ECU joins national honor society for veterans

East Carolina University has started a chapter of SALUTE, the first national honor society for veterans.

SALUTE, an acronym for service, academics, leadership, unity, tribute and excellence, recognizes veterans, active duty service members, National Guard members and reservists who have been honorably discharged, or who are currently serving. Undergraduate and graduate students are eligible for membership.

File photo - ROTC

ECU ROTC students recognized at a ceremony earlier this year are some of the students eligible for the new SALUTE honor society being organized on campus this fall. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

“The students who are inducted into membership in SALUTE represent every slice of American military and veterans in higher education,” according to SALUTE’s website.

Set up as a four-step system, SALUTE encourages student veterans to improve their GPAs in order to advance to the next tier level throughout their academic career. Tiers include Delta (3.00-3.24), Charlie (3.25-3.49), Bravo (3.50-3.74) and Alpha (3.75-4.0).

“Student veteran services decided to apply for membership to SALUTE because transitioning from military service can be a challenging time for our student veterans. We want to support our students by taking time to officially honor those who have succeeded academically at ECU,” said Nicole Jablonski, assistant director of ECU Student Veteran Services.

Although ECU’s chapter is purely an academic recognition group, Jablonski hopes to add a service component in the future.

Each new member will be presented with a certificate and a challenge coin at an awards ceremony. Approximately 50 veterans are expected to be inducted into the inaugural group in spring 2017.

SALUTE was founded at Colorado State University in 2009. The honors society includes both two-year and four-year higher education institutes.

Flags

For more information, contact Nicole Jablonski at 252-737-6542 or visit SALUTE’s website at www.salute.colostate.edu.

–Sophronia Knott

Tenth anniversary of Voyages lecture series to kick off at ECU

The 10th anniversary of East Carolina University’s Voyages of Discovery Lecture Series kicks off in September with speakers of internationally renowned and wide public interest.

“Whether encountering a person or topic for the first time, or delving into a familiar subject more deeply, the Voyages lectures are events that engage our curiosity and touch our sense of wonder,” said Dr. William M. Downs, dean of the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences. “All of the speakers in this year’s series will challenge us to explore ideas that enlarge our understanding of ourselves and our place in the world.”

The season opens at 7:30 p.m. on Sept. 28 with the Premier Lecture featuring Bob Woodward, the Pulitzer Prize-winning writer and investigative reporter who broke the news about the Watergate scandal during the Nixon administration. In this well-timed presidential election year, Woodward will discuss “The Age of the American Presidency.”

Woodward

Woodward (contributed photo)

On Nov. 7 at 7 p.m., ECU will welcome Eboo Patel, a member of President Barack Obama’s inaugural Advisory Council on Faith-Based Neighborhood Partnerships, for the Religion and Culture Lecture. Patel will talk about how “Interfaith Leadership Can Save the World.”

Two events will follow in the spring. The Brewster History Lecture, which will be held at 7 p.m. on Jan. 31, will feature Keith Wailoo on the topic of “Pain: A Political History.” Wailoo, a history professor at Princeton University, is an award-winning author who has written on the topics of drugs and drug policy; race, science and health; and health policy and medical affairs in the U.S.

The Thomas Harriot Lecture rounds out the 2016-17 series. In conjunction with the ECU School of Music, The Nile Project will present “Citizen Diplomacy & Transboundary Water Conflict” at 7 p.m. on April 6. One of the tightest, cross-cultural collaborations in history, the Nile Project Collective brings together artists from the 11 Nile basin countries, representing more than 400 million people, to make music that combines the rich diversity of the oldest places on Earth. Using music to spark cultural curiosity, the Nile Project engages musicians and audiences, challenging them to connect to the world’s longest river and explore new approaches to its social, cultural and environmental problems.

“This special anniversary season of the Voyages lecture series features speakers who are changing the world and who will inspire us to work together for a better future,” said Dr. Jeffrey S. Johnson, professor of English and director of the lecture series.

The Voyages of Discovery Lecture Series is made possible through contributions from Harriot College’s Dean’s Advancement Council, various university organizations and many friends and supporters. For more information, contact Johnson at 252-328-6378 or via email at johnsonj@ecu.edu. Additional information is available online at www.ecu.edu/voyages.

Lectures for the 2016-17 season will be held in Wright Auditorium and are open to the public. Individual and season tickets are available by visiting www.ecu.edu/voyages/tickets.cfm or by calling the ECU Central Ticket Office at 1-800-ECU-ARTS. All lectures are free for ECU students. To receive a free ticket, ECU students must go to the ECU Central Ticket Office, located in Mendenhall Student Center, and present his or her ECU One Card. Individuals requesting accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) should call 252-737-1016 (voice/TTY) at least 48 hours prior to the event.

–Lacey Gray

North Carolina Literary Review celebrates 25th anniversary

This year’s North Carolina Literary Review (NCLR), now on its way to readers throughout the state, celebrates the 25th issue of the publication.

Opening the issue is an interview with the editor, Margaret Bauer, who reflects on how NCLR has grown over the past quarter century and the importance of writing in North Carolina. “North Carolina has countless great writers, and many of the best writers in the country have North Carolina connections,” she said. 

Other highlights include poetry by James Applewhite, Debra Kaufman and Florence Nash; a short story by Jim Grimsley; an essay by Ed Southern entitled “Why We Are ‘The Writingest State’”; and an interview with Lee Smith and Jill McCorkle.

Southern, the executive director of the North Carolina Writers’ Network, said the publication serves as a flagship for the state’s literary community.

“Each issue shows off the state at its best, especially because Margaret and her staff don’t just keep going back to the same well of favorites (no matter how deep and refreshing that well may be),” he said. “They’ve made the re-discovery of forgotten or neglected North Carolina writers an integral part of their mission, and made sure to show off many of our new and emerging writers as well.” 

ECU undergraduate and graduate students are closely involved in the production of NCLR – editing, checking facts and designing pages. NCLR has begun working with the ECU Foundation on a campaign to raise a $2 million endowment that would ensure the next 25 years of publication. 

There will be a reception to celebrate the 25th issue from 2-4 p.m. on Oct. 22 at Joyner Library’s Faulkner Gallery. There will also be a ticketed fundraising event with novelist Charles Frazier, author of “Cold Mountain,” from 5-7 p.m. on Oct. 1 at the Battery Park Book Exchange in Asheville. 

NCLR is published at ECU with additional support from the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association. NCLR Online 2016, a winter supplement to the annual print issue, is in its fifth year. NCLR Online maintains the same design as the print edition, which was created by the journal’s art director, Dana Ezzell, a faculty member of Meredith College in Raleigh. To read the online edition and subscribe to the print issue, visit www.nclr.ecu.edu.

–Jules Norwood


UPDATE: ECU’s Margaret Bauer was named the Tar Heel of the week July 24 by the News & Observer, describing her as “a mentor to young writers and scholars, a cheerleader for the state’s literary tradition, a champion of unknown or forgotten authors.”

 Read the full profile of her and more about the NC Literary Review: http://www.newsobserver.com/news/state/north-carolina/article91477907.html

Meet fellow alumni in Charlotte, Wake County or Washington, D.C.

Ahoy there, Pirates! Do you want to meet fellow East Carolina University alumni in your area this summer? The East Carolina Alumni Association has several events this month around the Pirate Nation!

The Charlotte Chapter is holding an interest meeting this Thursday, July 14 at 6:30 p.m. at Old Mecklenburg Brewery located at 4150 Yancey Rd. No registration is required. If you’ve been looking for ways to get more involved and stay connected to ECU, this is a great way to start! If you can’t make it and still want to be involved, e-mail charlotte.nc@alumni.ecu.edu or follow the Charlotte Chapter on Facebook.

The Wake County Chapter is holding a casual meetup next Thursday, July 21 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Blackfinn Ameripub in Morrisville. These meetups are held twice a month alternating between Morrisville and Raleigh. There’s no need to sign up ahead of time but e-mail raleigh.nc@alumni.ecu.edu  or follow the Wake County Chapter on Facebook for more information.

Finally, join us for a professional happy hour in Washington, D.C. on July 28 from 6-7:30 p.m. at Flight Wine Bar located at 777 6th St NW. Be sure to follow the DC Metro Chapter on Facebook!

All of the alumni association’s upcoming events can be found here.

–Jackie Drake

Women’s Roundtable event set for Oct. 13 at ECU

The fifth event in the Incredible Women Series will focus on leadership, service and philanthropy while also recognizing the careers and community service of several East Carolina University alumnae. 

Eleven women will be honored during the Oct. 13 event that will begin at 11 a.m. at the Greenville Convention Center in Greenville. Their backgrounds are varied – from the the two college friends who started a worldwide public relations firm to a museum director whose goal is to inspire students through art. 

“It’s very humbling for me to look at this group of women. They’re giants in their fields,” said Gail Herring, chair of the Women’s Roundtable.

Gail Herring

Gail Herring

During the event, the following women will be inducted into the “Incredible ECU Women” group, joining the 117 previous inductees:

  • Angela Allen ’81, Raleigh, retired IBM Executive;
  • Alta Andrews ’74, Ayden, director of Community Partnership and Practice in the ECU College of Nursing;
  • Charlene Bregier ’82, Charlotte, director of the Hinson Art Museum and Visual Arts coordinator at Wingate University;
  • Mary Chatman ’90, ’96, ’12, Savannah, Georgia, chief operating officer and chief nursing officer at Memorial University Medical Center;
  • Karen Evans ’80, Washington, D.C., lawyer partner with The Cochran Firm;
  • Sarah Evans ’01, Darien, Connecticut, partner at J Public Relations and 7th and Wit;
  • Paulina Hill ’04, Charlestown, Massachusetts, principal at Polaris Partners;
  • Annette Peery ’96, Greenville, associate dean of the undergraduate program in the ECU College of Nursing;
  • Jamie Sigler, ’01, San Diego, California, partner at J Public Relations and 7th and Wit;
  • Cathy Thomas ’79, ’86, Raleigh, branch manager with Community and Clinical Connections for Prevention and Health for the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services;
  • Linda Thomas ’81, Charlotte, retired director of Human Resources Business Partners at Duke Energy.

The proceeds of the event will benefit ECU students through the Women’s Roundtable Access Scholarship Endowment Fund and the Women’s Roundtable Honors College Endowment Fund.

“We promise that you will be inspired, you will be motivated; you’ll hear from students who have benefitted from these scholarships and what it has meant in their lives and how it has changed their lives, because many of these students are first generation college students in their families,” Herring said.

Updates on university initiatives and an opportunity to connect with community and university leaders and volunteers will also be available during the event.

The Women’s Roundtable at ECU was founded in 2003. Its mission is to support ECU and create a culture of giving by raising money for its scholarships and to build a sense of community through leadership, service, networking, mentoring and philanthropy.

Tickets are on sale now for the event. Individual tickets cost $100 and sponsorship opportunities are still available. Visit www.ecu.edu/womensroundtable/incrediblewomen for ticket and other information. 

“Ultimately we’re raising money for scholarships and providing an opportunity for someone to earn a college education who otherwise would not have that chance,” Herring added.

To make a charitable gift to The Women’s Roundtable, Access Scholars or Honors College, or East Carolina University visit www.ecu.edu/give.

–Rich Klindworth

Brody women scientists, clinicians host workshop for middle-school girls

A couple dozen seventh and eight grade female students from three Pitt County schools recently participated in a Biomedical STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Workshop at the Brody School of Medicine.

The May 12 event was sponsored by the Brody Women Faculty Committee in collaboration with East Carolina University’s chapter of Graduate Women in Science.

Dr. Lisandra de Castro Bras, assistant professor in the Department of Physiology, works with student Kimya Boyd.

Dr. Lisandra de Castro Bras, assistant professor in the Department of Physiology, works with student Kimya Boyd. (Photos by Gretchen Baugh)

The students participated in basic science experiments, lunched with basic sciences and clinical faculty, and joined in a medical simulation at Brody. Faculty, post-doctoral and graduate student volunteers ensured the daylong event was packed with fun-filled activities, advice and support for the future scientists and clinicians.

“The students left with smiles on their faces. It’s very rewarding to know that we had a positive impact on them,” said Dr. Lisa Domico, teaching assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and chair of Brody women faculty.

“This is where we need to start instilling a sense of support, confidence and a need to explore academic options,” she added. “The day was a success and we…were happy to be a part of it and lend to the growth and exploration of the biomedical sciences.”

Dr. Lisandra de Castro Bras, assistant professor in the Department of Physiology, demonstrates a tool for students.

Dr. Lisandra de Castro Bras demonstrates a medical tool for students.

“My favorite thing that happened was when we got to pretend like we were doctors and got to solve a medical scenario,” said Kimya Boyd, a participant from Wellcome Middle School. “We got to see a simulation doll act like a real patient. It sweated and even trembled like a real person. This is definitely a field trip I would recommend to others.”

–Amy Ellis

ECU Admissions to host virtual Q&A for prospective students

On Tuesday, May 24, from 3 – 6 p.m., ECU’s experienced admissions staff will be live tweeting answers to admissions questions from prospective students and parents.

During this time, followers are encourage to share questions using the hashtag #AskECUAdmissions and we’ll post answers on the @ECUAdmissions Twitter account.

The ECU Admissions team looks forward to meeting you online next Tuesday!

ECU School of Art and Design presents the Coastal Carolina Clay Guild Exhibition

by Dana Wilde-Ramsing

Five alumni from East Carolina University will have pieces on display in the Coastal Carolina Clay Guild Exhibition to be held June 3-30 in the Wellington B. Gray Gallery. There is an opening reception with many of the artists on Friday, June 3, from 5 until 7:30 p.m.

The exhibition features ceramic art work in a variety of styles and aesthetics by 35 artists from the greater Wilmington area including the following ECU alumni: Richard Heiser, Jacob Herrmann, Vicky Smith, Kathy Whitley and Dina Wilde-Ramsing.

The Coastal Carolina Clay Guild was established in 2007 and now has more than 100 members from the coastal areas of North and South Carolina.

by Brian Evans (Contributed photos)

The Wellington B. Gray Gallery is located off of 5th and Jarvis Streets on campus in the Jenkins Fine Arts Center. Summer gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. during the exhibition.

For more information, contact Tom Braswell, interim gallery director, at 252-328-1312 or visit www.ecu.edu/graygallery.

Graduates toasted at Senior Celebration

Glasses were raised to East Carolina graduates of two generations at Senior Celebration on Thursday afternoon.


Sponsored jointly by the East Carolina Alumni Association and the Pirate Club, the event allowed members of the class of 2016 to celebrate earning their degrees and joining the ranks of Pirate alumni.

Graduates also had a chance to converse with 1966 alumni, who were back on campus for the association’s annual Golden Alumni Reunion for the 50-year reunion class.

While rain poured from the roof of the Club Level into Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium, champagne was poured into keepsake flutes for a toast to graduates past and present.

“The future of ECU is certainly bright thanks to you, our newest Pirate alumni,” said Associate Vice Chancellor for Alumni Relations Heath Bowman, who led the toast.

“Like many families, we may not all live in the same place, but staying in touch keeps our bonds strong,” said Erinn Latta, a 2009 alumna who coordinates young graduate programming for the Pirate Club.

Also recognized were five graduates who received the 2016 Robert H. Wright Alumni Leadership Award from the alumni association: Ryan Clancy, Erika Dietrick, Joel Glotfelty, Sarah Lisson and Kate McPherson.

–Jackie Drake; video by Rich Klindworth