Category Archives: Events

ECU to host Fall Career Fairs for students and alumni

East Carolina University Career Services will host two career fairs on Oct. 17 at the Greenville Convention Center. The College of Engineering and Technology (CET) Career Fair will be held from 9-11 a.m., followed by the Fall Career Fair for all majors from 1-4 p.m.

The CET Career Fair is open to all Engineering and Technology majors or students interested in pursuing a career within these fields. During the two-hour session, students will have the opportunity to connect with more than 100 employers, including both local and national companies. That afternoon, the Fall Career Fair will welcome students of all majors at ECU and feature over 200 employers.

ECU students and alumni have the opportunity to meet potential employers from across the country recruiting for internship, part-time and full-time positions. Both career fairs give attendees the opportunity to create professional contacts and secure interviews with employers from several different industries including science, technology, business, government and healthcare.

“According to recent ECU student survey responses, 93 percent of students that attended a previous career fair discovered at least one employer related to their major or career interests,” said Patrick Roberts, associate director for ECU Career Services. “This shows that we provide a diverse collection of employment opportunities that matches the over 120 majors available at ECU. Our goal is to create opportunities for students to establish relationships with employers that directly relate to their career goals.”

Participating companies at these career fairs include American Tower Corporation, Aramark, Barnhill Contracting Company, BB&T Corporation, Cisco, Credit Suisse, e-Emphasys Technologies, Enterprise Holdings, GEICO, Greenville Utilities Commission, Honda North America South HUB, Horace Mann, Hyster-Yale Group, Lincoln Financial Group, Motion Industries, NAVAIR, NetApp, Novo Nordisk, Patheon, Peace Corps, Peter Millar, T.A. Loving Company, UTC Aerospace Systems, Vidant Health and Youth Villages.

For more information and suggestions on how to prepare for the Career Fairs, visit the Career Services website at www.ecu.edu/career.

 

-Contact: Tom Halasz, director for ECU Career Services, Halaszt18@ecu.edu, 252-328-6050

Make-a-thon inspires innovation

East Carolina University students brought new ideas and innovations to the university’s BrainSTORM make-a-thon event on Oct. 4, offering fresh perspectives to problems that plague communities after natural disasters.

Nearly 60 students attended the seven-hour event at the university’s Innovation Design Lab, exploring problems encountered by families, businesses and first responders, and prototyping solutions to those challenges.

East Carolina University alumnus Magus Pereria tests a laser sensor that detects the depth of water at the university’s make-a-thon event. The event brought students and mentors together to develop ideas to combat challenges that arise from natural and man-made disasters.

East Carolina University alumnus Magus Pereria tests a laser sensor that detects the depth of water at the university’s make-a-thon event. The event brought students and mentors together to develop ideas to combat challenges that arise from natural and man-made disasters. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

ECU innovators developed plans to provide power through interchangeable batteries to those affected by power outages during disasters; investigated how they could collect and distribute data during disasters using existing infrastructure that could help inform emergency management decision making; and worked on sensors that could detect food spoilage during disaster events.

Senior Austin Rabah, a business management major, said he learned about BrainSTORM through one of his classes.

“This was my first time attending such an event,” Rabah said. “Because of it, I was able to come out of my comfort zone to try to help hurricane victims. I learned a lot about technology development, more specifically the actual amount of work that goes into creating items that could make a difference (in a time of need).”

The make-a-thon, hosted by ECU’s Miller School of Entrepreneurship, Innovation Design Lab, and Division of Research, Economic Development and Engagement, was broken into three sessions. During the morning session, students learned about disaster response and recovery basics during both natural and man-made disasters. The afternoon session saw students split into teams and identify potential disaster issues before building a prototype or business plan in the afternoon session.

Pereira and David Mayo, right, work on the laser sensor during the make-a-thon event.

Pereira and David Mayo, right, work on the laser sensor during the make-a-thon event.

While hurricane relief weighed heavy on the minds of many students, the prototypes developed by the participants weren’t only storm related. A major component of the event was producing solutions that could be used in many types disasters, whether they be hurricanes, floods, earthquakes or even terrorist attacks.

“I believe they learned a lot about the innovation process and how entrepreneurship can help others,” said David Mayo, a teaching instructor with the Miller School of Entrepreneurship and BrainSTORM coordinator. “One day these students may create ventures that can make an impact on their community and the world. It’s not just about making money, it’s about doing good.”

Mayo said the students worked diligently on solutions that could scale beyond just the Greenville community.

“They saw that they can make a big impact in their community by working toward solutions to tough problems, but we really wanted them to think about the big picture,” he said. “Our students can create solutions that really scale. They don’t have to just help in one or two disasters, they can be used across the globe to help a lot of people.”

Rabah agreed and hopes that in the future, even more ECU students will participate in events like the make-a-thon and share their potential ideas.

“I think the make-a-thon was extremely beneficial for all students,” Rahab said. “I really think we should market the event to everyone on campus, not just for business majors, but for everyone who might have even the slightest inclination to help.”

Learn more about how you can help victims of Hurricane Florence at East Carolina Undaunted.

The laser sensor detects the depth of water.

The laser sensor detects the depth of water.

 

-by Matt Smith, University Communications

ECU hosts traveling Blackbeard exhibit commemorating 300th anniversary of pirate’s death

To commemorate the 300th anniversary of Blackbeard’s notorious adventures along the North Carolina coast, East Carolina University’s Joyner Library is showcasing a traveling exhibit with artifacts from Blackbeard’s flagship Oct. 8 through Nov. 29.

The Queen Anne’s Revenge traveling exhibition is on loan from the N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources with items from the Maritime Museum in Beaufort. Blackbeard died in 1718 during a battle at Ocracoke.

The BlackBeard 300 exhibit is located in the Janice Hardison Faulkner Gallery on the second floor of Joyner Library.

The BlackBeard 300 exhibit is located in the Janice Hardison Faulkner Gallery on the second floor of Joyner Library. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

On display in the Janice Hardison Faulkner Gallery, the exhibit includes artifacts that represent weaponry, nautical tools and personal items ranging from cannonballs, lead shot, gun flint, grinding stones, dinner plates, thumb screws and cask hoops. Replicas of other maritime items including a model of the Queen Anne’s Revenge will also be on display.

Also on display in the North Carolina Collections at Joyner Library is “Blackbeard Fact & Fiction,” an exhibit exploring the fascinating world of Blackbeard through historical texts and fiction taken from the library’s own rare book collection.

On Saturday, Oct. 20 from 10:30 a.m. until 1 p.m., Joyner Library will host a pirate-themed family fun day with free activities including a performance by ECU’s Storybook Theatre and face painting.

The Blackbeard 300 exhibit and the Blackbeard Family Fun Day are free and open to the public. For more information, contact Charlotte Fitz Daniels at fitzdanielsc16@ecu.edu or 252-328-0287.

Blackbeard 300 Event Calendar

 

-Contact: Charlotte Fitz Daniels, events and programs coordinator, Joyner Library, fitzdanielsc16@ecu.edu or 252-328-0287

Student event at ECU combines innovation, hurricane relief

An event geared toward students aims to bring innovative ideas to disaster relief efforts as eastern North Carolina continues to recover from the effects of Hurricane Florence.

On Thursday, Oct. 4, East Carolina University will host BrainSTORM, a “make-a-thon” exhibition that brings student teams together for a seven-hour period to create products to help communities recover after natural disasters. During the session, students will explore problems encountered by families, businesses and first responders during natural disasters, create ideas to solve those problems and develop prototypes for potential solutions.

Modeled after popular “hack-a-thons,” BrainSTORM will challenge student innovation by providing tools and resources for creative problem solving around specific needs.

The event is hosted by ECU’s Miller School of Entrepreneurship, Innovation Design Lab, and Division of Research, Economic Development and Engagement.

David Mayo, a teaching instructor with the Miller School of Entrepreneurship and leader for BrainSTORM, said the event offers a unique opportunity for students to positively impact distressed regions in eastern North Carolina.

“This event is important because it allows students to create scalable solutions that can impact many lives,” Mayo said. “When we think of disaster recovery, many times we think about cutting tree limbs or handing out water bottles. However, if we can come up with creative solutions to help with disaster prevention, make logistics more efficient in flooded areas, or create early warning systems, we can improve outcomes for many instead of a few.”

Faculty members will be on hand to guide students through the creation process and provide technical development expertise, if needed.

BrainSTORM will be held from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at ECU’s Innovation Design Lab at Suite 100, 211 S. Jarvis St.

Students can register online; however registration is not required to participate.

 

What: BrainSTORM Make-A-Thon

When: Thursday, Oct. 4, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Where: Innovation Design Lab, Suite 110, 211 S. Jarvis St.

 

-Contact: Matt Smith, University Communications, smithmatt17@ecu.edu or 252-737-5423

Native American poet, activist to visit ECU

Natalie Diaz

Natalie Diaz
(Photo by Rachel Eliza Griffiths)

East Carolina University’s Contemporary Writers Series will welcome Native American poet and activist Natalie Diaz on Oct. 2.

Author of “When My Brother Was an Aztec,” Diaz will read from her work at 7 p.m. in the Jenkins Fine Arts Center, Room 1220. A book signing and question and answer session will follow the reading. 

Fellow American poet Adrian Matejka decribes “When My Brother Was an Aztec” as a spacious, sophisticated collection, one that puts in work addressing the author’s divergent experiences — whether it be family, skin politics, hoops, code switching or government commodities.” The book was a 2012 Lannan Literary Selection. 

According to Publishers Weekly, “Diaz portrays experiences rooted in Native American life with personal and mythic power.”

Diaz was born and raised in the Fort Mojave Indian Village in Needles, California, on the banks of the Colorado River. She is Mojave and an enrolled member of the Gila River Indian Tribe. Diaz also is an advocate for the Mojave language and a director of the language preservation program at Fort Mojave. Her work with the three surviving fluent speakers of Mojave has been featured on news outlets, including PBS NewsHour. She is a graduate of Old Dominion University, where she earned her master of fine arts degree after playing professional basketball in Europe and Asia.

Matejka, who chose Diaz as a Poetry Society of America “New American Poet,” explains that her work “is about the transformation of traditions — the traditions of poverty, the traditions of Indigenousness, the traditions of poetics.”

Diaz’s poetry has received the Nimrod/Hardman Pablo Neruda Prize for Poetry, the Louis Untermeyer Scholarship in Poetry from Bread Loaf, the Narrative Poetry Prize, the Holmes National Poetry Prize from Princeton University, a U.S. Artists Ford Fellowship, a Native Arts Council Foundation Artist Fellowship and a Lannan Literary Fellowship.

This event is free and open to the public. It is co-sponsored by the Office of the Provost, LGBT Resource Office, and the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences Departments of English, History and Anthropology. For more information, contact John Hoppenthaler, professor of English, at hoppenthalerj@ecu.edu.

 

-by Lacey L. Gray, University Communications

ECU Hurricane Florence food drive off to fast start

East Carolina University’s efforts to help those affected by Hurricane Florence are off to a quick start thanks to early success from its community-wide food drive.

During its first week, the food drive – led by East Carolina Undaunted and the Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina – brought in more than 6,200 pounds of water, food and household supplies. In all, 10 pallets were filled with supplies, servicing 10 counties in eastern North Carolina with the capacity to serve nearly 5,300 meals.

East Carolina University faculty, staff and student volunteers sort food at ECU’s Hurricane Florence Food Drive held in partnership with the Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina. As of Monday, the food drive brought in more than 6,200 pounds of water, food and household supplies.

East Carolina University faculty, staff and student volunteers sort food at ECU’s Hurricane Florence Food Drive held in partnership with the Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina. As of Monday, the food drive brought in more than 6,200 pounds of water, food and household supplies. (Contributed photos)

The food drive, held at the Willis Building across from Greenville’s Town Common at 300 E. First St., continues through Sept. 29. The food drive is open from 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday, and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday. Those wishing to donate are asked to bring canned fruits and vegetables, canned meat and fish, canned beans and soup, hygiene products, household cleaning supplies, and other non-perishable items.

George Young, eastern regional director for the Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina, said so far the community’s response has been “awesome.”

“I think the people of Greenville are appreciative of what they’ve been through in the past,” Young said. “They missed the bullseye of the storm this time, but they realize families and friends in other areas are in need and how important this outreach is.

“These in-kind donations are vital to helping those impacted by the storm,” he said. “Those affected by Hurricane Florence may not be able to get to a grocery store, or their grocery store is without food or power. We’re able to take these items, put them into family packs and put them to good use.”

A volunteer helps load supplies from ECU’s Hurricane Florence Food Drive into a truck for the Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina.

A volunteer helps load supplies from ECU’s Hurricane Florence Food Drive into a truck for the Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina.

ECU has been able to provide critical assistance through its Hurricane Florence recovery support team – East Carolina Undaunted – and its hurricane recovery website. As of Monday, ECU has received 38 nonemergency assistance requests, including 29 individual and eight community requests. Additionally, the university’s Small Business Technology and Development Center joined forces with the U.S. Small Business Administration to open a business recovery center – the only such center currently operating in the region.

In total, 537 students, faculty, staff and community members have registered to volunteer through the site, totaling 817 volunteer hours. Additionally, the university has raised more than $4,000 toward hurricane recovery efforts.

“The way ECU has approached this food drive, including having a central contact person and location, has been invaluable,” Young said. “ECU volunteers have brought in the food, sorted the items and helped get them packed and on the way out to those in need. We’ve really appreciated them taking our most-needed list and sharing it with the community.”

The Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina serves 34 counties, including 10 from its Greenville branch. The 35-year-old program partners with 800 food agencies across the state, providing food to families suffering from food insecurity and natural disasters like Hurricane Florence.

“The successful first week of our food drive is just the start on the road to recovery for those in eastern North Carolina after Hurricane Florence,” said Jay Golden, vice chancellor for research, economic development and engagement at ECU. “The community support we’ve received so far has been monumental. I urge ECU students, faculty, staff and community members to visit our Florence Recovery website to sign-up for volunteer opportunities and continue the university’s tradition of serving others.”

Visit FlorenceRecovery.ecu.edu to volunteer and get connected with ECU’s hurricane recovery efforts. Learn more about the Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina at foodbankcenc.org.

 

-by Matt Smith, University Communications

Social work celebration: Burwell receives Distinguished Faculty Legacy Award

Dr. N. Yolanda Burwell has received the East Carolina University School of Social Work 2018 Distinguished Faculty Legacy Award.

Burwell will be honored at the school’s annual Alumni and Friends Celebration on Friday, Oct. 26, at the Greenville Hilton. The Outstanding Alumni Award and A Rising Star Award also will be presented at the event. Nominations will be accepted until Sept. 20.

Dr. N. Yolanda Burwell

Dr. N. Yolanda Burwell

Burwell of Zebulon has been a faculty member of the leadership training program of the N.C. Rural Center for 24 years.

She joined the ECU School of Social Work in 1990 as an assistant professor. She taught courses in social work policy, human behavior and macro practice and served as the director of the undergraduate program for four years.

Colleagues said Burwell challenged and motivated students to become excellent social workers “because clients and communities deserved the best. She held them to high expectations, and her legacy is evident through the successful careers of former students.”

Her academic research focused on social welfare history in African-American communities, empowerment strategies and social work in rural communities. She also has conducted numerous training and consultations on teamwork, cultural competence, conflict resolution and communication.

Burwell was active on the local mental health board and the Mediation Center of Eastern North Carolina. In 2005, she joined the North Carolina Rural Economic Development Center as a senior fellow, where she worked for eight years. She studied barriers and incentives for economic opportunities, especially for low-resourced communities and groups.

Burwell received her bachelor’s degree in social work from N.C. A&T State University, a master’s of social work from Washington University and her doctorate from Cornell University.

The event will celebrate the school’s accomplishments, provide networking for alumni and friends, and raise money for the School of Social Work Scholarship Pool to support students in the program. Graduates from ECU’s bachelor of social work program leave with an average of almost $23,000 in debt, while graduate students incur on average about $55,000 in debt.

The event is open to the public. For more information, tickets or to nominate someone for an award, visit https://hhp.ecu.edu/socw/alumni/, email parkeran@ecu.edu or call Virginia Bunch at 252-737-2058.

 

-by Crystal Baity, ECU News Services

ECU College of Nursing welcomes new students at Lamp of Learning ceremony

The ECU College of Nursing welcomed 122 future nurses on Sept. 6 during a ceremony at the Brody School of Medicine.

Parents beamed while their daughters and sons crossed the stage to receive a gold lamp pin signifying service and light as part of the twice-annual Lamp of Learning ceremony that serves an official welcome to the college’s new Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program.

Nursing students Hanah Terhune, left, and Edirin Tebehaevu pin each other with the gold lamp pin at the ECU College of Nursing’s Lamp of Learning ceremony.

Nursing students Hanah Terhune, left, and Edirin Tebehaevu pin each other with the gold lamp pin at the ECU College of Nursing’s Lamp of Learning ceremony. (Photos by Conley Evans)

The lamp symbol, representing the founder of modern nursing, Florence Nightingale, also appears on the pin that students receive upon graduating. During the ceremony, Dr. Sylvia Brown, dean of the College of Nursing, urged students to reflect on the pin’s meaning when they wear it.

Nursing students Jeremy Wilson, left, and Samantha Williams, affix each other’s lamp pins at the Lamp of Learning ceremony on Sept. 6.

Nursing students Jeremy Wilson, left, and Samantha Williams, affix each other’s lamp pins at the Lamp of Learning ceremony on Sept. 6.

“Think about your role in providing service, not only when you graduate, but also right now as nursing students,” Brown said.

Students also recited the college’s pledge, which includes promises to respect patient confidentiality, to collaborate with other health professionals, to participate in the advancement of the profession and to advocate for patients.

Natasha Walker, a nursing student who grew up in Germany and Georgia, was among those receiving a pin to wear on her purple scrubs.

“I feel like all my work has paid off to get here,” she said. “I know that it’s going to be hard, but it’s all worth it in the end. This is what it was all about, being a nurse.

Admission to the College of Nursing’s BSN program is very competitive. In addition to meeting the university and college requirements, students’ scores on a required national pre-admission exam are taken into account along with their GPA, enrollment status and other factors. Students accepted into the program this fall had an average GPA of 3.8.

Nursing student DaCaria Adams leads the line of nursing students into the auditorium at the Brody School of Medicine for the Lamp of Learning ceremony.

Nursing student DaCaria Adams leads the line of nursing students into the auditorium at the Brody School of Medicine for the Lamp of Learning ceremony.

 

-by Natalie Sayewich, University Communications

Purple Gold Golf Tournament raises $20K for alumni association

The East Carolina University Alumni Association hosted the annual Purple Gold Golf Tournament on Friday, Sept. 7 at the Ironwood Golf and Country Club in Greenville, where 32 teams of golfers played for prizes, pride and tradition. The event raised nearly $20,000 for scholarships, according to the alumni association.

“This is one of our major scholarship fundraisers for the year,” said Heath Bowman, associate vice chancellor for alumni relations. “The timing of it makes it really fun. It’s an exciting game weekend in early fall when alumni return en masse to Greenville. And it’s an event that many people circle on their calendars.”

Golfers hit the links at Ironwood Golf & Country Club Friday, Sep. 7 for the Purple Gold Golf Tournament.

Golfers hit the links at Ironwood Golf & Country Club Friday, Sep. 7 for the Purple Gold Golf Tournament. (Photo by George Crocker)

Ryan Cole ’12 traveled from Syracuse, New York, to play in the tournament with his father, Randy Cole ’85, who made the trip from Stafford, Virginia. It was their first time participating in the tournament.

“We’ve wanted to do it for years,” Ryan Cole said. “I’ve always heard Ironwood is a beautiful course. I also like doing anything alumni related and spending time with my dad.”

For five-time participants Ryan Castillo, Jason Sagadraca, Andrew Sagadraca and Wayne Conner, the tournament has become a yearly tradition – and a chance to dress up. The team, named the Fore Fathers, arrived in matching American flag shorts, shirts and hats, complete with powdered wigs that would make George Washington proud.

“This is how we stand out. We can’t golf so we have to dress up,” Jason Sagadraca joked.

Proceeds from the Purple Gold Golf Open go directly to the ECU Alumni Scholarship Program.

Since its establishment in 2005, the program has awarded 297 scholarships totaling over $432,000.

Kirsten Powell, a senior public health student and alumni scholarship recipient, was on the course Friday chatting with alumni and overseeing the hole-in-one contest.

“It’s really rewarding to be out here,” she said. “This scholarship not only provides funds but opportunities; it’s awesome.”

Winners

1st place gross: ASAP Photo & Camera

  • Carder Frutiger ‘05
  • Stephen Pugh
  • Tyler Braden
  • Eric Miller

1st Place net: Institutional Interiors

  • Mike Baskett ‘77
  • Tim Hill ‘77
  • Roddy Seymour ‘73
  • Scott Seymour

For more information about the alumni scholarship program, visit piratealumni.com/scholarships.

 

-Erin Shaw, University Communications

 

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