Category Archives: Events

Students and Employers Benefit from 2017 Career Networking Day

Adorned in business attire and armed with updated resumes and talking points, more than 400 students from the College of Engineering and Technology and the College of Business jammed the University’s Murphy Center Thursday, Feb. 9. to network with potential employees and possible references.

The Feb. 9 Career Networking Day broke attendance records, with more than 400 students attending and 55 companies exhibiting at the event. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

The Feb. 9 Career Networking Day broke attendance records, with more than 400 students attending and 55 companies exhibiting at the event. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

The College of Engineering and Technology’s eighth Annual Career Networking Day brought these students together with approximately 150 representatives from 55 statewide companies. Representatives greeted students with company information and business cards. Sidebar conversations, networking tips, and new relationships were the order of things once the event started at 1 p.m.

“The goal of this event, which was the most attended one to date, was not about finding jobs. It was more of a networking event so students can learn how to communicate and sell themselves to potential employers,” said Dr. Leslie Pagliari, associate dean of the College of Engineering and Technology. “We wanted to make sure they were prepared for next month’s spring Career Fair.”

Senior Magus Pereira networks with Vidant Health’s Tammy Wilkins during the 2017 Annual Career Networking Day, sponsored by the College of Engineering and Technology. (contributes photo)

Junior Sarika Merchant speaks to one of the 150 company representatives that exhibited at the Eighth Annual Career Networking Day.

And prepared they were.

Sarika Merchant, a junior with the College of Engineering and Technology, made sure her resume was up-to-date and reviewed talking scripts before the event. She also took it upon herself to learn a little about the companies who were in attendance. The benefit from doing this one step, she believes, is strong.

“If you go up to them and say I know about your company and this is what you do, it shows that you have done the research and that you are actually interested,” said Merchant.

To those students who did not attend the annual Career Networking Day, Senior Magus Pereira says they are missing out, “on making the network connections with recruiters. Even if they don’t get the opportunity, they could have gotten their names across to the recruiters and what they’re working on.”

Senior Magus Pereira networks with Vidant Health’s Tammy Wilkins during the 2017 Annual Career Networking Day, sponsored by the College of Engineering and Technology.

Senior Magus Pereira networks with Vidant Health’s Tammy Wilkins during the 2017 Annual Career Networking Day, sponsored by the College of Engineering and Technology. 

 

It’s Good for the Employers, Too

Students were not the only ones who benefited from this networking event. Employers got a chance to learn more about what graduates from both colleges can potentially bring to their organizations.

“These events are ideal because, as an alumni, I get to give back to the students and the faculty,” said Mark Bray, supply chain director with ACR Supply Company. “As an employer, we have the opportunity to hire interns…and sometimes we get to hire them after the internship. It’s (the event) been a great resource for the company.”

This event was the first one that Tammy Wilkins of Vidant Health had attended. She was excited to be there because she knew the event would give Vidant Heath an opportunity to, “network and build relationships with students and help them learn about the initiatives and services that Vidant provides.”

Organizers and exhibitors at the event said they were not only encouraged by the quality of senior and junior level students that participated, but they were also excited to see sophomores attend and understand the importance of networking events such as this one.

 

 

-by Michael Rudd, College of Engineering & Technology

ECU celebrates World Anthropology Day

The Department of Anthropology at East Carolina University is celebrating World Anthropology Day 2017 with an Anthropology in the Workplace event Feb. 16 from 6:30-8:30 p.m. on the second floor of the Flanagan Building.

The third annual Anthropology After Dark open house will exhibit laboratories, artifact displays, an Egyptian tomb, Mexican dance masks and three ECU alumni who will discuss how they have incorporated their training in anthropology into their professional careers.

The Anthropology Student Organization (ANSO) will provide food and refreshments following the lecture hour, which starts at 7 p.m.

“This event is one of our more significant public outreach events. We invite the public into our classrooms and labs to help them understand the relevance of anthropology in the 21st century,” said Dr. Randy Daniel, chair of the Department of Anthropology.

To complement the discussion of food wealth and food insecurity, contributions of food, toiletries and paper products will be accepted for donation to the Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina – Greenville Branch.

Parking will be available at the parking lot at the corner of 10th and Cotanche streets.

Anthropology Day is a day for anthropologists to share their excitement about their discipline with the public around them. Anthropologists will share their work around the world. Events and activities in Canada, Morocco, India, Egypt, Mexico, Tunisia and across the United States will build enthusiasm and awareness for current and future anthropologists.

“This is a great time for anthropology,” said Dr. Alisse Waterston, president of the American Anthropological Association. “Today’s anthropologists are making remarkable contributions to human understanding and tackling the world’s most pressing problems.”

 

 

-by Heidi Luchsinger, Department of Anthropology

ECU’S CENTER OF SUSTAINABILITY TO HOLD FIRST SUSTAINABILITY SYMPOSIUM

The University’s College of Engineering and Technology and the College’s Center for Sustainability will hold its first Sustainability Symposium Feb. 20, 2017. The event’s goal is to discuss ways sustainability can be integrated into research and industry practices,

Dr. Tarek Abdel-Salam, event organizer and associate dean of research and graduate studies for the College of Engineering and Technology. (Contributed photo)

Dr. Tarek Abdel-Salam, event organizer and associate dean of research and graduate studies for the College of Engineering and Technology. (contributed photo)

especially those that will benefit eastern North Carolina. It will also promote approaches that adopt and implement inclusive views of the key dimensions of sustainability: environmental, economic and social.

The symposium will be held at the University’s Murphy Center from 8 a.m. – 3 p.m.

“We want to present thought-provoking examples of sustainability ideas, analyses and practices that are available to our region’s farmers and agricultural organizations so they can maintain and grow their businesses and be good stewards of the environment, as

well,” said Dr. Tarek Abdel-Salam, event organizer and associate dean of research and graduate studies for the College of Engineering and Technology.

Pam Swingle of the Environmental Protection Agency will be the keynote speaker. She is the agency’s pollution prevention program manager for the Region 4 Office of Environmental Justice and Sustainability. She is responsible

Pam Swingle, Environmental Protection Agency’s pollution prevention program manager for the Region 4 Office of Environmental Justice and Sustainability. (contributed photo)

Pam Swingle, Environmental Protection Agency’s pollution prevention program manager for the Region 4 Office of Environmental Justice and Sustainability. (contributed photo)

for administering pollution prevention and sustainability programs and providing technical assistance within Region 4’s eight, southeastern states.

Symposium discussions will include:

  1. We know how to do this: Sustainability and Energy: Ged Moody, Appalachian State University, special assistant to the Chancellor for Sustainability
  2. What does food have to do with sustainability?: Rebecca Dunning, North Carolina State University, Department of Horticultural Science
  3. Strategies to protect water resources in agricultural watersheds: Mike Burchell, North Carolina State University, Biological and Agricultural Engineering
  4. The vulnerable food, energy, and water system in the Caribbean: Scott Curtis, East Carolina University, Geography
  5. Soil Conservation and Organic Farming: Kristi Hocutt, sales manager, Triple J Produce
  6. Organic Feasibility: Thomas Moore, food systems coordinator, Carolina Farm Stewards

The symposium will also include a student/faculty poster session, which will cover all areas of sustainability-related research including tourism, water, energy, agriculture and buildings.

This event is supported by the Pitt County Development Commission, College of Engineering and Technology, the Center for Innovation in Technology and Engineering Outreach (CITE), and Phi Kappa Phi.

Breakfast and lunch will be provided.

The registration fee is $35 per person.

To register for the event visit: https://www.enrole.com/ecu/jsp/session.jsp?sessionId=17SUST0220&courseId=17SUST0220&categoryId=ROOT or call (252) 328-9198

 

 

-by Michael Rudd, College of Engineering & Technology

Peter Makuck to read at ECU

Longtime eastern North Carolina resident Peter Makuck will present a public reading from his poetry and fiction on Wednesday, Feb. 15 at 7:30 p.m. in East Carolina University’s Bate building, room 1026.

(contributed photo)

(contributed photo)

Makuck, distinguished professor emeritus, taught English and creative writing at ECU from 1978 until his retirement in 2006. Founder of the internationally acclaimed literary journal Tar River Poetry, he is also the author of eight books of poetry and four collections of short stories, including one of each published in 2016.

Makuck grew up in New London, Connecticut and has a doctorate in American literature from Kent State University. He has been a Fulbright Exchange Professor at Cambery, France and a visiting writer at Brigham Young University and N.C. State University. He and his wife, Phyllis, live on Bogue Banks.

Five Makuck short stories have received honorable mentions in the Best American Short Stories collections, and a personal essay on guns was named a Best Essay of 2000. For poetry, he has received the Zoe Kincaid Brockman Award for best book of poems by a North Carolinian.

The reading is sponsored by ECU’s Department of English. Admission is free and open to the public.

 

-by Alex Albright, ECU English Department

Dowdy Student Store to host Grad Expo

Dowdy Student Store will host a Grad Expo for May 2017 graduates from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Feb. 7 and 8 and from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. on Feb. 9 at the student store in the Wright Building on campus.

Graduating seniors can pick up caps and gowns; register for graduation; and order class rings, custom invitations, announcements and thank-you notes. Jostens, the official provider of class rings for ECU, will have samples of class rings, and representatives can help with finger sizing and original designs.

The Alumni Association, Pirate Club, Rec Center, Career Services, Registrar, The Buccaneer, College of  Education Office of Alternative Licensure, Custom Stoles and University Frames will be on hand with offers and information. Jostens has donated three $100 Dowdy Student Store gift cards that will be given away in a drawing. A diploma frame donated by University Frames will also be given away in the drawing. All May 2017 graduates are invited to enter; no purchase is necessary.

Representatives from Oak Hall custom regalia will be at Dowdy during the Expo for faculty members who wish to purchase their own gowns. They will have samples of regalia and can take measurements. A 10% discount will be given on all orders placed during this visit.

Graduating seniors unable to attend the Expo can visit Dowdy Student Stores after Feb. 9 to pick up their caps and gowns.

For more information about the Expo, call 252-328-6731 or visit www.studentstores.ecu.edu.

 

-by Karen Simmons

Voyages lecturer discusses keys to being an interfaith leader

Eboo Patel, founder and president of Interfaith Youth Core, a national nonprofit that aims to promote interfaith cooperation, discussed the keys to interfaith leadership during the Voyages of Discovery Lecture Series’ Religion and Culture Lecture Nov. 7 at East Carolina University.

In his discussion, “Interfaith Leadership Can Save the World,” Patel said the United States is the “most religiously diverse and devout nation.” He discussed the questions of who will break down the barriers, why it is important, and what makes an interfaith leader.

Eboo Patel (Photo provided by the Interfaith Youth Core)

Eboo Patel (Photo provided by the Interfaith Youth Core)

According to Patel, there are three key ways to become an interfaith leader. One is to have an appreciative knowledge of other religions and their contributions. The second is to have a theology of interfaith cooperation within one’s own religious beliefs; in effect, being able to work with others of other faiths and follow their good examples. Third, is that being an interfaith leader takes grace.

Patel believes that American society is stronger when people of different religious backgrounds and beliefs acquire the skills and knowledge to work together cooperatively; that pluralism will defeat prejudice.

He said the United States is made up of many interfaith stories. He used Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. as an example of how leaders throughout history demonstrate interfaith leadership in their civil discourses.

King, although a Christian, studied Indian leader Mahatma Gandhi’s methods of non-violence and used this within his own non-violent movements, including the Aug. 6, 1966 march for fair housing in Chicago. Patel pointed out that King even went on to preach a sermon of non-violence after his house was firebombed by protestors.

“He formed a movement that shaped America,” said Patel.

When examining who will be interfaith leaders in the future, Patel said that everyone, in every profession (civic leaders, educators, doctors, athletes, coaches, etc.), should be aware of other people’s religious beliefs, practices and traditions.

As to why interfaith leadership and cooperation is important, Patel said, “All of us have a chance to do something good.”

–Lacey Gray

Chancellor’s Roadshow visits the Queen City

The East Carolina University Chancellor’s Roadshow pulled into Charlotte Oct. 18 to visit alumni and university supporters. About 50 people came out to the Duke Energy Center to meet Dr. Cecil Staton and hear firsthand his vision for ECU’s future.

 

“I loved the opportunity to be able to hear what he had to say, his new vision for the university, the boldness of his statements – which I think pirate pride can match,” said ECU alumna Michaelina Antahades.

“We need for every pirate to make an investment in this institution. It’s only when we can come together and do this as a team that we’re going to be able to make sure East Carolina University can be all that I believe it can be in the days ahead,” Staton said.

Staton

Chancellor Staton shares his vision of ECU with those gathered for his roadshow.

During his remarks, the chancellor noted that he believes East Carolina is on the cusp of becoming America’s next great university. His plans include increasing the university’s national profile, increasing research, expanding international studies and preparing for a comprehensive campaign.

“The chancellor talks about increasing research, and we have philanthropic partnerships with corporations that help further research,” said Vice Chancellor for University Advancement Chris Dyba. “Duke Energy is a great example of that. They’ve given hundreds of thousands of dollars to our engineering program and other programs at ECU to advance our research and do collective work for the citizens of North Carolina.”

Linda Thomas, Chancellor Staton, Wanda Montano, Jon DeFriese, and David Fisher

Linda Thomas, Chancellor Staton, Wanda Montano, Jon DeFriese, and David Fisher

The view from the 46th floor of the Duke Energy Center where the Chancellor’s Roadshow was held.

The view from the 46th floor of the Duke Energy Center where the event was held.

A big focus of the night was the importance of corporate support for the university. While corporate funding can help the university increase its national footprint in research and scholarships, it also helps students prepare for the future through internships and job placement.

“Anytime you talk about a true partnership, it goes beyond the financial commitment,” said ECU alumnus Mike Hughes who is also the vice president of community relations for Duke Energy in North Carolina. “You’ve got to develop opportunities for young people to get integrated into your workforce. I think we can find things that we need at Duke Energy and that East Carolina can absolutely deliver on and provide those kind of opportunities for students.”

These roadshows also give alumni and supporters a unique opportunity to speak with the Chancellor in one-on-one conversations.

“I definitely want to hear his ideas about these challenging times, but exciting times, and celebrating diversity and where we go from here,” said Steven Carmichael, a 2000 ECU graduate and co-founder of the Black Student Union at ECU.

Ronald Ellis, Chancellor Staton, and Roni Ellis

Ronald Ellis, Chancellor Staton, and Roni Ellis

Staton began his roadshow in August at the Murphy Center on ECU’s campus and plans to visit nearly a dozen locations in North Carolina and along the East Coast. The chancellor’s next roadshow event is planned for New York City in early December. For more information, contact ECU Advancement at 252-328-9550 or visit ecu.edu/give.

–Rich Klindworth

 

Click here to see all photos from the event.

Chancellor Staton takes a selfie with a guest.

Chancellor Staton takes a selfie with a guest.

Chancellor’s Roadshow excites ECU supporters

East Carolina University’s reach extends well beyond North Carolina which is why Chancellor Cecil Staton took his roadshow across the state’s northern border. The third round of his meet and greets was in Norfolk, Virginia.

“I think it is fantastic. It makes me feel that he [Staton] understands how important we are as a body of alumni,” said ECU supporter Gail Englert.

“We appreciate you, we appreciate your loyalty to ECU,” Staton said as he addressed the crowd of about 60 people who came out to the Norfolk Yacht and Country Club.

The alumni and supporters heard firsthand Staton’s vision for ECU’s future. That vision includes increasing the university’s national profile, increasing research, expanding international studies and preparing for a comprehensive campaign. However, one of the main points of focus on this trip centered on the power of the Pirate alumni.

Shirley Byrd Slaughter, Chancellor Staton

ECU supporter Shirley Byrd Slaughter speaks with Chancellor Staton at the Norfolk Yacht Club.

“[Staton] being able to reach out and ask for our opinions and suggestions – we all love East Carolina, we all want to make it better – and it means so much to us for him to come up here for this visit,” said Class of 1985 graduate Neal Crawford.

“We want them [alumni] to be involved. Of course financial support is always welcomed but it’s the day in and day out, life-long relationships that are so very important as well,” said ECU Vice Chancellor for University Advancement Chris Dyba.

The Pirate alumni and supporters who came out said they are proud to be ambassadors of the university and will continue to spread the word as to all that ECU has to offer.

“I think it’s an obligation of ours to let people know [about ECU],” Englert said.

Bill Burnette, Joe Covington, Michelle Burnette, Neal Crawford

Bill Burnette, Joe Covington, Michelle Burnette, Neal Crawford

“We’re going to need our alumni to stand up and say ‘yes, we believe in the future of our university and we’re going to support it,’” Staton said. “I know a lot of you have already done that and I want to thank you very, very much for your investment in East Carolina University.”

Staton began his roadshow in August at the Murphy Center in Greenville and plans to visit nearly a dozen locations in North Carolina and along the East Coast. The chancellor’s next roadshow event will be on Oct. 18 in Charlotte. For more information, contact ECU Advancement at 252-328-9550 or visit ecu.edu/give.

–Rich Klindworth
Click here to see all photos from the event.

Pulitzer-prize winning poet coming to ECU

Pulitzer-prize winning poet Stephen Dunn will be reading from his work at 5 p.m. on Friday, October 21 at the Greenville Museum of Art.

Stephen Dunn (Photo by Bernard C. Meyers)

Stephen Dunn (Photo by Bernard C. Meyers)

The event is free and open to the public. It is sponsored by Thomas Harriet College of Arts and Sciences, the Great Books Program, the Department of English, and the Contemporary Writer’s Series.

Dunn is the author of sixteen books; his poems have appeared in Poetry, The Atlantic, The Nation, the New Yorker, the American Poetry Review, the New Republic, and many other journals. Since 1974 he has taught at Richard Stockton College of NJ, where he is Distinguished Professor of Creative Writing. Dunn has been a Visiting Professor at The University of Washington, NYU, Columbia, and The University of Michigan. 

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