Category Archives: Events

Students attend largest, oldest French film festival in the U.S.

Students from the ECU French Club stand outside the historic Byrd Theater in Richmond, Virginia, at this year’s 26th annual French Film Festival. Pictured from left to right are Julia Beauchamp, Sadie Crockett, Jon Cockerham, Kara Hall, Chase Ottensen, Marylaura Papalas (ECU faculty representative), Gary Lavenia, Amanda Curran, Rachel Griffith and Roylanda Merricks. (Contributed photo.)

Students from the ECU French Club stand outside the historic Byrd Theater in Richmond, Virginia, at this year’s 26thannual French Film Festival. Pictured from left to right are Julia Beauchamp, Sadie Crockett, Jon Cockerham, Kara Hall, Chase Ottensen, Marylaura Papalas (ECU faculty representative), Gary Lavenia, Amanda Curran, Rachel Griffith and Roylanda Merricks.
(Contributed photo.)

Students in East Carolina University’s French Club enriched their knowledge of French culture by attending the 26thannual French Film Festival in Richmond, Virginia, March 23-25.

“For years the club has tried to make a trip happen, but it just hadn’t worked out,” said Julia Beauchamp, president of the ECU French Club. “This was a great opportunity. Rarely do you get a chance to find a Francophone activity around the North Carolina, Virginia area. What a wonderful opportunity it was to have something so significant so close to us.”

As one of the French Club officers who planned the trip, Beauchamp, who is a junior majoring in communications and minoring in French and business, said the trip offered students a new opportunity to emerse themselves in the French culture.

“This trip gave us the real-life experience of being around another language,” Beauchamp said. “It revived my energy toward learning a second language.”

The festival is one of the largest and oldest French film festivals in the United States and offered the students a unique experience.

“French films are so different than Hollywood. They keep you at the edge of your seat, and you can’t guess the ending,” said Beauchamp.

During the three-day festival, students attended films each day in the historic Byrd Theater in Richmond.

“Each student had a favorite film, but one that everyone was particularly enthusiastic about was ‘Au revoir là-haut’ [English translation: ‘See you up there’], which won 5 Césars this year – France’s equivalent of the Oscars,” said Dr. Marylaura Papalas, assistant professor of French, who attended the festival with the students.

Students also had the opportunity to interact with directors, actors and musicians involved with the films.

“Many of the students bought the novel (‘Au revoir là-haut’), on which the movie was based. They were then able to talk to the music composer, Christophe Julien, and obtain his autograph,” Papalas said. “The privilege of talking to someone involved in the production of the film as well as conversations with other actors and directors at the conference were once-in-a-lifetime experiences.”

Officers of the French Club sought and received funding from ECU’s Student Government Association and the Student Activities and Organizations’ Co-Curricular Programs to attend the event, which covered the cost of lodging and cinema passes.

 

-by Lacey Gray, University Communications

Riverbank erosion in Bangladesh

In North Carolina, coastal communities are faced with environmental change as water interacts with the land. Sea level rise and storm surges are the primary threats, but an understudied issue in Bangladesh may help provide N.C. coastal communities with a model for resiliency.

On the banks of the Meghna River, a village in Bangladesh uses a concrete block wall to protect the village from further river bank erosion. (Contributed photos.)

On the banks of the Meghna River, a village in Bangladesh uses a concrete block wall to protect the village from further river bank erosion. (Contributed photos.)

Citizens of Bangladesh live on a delta and also must contend with the power of the Meghna River, which flows in response to monsoon rainfall. While excess rains can lead to flooding in both eastern North Carolina and Bangladesh, riverbank erosion is a unique challenge for Bangladesh.

This multifaceted problem is understudied, but members of an expert panel funded by the National Science Foundation will address this issue at East Carolina University.

ECU will host “Geospatial Science, Human Geography and Atmospheric Science for Coastal Research: Understanding and Predicting Riverbank Erosion in Bangladesh,” at 3:30 p.m. Friday, April 20, in the Science and Technology Building, Room C-209.

Bangladesh coastal map

Bangladesh coastal map

Dr. Scott Curtis, ECU professor of atmospheric science in the Department of Geography, Planning and Environment and one of the event panelists, said, “In Bangladesh, people are caught between geologic and climate drivers and local land loss, which is permanent and can be so severe that entire villages may be wiped out in a year or two.”

During the event, panelists will discuss their interdisciplinary research experiences, focusing on the potential benefits of local adaptation measures and large-scale climate prediction for enhanced resiliency at the coast.

“Our project will add to the current understandings of vulnerability, resilience and adaptation related to coastal erosion,” said Curtis.

Curtis said the average erosion rate for the area they are studying in Bangladesh is 100 meters per year. If that was translated to the Outer Banks, he said it would be underwater in fewer than 50 years.

N.C. coastal map

N.C. coastal map

“The rates of erosion are much higher in Bangladesh than North Carolina,” Curtis said, “which means that social adjustments, recoveries and resettlements occur rapidly and may be a model for our area where accelerated sea level rise is predicted to be a consequence of climate change.”

Curtis will be joined on the panel by Dr. Bimal Paul from Kansas State University; Dr. Kahled Rahman from Virginia Tech; and Dr. Tom Crawford, professor and chair of the Department of Geography at Virginia Tech and former ECU faculty member, who will lead the panel.

The event is free and open to the public. It is co-sponsored by The Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences and the Department of Geography, Planning and Environment as part of the THCAS Advancement Council Distinguished Professorship in Natural Sciences and Mathematics held by Curtis.

For additional information contact Curtis at curtisw@ecu.edu.

Seen here on the banks of the Meghan River, river bank erosion encroaches on farm fields.

Seen here on the banks of the Meghan River, river bank erosion encroaches on farm fields.

 

-by Lacey L. Gray, University Communications

Laupus Library’s leadership worthy of national celebration

This week, Laupus Library joins libraries nationwide in celebrating the many ways libraries lead our communities through the transformative services, programs and expertise they offer.

April 8-14 is National Library Week, an annual celebration of the life-changing work of libraries, librarians and library workers. Libraries aren’t just places to borrow books or study — they’re also creative and engaging community centers where people can collaborate using new technologies and develop their skills and passions.

“The History of PTSD: How Cultural Narratives Affect the Patient Experience” will be held at 4:30 p.m. April 9. (Contributed by Laupus Library)

“We promote our scholarship at a national level,” said Beth Ketterman, Laupus Library director. “Our library employees lead through active service in regional, state and national library associations. Next month, we have librarians speaking at the Medical Library Association on innovative ways we’ve transformed our collection development practices to best meet the needs of our university patrons. Our archivist, Layne Carpenter, relayed some of her interpretive expertise and practices at a recent Society of N.C. Archivists meeting.”

Ketterman said Laupus leads ECU’s Division of Health Sciences by introducing new services. One recent example is the launch of a systematic review service that provides authoritative and exhaustive searches for investigators in the health sciences.

“Our librarians conduct the searches and supply the literature search methodology for published reviews, and receive authorship credit for this very important partnership in the research process.”

Dr. Joseph Lee, assistant professor for the Department of Health Education and Promotion in the College of Health and Human Performance, recently completed a published review using the library’s service.

“Our collaboration with the systematic review service at Laupus provided information critical to the Food and Drug Administration’s regulation of vaping (or e-cigarette) retailers,” he said.

“Our systematic review, which is published in Tobacco Control, was only possible with the expertise and collaboration of a librarian. This service is indispensable given the ever growing volume of scientific literature and the need to leverage high-quality scientific evidence to improve the health of the public.”

Also a leader in the provision of resources to support the division and area health practitioners, the library selects and ensures efficient access to thousands of journals, books and other resources.

“A unique and growing part of our collection is our anatomical models; in fact, we have the largest collection of these models of all health sciences libraries in the state, and that is due to Laupus’ responsiveness to student need,” said Ketterman.

As part of the celebration, the library is hosting free programs and exhibits during the week and into the later part of April.

An opening reception for art exhibit “Eye Rain and Heart Cramps” will be held from 4:30-6:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 10. (Contributed by Laupus Library)

An opening reception for “Eye Rain and Heart Cramps” will be held from 4:30-6:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 10. (Contributed by Laupus Library)

On Monday, April 9 the Medical History Interest Group lecture, “The History of PTSD: How Cultural Narratives Affect the Patient Experience,” presented by Dr. Sheena M. Eagan, assistant professor in the Department of Bioethics and Interdisciplinary Studies, will be held at 4:30 p.m. in the Evelyn Fike Laupus Gallery located on the fourth floor of Laupus Library.

On Tuesday, April 10 an opening reception will be held for art exhibit “Eye Rain and Heart Cramps” from 4:30-6:30 p.m. in the Evelyn Fike Laupus Gallery on the fourth floor of the library. On display through June 1, the exhibit showcases a collection of paintings and mixed media artworks by April Holbrook, administrative support specialist for clinical financial services in the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University. The art exhibit is part of the library’s ongoing Art as Avocation series that explores artistic talents of faculty and staff from the health sciences.

On exhibit throughout the week in the fourth floor gallery is “Fighting for their Lives: Medical Practices During the American Civil War.” The exhibit examines how doctors and medical staff cared for soldiers, looking specifically at surgery, disease, infection and the role of hospitals. Items on display represent an unrecognizable era of medicine when amputations were common and anesthesia was fairly new.

The following week of April 16-20, Laupus will celebrate National Preservation Week with a variety of daily activities and demonstrations offered on the second floor of the library. Students and patrons will have the opportunity to learn more about book preservation, digitizing and photographing artifacts for the database, performing conservation on artifacts and archival materials, packing and storage of family heirlooms, and more about cultural heritage. Handouts and supplemental materials will be available each day.

Finishing out the month, the Country Doctor Museum will celebrate its 50th anniversary on Saturday, April 21 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. with “History Alive! A 50thAnniversary Celebration” – a family-friendly event that aims to offer visitors a glimpse into the past. Free activities will include museum tours, a petting zoo and horse drawn carriage rides from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The Country Doctor Museum will offer horse drawn carriage rides as part of its 50th anniversary celebration. (Contributed by the Country Doctor Museum)

The Country Doctor Museum will offer horse drawn carriage rides as part of its 50th anniversary celebration. (Contributed by the Country Doctor Museum)

Acoustic and old-time music will be provided by DryBread Road, and a variety of food vendors will be present. The Aurora Fossil Museum, Joel Lane House, Imagination Station Science and History Museum, Aycock Birthplace and the Tobacco Farm Life Museum will offer free activities and demonstrations.

The Country Doctor Museum will also showcase a new exhibit, “The Sick Room: Home Comfort & Bedside Necessities,” which illustrates how an extended illness of a family member or loved one was a common part of life at the turn of the 20thcentury.

Opened in 1968, The Country Doctor Museum shares the history of medicine in rural America and is managed as part of the History Collections of Laupus Library. It is the oldest museum in the United States dedicated to the history of America’s rural health care and is located in Bailey, N.C.

“None of what we do would be possible without the advocacy and commitment from our Friends of the Laupus Library,” said Ketterman. “The Friends promote the library and ensure that we have funds to enrich these programs and student-focused events when we wouldn’t otherwise be able to.”

Chairman of the Friends of Laupus Library Dr. John Papalas said, “As a Brody School of Medicine alumnus, I know how instrumental Laupus Library was to my success as well as the class of 2006. By being involved with the Friends, my support helps Laupus to continue to serve a growing health sciences division.”

Read more about the Friends in a photo story at https://spark.adobe.com/page/DoKdK0nuMj46g/.

First sponsored in 1958, National Library Week is a national observance sponsored by the American Library Association (ALA) and libraries across the country each April.

For more information about Laupus Library, The Country Doctor Museum and the Friends of Laupus Library, visit http://www.ecu.edu/cs-dhs/laupuslibrary/.

 

-by Kelly Rogers Dilda, University Communications

Tarboro native and entrepreneur Janice Bryant Howroyd to keynote annual Business Leadership Conference

East Carolina University’s College of Business (COB) will hold its fourth annual Business Leadership Conference April 10-11 at the Mendenhall Student Center.

The two-day conference, open to COB juniors, seniors and graduate students, complements the intensive leadership preparation students receive while enrolled. Speakers and breakout sessions will prepare students for the realities of the business world and provide opportunities to interact with conference speakers, ECU’s Business Advisory Council, alumni, employers and community members.

Janice Bryant Howroyd (Contributed photo)

Janice Bryant Howroyd (Contributed photo)

Janice Bryant Howroyd, founder and CEO of ActOne Group, will be this year’s keynote speaker. She will speak Tuesday, April 10, from 1-1:45 p.m. in Mendenhall’s Hendrix Theatre.

More than 40 additional leaders and entrepreneurs representing hospitality, banking, finance, accounting, sporting and health care industries will participate in more than 25 breakout sessions during the event.

Discussions include:

  • CEO lessons learned with Chad Dickerson, former CEO with ETSY and John Chaffee, CEO with NCEast Alliance.
  • Paths to sports marketing jobs presented by Kelly Jones of the Columbus Blue Jackets and Ryan Erdman of the Carolina Hurricanes.
  • From student to professional with COB alumna Angelina Brack, VP with JPMorgan Chase, who will talk about how students should focus on their foundation.
  • Words of wisdom from Business leaders Tom Arthur, retired CEO of Havatampa, Bob Arthur, retired president of Philadelphia Investment Management Company, and CEO Eddie Smith of Grady-White Boats.

Approximately 1,000 business students are expected to attend this year’s conference.

“This is my favorite time of year at the College of Business,” said COB Dean Stan Eakins. “During the conference, students will be able to hear from major national and international leaders that represent a variety of backgrounds and successes. I, for one, can’t wait to hear what these leaders have to say.”

Born in Tarboro, Howroyd founded ActOne Group in 1978. Today, the company is a multibillion-dollar global enterprise with multiple divisions including AppleOne (staffing), ACheck Global (background checks and screening), and AgileOne (workforce, total talent management and procurement solutions). Each of these divisions service unique areas of workforce needs and provide total talent communities and management solutions across the globe. Staffing offices are located in more than 300 cities across the United States and Canada. ActOne Group does business in 21 countries and addresses the needs of workforce, technology and competitiveness.

Howroyd also is the author of “The Art of Work: How to Make Work, Work For You” and serves on academic and industry boards that promote the education and support of women and minorities in business.

“We are looking forward to hosting Ms. Howroyd,” said Eakins. “She spoke at last year’s conference and the feedback was so tremendous, we asked her to be the keynote for this year. We are so honored and proud that she accepted.”

For more information about the Business Leadership Conference and a detailed program, visit http://www.ecu.edu/cs-bus/conference/.

 

-Contact: Michael C. Rudd, College of Business, ruddm16@ecu.edu, 252-737-4574

Annual AIMO fashion show set for April 5

In preparation for the 2017 show, Caitlyn Grubb tried on a dress in Truly Yours, a downtown boutique owned by ECU alum Erin Davis, at left, a longtime supporter of the fashion show. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

In preparation for the 2017 show, Caitlyn Grubb tried on a dress in Truly Yours, a downtown boutique owned by ECU alum Erin Davis, at left, a longtime supporter of the fashion show. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

The ECU Apparel and Interior Merchandising Organization’s 14th annual Fashion Show will be held Thursday, April 5 at 8 p.m. at Brook Valley Country Club. This year’s theme is “Into the Wild.”

Tickets are $10 for students, $20 for guests and include heavy hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar. Tickets can be purchased at Bostic Sugg Furniture or these participating boutiques: Truly Yours, Bevello, Catalog Connection, Shimmer, Votre, My Sister’s Closet, Escape Spa and Who is Rose. There are a limited number of tickets but any remaining seats will be available at the door.

The student-run show provides learning opportunities from communications and negotiating to event and time management and leadership skills. The fashion show also is a fundraiser which helps provide opportunities for students to attend events such as the Atlanta Apparel Mart and New York showrooms, and to learn about different careers in the industry. There are about 50 students including AIMO members and merchandising majors helping in the show.

 

-by Crystal Baity, ECU News Services

Symposium builds connections

Nearly 80 East Carolina University faculty members filled Harvey Hall at the Murphy Center on Tuesday for the inaugural Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Engagement Symposium.

The symposium, hosted by ECU’s Economic Development and Engagement Council, brought together faculty members from across academic disciplines to showcase existing innovation, entrepreneurship and engagement opportunities offered by the university.

Matthew Nash gives a keynote address at East Carolina University’s inaugural Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Engagement Symposium on Tuesday. The symposium introduced faculty members to innovation, entrepreneurship and engagement services provided by the university. (Photos by Matt Smith)

Matthew Nash gives a keynote address at East Carolina University’s inaugural Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Engagement Symposium on Tuesday. The symposium introduced faculty members to innovation, entrepreneurship and engagement services provided by the university. (Photos by Matt Smith)

The event was highlighted by a keynote speech from Matthew Nash, managing director for social entrepreneurship at Duke University’s Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative. Faculty members also participated in roundtable discussions with leaders from ECU services including I-Corps, innovation spaces, community engagement, the Miller School of Entrepreneurship, crowd funding, the Research and Innovation Campus, the School of Dental Medicine’s community service learning centers, virtual technologies, the Center for STEM Education, the North Carolina Agromedicine Institute, and the Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Engagement Living and Learning Community.

Innovation, entrepreneurship and engaged research activities are enterprises that seek to build, improve, create or affect issues in a community. These activities could include creating a new product that serves a community need, opening a new business or applying academic knowledge to community-based issues with partners from inside and outside academia.

“When you’re trying to build a foundation for conducting innovative and engaged work, you have to think about how to fit the concept of innovation, entrepreneurship and engagement into faculty members’ productivity,” said Sharon Paynter, assistant vice chancellor for community engagement and research. “Today’s event was a way to show faculty members how they can connect to offices and programs that focus on IEE activities.”

Jennifer Watson discusses crowd funding opportunities to a group of ECU faculty members at ECU’s inaugural Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Engagement Symposium.

Jennifer Watson discusses crowd funding opportunities to a group of ECU faculty members at ECU’s inaugural Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Engagement Symposium.

Paynter said that the symposium also offered faculty members a chance to learn about IEE services to bring back to their students.

Department of Interior Design and Merchandising teaching instructor Tiffany Blanchflower agreed, saying that the event gave her a chance to learn how to connect her students with local community partners.

“Community engagement is the future and we need to embrace that,” Blanchflower said. “If we’re (faculty) only doing research for academia, it’s not going to impact society or our communities. The point of research is to solve problems. By conducting engaged research and by introducing students to engaged research, we’re better preparing students for what their future is going to look like outside of the classroom.”

In his speech, Nash touched on using innovation and entrepreneurship to impact social change. He said by asking students not what they will be, but what problem they are trying to solve, it changes the mindset of how students tackle regional disparities.

“We’re looking for new and improved ways to achieve impact,” Nash said. “We can no longer just imagine what the solutions are and hope that things will work out. We have to work with communities, define their needs with their support and create solutions.”

ECU offers a variety of IEE programs for faculty and students, including the Engagement and Outreach Scholars Academy, the State Employees Credit Union Public Fellows Internship program, and the Community-University Partners Academy. For more information on innovation, entrepreneurship and engagement opportunities, visit www.ecu.edu/cs-admin/communityengagement/index.cfm.

 

-by Matt Smith, University Communications

Simulation brings awareness about living in poverty

About 50 East Carolina University students recently assumed the role of a family member living in poverty while juggling monthly bills, buying food or going to the doctor.

The students took part in a community action poverty simulation on March 16 at the East Carolina Heart Institute at ECU. The simulation was led by Tamra Church, a teaching instructor in the College of Health and Human Performance’s Department of Health Education and Promotion, Kim Werth, a counselor in the School of Dental Medicine, and the Center for Leadership and Civic Engagement. Courtney Williams, a master’s student and graduate teaching assistant, was instrumental in planning, organizing and volunteering in the simulation as well as overseeing registration, lunch, snacks and community resource tables.

Students – most from a health behavior theory class in the Department of Health Education and Promotion - portray family members living on a budget in a recent poverty simulation held in the East Carolina Heart Institute at ECU. (Photos by Josh Vaughan)

Students – most from a health behavior theory class in the Department of Health Education and Promotion – portray family members living on a budget in a recent poverty simulation held in the East Carolina Heart Institute at ECU. (Photos by Josh Vaughan)

Church’s students are pre-health professionals and many are preparing for graduate school in physician assistant studies, occupational therapy, physical therapy, medicine, nursing or dentistry. Other graduates will go into the workforce where they will interact with people and patients from all walks of life.

“It was an opportunity to put themselves in the shoes of someone experiencing poverty,” Church said. “My goals for the simulation were to change beliefs about people experiencing poverty, increase students’ empathy towards people living in poverty and encourage them to get involved in more civic engagement.”

A student receives information for her simulation.

A student receives information for her simulation.

In the simulation, students were assigned to a family unit ranging from a single parent without a car to an elderly person having to pay for heat and medication for a month. The students sometimes faced unexpected challenges such as a death in the family or a break-in at their home. They interacted with service providers including employers, bankers, grocers, public schools or police officers portrayed by 14 volunteers from the School of Social Work, Pitt County Health Department and community.

“The poverty simulation accurately demonstrated the roller coaster of life that people in poverty have to live to get by day to day,” said Harlee Rowe, a public health studies major. “It was a shock of reality to see how much needs to be changed to help these people in need.”

Emmanuel McLeod, who is also in the public health studies program, said the activity was an eye-opening experience. “It has helped me to understand the daily lives they may face, and how the majority of the things they go through are out of their control,” McLeod said. “Despite this, we can reach out as a community and support those who need it.”

Students review materials for a community action poverty simulation held March 16.

Students review materials for a community action poverty simulation held March 16.

The simulation also taught students about available resources in the community.

After the event, some students said they planned to start having conversations about poverty while others planned to volunteer or start writing local government about issues.

“It changed my perception of how families in poverty deal with daily life struggles (that) the people who are not in poverty never have to think twice about,” said public health studies student Angela Bracco.

Church plans to offer the simulation each semester.

 

-by Crystal Baity, ECU News Services

ECU kicks off Research and Creative Achievement Week

A line of posters, students and judges in Mendenhall Student Center kicked off East Carolina University’s 2018 Research and Creative Achievement Week on March 26.

The 12th annual event features more than 440 research posters and presentations, giving undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral students an opportunity to share their work with their peers and mentors.

Student Andra Glover (left) discusses her research poster with judges at the 2018 Research and Creative Achievement Week. The event began Monday at Mendenhall Student Center and runs through April 2. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Student Andra Glover (left) discusses her research poster with judges at the 2018 Research and Creative Achievement Week. The event began Monday at Mendenhall Student Center and runs through April 2. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

RCAW allows students from all disciplines – from biomedical sciences to visual arts and design – to practice their presentation skills and interact with other creative scholars on campus. Judges, made up of ECU faculty, staff and graduate students, provide a balanced evaluation of the students’ work, grading them on subject knowledge, effective medium use, clarity and question response, and originality and creativity. Awards are presented at the end of the week to both poster and oral presenters.

Left to right, guest panelists Bridget Todd, Allison Mathews and Suzanne Lazorick discuss how they have used research and creative achievement to change the world at RCAW’s opening session and discussion panel. (Photo by Matt Smith)

Left to right, guest panelists Bridget Todd, Allison Mathews and Suzanne Lazorick discuss how they have used research and creative achievement to change the world at RCAW’s opening session and discussion panel. (Photos by Matt Smith)

For the first time, RCAW held an opening session and panel discussion. The event featured digital strategist Bridget Todd, MATCH Wellness co-director Suzanne Lazorick and 2BeatHIV director and Community Expert Solutions CEO Allison Mathews. The trio hosted the panel “Run with New Ideas: Using Research and Creative Achievement to Effect Real World Change.” Todd, Lazorick and Mathews discussed their work with underserved communities – including women, children and minorities – and took questions from the crowd.

Katina Hilliard, a graduate student in the College of Health and Human Performance, said she wanted to go through the learning experience of presenting her research to others. Hilliard and her co-researcher’s study focused on the relationship between staff practices in an after-school service program and school connectedness.

“Presenting at RCAW gives you a lot of practice in public speaking,” Hilliard said. “Presenting your research to others is a big part of the research process and this gives you an opportunity to share in a safe setting. In the future when I present at conferences, I’ll be able to use this experience to guide me.

Research posters line the halls of Mendenhall Student Center for the opening of RCAW.

Research posters line the halls of Mendenhall Student Center for the opening of RCAW.

“Every one of the judges and students that come through RCAW are here to help you,” she said. “They’re not here to criticize or put your work down; they’re here to build you up and make your work better.”

RCAW Chairman and Associate Dean of Graduate Studies Tom McConnell agreed with Hilliard, emphasizing the importance of students dipping their research toes into public speaking.

“RCAW is all centered around our students,” McConnell said. “We want to give them a number of learning opportunities. These presentations are often the first presentations ECU students give and they gain valuable communication skills in the process. They also learn how to work with teammates and mentors – important skills to master if they plan to continue their research initiatives in the future.”

RCAW will run until April 2. More information is at https://blog.ecu.edu/sites/rcaw/.

 

-by Matt Smith, University Communications

‘Death and Diversity in Civil War Medicine’ explains the disparity of mortality

Quinine bottles on display at Laupus Library (Photos contributed by Laupus Library History Collections)

Quinine bottles on display at Laupus Library (Photos contributed by Laupus Library History Collections)

The American Civil War occurred during a time when medicine was just beginning to make great strides. Contemporary doctors did not fully understand the origin of disease, the importance of hygiene, or the need for sterilized tools during surgery, but discoveries such as anesthesia improved the patient experience immensely.

In North Carolina, the war impacted both civilians and the medical community. Young men joined the war effort as soldiers, doctors joined the ranks to provide medical care, and women stepped up to aid with nursing.

Currently on exhibit through June 3 in the Evelyn Fike Laupus Gallery on the fourth floor of Laupus Library, “Fighting for their Lives: Medical Practices During the American Civil War” examines how doctors and medical staff cared for the soldiers, looking specifically at surgery, disease, infection and the role of hospitals.

“The items on display represent an era of medicine that seems quite foreign to us today,” said Layne Carpenter, Laupus Library history collections archivist. “During this time, anesthesia was fairly new. It was also a common belief that liquor could cure multiple ailments, and amputations were frequent.”

Amputation kit on display at Laupus Library

Amputation kit on display at Laupus Library

“The collection of items tells a story about medicine before people knew what germs were,” she continued. “I think viewers of this exhibit will develop a greater appreciation for modern medicine.”

War deaths from disease did not occur at the same rates across national and racial groups. Almost 17 percent of Confederate soldiers died from disease. In the Union Army, three times more black troops suffered disease deaths than white troops.

The Medical History Interest Group will host “Death and Diversity in Civil War Medicine,” presented by Dr. Margaret Humphreys, the Josiah Charles Trent Professor in the History of Medicine at Duke University, on March 26 at 4:30 p.m. in the Evelyn Fike Laupus Gallery.

Humphrey’s talk will explore the ways in which social determinants of health, particularly nutritious food and nursing care, explain much of this differential mortality.

The lecture will be followed by an opening reception for the exhibit. Refreshments will be provided. This event is free and open to the public. This is a Wellness Passport Event.

For more information email hslhistmed@ecu.edu.

 

-by Kelly Rogers Dilda, University Communications

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