Category Archives: Events

Living the motto: Faculty, staff and students recognized for service

East Carolina University honored faculty, staff and students for living the university’s motto – Servire, to serve – during an event March 22 as part of Chancellor Cecil Staton’s installation week.

More than 100 members of the university community were honored at Harvey Hall; afterwards many of the group walked over to Clark-LeClair Baseball Stadium to see the Pirates take on the UNC-Chapel Hill Tar Heels.

“The honorees tonight represent the very best of our university. They are talented and engaged and committed to transforming our community, North Carolina and the world,” said Staton in his welcome to honorees and guests. “Service is among the hallmark characteristics of this university, and one that sets us apart.”

Dr. Glen Gilbert, dean of the College of Health and Human Performance, receives the James R. Talton Leadership Award from Chancellor Cecil Staton. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

Dr. Glen Gilbert, dean of the College of Health and Human Performance, receives the James R. Talton Leadership Award from Chancellor Cecil Staton.
(Photos by Cliff Hollis)

Staton presented the first award of the event, the James R. Talton Leadership Award, to Dr. Glen Gilbert, dean of the College of Health and Human Performance.

The award for servant leadership is in honor of the outstanding life and work of James R. Talton Jr., a former chair of the ECU Board of Trustees and a lifelong Pirate.

A nomination letter said of Gilbert: “His philosophy of leadership helps every person feel as though his or her voice is important and his or her contributions are essential to the success of the team. Dean Gilbert is committed to many great initiatives throughout eastern North Carolina, but perhaps most impressive is his unwavering support for our country’s servicemen and women.”

Also recognized were recipients of diversity and inclusion awards, presented by the Office of Equity and Diversity. Recipients, who can be faculty, staff, students or teams, are engaged in meaningful diversity and inclusion activities in addition to or extending beyond their primary responsibility at the university.

Honored were faculty member Dr. Nicole Caswell, the director of the University Writing Center and assistant professor in the Department of English; staff member Mark Rasdorf, associate director for the LGBT Resource Office in Intercultural Affairs; senior art major Janae Brown; and the Department of Sociology in the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences.

Students who have completed the State Employees Credit Union Public Service Fellows Internship program were recognized by Jama Dagenhart, executive director of the State Employees Credit Union Foundation.

The internships are a component of the larger Public Service Fellows program, led by Dr. Sharon Paynter, assistant vice chancellor for public service and community relations.

Recognized were Eva Gallardo, Lauren Barkand, Toni Abernathy, Ashley Cromie, Lucas Merriam, James Kidd, Damiere Powell, Alexis Everette, Lee Hodges, Andrew Strong, Taylor Nelson, Stephanie Minor, Hope Stuart, Connor Hoffman, Matthew Barrier, Andrew DiMeglio and Nelson Martinez-Borja.

 The Centennial Award in the category of leadership recipients are Dr. Wendy Sharer, John Gill and Ernest Marshburn, from left.

The Centennial Award in the category of leadership recipients are Dr. Wendy Sharer, John Gill and Ernest Marshburn, from left.

The annual Centennial Awards for Excellence recognize contributors in each of the following four areas: Ambition, Leadership, Service and Spirit.
The recipients represent one staff member, one faculty member, and one other contributor —a member of the administration or an administrative team, a second staff member or a staff team, or a second faculty member or faculty team. Winners are selected from peer nominations and selection by the Centennial Awards for Excellence Selection Committee.
The team honored for ambition was the North Carolina Literary Review Staff: Margaret Bauer, Diane Rodman, Liza Wieland, Christy Hallberg and Randall Martoccia for innovation and commitment to “showcase the best … authors and scholars.”

Dr. Wendy Sharer was the faculty honoree in leadership for her transformative work leading ECU’s Quality Enhancement Plan, establishing the University Writing Center, founding a sophomore-level writing course and coordinating writing liaisons from disciplines across the university.

The staff honoree in leadership was John Gill, campus landscape architect, for his leadership in education and research, and leadership to the university and regional community in improving environmental quality.

The honoree in leadership for the “other” category was Ernest Marshburn for many years of institutional and public service with the Office of Research Development and as a volunteer in recreational boating safety.

Dr. Mary Jackson was the faculty honoree in the service category for her service in helping those who suffer from substance use disorders by enhancing the training program at ECU and working with military personnel who are trying to overcome their own addictions.

The Tedi Bear Child Advocacy Team was the team honoree for their service in providing a nationally recognized child advocacy center. The team members are Julie Gill, Ann Parsons, Cassandra Hawkins, Latoya Mobley, Katie Wood, Lauren Miller, Rebecca Yoder, Wendy Shouse, Mary Curry, Andora Hankerson, Melanie Meeks, Kelly Baxter, Kia Glosson, Lacy Hobgood, Coral Steffey and Matthew Ledoux.

This year’s staff recipient was Lori Lee for her undaunted commitment to ECU, her steadfast support for Faculty Senate, its officers and committees, and unparalleled dedication to ECU’s system of shared governance.

Employee Steven Asby was the final spirit award honoree in the “other” category for his unwavering support of the Pirate Nation, his volunteer work with student-athletes, and his commitment to first-generation students.
The Servire Society recognized 22 first-time inductees, 12 members were recognized for two to four years and 20 were honored for five to eight years of membership.

Each Servire Society member has contributed 100 or more hours of volunteer service – without compensation and outside his or her normal realm of duties – to the community at large within the previous year.

 The students who have completed the State Employees Credit Union Public Fellows Internship were also recognized.

The students who have completed the State Employees Credit Union Public Fellows Internship were also recognized.

The following members of the ECU community were recognized Austin Allen, Crissa Allen, Mona Amin, Terah Archie, David Batie, Sheresa Blanchard, Craig Brown, Nicole Caswell, Lisa Compton, Sahil Dayal, Daniel Dickerson, Denise Donica, Lori Earls, Sylvia Escott Stump, Tina Mickey, Nicole Fox, Amy Frank, Sylvia Fuller, Lou Anna Hardee, Dawn Harrison, Archana Hegde, Jason Higginson, Jennifer Hodgson, Pamela Hopkins, Jakob Jensen, Plummer Jones, Andrea Kitta, Angela Lamson, Kim Larson, Janice Lewis, Huigang Liang, Aaron Lucier, Susan McCammon, Vivian Mott, Sandra Nobles, Patty Peebles, Annette Peery, Nancy Ray, April Reed, Leah Riddell, Jonelle Romero, Melanie Sartore, Lorie Sigmon, Robert Stagg, Jamie Williams, Marsha Tripp, Tracy Tuten, Deborah Tyndall, Garrett VanHoy, Sandra Warren, Bryan Wheeler, Courtney Williams, Yajiong Xue and Breyah Atkinson.

As he congratulated all of those recognized, Provost Ron Mitchelson said their service to the community and others “is a great testimony to a great university.”

He added, “So much of this work is quiet. I think it’s good for the university to shine a bright light on these efforts.”

 

 

-by Jeannine Manning Hutson, ECU News Services

 

Joyner exhibit showcases trappings of early healthcare

Joyner Library is hosting the traveling exhibit “The Sick Room: Invalid Feeders and Bedside Necessities” in the Verona Joyner Langford North Carolina Collection on the third floor of the library. The exhibit, open through the month of May, showcases a variety of items — both beautiful and useful — that helped ease invalids back to health during the Victorian Period.

(Contributed photos)

(Contributed photos)

Caring for a sick family member was a common part of life, and any bedroom could become the “sick room” where a convalescing patient would rest undisturbed from the difficulties of life.

“The exhibit gives us a better understanding of what life was like taking care of sick family members during the late 19th century,” said Anne Anderson, exhibit curator for the Country Doctor Museum. “This responsibility usually fell to the woman of the household, and much of her time might have been spent using the types of objects featured in the exhibit.

“This concept still connects to us today where an illness can have a huge impact on family life.”

On loan from the Country Doctor Museum in Bailey, North Carolina, the exhibit includes feeders, baby rattles, bedpans, and an invalid chair.

The exhibit also offers many pieces from the private collection of Brenda Rewalt of Bolivia, North Carolina, a retired nurse who has collected more than 700 feeders and related items, some dating back to the 1700s.

“Brenda Rewalt’s collection of invalid feeders is one of the best in the country, and the Country Doctor Museum is very fortunate to include some of her beautiful pieces in this exhibit,” said Anderson. “Her knowledge about the objects, both as a collector and nurse, helped inform the exhibit’s interpretation of life in the sick room.”

On April 6 from 1-3 p.m. in the first floor lobby of Joyner Library, Anderson will offer students an opportunity to participate in a related hands-on activity. Students will grind up medicinal herbs such as eucalyptus, rosemary and peppermint to make medicinal herb sachets, while Anderson and other Joyner Special Collections staff speak on how these herbs were used as home remedies, particularly in sick rooms.

Activities will continue on the third floor, and students are also encouraged to visit the exhibit and use the iPad kiosk to vote on their favorite exhibit item. Results will be posted to Joyner Library’s social media platforms.
“This is our first exhibit installation at Joyner Library and we are very grateful for the opportunity to share our passion for medical history with a new audience,” said Anderson.

For additional information, please contact the Country Doctor Museum at 252-235-4165 or email Anne Anderson, andersonan@ecu.edu.

 

 

-by Kelly Dilda, Joyner Library

 

Taft STEM Education Lecture on March 27

Dr. Len Annetta, the College of Education’s Taft Distinguished Professor of Science Education, cordially invites you to attend the inaugural Taft STEM Education Lecture on Monday, March 27 pm in Speight 203 at 6:00 pm. The event is free and open to students, faculty and the public.

The College of Education is introducing this lecture series in order to ignite new ideas in teaching and learning in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. The Taft STEM Education Lecture Series will bring international knowledge and discovery from some of the most well-known scholars in the field to Eastern North Carolina. The lectures will provide opportunities to ECU students, faculty, and K-12 schools to meet and collaborate with these scholars while increasing the visibility of ECU’s commitment to STEM education.

Dr. Orit Ben Zvi Assraf of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel is the featured speaker for the March 27 Taft STEM Education Lecture. Dr. Assraf will discuss taking a systems approach to teaching about human biology.

 

 

-by Terah B. Archie, College of Education

ECU celebrates International Women’s Day

While policies and programs protecting women from violence have improved in the last 20 years, this progress is in danger of not being renewed or funded in the near future, according to a national expert who spoke to students and faculty at East Carolina University on March 2.

Jacquelyn Campbell, an authority on intimate partner violence from Johns Hopkins University, was the keynote speaker for the university’s celebration of International Women’s Day, hosted by the Chancellor’s Committee on the Status of Women, the Office for Equity and Diversity, and the women’s studies program. Nearly 70 people attended the event, which was held a few days early since the actual observation on March 8 fell during spring break.

Jacquelyn Campbell, an authority on intimate partner violence from Johns Hopkins University, was the keynote speaker for the ECU’s celebration on March 2 of International Women’s Day. (Photos by Jackie Drake)

Jacquelyn Campbell, an authority on intimate partner violence from Johns Hopkins University, was the keynote speaker for the ECU’s celebration on March 2 of International Women’s Day. (Photos by Jackie Drake)

“All around the world, in spite of different cultural norms, what I find is that there are more similarities than differences,” said Campbell, who has studied gender-based violence for 20 years in several countries. “Women’s physical security is significantly associated with global peace and economic development.”

Women are killed by a partner or an ex at nine times the rate they are killed by a stranger, according to Campbell. There are more homicides of women in the U.S. than many other countries around the world, she added.

In the U.S., the Violence Against Women Act is up for renewal every five years, and is next due in 2018, she said. “This year is when we lay the groundwork, but it is in serious peril.”

The North Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence, which receives federal grants, is also in danger of losing funding, a participant told the audience.

Campbell presented several more statistics about violence against women in the U.S. and around the world, and also shared several organizations that are working to combat the problem, from Pigs for Peace in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, to One Love Foundation, founded in memory of Yeardley Love, a University of Virginia student who was beaten to death by her ex-boyfriend in 2010.

Almost 70 people attended International Women’s Day at ECU.

Almost 70 people attended International Women’s Day at ECU.

“Our solutions have to be effective at many different levels: cultural, economic and individual,” Campbell said. “I’m thrilled to be part of this celebration of International Women’s Day at ECU. And I’m pleased as punch to see a few men in the room. This can’t just be a women’s issue.”

International Women’s Day, which started in the U.S. in the 1910s, celebrates the achievements of women everywhere and acknowledges the challenges they face. The Chancellor’s Committee on the Status of Women began leading ECU’s celebrations in 2014.

Following the keynote luncheon, organizers held a call to action session that showcased campus and community organizations, like the Center for Family Violence Prevention in Greenville, so participants could get involved and stay active. The day ended with a screening and panel discussion of the movie “Embrace,” which depicts the story of Taryn Brumfitt, founder of the Body Image Movement.

 

 

-by Jackie Drake, Chancellor’s Committee on the Status of Women

Award-winning Children’s Author & Illustrator Don Tate Visits Greenville

Overnight success does not always happen overnight. In fact, for Don Tate, overnight success took thirty-plus years to attain. This self-described “Longest-coming up-and-

Author-Illustrator Don Tate (www.donate.com); Represented by CarynWiseman, Andrea Brown Literary Agency. (Photo by Sam Bond Photography)

Author-Illustrator Don Tate (www.dontate.com); Represented by CarynWiseman, Andrea Brown Literary Agency. (Photo by Sam Bond Photography)

comer” will share his journey from reluctant grade-school reader to published illustrator, and then on to becoming an award-winning children’s book author.

In his presentation on Saturday, March 25, at the Sheppard Memorial Library, Tate will discuss lessons learned, myths vs. reality, and offer practical advice for both aspiring and published authors and illustrators. Don will read and share a few pages from his forthcoming picture book Strong as Sandow: How Eugene Sandow Became the Strongest Man on Earth and highlight his research process.

Mr. Tate is the founding host of The Brown Bookshelf – a blog dedicated to books for African-American young readers, and is the author of award-winning books It Jes’ Happened: When Bill Traylor Started to Draw (2012) and Poet: The Remarkable Story of George Moses Horton (2015).

Mr. Tate’s books will be available for purchase and he will autograph them following his presentation.

This event is free and open to the public. For additional information, contact Dan Zuberbier (252-328-0406).

 

 

-by Dan Zuberbier, Joyner Library’s Teaching Resources Center

 

Ethnic Studies Film Series screening on March 21

ECU Ethnic Studies, Sociology department, English department, and the Ledonia Wright Cultural Center present: Forbidden; Undocumented and Queer in Rural America by Tiffany Rhyard. The documentary will be shown in Sci-tech 307C on Tuesday, March 21 from 6:00 to 8:30 p.m.

Forbidden is a feature length documentary about an inspiring young man whose story is exceptional, although not unique. Moises is like the thousands of young people growing up in the United States with steadfast dreams but facing overwhelming obstacles.

If you are an undocumented queer immigrant living in the United States amidst this turbulent political climate, you are not safe and your future is at risk. When Moises Serrano was just a baby, his parents risked everything to flee Mexico and make the perilous journey across the desert in search of the American dream. After 23 years growing up in the rural south where he is forbidden to live and love, Moises sees only one option — to fight for justice.

The film chronicles Moises’ work as an activist traveling across his home state of North Carolina as a voice for his community, all while trying to forge a path for his own future.

Both the director, Tiffany Rhynard, and Moises will be attending the screening. There will be a breif Q & A after the film. This event is a Wellness Passport Event!

-by Gera s. Miles Jr., Ethnic Studies

 

ECU’s annual Youth Arts Festival set for March 25

East Carolina University’s annual Youth Arts Festival will be held on the campus mall from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Saturday, March 25.

The event, hosted by the ECU School of Art and Design, is free and open to the public. The festival is geared to elementary and middle school children, but all ages are welcome.

In case of rain, the festival will be held in Jenkins Fine Arts Center on East 5th Street.

A youngster tries on a mask at the 2016 ECU Youth Arts Festival. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

A youngster tries on a mask at the 2016 ECU Youth Arts Festival. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

More than 150 visual and performing artists are expected. Musical, dance and theatrical groups also will perform. Children will have the opportunity to meet artists demonstrating activities such as wheel-thrown ceramics, watercolor painting, weaving, blacksmithing, papermaking, printmaking, sculpture, portraiture and other visual arts.

Children also can create their own artwork with the help of professional artists and ECU art students.

The event is supported by grants from the ECU Office of the Provost, College of Fine Arts and Communication, School of Art and Design, Student Involvement and Leadership, Ledonia Wright Cultural Center, Recreation and Wellness, Uptown Art and Supply, Friends of the ECU School of Art and Design, North Carolina Arts Council, Christy’s Euro Pub and Pitt County Arts Council at Emerge.

For more information, the festival is on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pages/ECU-Youth-Arts-Festival/145899762138141 or http://www.ecu.edu/cs-cfac/soad/youth-arts.cfm or contact Dindy Reich, coordinator of the Youth Arts Festival, at reichd@ecu.edu or 252-328-5749.

-by Crystal Baity

Campus Recreation & Wellness summer camps

ECU’s Campus Recreation and Wellness (CRW) will begin Summer Camp registration for students, faculty, and staff on Tuesday, March 14th at 8:00 a.m. The CRW offers camps for children ages 5-13, with Rec Junior being ages 5-8 and Recreation Nation being ages 8-13.

Registration details and program information can be accessed by going to our website: www.ecu.edu/crw/summercamps.

For more information please contact Jon Wall at 252-328-1565 or walljo@ecu.edu.

Writing workshop highlights veterans’ stories

Former Marine Phil Klay. (contributed photo)

Former Marine Phil Klay. (contributed photo)

Former Marine Phil Klay will be at East Carolina University March 16-17 to participate in the University-sponsored Veterans Writing Workshop, designed to coach and mentor veterans and military-connected writers to record their stories of service.

Klay joined the Marines because we were a nation at war, he says. He wrote short stories about his war, and how that war followed him home, so the American people could better understand the consequences of America’s reactions to the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. There were stories he had to tell — individual stories about men and women that weren’t being told on the nightly news.

Now he’s returning to eastern North Carolina to help other veterans tell their own stories.

Klay will lead a writing workshop March 16 and will be joined by fellow authors Ron Capps, Monica Haller and Dr. Fredrick Foote at Hendrix Theater that evening from 7-9 p.m. for readings and a question-and-answer session, which is open to the public and is an ECU Passport Event.

Author Ron Capps. (contributed photo)

Author Ron Capps. (contributed photo)

“I think the craft of writing is the best way we have of dealing with the most vital, painful and beautiful aspects of life. Hopefully, I’ll have something useful to say to writers who are trying to figure out how to approach subjects that are important to them,” Klay said. “Certainly, I’ve found conversations with veteran writers to be hugely important in helping me to formulate my thoughts.”

Klay won the 2014 National Book Award for Fiction for “Redeployment,” a collection of short stories about the war he witnessed in Iraq during a 2007 troop surge intended push back against a raging insurgency that threatened Iraq’s future.

“It’s such an odd space to be in, transferring being at war in Iraq and at peace the States, between one’s primary sense of oneself as a Marine and as a husband, as a soldier and a citizen,” Klay said. He hopes that his work, and the writing produced by the Veterans Writing Workshop, will extend a bridge to those who didn’t share the experiences of combat.

Klay continues to be affected by his time in Iraq and the continuing legacy of a war well into its second decade. In February 2017, the New York Times published an opinion piece (https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/10/opinion/sunday/what-were-fighting-for.html) that commended the moral courage of individual American fighting men and women.

“I think I’ve continued to develop a respect for the depth and complexity of veteran’s experiences. I’ve also thought more about the role of American citizens more broadly, whether veteran or not, and the things that unify us as a country,” Klay said.

Veterans and military-connected writers interested in participating in the Veterans Writing workshop can visit http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/veteranswritingworkshop/registration.cfm to register.

 

 

-by Benjamin Abel, Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences

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