohn. “The stories of this year’s Newman Civic Fellows make clear that they are committed to finding solutions to pressing problems in their communities and beyond. That is what Campus Compact is about, and it’s what our country and our world desperately need.”

The Newman Civic Fellowship is supported by the KPMG Foundation and Newman’s Own Foundation.

For more information, visit Campus Compact’s website.

 

-by Crystal Baity, ECU News Services

Spring URCA Awards announced

East Carolina University’s Office of Undergraduate Research announced that 32 students will receive spring Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity awards.

The award provides support for faculty-mentored research and creative projects led by undergraduates in four disciplines: biomedical science, STEM, social science, and the arts and humanities.

Awards are given twice during the academic year. Students apply for the award with a defined project narrative and budget justification summary that they’ve developed in collaboration with a mentor.

Awards range from $1,500-2,000 for each project. Honors College recipients can receive up to $2,500 with support from the college. The award may go toward project materials and cost, a stipend for the student, or used for travel to conduct field or archival research. Award recipients are required to present their findings at venues including Undergraduate Day during ECU’s Research and Creative Achievement Week and the State of North Carolina Undergraduate Research and Creativity Symposium held in November.

This spring’s URCA award recipients are:

  • Kirtan Amin, exercise physiology, “South Asian cancer survivors health study”
  • Rouzbeh Beig Heidari, engineering, “Using cellphone attachable microscope in identifying molds”
  • Glenesha Berryman, English and great books, “I made it up: Maps, essays, and other guides for the queer black girl”
  • Sarah Bradshaw, chemistry and public health, “Ozone inhalation impairs efferocytosis in the lung”
  • Jake Bruen, fine arts, “Untouchable”
  • Amber Chavis, biology, “The evolution of laying times in eastern bluebirds”
  • Emily Edmonds, biology, “Parasites as indicators of biodiversity in coastal shoreline habitats”
  • Claire Fabian-Bayola, biochemistry and chemistry, “Identifying key residues in 15-LOX-2 enzyme for interactions with allosteric effectors”
  • Nicholas Hill, electrical engineering, “An advanced control system for hand prosthesis for candidates with trans radial amputation”
  • Brooks Holt, nursing, “Evaluating the effect of community engagement on the impact and use of water filters in four villages in Guatemala”
  • Anan Islam, neuroscience and biology, “Protocols for evaluating enzymatic detergents”
  • Nicholas Kannarr, film and video production, “Our story”
  • Juliana Lane, film and video production, “Paranoid insomniac”
  • Nickolas Leach, film and video production, “A-L-I-E-N-S senior thesis film”
  • Jiahao Li, electrical and mechanical engineering, “Project peregrine”
  • Phoenix Little, psychology and neuroscience, “Barriers to higher education in the Latino population”
  • Olivia McBride, nutrition science and biology, “Patient interest in farm to clinic program”
  • Serena Mooney, public health studies and international studies, “Comprehensive assessment of mitochondrial energy fluxes of the flexor digitorum brevis”
  • Emma O’Brien, business management, “Eliminating barriers to youth sport in Pitt County”
  • Brooke Palmer, professional acting training and theatre for youth, “Performing in American Sign Language – ‘The magic of winter from around the world'”
  • Pujan Patel, biology and public health, “The role PGRMC1 plays in hormone metabolism”
  • Victoria Preston, chemistry, “Electrochemical analysis of methylated DNA in MS”
  • Katherine Ray, biochemistry, “Elucidation of 15-Lipoxygenase-2 and PEBP1 interactions implicated in acute renal failure”
  • Sydney Rossback, exercise physiology, “What is the significance of hand dominance in motor learning and motor control?”
  • Semiyah Sams, public health, “A qualitative analysis of health care provider roles and perspectives related to abnormal mammography results”
  • Mohammad Sarsour, chemistry, “Trace metal elements in extracted and exfoliated teeth – The ECU tooth fairy project”
  • Christopher Satterley, electrical engineering, “Design of a patient orientation monitoring system”
  • Jessica Schulte, social work, “Meals on Wheels and the well-being of seniors”
  • Haley Tailor, public health, “HPV vaccinations among black immigrants”
  • Alexander Turner, neuroscience and psychology, “Impact of prostatic radiation on bladder innervation and neuronal apoptosis”
  • Kristin Tyson, chemistry and biochemistry, “Development of novel tryptophan analogues to study and expand protein function”
  • Maddie Wells, dance performance and choreography, “Improving cardiovascular fitness in dancers through aquatic conditioning”

Learn more about the URCA awards online. For more information on individual projects, view the 2019 Spring URCA spreadsheet.

 

-by Matt Smith, University Communications

Alumni Association names leadership award recipients

The East Carolina University Alumni Association named its five student recipients of the Robert H. Wright Alumni Leadership Award on Tuesday. The award recognizes students’ academic achievement as well as commitment to leadership and integrity. The students will be honored at ECU’s spring commencement ceremony on May 3.

The Robert H. Wright Alumni Leadership Award is the most prestigious award presented by the ECU Alumni Association, given to students who live up to Robert H. Wright’s legacy of using leadership to influence positive change, just as Wright did as the first president of East Carolina Teachers College.

“It is an honor for the ECU Alumni Association to recognize these amazing students as the 2019 Robert H. Wright Award recipients. They truly represent Pirate Nation through their academic accomplishments, dedication to serving others, and outstanding leadership. We cannot wait to see their impact on the world,” said Mark Notestine, interim associate vice chancellor for alumni relations.

 

The 2019 recipients are as follows:

 

Austin James Allen

Allen

Austin James Allen of Asheboro is a biochemistry major, Honors College student and member of the men’s tennis team. During his time at ECU, Allen has served on the Student-Athlete Advisory Committee working to improve awareness of mental health issues among student-athletes. He also interned with the East Carolina Heart Institute, where he observed cardiac, thoracic and vascular surgeons in both the clinic and operating room, and studied abroad in Spain in the summer of 2018. After graduation, Allen plans to attend medical school. He has already been accepted to multiple schools, including ECU’s Brody School of Medicine.

 

William Michael Taylor

Taylor

William Michael Taylor of Garner is a biochemistry and chemistry major and Honors College student. Taylor is a resident advisor and currently oversees the Biology Living Learning Community at ECU. He also worked as a research assistant in the chemistry department and will be presenting work at two upcoming research conferences. After graduation, Taylor will attend the Brody School of Medicine as part of the class of 2023. He’s interested in studying family medicine and working in eastern North Carolina helping underserved populations.

 

 

Michael Denning Jr.

Denning Jr.

Michael Tyrone Denning Jr. of Garner is a public health studies major interested in medicine and science. One of Denning’s formative experiences at ECU was attending a National Academy of Medicine workshop titled “An American Crisis: The Growing Absence of Black Men in Medicine and Science” in Washington, D.C. He has also traveled abroad on three occasions, to England, the Dominican Republic and Northern Ireland. Denning plans to get a master’s degree in public health and then attend the Brody School of Medicine.

 

 

Lower

Lower

Meghan Lower of Greenville is an EC Scholar majoring in science education and chemistry. She has worked as a research assistant in the chemistry department under Dr. Joi Walker studying the implementation of argumentation-based chemistry laboratory curriculum at ECU. Lower has also served as a mentor with the Pitt Pirates Robotics program and participated in numerous community service opportunities through the EC Scholars program. After graduation, Lower plans to earn her master’s degree in science education at ECU. Eventually, she’d like to earn her doctorate and work with chemistry teachers at the college level.

 

 

Weingarz

Weingarz

Ashley Weingartz of Greenville is a sports studies major and catcher for the ECU softball team. At ECU, Weingartz developed a student-athlete pen pal program with Wahl-Coates Elementary School, studied abroad in Cape Town, South Africa, and interned with Little League International assisting in preparations for the 2017 Little League World Series. Weingartz will attend the University of South Carolina to earn her Master of Science in sport and entertainment management, while also working as a graduate assistant with the USC softball team. After that, she plans to pursue coaching or collegiate athletics administration.

 

-by Erin Shaw, University Communications

College of Arts and Sciences honors students at ECU Excels reception

East Carolina University’s Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences recognized its high-achieving freshmen and first-year transfer students at the college’s annual ECU Excels reception Feb. 15 in the new Student Center Ballroom.

In its 10th year, the event honored roughly 477 Harriot College students who achieved a GPA of 3.0 or higher during their first semester at ECU, the largest for the college to date. Honorees and their guests celebrated with cake and mingled with faculty and associate deans from the college. Students in attendance also received a certificate and had photos taken by a professional photographer.

Harriot College freshmen and first-year transfer students who received at least a 3.0 GPA during their first semester at ECU were honored during the college’s annual ECU Excels reception Feb. 15.

Harriot College freshmen and first-year transfer students who received at least a 3.0 GPA during their first semester at ECU were honored during the college’s annual ECU Excels reception Feb. 15. (Contributed photos)

Dr. William M. Downs, dean of Harriot College, welcomed everyone to the celebration and congratulated the students on their accomplishments.

“The transition from high school to college is the most difficult of a student’s life,” Downs said. “ECU Excels is all about recognizing and encouraging you early so that you stay on the path to success and a timely graduation; finish in four.”

Following the dean’s remarks, three members of the THCAS Dean’s Student Leadership Council provided words of wisdom and encouragement to awardees on how to be successful throughout their academic career at ECU.

Students sign in for the ECU Excels reception in the new Student Center Ballroom. (Contributed photo)

Students sign in for the ECU Excels reception in the new Student Center Ballroom.

“I want to say congratulations,” said Laney Ezzell, chair of the leadership council and a senior majoring in criminal justice and political science. “It is a great accomplishment to maintain a good GPA your first semester of college. That number means you have worked hard, and like me, you probably did so despite other difficult moments in your life.”

Ezzell highlighted the intensity of a college course workload, the importance of time management and shared a personal story of losing a friend to cancer her freshman year, but said she was able to overcome her adversities.

“Throughout life, you are going to face adversity. If you fail, it is OK. Failure is inevitable,” Ezell said. “Get up, brush yourself off and keep going. This is a testament to your character. In life there is no success without adversity.”

Garrett Yarbrough, vice chair of the leadership council and a senior majoring in English and history, said, “As any student in their second year or beyond will attest, starting your college career off on the right foot is as significant to continued success as it is impressive.”

Yarbrough encourages students to practice lateral, interdisciplinary thinking and to study abroad to fully enhance their educational experience and knowledge.

“My biggest piece of advice to anyone in their freshman year is to follow your passions — they don’t have to be solely in your major,” Yarbrough said. “While you are in college, make it a goal to stay uncomfortable. When you are uncomfortable, you use this opportunity to adapt, and to adapt, you apply what you have learned to succeed in creative ways.”

Alexandria “Lexi” Miller, secretary of the leadership council and a senior pre-med student majoring in chemistry and foreign languages and literatures with a concentration in Hispanic studies, said, “You’ve now got a newfound freedom and it is up to you to be wise about how you spend your time.”

Table setting at the ECU Excels reception.

Table setting at the ECU Excels reception.

She told students there are four things to remember as they continue their college career: don’t skip class; use your planner; study, study, study; and don’t procrastinate.

“Have fun and have a social life, but don’t forget that you are here to begin your career. You’ve done well thus far, and I believe that you will continue to excel,” Miller concluded.

 

by Lacey L. Gray, University Communications

ECU university studies major wins top award in Campus Movie Fest competition

Nathaniel Reid, a senior university studies major, won a top award in ECU’s Campus Movie Fest contest.

Nathaniel Reid, a senior university studies major, won a top award in ECU’s Campus Movie Fest contest. (Contributed photo)

East Carolina University senior Nathaniel Reid, a university studies major, has won the Campus Movie Fest best video award in the Hurricane Florence category. This category, sponsored by ECU’s Water Resources Center and the Natural Resources and Environment Cluster, included a $500 prize.

“This was my first time doing Campus Movie Fest, and I am truly honored to have received an award and prize. Prior to the event, I had taken a film survey and two video art courses, so that helped me convey a clear perspective on how I wanted to show my film to the audience,” Reid said.

Reid, a first-generation college student, is minoring in art and merging animation with sociology into a degree through the university studies program. Reid enjoys working in Adobe After Effects, Adobe Premiere Pro, Maya, Adobe Illustrator and Unity.

“I want to say thank you to both the volunteers and the American Red Cross for allowing me their time to make my film a success,” Reid said.

Reid’s extracurricular activities include acting as secretary of ECU’s Sexuality and Gender Alliance group, also known as SAGA; serving as a member of the ECU animation/interactive design guild; and assisting as a volunteer leader with the Pitt County All-Stars 4-H Club.

“I would like to see more students getting involved in this kind of activity, and I also think it is a great example of a different way of reaching out to the community beyond research,” said Dr. Stephen Moysey, director of the ECU Water Resources Center.

 

-by Lacey L Gray, University Communications

ECU physician receives national service award

Dr. Michael Lang (Contributed photo)

Dr. Michael Lang (Contributed photo)

A physician at the ECU Brody School of Medicine has received the 2018 Outstanding Service Award from the Association of Medicine and Psychiatry (AMP).

Dr. Michael Lang, clinical associate professor in the Departments of Internal Medicine and Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, was recognized for his contributions to the organization during its recent annual meeting in Chicago.

Lang directs the Internal Medicine-Psychiatry Residency Program as well as ECU’s electroconvulsive therapy and transcranial magnetic stimulation programs. He also serves as secretary of the AMP and is co-chairing the planning committee for the group’s next annual meeting.

“The organization, which has as its mission ‘Promoting Education, Mentorship, Research and Quality Patient Care at the Interface of Medicine and Psychiatry,’ benefited greatly from Dr. Lang’s tireless advocacy to further visibility and promote the mission broadly through efforts at local and national meetings, recruitment of effective and inspirational speakers, and work to promote stability and growth in the organization,” AMP president Dr. Jane Gagliardi said.

“Dr. Lang was unanimously selected to receive the 2018 AMP Outstanding Service Award in honor of his important contributions and efforts to further the reach of AMP.”

Lang earned his medical degree from East Carolina University in 2002 and completed residency training at Pitt County Memorial Hospital (now Vidant Medical Center) in 2007. He also completed a fellowship at Duke University in 2009 to become certified in electroconvulsive therapy. He joined the ECU faculty in 2007.

 

-by Kelly R. Dilda, University Communications

Brody alumni selected for prestigious teaching award

A pair of Brody alumni recently received a distinguished award for their contributions to teaching and mentoring the next generation of family physicians.

Dr. Bryan Bunn ’10 and Dr. Jeremy Sexton ’11 were selected to receive a 2018 Community Teaching Award from the North Carolina Academy of Family Physicians Foundation.

Brody School of Medicine alums Dr. Bryan Bunn, left, and Dr. Jeremy Sexton were selected to receive a 2018 Community Teaching Award from the North Carolina Academy of Family Physicians Foundation.

Brody School of Medicine alums Dr. Bryan Bunn, left, and Dr. Jeremy Sexton were selected to receive a 2018 Community Teaching Award from the North Carolina Academy of Family Physicians Foundation. (Photos by Rob Spahr)

The Community Teaching Award honors and recognizes dedicated family physicians who sacrifice their time in the interest of advancing the principles and ideals of family medicine by teaching and mentoring the next generation of physicians.

The Brody alumni received a commemorative plaque, a cash award and recognition at NCAFP’s State-of-the Academy Address & Awards Lunch in Asheville on Nov. 30.

Bunn and Sexton both practice at Vidant Family and Sports Medicine-Edenton in Edenton.

 

JEREMY SEXTON

Sexton said he was thankful to be chosen for the Community Teaching Award and that it helps validate efforts to do something beneficial for the people of the region.

“We’re not only providing health care to people who really need it in eastern North Carolina, but also kind of bringing a good example of what primary care can be like to people who are going through the process of deciding what specialty that they’re interested in committing to,” he said. “Hopefully the people who come through here are able to see that we do a lot of different stuff and it stays interesting. So hopefully we can get more medical students committed to primary care.”

Dr. Jeremy Sexton

Dr. Jeremy Sexton

Even though the Edenton practice is extremely busy – due in large part to the shortage of primary care physicians in the region – Sexton said he has enjoyed the experience of having students around.

“It’s nice to work with learners because most of the time they’re still really excited about medicine and sometimes when you are busy, you don’t always remember that ‘Oh yeah, this is pretty cool,’” he said.

Returning to North Carolina to practice after completing his residency training in Idaho was particularly meaningful to Sexton.

“I was in med school in Greenville not too long ago and the mission statement is kind of embedded into everything that Brody does. They really do want to turn out primary care providers who stick around in this part of the state because there is such a big need here,” he said. “If you work in primary care, you can work anywhere you want. There are five openings on the big island of Hawaii right now. I’m in Edenton, North Carolina, and I love it.”

Sexton said one piece of advice he would offer current medical students is to get as much clinical experience as possible.

“Meet or find a doctor that is doing something similar to what you imagine doing, so that you can see what kind of pitfalls they’ve experienced and things that would be helpful to navigate,” he said. “It’s an ever-evolving process and it’s going to keep changing. So it’s helpful to know someone who does something very similar to what you want to do, to get advice from.”

 

BRYAN BUNN

Bunn, a Greenville native, said he appreciates all the ways his Brody experience taught him to treat the patient, not the illness.

“Brody did a good job of continuing to emphasize that the academics are important, and the learning is extremely important, but don’t forget about the patient,” he said. “Don’t forget the history and physical, don’t forget about the social aspects and that the patient might not be able to afford these medicines.”

Dr. Bryan Bunn

Dr. Bryan Bunn

Caring for patients has a different meaning for Bunn and Sexton than it does for primary care physicians in many other parts of the country, they said. In their medically underserved area of northeastern North Carolina, there are only about a half dozen primary care doctors caring for patients across nine counties.

“Between the two of us, there are about 2,000 patients who call us their primary care provider,” said Bunn, adding that their clinic is fairly unique because it offers colonoscopies, inpatient medicine, pediatrics, outpatient medicine and sports medicine – all in one location.

Working in a practice that allows him to use, on a daily basis, more of the skills he learned in medical school and residency is exciting for Bunn, who completed his residency at North Colorado Family Medicine.

“It’s refreshing from my own intellectual standpoint and from what I want to do with medicine. So I appreciate the opportunity that Vidant has afforded us with flexibility and autonomy to do what we do,” he said. “We’re an underserved area and this is needed.”

Bunn said the Community Teaching Award is a meaningful recognition for him, because he never expected to be a “teacher” after choosing a career in medicine. He hopes medical students who are interested in primary care can see all of the opportunities available to them when they spend time in his clinic.

“Having the opportunity to see med students come through and to think that you’re giving back to them is really cool,” he said. “And you learn from them as well, because medicine is always changing. So it’s definitely an honor to know that med students think that we’re helping them too.”

 

-by Laura McFall Bond and Rob Spahr, University Communications

Office of Undergraduate Research announces fall URCA award winners

East Carolina University’s Office of Undergraduate Research announced that 38 students will receive fall Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity awards.

The award provides support for faculty-mentored research and creative projects led by undergraduate researchers in four disciplines including biomedical science, STEM, social science, and the arts and humanities.

Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity awards are announced twice during the academic year. Students apply for the award with a developed project narrative and budget justification summary that they’ve developed in collaboration with a mentor.

Awards range from $1,500-2,000 for each project. Honors College recipients can be awarded up to $2,500 with support from the college. The award may go toward project materials and cost, a stipend for the student, or used for travel to conduct field or archival research. Award recipients are required to present their findings at venues including Undergraduate Day during ECU’s Research and Creative Achievement Week and the State of North Carolina Undergraduate Research and Creativity Symposium held in November.

“The URCA award program is a long-standing tradition at ECU and is our largest single output of funds, accounting for 80 percent of the office’s budget,” said Mary Farwell, director of undergraduate research. “The Academic Council has generously provided increased support over the last several years to keep up with demand. The partnership between our office and the Honors College is a welcome change that allows a more equitable and sustainable approach to funding thesis projects.

“The quality of the research and creative projects have increased substantially since I began as director 10 years ago,” she said. “I very much appreciate faculty mentors and their hard work in supporting these student-led projects.”

This year’s URCA award recipients are:

  • Jocelyn Bayles, nutrition science, “Can food-based learning improve preschoolers vegetable intake?”
  • Lesley Benderman, anatomy and cell biology, “Investigate the role of claudin-7 in intestinal stem cell functions”
  • Hannah Black, biomechanics, “High intensity weightlifting mechanical analysis”
  • Timothy O’Quinn Boykin, anthropology, “Prehistoric artifact classification at Raven Rock State Park”
  • Joshua Butler, engineering, “3D printing patient-specific images for preoperative planning”
  • Mina Chanakira, chemistry, “Investigating protein folding stability and Cu2+ binding ability of a new class of ferroxidase from brucella spp.”
  • Katie Collins, foreign languages and literatures, “Chekhov and Shakespeare on the modern stage: two plays in one show”
  • Caleb Collins, chemistry, “Use of HPLC column retention probes to predict pharmaceutical method development direction”
  • Sean Cone, physics, “Studying the breakdown of fibrin initiated by tPA”
  • Griffin Crail-Steinbaker, Center for Sustainability and Department of Engineering, “Design and development of a frugally-engineered, low-cost energy-savings device for the built environment”
  • Connor Gerney, School of Theatre and Dance, “Twilight boy”
  • William Guiler, psychology, “Effects of a mindfulness-based stress management program for college students”
  • Danish Hasan, School of Dental Medicine Foundational Sciences, “Anti-fungal properties of berberine chloride on candida spp.”
  • Faith Heagy, biology, “Social status-dependent regulation of hypothalamic dopaminergic neurons”
  • Calie Hemgen, geography, “Planning and environment, applying data science to a dense network of precipitation observation in rural Jamaica: 2014-2015”
  • Callie Herman, kinesiology, “Does consumption of slow-releasing carbohydrates improve mental performance following exhaustive exercise?”
  • Felicia E Jaimes, nutrition science, “Matricryptins as regulators of hepatic macrophage phenotype”
  • Megan Koceja, biology, “Investigating how litter decomposition and microbial activity respond to long-term fertilization in a wetland habitat”
  • Hanna Kosnik, physiology, “High fat diet induced sex differences in bladder mitochondrial complexes”
  • Christina Larkins, kinesiology, “Clean up your health intervention”
  • Miranda Lee, physics, “Using microfluidics to study the effect flow has on fibrin properties”
  • Madison McCauley, College of Nursing, “From the students perspective: analysis of graduate students quality improvement (QI) learning outcomes using reflective strategies”
  • Erin McCullen, psychology, “Internalized weight bias and self-compassion study”
  • Jaylon Morehead, biology, “Prenatal supplementation prevents birth defects”
  • Chase Neese, foreign languages and literatures, “Linking Tsiolkovsky’s rocket science to humanities”
  • Radha Patel, biology, “Venom proteomic profiling of wandering spiders”
  • Ryan Patton, emergency medicine, “Physiology, relationship between dopamine and morphine responsiveness after spinal cord injury”
  • Morgan Phillips, biology, “Examining the role of Tpr2 in germ cell division”
  • Samantha Poppenfuse, biochemistry and molecular biology, “Toxicology screening of umbilical cords”
  • Taylor Reed, School of Theatre and Dance, “Legends of the past”
  • Sara Roozbehi, biology, “Microbial influence on zombie crab parasitism”
  • Stephiya Sabu, anatomy and cell biology, “Role of claudin-7 on intestinal inflammation”
  • Anup Sanghvi, engineering, “The effect of downstream resistance in a CABG”
  • Catherine Taylor, College of Nursing, “Function trajectory in older adults with heart failure”
  • Chelsea Thompson, health education and promotion, “Nutrition compliance among cancer patients”
  • Erin Tucci, nutrition science, “miRNA regulation of TLR4 in macrophages”
  • Bhakti Vahewala, biology, “Opsin gene expression in white stickleback”
  • Claudia Woznichak, College of Nursing, “Community engagement in a developing country.”

Learn more about the URCA awards online.

 

-by Matt Smith, University Communications

1 2 3 11