Category Archives: Events

Taft STEM Education Lecture on March 27

Dr. Len Annetta, the College of Education’s Taft Distinguished Professor of Science Education, cordially invites you to attend the inaugural Taft STEM Education Lecture on Monday, March 27 pm in Speight 203 at 6:00 pm. The event is free and open to students, faculty and the public.

The College of Education is introducing this lecture series in order to ignite new ideas in teaching and learning in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. The Taft STEM Education Lecture Series will bring international knowledge and discovery from some of the most well-known scholars in the field to Eastern North Carolina. The lectures will provide opportunities to ECU students, faculty, and K-12 schools to meet and collaborate with these scholars while increasing the visibility of ECU’s commitment to STEM education.

Dr. Orit Ben Zvi Assraf of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel is the featured speaker for the March 27 Taft STEM Education Lecture. Dr. Assraf will discuss taking a systems approach to teaching about human biology.

 

 

-by Terah B. Archie, College of Education

ECU celebrates International Women’s Day

While policies and programs protecting women from violence have improved in the last 20 years, this progress is in danger of not being renewed or funded in the near future, according to a national expert who spoke to students and faculty at East Carolina University on March 2.

Jacquelyn Campbell, an authority on intimate partner violence from Johns Hopkins University, was the keynote speaker for the university’s celebration of International Women’s Day, hosted by the Chancellor’s Committee on the Status of Women, the Office for Equity and Diversity, and the women’s studies program. Nearly 70 people attended the event, which was held a few days early since the actual observation on March 8 fell during spring break.

Jacquelyn Campbell, an authority on intimate partner violence from Johns Hopkins University, was the keynote speaker for the ECU’s celebration on March 2 of International Women’s Day. (Photos by Jackie Drake)

Jacquelyn Campbell, an authority on intimate partner violence from Johns Hopkins University, was the keynote speaker for the ECU’s celebration on March 2 of International Women’s Day. (Photos by Jackie Drake)

“All around the world, in spite of different cultural norms, what I find is that there are more similarities than differences,” said Campbell, who has studied gender-based violence for 20 years in several countries. “Women’s physical security is significantly associated with global peace and economic development.”

Women are killed by a partner or an ex at nine times the rate they are killed by a stranger, according to Campbell. There are more homicides of women in the U.S. than many other countries around the world, she added.

In the U.S., the Violence Against Women Act is up for renewal every five years, and is next due in 2018, she said. “This year is when we lay the groundwork, but it is in serious peril.”

The North Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence, which receives federal grants, is also in danger of losing funding, a participant told the audience.

Campbell presented several more statistics about violence against women in the U.S. and around the world, and also shared several organizations that are working to combat the problem, from Pigs for Peace in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, to One Love Foundation, founded in memory of Yeardley Love, a University of Virginia student who was beaten to death by her ex-boyfriend in 2010.

Almost 70 people attended International Women’s Day at ECU.

Almost 70 people attended International Women’s Day at ECU.

“Our solutions have to be effective at many different levels: cultural, economic and individual,” Campbell said. “I’m thrilled to be part of this celebration of International Women’s Day at ECU. And I’m pleased as punch to see a few men in the room. This can’t just be a women’s issue.”

International Women’s Day, which started in the U.S. in the 1910s, celebrates the achievements of women everywhere and acknowledges the challenges they face. The Chancellor’s Committee on the Status of Women began leading ECU’s celebrations in 2014.

Following the keynote luncheon, organizers held a call to action session that showcased campus and community organizations, like the Center for Family Violence Prevention in Greenville, so participants could get involved and stay active. The day ended with a screening and panel discussion of the movie “Embrace,” which depicts the story of Taryn Brumfitt, founder of the Body Image Movement.

 

 

-by Jackie Drake, Chancellor’s Committee on the Status of Women

Award-winning Children’s Author & Illustrator Don Tate Visits Greenville

Overnight success does not always happen overnight. In fact, for Don Tate, overnight success took thirty-plus years to attain. This self-described “Longest-coming up-and-

Author-Illustrator Don Tate (www.donate.com); Represented by CarynWiseman, Andrea Brown Literary Agency. (Photo by Sam Bond Photography)

Author-Illustrator Don Tate (www.dontate.com); Represented by CarynWiseman, Andrea Brown Literary Agency. (Photo by Sam Bond Photography)

comer” will share his journey from reluctant grade-school reader to published illustrator, and then on to becoming an award-winning children’s book author.

In his presentation on Saturday, March 25, at the Sheppard Memorial Library, Tate will discuss lessons learned, myths vs. reality, and offer practical advice for both aspiring and published authors and illustrators. Don will read and share a few pages from his forthcoming picture book Strong as Sandow: How Eugene Sandow Became the Strongest Man on Earth and highlight his research process.

Mr. Tate is the founding host of The Brown Bookshelf – a blog dedicated to books for African-American young readers, and is the author of award-winning books It Jes’ Happened: When Bill Traylor Started to Draw (2012) and Poet: The Remarkable Story of George Moses Horton (2015).

Mr. Tate’s books will be available for purchase and he will autograph them following his presentation.

This event is free and open to the public. For additional information, contact Dan Zuberbier (252-328-0406).

 

 

-by Dan Zuberbier, Joyner Library’s Teaching Resources Center

 

Ethnic Studies Film Series screening on March 21

ECU Ethnic Studies, Sociology department, English department, and the Ledonia Wright Cultural Center present: Forbidden; Undocumented and Queer in Rural America by Tiffany Rhyard. The documentary will be shown in Sci-tech 307C on Tuesday, March 21 from 6:00 to 8:30 p.m.

Forbidden is a feature length documentary about an inspiring young man whose story is exceptional, although not unique. Moises is like the thousands of young people growing up in the United States with steadfast dreams but facing overwhelming obstacles.

If you are an undocumented queer immigrant living in the United States amidst this turbulent political climate, you are not safe and your future is at risk. When Moises Serrano was just a baby, his parents risked everything to flee Mexico and make the perilous journey across the desert in search of the American dream. After 23 years growing up in the rural south where he is forbidden to live and love, Moises sees only one option — to fight for justice.

The film chronicles Moises’ work as an activist traveling across his home state of North Carolina as a voice for his community, all while trying to forge a path for his own future.

Both the director, Tiffany Rhynard, and Moises will be attending the screening. There will be a breif Q & A after the film. This event is a Wellness Passport Event!

-by Gera s. Miles Jr., Ethnic Studies

 

ECU’s annual Youth Arts Festival set for March 25

East Carolina University’s annual Youth Arts Festival will be held on the campus mall from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Saturday, March 25.

The event, hosted by the ECU School of Art and Design, is free and open to the public. The festival is geared to elementary and middle school children, but all ages are welcome.

In case of rain, the festival will be held in Jenkins Fine Arts Center on East 5th Street.

A youngster tries on a mask at the 2016 ECU Youth Arts Festival. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

A youngster tries on a mask at the 2016 ECU Youth Arts Festival. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

More than 150 visual and performing artists are expected. Musical, dance and theatrical groups also will perform. Children will have the opportunity to meet artists demonstrating activities such as wheel-thrown ceramics, watercolor painting, weaving, blacksmithing, papermaking, printmaking, sculpture, portraiture and other visual arts.

Children also can create their own artwork with the help of professional artists and ECU art students.

The event is supported by grants from the ECU Office of the Provost, College of Fine Arts and Communication, School of Art and Design, Student Involvement and Leadership, Ledonia Wright Cultural Center, Recreation and Wellness, Uptown Art and Supply, Friends of the ECU School of Art and Design, North Carolina Arts Council, Christy’s Euro Pub and Pitt County Arts Council at Emerge.

For more information, the festival is on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pages/ECU-Youth-Arts-Festival/145899762138141 or http://www.ecu.edu/cs-cfac/soad/youth-arts.cfm or contact Dindy Reich, coordinator of the Youth Arts Festival, at reichd@ecu.edu or 252-328-5749.

-by Crystal Baity

Campus Recreation & Wellness summer camps

ECU’s Campus Recreation and Wellness (CRW) will begin Summer Camp registration for students, faculty, and staff on Tuesday, March 14th at 8:00 a.m. The CRW offers camps for children ages 5-13, with Rec Junior being ages 5-8 and Recreation Nation being ages 8-13.

Registration details and program information can be accessed by going to our website: www.ecu.edu/crw/summercamps.

For more information please contact Jon Wall at 252-328-1565 or walljo@ecu.edu.

Writing workshop highlights veterans’ stories

Former Marine Phil Klay. (contributed photo)

Former Marine Phil Klay. (contributed photo)

Former Marine Phil Klay will be at East Carolina University March 16-17 to participate in the University-sponsored Veterans Writing Workshop, designed to coach and mentor veterans and military-connected writers to record their stories of service.

Klay joined the Marines because we were a nation at war, he says. He wrote short stories about his war, and how that war followed him home, so the American people could better understand the consequences of America’s reactions to the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. There were stories he had to tell — individual stories about men and women that weren’t being told on the nightly news.

Now he’s returning to eastern North Carolina to help other veterans tell their own stories.

Klay will lead a writing workshop March 16 and will be joined by fellow authors Ron Capps, Monica Haller and Dr. Fredrick Foote at Hendrix Theater that evening from 7-9 p.m. for readings and a question-and-answer session, which is open to the public and is an ECU Passport Event.

Author Ron Capps. (contributed photo)

Author Ron Capps. (contributed photo)

“I think the craft of writing is the best way we have of dealing with the most vital, painful and beautiful aspects of life. Hopefully, I’ll have something useful to say to writers who are trying to figure out how to approach subjects that are important to them,” Klay said. “Certainly, I’ve found conversations with veteran writers to be hugely important in helping me to formulate my thoughts.”

Klay won the 2014 National Book Award for Fiction for “Redeployment,” a collection of short stories about the war he witnessed in Iraq during a 2007 troop surge intended push back against a raging insurgency that threatened Iraq’s future.

“It’s such an odd space to be in, transferring being at war in Iraq and at peace the States, between one’s primary sense of oneself as a Marine and as a husband, as a soldier and a citizen,” Klay said. He hopes that his work, and the writing produced by the Veterans Writing Workshop, will extend a bridge to those who didn’t share the experiences of combat.

Klay continues to be affected by his time in Iraq and the continuing legacy of a war well into its second decade. In February 2017, the New York Times published an opinion piece (https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/10/opinion/sunday/what-were-fighting-for.html) that commended the moral courage of individual American fighting men and women.

“I think I’ve continued to develop a respect for the depth and complexity of veteran’s experiences. I’ve also thought more about the role of American citizens more broadly, whether veteran or not, and the things that unify us as a country,” Klay said.

Veterans and military-connected writers interested in participating in the Veterans Writing workshop can visit http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/veteranswritingworkshop/registration.cfm to register.

 

 

-by Benjamin Abel, Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences

ECU students attend 2017 Retail’s BIG Show in NYC

Semi-finalist for the Next Generation Scholarship. (contributed photo)

Semi-finalist for the Next Generation Scholarship. (contributed photo)

National Retail Federation (NRF) provided $6000 in travel scholarships for seven students from the Interior Design and Merchandising department to attend the 2017 Retail’s BIG Show Student Program in New York City, NY January 13-15, 2017. One of the students who attended the Retail Big Show (Matthew Talbot) was among the 25 semi-finalists nationwide for the Next Generation Scholarship https://nrf.com/career-center/scholarships/next-generation-scholarship/next-generation-class-of-2017.   Other students who attended the show are Morgan Price (Next Generation Scholarship), Lindsay Grimmett (NRF Student Ambassador), Sydney Warren (Rising Star), Grace Gemberling, Caroline Pearson, and Rebecca Olsen.

Students from ECU at the 2017 Retail’s BIG show. (contributed photo)

Students from ECU at the 2017 Retail’s BIG show. (contributed photo)

Over 500 students from 70 universities nationwide attended this event. Students got the opportunity to hear industry professionals such as Rebecca Minkoff (Designer), Simon Sinek (Leadership speaker from TED Talks), Karen Katz (CEO of Neiman Marcus), in addition to top industry professionals from Dillard’s, Belk, Disney, Kohl’s, HSN, Walmart, etc. Caroline Pearson received an internship with Belk after the interview and was also contacted by Ross Stores, Inc. for a phone interview, Lindsay Grimmett got an internship offer from HSN and Grace Gemberling is interviewing with Macy’s and Nordstrom for a summer internship. Faculty advisor for the NRF Student chapter is Marina Alexander.

 

 

-by Marina Alexander, Department of Interior Design and Merchandising

ECU’s Harriot College recognizes high-achieving first-year students

East Carolina University’s Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences recognized its high-achieving first-year freshmen and transfer students at the college’s annual ECU Excels Awards Ceremony on Feb. 17 in the Mendenhall Student Center Great Rooms.

The event, which began in 2010 and is in its eighth year, honored 573 Harriot College students who achieved a GPA of 3.0 or higher in their first semester at ECU.

Dr. William M. Downs, dean of the Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences, welcomed the students and their guests to the celebration.

“ECU is an exceptional place. We really do put our students first,” said Downs. “ECU Excels is all about recognizing that you are already on the path to success and a timely graduation. It is a huge accomplishment.”

Following the dean’s comments, three officers from the THCAS Dean’s Student Leadership Council gave formal remarks about their lives at ECU. They provided words of wisdom to current Excels awardees on how to be successful throughout their academic career at ECU.

Chair of the council Lily Faulconer, an Honors College student who will graduate in May with degrees in political science and multidisciplinary studies, said, “Your time of transition is not over after your first semester. You’re going to experience many types of transition. You may find yourself in a time that feels like constant chaos, but you’ve already demonstrated your ability to adapt to a new environment and to new responsibilities.”

“I want to encourage you to continue on this path,” said Faulconer. “Think of today and our celebration of your success. Think of how hard you worked to be here at East Carolina, reflect on your successes and remember the incredible opportunities you have had and will have as a student and future graduate and alumni of East Carolina University.”

“ECU is a community, a family, a network of support and a hub of resources. You have everything you need to succeed nestled somewhere on our campus. Take advantage of what ECU has to offer you,” Faulconer concluded.

Katharine Chandler, co-chair of the leadership council who is majoring in history, philosophy, religious studies and great books, said “the key to success is to harness strength in all your academic endeavors.”

Within her first two years at ECU, Chandler studied abroad in Italy, South Africa and India. She said that getting to know her professors and being involved in campus organizations helped her focus and achieve her goals.

“It was because of the professors that I was able to accomplish so much,” said Chandler.

Virginia Vasquez-Rios, secretary of the leadership council and a sophomore biology major, was the final student to speak at the event.

“You should be very proud of yourselves,” said Vasquez-Rios.

Vasquez-Rios re-iterated Chandler’s comment about getting to know the professors at ECU, and also told students to use their time wisely and apply themselves in everything they do.

“Apply, apply, apply,” said Vasquez-Rios. “Persist in what you think will help you reach your goals.”

Honorees of the event received a certificate to commemorate their accomplishments and had the opportunity to have photos taken by a professional photographer. Additionally, the scholars and their guests celebrated with cake and mingled with faculty and associate deans from Harriot College.

 

 

-by Lacey Gray, Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences

1 2 3 4 5 46