ECU to build dental center in Lillington

By Doug Boyd

LILLINGTON, N.C.   (Jan. 19, 2011)   —   Lillington has been selected to be the site of an educational and patient-care facility of the East Carolina University School of Dental Medicine.

Dr. Jim Hupp, dean of the ECU School of Dental Medicine, speaks Jan. 19 in Lillington. (Photos by Doug Boyd)

ECU announced today at the Harnett County Government Complex that it will build one of its community service learning centers beside the new First Choice Community Health Center off U.S. 401. There, dental students and residents will train and, together with ECU faculty members, provide care to local residents.

“This is going to be a very good site, a good collaboration with First Choice Community Health Center,” said Dr. Gregory Chadwick, associate dean for planning and extramural affairs at the dental school. The two facilities “will really have an impact on primary health care in Harnett County.”

Lillington is the fourth site to be named for what will eventually be 10 such centers across the state and the first in central North Carolina. The other sites identified so far are Ahoskie and Elizabeth City in eastern North Carolina and Sylva in the western part of the state.

The 7,700-square-foot center will be a fully functioning general dentistry office with 16 treatment rooms, X-ray equipment, educational space and more. The state will own the land, and construction could begin this year if all goes well, Chadwick said.

Sheila Simmons, executive director of First Choice, said the partnership with ECU will be important to her community. “The future consists of not just ‘make a difference’ but ‘be the difference,'” she said, “and this collaboration will allow us to be the difference.”

Full-time dental school faculty members will staff the center, along with dental hygienists and other staff members, and fourth-year dental students and residents will train at the center. Chadwick has described the centers as similar to “moving the fourth floor of the dental school — the clinical training — off campus to rural areas of our state where dental services are needed.”

Retired Lillington dentist Dr. Catherine Evans praised the plan for the education it will provide students and care it will provide for residents who might not get it any other way. “It will give access to dental care to people who cannot afford it on large basis, and I’m talking about basic care,” she said.

The school will admit its first 50 students, all North Carolina residents, in August, with plans to admit 50 each year.

North Carolina is below the national average in the ratio of dentists to population, and that ratio has declined recently as the population has increased faster than the supply of practitioners. Harnett County has one dentist for every 10,000 people, Simmons said, less than the state average of about 4 dentists for every 10,000 people.

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NCLR Awarded

NCLR 2010

NCLR earns national design award

The North Carolina Literary Review won the 2010 Best Journal Design Award in the recent Council of Editors of Learned Journals competition.

NCLR is published by ECU and the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association. The award was announced during the 2011 Modern Language Association annual conference held in Los Angeles.

“First and foremost, the person responsible for our receiving this award is Dana Ezzell Gay, NCLR’s Art Director, who has designed for NCLR since its beginning when she was a student at ECU, working with Eva Roberts, who created NCLR’s original design,” said NCLR Editor Dr. Margaret Bauer. “Dana approached me in 2008 about a redesign, and while my initial reaction was ‘If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,’ I’ve often found myself frustrated by people who resist change. I’m glad we decided to take this chance.”

The journal was redesigned in 2009, and the 2008-2010 issues were submitted for the competition. NCLR is a large comprehensive body of work – both a scholarly journal and a literary magazine – and includes creative nonfiction, poetry, fiction, and drama to interviews, literary criticism and literary news articles.

“The creation of a new design for a literary journal offers many challenges, but primarily involves developing strong, cohesive visual relationships between text and image,” Gay said. “Redesign brings text and image to life in a cohesive way and asks the reader to embrace the beauty of the words, as well as the layout.”

Announcing the award at the City Art Gallery in Greenville, Bauer also praised the efforts of graphic designers Stephanie Whitlock Dicken of Greenville and Pamela and Dave Cox of Five to Ten Design in Washington, N.C., as well as the art selections of Diane Rodman, art editor and a faculty member in the ECU English Department.

This was the second CELJ award for best design for NCLR, with the other coming in 1999. NCLR’s other CELJ awards were Best New Journal in 1994 and the Parnassus Award for Significant Editorial Achievement in 2007.

The North Carolina Literary Review is published annually and is available by subscription as well as at several retail outlets across North Carolina. For more information, visit the journal’s website at www.nclr.ecu.edu.

Youth Arts Festival

The annual Youth Arts Festival at ECU provides an opportunity for artists to show their work with eastern North Carolina youth.

Annual Youth Arts Festival seeks artists

The Seventh Annual Youth Arts Festival at ECU is seeking artists to participate in its annual show 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 2.

The goal of the East Carolina Annual Youth Arts Festival is to promote the visual and performing arts to the region’s children.

Visual and performing artists present their art forms to the youth of Pitt County and eastern North Carolina. Some artists showcase their talents and demonstrate the media they work in, while others work with the children doing hands-on projects.

The festival strives to feature multicultural and multiethnic artists from the university community, Greenville and the region.

Artists are not charged booth fees and no commission is taken on any work that is sold.

This festival is geared towards elementary and middle school children but is open to all.

For more information or to participate, contact Dindy Reich, coordinator of the Youth Arts Festival, at 252-328-5749 or reichd@ecu.edu. More information about the festival can be found at http://www.ecu.edu/soad/youtharts.cfm.

NCLR Awarded

The North Carolina Literary Review won the 2010 Best Journal Design Award in the recent Council of Editors of Learned Journals competition.

NCLR is published by ECU and the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association. The award was announced during the 2011 Modern Language Association annual conference held in Los Angeles.

Making a Difference

Jane Pollock (Brody School of Medicine) has volunteered with emergency medical services since 1982. (Contributed photo)

Pollock aims to make a difference

By Judy Currin

The year was 1982.

ECU Chancellor John Howell called for an increase in research and public service during his annual faculty convocation, the university registered a record official enrollment of 13,300 students, the School of Medicine found a permanent home in the new Brody Medical Science Building and Jane Pollock began her volunteer service for Pitt County.

Pollock began as one of the original emergency medical service crew members on the first day of operations for Eastern Pines Rescue. She remains the only active paramedic in the county from the first Pitt County paramedic graduating class.

Pollock, training specialist in the Brody School of Medicine, attributes her initial interest in emergency medicine to an automobile accident she and her husband, John, witnessed two years earlier.

“We were following a pickup truck that veered off the right shoulder, overcorrected and ultimately flipped,” Pollock said. “The passenger was ejected from the vehicle, rendering him unconscious.”

While she was able to determine that the injured man was still breathing, her ability to aid was limited.
Some months later the fire department for the community of  Eastern Pines decided to develop an EMS squad. Pollock joined the basic EMT class.

Then a stay-at-home mother of daughter Gwen and son Matthew, she volunteered while they were in school, logging more than 2,000 hours of service a year. She served as scheduler, secretary and lieutenant before becoming the unit’s first female captain.

Pollock joined Brody School of Medicine’s Department of Emergency Medicine in 1990. Qualified as an NC Level II EMS instructor, EMT-paramedic and an emergency medical dispatcher, Pollock has conducted countless training sessions.

“The program for medical responder covers topics on general medical emergencies, CPR and traumatic injuries to prepare those who may be the first to arrive at the scene of an emergency,” Pollock said.
Basic emergency medical technicians training is more advanced, with emphasis on evaluating diagnostic signs, determining the extent of an injury or illness, provide emergency patient care and transport through classroom and clinical training.

“Usually a two year commitment that includes classroom, clinical and field internship, as well as the successful completion of courses in anatomy and physiology, is required to become a paramedic,” Pollock said.

“Conducted over four semesters, the course is designed to educate individuals who have no medical training.” Invasive skills and comprehensive assessments enable trainees to provide advanced life support to the ill or injured patient.

Pollock has conducted training sessions throughout the state adjusting the educational programs to meet the needs of a particular county.  “Literacy levels, economics, the availability of physicians’ offices and nursing homes dictate program emphasis,” Pollock said.

These days, her primary role for the Division of Emergency Medical Services is quality management. She responds to complaints or concerns involving any Pitt County EMS personnel. She works with Dr. Juan March, an emergency physician and Pitt County EMS medical director, to determine if any educational remediation or other action is required.

“Everyone is tested before they ever function on an EMS truck,” Pollock said.

And while on any given day, stacks of call reports await her review, Pollock keeps a hands on approach with a constant desire to provide the best possible patient care out in the field.

“Our mission is to provide and continue to improve the quality of health care services whenever and wherever the patient needs them,” she said.

“It is all about making a difference in their time of need.”

Making a Difference

The year was 1982.

ECU Chancellor John Howell called for an increase in research and public service during his annual faculty convocation, the university registered a record official enrollment of 13,300 students, the School of Medicine found a permanent home in the new Brody Medical Science Building and Jane Pollock began her volunteer service for Pitt County.

Pollock began as one of the original emergency medical service crew members on the first day of operations for Eastern Pines Rescue. She remains the only active paramedic in the county from the first Pitt County paramedic graduating class.

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