Category Archives: Medicine

Gift honors medical providers who put patient first

While supporting her younger sister through a number of severe illnesses over four decades, Dr. Laura Gantt witnessed both the best and the worst in health care.

Her experiences taught her that one thing distinguishes exceptional care: compassion – or as Gantt puts it, “truly caring about patients and their families.”

Gantt’s sister, Madeline, was diagnosed with bipolar disorder at age 14 and developed a series of chronic illnesses as an adult. When her health declined severely in 2010, Madeline moved to Greenville to live with Gantt, associate dean for nursing support services in the College of Nursing at East Carolina University.

Laura Gantt, left, with her sister, Madeline. (contributed photo)

Laura Gantt, left, with her sister, Madeline. (contributed photo)

It was then that Dr. Michael Lang, a clinical associate professor in ECU’s Brody School of Medicine who is board-certified in both psychiatry and internal medicine, took over Madeline’s care and the Gantt family found a level of support they hadn’t known previously.

“He was both her primary care physician and her psychiatrist,” Gantt explained. “I would have been in a much more horrible place without him because he helped me manage things really well.”

Lang oversaw Madeline’s care until she passed away from cancer at age 57 in June 2016.

Shortly after her sister’s passing, Gantt honored the compassion she and her family had experienced by making a planned gift to establish the Madeline S. Gantt Endowed Professorship in Psychiatry. She also created the Madeline Gantt Endowment to support continuing education for the ECU Internal Medicine-Psychiatry Residency Program, which Lang directs.

“This gift is going to provide ongoing education on arguably the most important aspect of care,” said Lang, “which is how the patient and the patient’s family improve with what we’re doing and making sure they partner in the patient’s recovery.”

The endowment also supports the new Department of Internal Medicine Compassion in Medicine Awards Luncheon. The goal of the event is to help new physicians learn to keep the needs of patients and families at the center of their practice. Together the gifts will total more than $430,000.

“Compassion in care and providing patients with a compassionate medical home is a top priority for us at ECU,” said Dr. Paul Bolin, professor and chair of the Department of Internal Medicine. “This gift enables us to emphasize that and keep it central in our training of young physicians.”

From left, Dr. Johnathan Polak, Dr. Laura Gantt, Dr. Michael Lang and Dr. Jim Peden at the first Compassion in Medicine Awards Luncheon. (contributed photo)

From left, Dr. Johnathan Polak, Dr. Laura Gantt, Dr. Michael Lang and Dr. Jim Peden at the first Compassion in Medicine Awards Luncheon. (contributed photo)

Addressing about 100 physicians at the inaugural Compassion in Medicine event on April 28, internist/psychiatrist Dr. Jim Peden, Brody’s associate dean for admissions, spoke about his experiences as a two-time cancer survivor. In 2001, Peden was diagnosed with a myxoid liposarcoma – a rare kind of cancer that grows in connective tissue, most often in the limbs – in his right lower leg. He underwent multiple surgeries, radiation and chemotherapy before experiencing a recurrence that led to an above-the-knee amputation in 2004.

In his address, Peden discussed the anxiety he experienced during periods of uncertainty, how sharing his situation openly with friends and colleagues resulted in added support, and how he used humor to cope with treatment and a new disability. He also recounted the different ways his doctors relayed troubling information.

“Having bad news broken to me a lot informed the way I break bad news,” he said, describing examples of both upsetting and reassuring approaches he experienced.

Also at the event, Johnathan Polak, a second-year internal medicine resident, received the first Madeline S. Gantt Endowed Resident Physician Award. Gantt relayed how Polak, who assisted with Madeline’s care, insisted on giving her sister the best care possible at the end of her life.

The award recognizes a resident who provides exemplary care to patients and provides funds for the recipient to attend a professional development opportunity of their choosing.

“It’s easy to fall into the training impulse ‘if this, then that,’” Polak said. “There’s so much more to medicine, really to being human, if we could all just take a moment and think about the other perspectives, the world would be a better place.”

To learn more about how gifts to the ECU Medical & Health Sciences Foundation can express appreciation for excellent medical care, contact Kathy Brown, senior advancement officer, at brownka@ecu.edu.

 

 

-by Elizabeth Willy, University Communication

 

 

Honor society inducts new members

The East Carolina University Brody School of Medicine chapter of the Gold Humanism Honor Society (GHHS) recently inducted seven new members.

Third-year medical students Amanda Carringer, Drew Crenshaw, Jinal Desai, Drew Gardner, Talia Horwitz, Wooten Jones, and Jaleeka Rudd were chosen by their peers for membership and honored at a dinner and induction ceremony at Ironwood Golf and Country Club on May 1.

Recent inductees into the Brody School of Medicine chapter of the Gold Humanism Honor Society are, front row from left, Wooten Jones, Drew Crenshaw and Drew Gardner; back row from left, Jaleeka Rudd, Talia Horwitz, Jinal Desai and Amanda Carringer. (Photos by Gretchen Baugh)

Recent inductees into the Brody School of Medicine chapter of the Gold Humanism Honor Society are, front row from left, Wooten Jones, Drew Crenshaw and Drew Gardner; back row from left, Jaleeka Rudd, Talia Horwitz, Jinal Desai and Amanda Carringer. (Photos by Gretchen Baugh)

“The Gold Humanism Honor Society recognizes students, residents and faculty who are exemplars of compassionate patient care and who serve as role models, mentors and leaders in medicine,” said Dr. Hellen Ransom, assistant professor of bioethics at Brody and GHHS faculty advisor. “GHHS members are the individuals whose peers would want them taking care of their own families.”

Drs. Manuel Izquierdo, left, and Hannah Fuhr, 2017 recipients of the Humanism and Excellence in Teaching Award. Not pictured is Dr. Stephanie Simmons.

Drs. Manuel Izquierdo, left, and Hannah Fuhr, 2017 recipients of the Humanism and Excellence in Teaching Award. Not pictured is Dr. Stephanie Simmons.

Also recognized at the event were the 2017 recipients of the Humanism and Excellence in Teaching Award sponsored by the Arnold P. Gold Foundation. Internal medicine resident Dr. Hannah Fuhr, internal medicine-pediatrics resident Dr. Manuel Izquierdo and obstetrics-gynecology resident Dr. Stephanie Simmons were selected by the third-year medical class for exemplifying humanism in their teaching and patient interactions.

Established in 2002 by the Arnold P. Gold Foundation, the Gold Humanism Honor Society (GHHS) is an international association of individuals and medical school chapters whose members are selected as exemplars of empathy, compassion, altruism, integrity, service, excellence and respect in their relationships with patients and others in the field of medicine.

The Brody chapter of the organization was founded in 2011. Membership is by peer selection in the third year of medical school. During their fourth year, members are responsible for executing a project that exemplifies humanism, sponsoring a fundraising event and participating in National Solidarity Day for Compassionate Patient Care.

 

 

-by Amy Ellis, University Communication 

 

College of Allied Health Sciences hosts first college-wide Research Day

The College of Allied Health Sciences recently held its first college-wide Research Day. The event, meant to foster inter-departmental collaboration, featured oral presentations and poster sessions from undergraduates, master’s students, Doctor of Physical Therapy students and Ph.D. candidates from the nine programs within the college.

Awards for posters and presentations were voted on by the CAHS research committee. Three People’s Choice award winners were chosen as well.

“Our first Research Day was an overwhelming success,” said Dr. Robert Orlikoff, dean of the college. “It showcased the fact that students in the College of Allied Health Sciences are not only developing the knowledge and skills to become effective evidence-based practitioners and health care workers, but are also acquiring strong skills in both basic and clinical research. I congratulate the students as well as our accomplished faculty research mentors.”

The ECU College of Allied Health Sciences recently held its first college-wide Research Day. Students from the college’s nine departments gave poster and oral presentations during morning and afternoon sessions. (Photos by Alyssa De Santis Figiel)

The ECU College of Allied Health Sciences recently held its first college-wide Research Day. Students from the college’s nine departments gave poster and oral presentations during morning and afternoon sessions. (Photos by Alyssa De Santis Figiel)

The event, held on the university’s Reading Day on April 26, was organized by Dr. Richard Willy, assistant professor in the Department of Physical Therapy, and Dr. Heather Harris Wright, professor and associate dean for research, who organized the presentations based on their subjects and theme, rather than by department.

“Every department in our college has typically done their own research day,” Willy said. “They’ve always kind of occurred in somewhat of a vacuum. So now that we’re pushing interprofessional communication, it made sense to hold them all on the same day.

“We might have someone from physical therapy standing next to someone from occupational therapy standing next to someone from clinical lab science,” Willy continued. “By seeing what our students are working on, essentially, by proxy we’re seeing what our faculty are working on. So we’re hopeful that maybe in the next couple years this Research Day might encourage more collaboration across the college.”

Students from the Department of Physical Therapy discuss their work during Research Day on April 26.

Students from the Department of Physical Therapy discuss their work during Research Day on April 26.

Peter Eischens, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Addictions & Rehabilitation Studies, won the best oral presentation award with his presentation “Developing queer competency in rehabilitation addictions, and clinical counseling graduate programs.”

Other winners chosen by the committee include Patrick Briley and Kori Engler from the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, as well as Morgan Haskins, the team of Jeffrey Harrington and Kate Foy, and Eric Kosco from the Department of Physical Therapy.

People’s Choice award winners were Eshan Pua of CSDI and Cynthia Edsall and Alyssa Kerls from the Department of Clinical Laboratory Science. Winners each received a $100 Amazon gift card.

The college plans to make its Research Day an annual event.

 

 

-by Natalie Sayewich, University Communication

Dr. Jonathon Firnhaber adds “distinguished professor” to his many titles

Dr. Jonathon Firnhaber ’14 stays busy.

He is a physician at East Carolina University’s Family Medicine Center, an associate professor of family medicine at the Brody School of Medicine, director of the family medicine residency program and vice chair of academic affairs – plus he is working on his MBA.

(Dr. Jonathon Firnhaber (left) shares a laugh with Max Ray Joyner, Sr. Firnhaber is now the Max R. & Catherine S. Joyner Distinguished Professor in Primary Care Medicine.) (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

Dr. Jonathon Firnhaber (left) shares a laugh with Max Ray Joyner, Sr. Firnhaber is now the Max R. & Catherine S. Joyner Distinguished Professor in Primary Care Medicine. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

Now he is the recipient of the Max R. & Catherine S. Joyner Distinguished Professorship in Primary Care Medicine.

“It’s personally an enormous honor. I think it’s a huge plus for our department as well,” Firnhaber said.

Dr. Jonathon Firnhaber.

Dr. Jonathon Firnhaber.

As the Joyner Distinguished Professor, Firnhaber serves as a role model for ECU faculty members and students. He will assist with activities to enrich teaching, develop opportunities in research and creative activity, provide patient care and boost the reputation of the school and university as a center for primary care medicine.

“Top of the list, we’re working to establish a fellowship in academic medicine, associated with our residency program,” he said. “(We) have all sorts of ideas in mind to improve the research standing of both our department and our residency program, which trickles down to improving the research focus of our students. If our students are seeing their mentors and their teachers participating in research and are working to improve their educational base, that translates to excitement on their part as well.”

Dr. Chelley Alexander, Robert T. Monk Distinguished Professor and chair of the Department of Family Medicine, said the professorship “is an enormous honor for Dr. Firnhaber, it reflects well on the department and also supplies funding and opportunities for our department to work with all the primary care disciplines at Brody School of Medicine in joint initiatives centered around research and academic medicine.”

After getting his undergraduate and medical degree from the University of Colorado, Firnhaber spent seven years in the Air Force as a resident and staff physician. Then he spent the next several years in private practice in Shelby, Washington and Chocowinity before coming to ECU in 2006.

ECU and medicine are a family affair. Dr. Firnhaber poses with his daughter, Jessica, who is a student in ECU’s School of Dental Medicine.

ECU and medicine are a family affair. Dr. Firnhaber poses with his daughter, Jessica, who is a student in ECU’s School of Dental Medicine.

Max Ray Joyner, Sr. ’54 described Firnhaber as a “very outstanding fellow” and said he was pleased the school selected him for the professorship.

The Max R. & Catherine S. Joyner Distinguished Professorship in Primary Care Medicine is made possible in part by the Joyner family. Their leadership gift has helped fund this professorship since 1992. Joyner has donated many gifts to the university since he graduated, helping with various scholarships and programs. He said the reason he got involved with this professorship is simple.

“I was asked… and I thought it was a good idea,” said Joyner.

“Folks like Mr. Joyner are the absolute unsung heroes of eastern North Carolina,” Firnhaber said. “To me, this professorship is not just an opportunity for me and for our department, but I think it really illustrates what individuals like him have done for health care in our state.”

Firnhaber and the Joyners were honored at a reception at the Family Medicine Center on May 11.

The Max R. & Catherine S. Joyner Distinguished Professorship in Primary Care Medicine is a five-year term and is renewable for a second five-year term. It includes an annual stipend that can be used for various needs such as salary supplement, travel and research expenses, stipends for teaching, research assistants, and special equipment.

Max Joyner poses with his family.

Max Joyner poses with his family.

If you would like make a charitable gift to or would like more information for the ECU Medical & Health Sciences Foundation, email Mark Notestine, President, ECU Medical & Health Sciences Foundation, notestinem14@ecu.edu.

 

-by Rich Klindworth

Brody student organization receives regional chapter award

East Carolina University’s Brody School of Medicine group that supports minority medical students and underserved communities has received a regional award.

The Brody Student National Medical Association chapter was recognized for the extensive community service its members performed this past year, outshining peer groups from North Carolina to Florida and the Caribbean.

“What I love about the Student National Medical Association is that the mission really aligns with the mission of the Brody School of Medicine,” explained chapter president Ebone Evans, a rising third-year medical student from Durham. “SNMA encourages physicians to go to these populations that are traditionally underserved and encourages support and mentorship for medical students who might not have had support in their lives around them.”

From left, Brody SNMA president Ebone Evans with members Jackie Watson and Consola Esambe Lobwede during Hurricane Matthew relief efforts. (contributed photo)

From left, Brody SNMA president Ebone Evans with members Jackie Watson and Consola Esambe Lobwede during Hurricane Matthew relief efforts. (contributed photo)

Many of the group’s community initiatives this past academic year involved members serving as role models for area youth.

For Project ALPHA, members provided weekly health education training to young men at Dobbs Community Juvenile Detention Center in Kinston. Weekly workshops at Building Hope Community Life Center in Greenville helped young ladies transition to womanhood. Programming included a seminar on making healthy snacks and another from ECU dental medicine students on proper dental hygiene.

Other community service efforts included a reading buddies program at the Little Willie Center in Greenville and a pre-medical conference to encourage undergraduate minority students interested in pursuing medicine. Members also took an active role in Hurricane Matthew relief efforts in the fall.

“Just as much as the people in these programs get from us, we get so much from them,” Evans said. “We get so much understanding of life — a better understanding of the community — and that’s how you really are able to affect the population that you’re serving, if you understand who they are.”

Any medical student can join the chapter, Evans said, but minority students typically comprise membership. The group’s leaders are working to continue increasing community service and encourage diversity among members.

“We want people to know this isn’t an organization just for minority students,” she said. “It’s an organization that would like to train the majority population to know how to support minority populations as they go through their medical training.”

Dr. Cassandra Bradby, the group’s adviser and clinical assistant professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine, applauded Brody’s SNMA members for their efforts to help promote and exemplify diversity in medicine.

“Given all of the rigors of medical school, it is very hard to be able to balance all of these service projects and programs, as well as excel in school and our students have managed to do both,” she said. “I am so proud and excited that they have earned this award. No chapter deserves it more.”

 

 

by Elizabeth Willy, University Communication

Pilot program updates area geriatric providers via webinar

Primary care providers who treat the elderly across eastern North Carolina recently received vital continuing education without ever leaving their offices, thanks to a pilot program provided by East Carolina University and Eastern Area Health Education Center.

The new Geriatric Medicine Academy is a series of six weekly lunchtime webinars that took place March 7 through April 11, with more sessions planned for the future. Leaders from the College of Nursing, College of Allied Health Sciences, Brody School of Medicine and the community gave the one-hour presentations from The Education Center at Eastern AHEC, which webcasted the sessions to providers throughout the region. The program is funded by the Geriatric Workforce Enhancement Program through the Health Resources and Services Administration.

Open to physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, pharmacists and others, this pilot program was limited to the first 25 participants – and filled up on the first day of registration.

“I think that speaks to a great need in our area. We’re enhancing the ability of providers to meet the needs of an aging population,” said Karen Goble, assistant director for continuing medical, dental and pharmacy education at Eastern AHEC, a non-profit affiliated with ECU.

Dr. Connie Pender, managing pharmacist at Wayne Memorial Hospital Pharmacy, participated in the new Geriatric Medicine Academy webinars from her office in Goldsboro. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Dr. Connie Pender, managing pharmacist at Wayne Memorial Hospital Pharmacy, participated in the new Geriatric Medicine Academy webinars from her office in Goldsboro. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Between 2000 and 2010, the largest increases in North Carolina’s age 65 and older population were seen in Brunswick, New Hanover and other eastern counties, according to the University of North Carolina Population Center.

“We have a large retirement population,” Goble said. “We’re an area of high priority.”

There are very few board-certified geriatric medicine physicians in the country, according to Goble.

“There’s a big gap across the U.S.,” she said. “Brody has geriatric medicine. Our goal is to bring this knowledge to the clinics in our area; we need to take it to them.”

From Currituck to Carteret, participants tuned in from across eastern North Carolina, accessing ECU’s expertise to help their patients without having to travel.

“A webinar is a very convenient way to earn continuing education credit, especially during lunch,” said participant Dr. Connie Pender, managing pharmacist at Wayne Memorial Hospital Pharmacy in Goldsboro. “Having a set of webinars specifically on dealing with issues regarding the elderly is of interest to me. I have an increasing number of retirees in my practice setting as well as aging parents so I was excited to see this program offered.”

The program covered a variety of topics, such as caregiver burnout, HIV in older adults, opioids and pain, frailty, polypharmacy (managing multiple prescriptions) as well as health care for older veterans.

“The session on HIV in older adults was especially informative,” Pender said. “It was eye opening to me to learn that 50 percent of HIV patients are over the age of 50. The presenter gave a great refresher on the mechanisms of action of the HIV medications, which was very helpful.”

The opening session focused on recognizing and preventing caregiver burnout.

“We might be living longer, but we’re living sicker; the goal is to stay healthier,” said presenter Kim Stokes, director of clinical education for the Department of Physician Assistant Studies in the College of Allied Health Sciences. “For the elderly, a caregiver could be a spouse or a whole team.”

More than 50 million Americans care for family members of all ages, according to Stokes.

“The definition of caregiver has expanded exponentially,” Stokes said. “The health and well-being of a patient and caregiver are closely linked.”

The purpose of the Geriatric Workforce Enhancement grant, which awarded $2.5 million in 2015 to the College of Nursing and its partners, is to develop a health care workforce that maximizes patient and family engagement and improves health outcomes for older adults by integrating geriatrics with primary care, according to Dr. Sonya Hardin, associate dean for graduate programs in the College of Nursing and the grant’s primary investigator.

“Our geriatrics funding helps prepare health care providers to meet the needs of the aging U.S. population and ensure improved health results for older adults,” said Hardin, who led the March 21 session on opioid use and abuse in older adults.

The response to the first round of webinars has been positive, according to Goble, and more sessions are planned for the future.

For more information on the Geriatric Medicine Academy, visit www.easternahec.net or contact Karen Goble at 252-744-6974 or goblek16@ecu.edu. For additional resources under the Geriatric Workforce Enhancement Grant, visit www.ecu.edu/cs-dhs/nursing/geriatric/.

 

 

-by Jackie Drake, AHEC

Brody Scholars hold health fair to benefit community

East Carolina University medical students will hold a community health fair Saturday, April 8, from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. at the Lucille W. Gorham Intergenerational Community Center at 1100 Ward St. in Greenville.

The event will include multiple booths geared toward various aspects of health for both children and adults. It is a collaboration among the Brody School of Medicine’s Brody Scholars and ECU dental, nursing and physician assistant students. The health fair is free and open to the public.

“The Brody Scholars had a new vision this year for our service project. We decided to do a health fair, because we want to serve our local community of Greenville,” said fourth-year medical student and Brody Scholar Mia Marshall.

Amanda Saad (left) and Mia Marshall are two of the Brody Scholars who helped organize the health fair. (contributed photo)

Amanda Saad (left) and Mia Marshall are two of the Brody Scholars who helped organize the health fair. (contributed photo)

Topics will range from childhood obesity to exercise and nutrition. Screenings will be provided for blood pressure, blood sugar, body mass index and oral health. Bike helmet safety will also be demonstrated, with 15 bike helmets to be raffled.

“We want to bring awareness to both adults and children and educate the general public in a way that is beneficial and sustainable,” Marshall said.

The health fair will be held in conjunction with the center’s 10th annual IGCC Day, a community block party celebrating a decade of service in the west Greenville and surrounding Pitt County areas with food, music, entertainment, giveaways, vendors, workshops and more.

The Brody Scholars program honors J. S. “Sammy” Brody, who, along with his brother Leo, were among the earliest supporters of medical education in eastern North Carolina The Brody Scholar award, valued at approximately $112,000, is the most prestigious scholarship available at the Brody School of Medicine. It includes four years of medical school tuition, living expenses and the opportunity for recipients to design their own summer enrichment programs that can include travel abroad. The award also supports community service projects recipients may undertake while in medical school. About 70 percent of Brody Scholars remain in North Carolina to practice, and the majority of those stay in eastern North Carolina.

 

 

-by Rich Klindworth

ECU obstetrics/gynecology professor completes national educators program

A clinical assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University has graduated from a prestigious national program designed to create expert educators in her field.

Dr. Jill Sutton has completed the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics Academic Scholars and Leaders Program, a 15-month course in curriculum design, educational theory, adult learning methodologies and teaching strategies. Sutton was one of only 24 professors nationwide admitted to the program last year. It was first offered in 1997.

 

Dr. Jill Sutton. (Photo by Gretchen Baugh)

Dr. Jill Sutton. (Photo by Gretchen Baugh)

“Dr. Sutton brought Pirate Pride to our university and department from a national stage,” said Dr. Libby Baxley, senior associate dean for academic affairs. “We are fortunate indeed to have her as a resource and educator.”

Sutton has already put to use the skills gained in the Scholars and Leaders Program. In March, she presented a research poster at the annual joint meeting of the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics and the Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Sutton, who also serves as clerkship director for third-year medical students at Brody, investigated forms of feedback in educational simulation sessions. She found that medical students prefer to receive feedback directly rather than electronically.

“I am grateful to have participated in this program,” she said. “I learned much about educational research and have been able to support several students in their own research projects with these new tools.”

Sutton completed her medical degree and residency training at the Brody School of Medicine and joined the faculty in 2010. She is board certified in obstetrics and gynecology. In 2016, she received the Katherine Bray-Strickland Young Alumni Award for her dedication to medical student education and to the mission of the Brody School of Medicine.

 

 

-by Elizabeth Willy, University Communication 

Joyner exhibit showcases trappings of early healthcare

Joyner Library is hosting the traveling exhibit “The Sick Room: Invalid Feeders and Bedside Necessities” in the Verona Joyner Langford North Carolina Collection on the third floor of the library. The exhibit, open through the month of May, showcases a variety of items — both beautiful and useful — that helped ease invalids back to health during the Victorian Period.

Early healthcare items on display in Joyner Library (Photos by Layne Carpenter)

Early healthcare items on display in Joyner Library. (Photos by Layne Carpenter)

Caring for a sick family member was a common part of life, and any bedroom could become the “sick room” where a convalescing patient would rest undisturbed from the difficulties of life.

“The exhibit gives us a better understanding of what life was like taking care of sick family members during the late 19th century,” said Anne Anderson, exhibit curator for the Country Doctor Museum. “This responsibility usually fell to the woman of the household, and much of her time might have been spent using the types of objects featured in the exhibit.

“This concept still connects to us today where an illness can have a huge impact on family life.”

On loan from the Country Doctor Museum in Bailey, North Carolina, the exhibit includes feeders, baby rattles, bedpans, and an invalid chair.

The exhibit also offers many pieces from the private collection of Brenda Rewalt of Bolivia, North Carolina, a retired nurse who has collected more than 700 feeders and related items, some dating back to the 1700s.

“Brenda Rewalt’s collection of invalid feeders is one of the best in the country, and the Country Doctor Museum is very fortunate to include some of her beautiful pieces in this exhibit,” said Anderson. “Her knowledge about the objects, both as a collector and nurse, helped inform the exhibit’s interpretation of life in the sick room.”

On April 6 from 1-3 p.m. in the first floor lobby of Joyner Library, Anderson will offer students an opportunity to participate in a related hands-on activity. Students will grind up medicinal herbs such as eucalyptus, rosemary and peppermint to make medicinal herb sachets, while Anderson and other Joyner Special Collections staff speak on how these herbs were used as home remedies, particularly in sick rooms.

Activities will continue on the third floor, and students are also encouraged to visit the exhibit and use the iPad kiosk to vote on their favorite exhibit item. Results will be posted to Joyner Library’s social media platforms.
“This is our first exhibit installation at Joyner Library and we are very grateful for the opportunity to share our passion for medical history with a new audience,” said Anderson.

For additional information, please contact the Country Doctor Museum at 252-235-4165 or email Anne Anderson, andersonan@ecu.edu.

 

 

-by Kelly Dilda, Joyner Library

 

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