Updated 1 Card design unveiled during orientation

The ECU 1 Card office has announced a redesign of the ECU 1 Card. Students attending the first New Student Orientation were among the first to receive a newly designed card. The new multi-purpose ID card will be phased in rather than doing a complete recarding of the entire campus community. Current 1 Cards will remain active.

The new card features a rendering of the cupola and university logo, along with the card holder’s name, photo, and designation, such as student, faculty or staff. It was a collaborative effort, with input from several campus constituents and student leaders, according to 1 Card Director Merlena Artis. The design was done by ECU Creative Services.

Also changing with this new class of East Carolina students is a new name for the Gold Key Account, one of the declining balance funds tied to the 1 Card. Bounty Bucks is the name of the account, making it more reflective of the university’s nautical themes. 

“We’re hoping students will find the new name fun, and be more inclined to join the number of students, faculty and staff who take advantage of the account,” said Artis. Given the enthusiasm at the first two orientation sessions, the account is becoming more popular than in previous years.

Funds in the Bounty Bucks account can be used for prescriptions and services at the Student Health Center, purchases at Dowdy Student Stores, payment of fines and fees at various campus locations, as well as at the 1 Card Office. A complete list of Bounty Bucks uses and how to add funds to the account is found on the 1 Card web site: www.ecu.edu/1card. Additional uses for this declining balance account are in the planning stages.

Earlier this year a new application for mobile devices was released called GET, where all card holders can see the balance of funds in accounts tied to their card. The GET application information is also available on computers through the Pirate Portal or the 1 Card website. Transaction history for 1 Card accounts, the ability to report your card lost, and view locations to use the 1 Card are available through GET. Through settings, users have an added security measure where they can mark their mobile device as lost and deactivate PIN’s that would be used for the GET application.

Another new feature underway is the ability for parents and family members to add funds to card accounts via the internet through TouchNet.  

Updated cards for staff and faculty will be phased in by departments at various intervals over the next two years. Employees will be notified when they can have their new card made. Current 1 Cards will remain active throughout the transition, including the GET and TouchNet features.

See the 1 Card web site for more information about card uses and security: www.ecu.edu/1card.

The ECU 1 Card is the official photo ID card for East Carolina University. All students, staff, and faculty need this card whenever they are asked to show university identification. The ECU 1 Card is used for spending accounts such as the Dining Plan and Bookstore account.  It is also used for specific building access and worn as an ID badge at the Brody School of Medicine and other locations. While the ECU 1 Card is required for identification purposes, other accounts linked to the card are optional.

–Leslie Craigle

ECU freshman wins best woman vocalist at NC NATS auditions

A first prize for best overall undergraduate woman performer highlighted a strong showing for East Carolina University vocalists at the 2016 North Carolina National Association of Teachers of Singing auditions. The auditions were held on Feb. 19-20 at the University of North Carolina – Greensboro School of Music.

Freshman vocal studies student Alexandra Fee earned the overall award following a first place finish in the category for freshmen women vocalists. A native of East Moriches, New York, she attended Westhampton Beach High School before coming to ECU to study with instructor Dr. Jami Rhodes. Fee performed three pieces from composers Giuseppe Verdi, Aaron Copland, and Clara Shumann.

AlexandraFee

Contributed photo by Alan Kaid Photography

“I went in knowing that I just wanted to give my best performance and I didn’t even think of the possible outcome,” Fee said. “I was listening to them announce the two awards and then they called out my name. I was so in shock that my jaw just dropped.”

“As a freshman singer, Alexandra was competing against upperclassmen winners of all of the other NATS divisions,” said John Kramar, chair of ECU’s Department of Vocal Studies. “The fact that she won the best overall female singer as a freshman is very impressive. She has a great voice, and she sings with much sophistication.”

ECU’s male vocalists also walked away with first place finishes in two categories. Timothy Messina won first place in the upper advanced college men category, and freshman William Edwards took first in the freshmen men category. Overall, East Carolina singers collected 13 awards at the auditions.

“I was very proud of every ECU student who participated in this year’s NATS auditions,” said Kramar. “They all sang beautifully — regardless of whether or not they were given an award.”

The NC NATS auditions draw competition from universities and colleges throughout the state. ECU vocalists competed against students from the North Carolina School of the Arts, Campbell University, High Point University, University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill and other rivals. The auditions provide an opportunity for the colleges and universities to show off their programs, and for students to get feedback from voice teachers working at other institutions.

“Our students behaved like young, gracious professional artists in a competitive environment,” Kramar said. “They are friendly, kind people who are happy for the success of others and enthusiastic about supporting the art form and tradition of beautiful singing.”

“From this experience, I learned that success isn’t just about doing well for yourself; it’s really about giving a good performance for others,” Fee said. “Performing is my passion but my end goal with singing is to bring others joy.”

List of award winners

First Place, Overall Best Undergraduate Woman, 2016 NC NATS — Alexandra Fee
First Place — Freshmen Women — Alexandra Fee
First Place — Freshmen Men — William Edwards
Second Place — Freshmen Women — Chloe Agostino
Honorable Mention — Freshmen Men — Christopher Short
Honorable Mention — Freshmen Men — Cory Whaley
Third Place — Sophomore Men — Eli Cole
Second Place — Junior Women — Rebekah Shamberger
Honorable Mention — Junior Men — Nolawi Araya
Third Place — Senior Women — Elizabeth Stovall
Second Place — Lower Advanced College Men — James Taylor
First Place — Upper Advanced College Men — Timothy Messina
Second Place — Hal Johnson Spiritual Prize — Johnathon Spell

Former student presidents surprise Chancellor Ballard with home-cooked meal

Photos by Cliff Hollis

Seven past SGA presidents and guests met on Summit street and carried food to prepare chicken parmesan at the Ballard’s home on Saturday, March 5. (Photos by Cliff Hollis)

When a chancellor retires, formal receptions with various dignitaries are traditional, but one group of students at East Carolina University wanted to do something more personal.

Several former student body presidents got together and hosted a surprise home-cooked dinner for outgoing Chancellor Steve Ballard and his wife Nancy at the chancellor’s residence on Saturday, March 5.

7_960x500_Ballard-SGA-897

“We wanted to do something in an intimate setting and honor him in a personal manner,” said Drew Griffin ’08, who coordinated the event. He served as president during the 2008-2009 school year as a last semester senior and first semester graduate student. “We wanted him to hear how much we appreciated him in a way that he could relax and soak it all in.”

Griffin and many of the other former presidents have kept in touch over the years, so when they heard Ballard was retiring, they knew they wanted to put together a nice surprise for him, it was just a question of how. Griffin and the others worked in secret with Mrs. Ballard to set a date and make their plans. A meal on campus or at a restaurant would attract too much attention, and catering an event at the house would spoil the surprise.

“I told Mrs. Ballard, how about we do this: we’ll just show up with bags full of groceries and cook dinner for everyone,” Griffin said.

3_525x500_Ballard-SGA-887

It took some doing, with former presidents and spouses coming in from multiple states, and Mrs. Ballard having to convince her husband to stay home that night instead of attending a baseball game as he loves to do, but the event went off without a hitch.

After enjoying a meal of chicken parmesan, roasted vegetables and Caesar salad, everyone took turns sharing what Chancellor Ballard meant to them and what they had learned from him.

“It’s rare to encounter a leader that treats you as a peer,” said Justin Davis ’15, who served as president in 2012. Like all student body presidents at ECU, Davis served as an ex officio member of the Board of Trustees.

“Serving on the board can be daunting for a 20-year-old,” Davis said. “He really listened to us. That does something for your confidence and professional development. I learned as much on the board as I did in class. His character and commitment made us who we are as people today.”

Ballard-SGA-0914

Davis is now the director of business development for a local catering company. Griffin is founding vice president of a consulting firm for the government in Washington, D.C.

“The environment he created at ECU allowed us to learn about leadership and entrepreneurship,” Griffin said. “He set an example. He was so poised under pressure. We got to see that up close. That’s definitely something I took away from ECU. It was nice to put life to the words we’ve been feeling all these years.”

Davis learned from Ballard that leadership is rendering vision into reality. Davis says, “His impact has been felt not only through the university but through this whole area.”

Drew Griffin (08-09); Keri Brockett Carelas (07-08); Bradley Congleton (09-10); Chancellor Steve Ballard; Justin Davis (12-13); Jake Srednicki (14-15); Tremayne Smith (10-11); Josh Martinkovic (11-12)

Left to right: Drew Griffin (08-09); Keri Brockett Carelas (07-08); Bradley Congleton (09-10); Chancellor Steve Ballard; Justin Davis (12-13); Jake Srednicki (14-15); Tremayne Smith (10-11); Josh Martinkovic (11-12)

–Jackie Drake, ECU News Services

ECU administrator joins national board

An East Carolina University administrator is one of five people elected this year to the board of a national accounting organization.

In October, Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance Dr. Rick Niswander began serving a three-year term on the Board of Directors of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, a member association representing the accounting profession with more than 412,000 members.

Dr. Rick Niswander

Dr. Rick Niswander

“It is a distinct honor to be able to continue to serve my CPA profession and at the same time represent ECU in a national organization,” Niswander said.

Niswander has worked as a CPA for almost 35 years. He came to ECU in 1993 as an accounting faculty member. He served as dean of the College of Business from 2004 until 2011, when he became vice chancellor.

The AICPA board consists of 16 members, 15 of whom rotate every three years in sets of five. The board acts as the executive committee of the AICPA and oversees the organization’s management as well its volunteer committees. Board members work in both the public and private sectors. While the board normally contains one educator, Niswander is the first from ECU and the first in recent memory from a North Carolina institution.

“This is also a distinction for ECU,” Niswander says. “This is another opportunity for me to spread the word about this great university, in addition to serving those in the accounting profession. ECU has many outstanding employees who represent ECU within their respective professions in a similar manner.”

Niswander has a long history of dedication to his profession. He is also a member of the AICPA Council, a body consisting of 250 accountants from all 50 states. He recently finished a term as chair of the Board of Examiners, the body responsible for the oversight of the CPA exam.

ECU psychology students support academic enhancements at Farmville Middle School

Pictured left to right are Farmville Middle School Instructional Coach Etosha Kiah; ECU SASP members Christine Rivera, Caroline Mulhare, Lauren Gaither, Katie Gitto, Erin Jackson, Hannah Wilson and Vicki Steinmetz. Kneeling in front is Farmville Middle School Principal Paul Briney. (Photo provided by Christine Rivera.)

Pictured left to right are Farmville Middle School Instructional Coach Etosha Kiah; ECU SASP members Christine Rivera, Caroline Mulhare, Lauren Gaither, Katie Gitto, Erin Jackson, Hannah Wilson and Vicki Steinmetz. Kneeling in front is Farmville Middle School Principal Paul Briney. (Photo provided by Christine Rivera.)

East Carolina University students are assisting Farmville Middle School students through tutoring and team building projects.

Approximately 10 school psychology and pediatric school psychology students in the ECU Chapter of the Student Affiliates in School Psychology (SASP) have been working with the middle school children to help them perform well academically and continue on to college.

ECU health psychology doctoral student Maribeth Wicoff said tutors provide assistance with subject matter as well as study skills, such as effective note-taking. Team building includes group discussions where students learn techniques for getting “their point across in a professional tone and expressing disagreement non-judgmentally,” she added.

While the partnership benefits students at Farmville Middle School, the ECU students are learning from the experience as well. Dr. Christy Walcott, director of ECU’s school psychology and pediatric school psychology programs, said graduate students who engage in community service enhance their areas of study and receive the added benefits of training before graduation.

Walcott noted three reasons for encouraging community service. “First, psychology is a helping profession that is strongly rooted in principals of social justice,” she said. “Second, we specifically train our students to be leaders in addressing needs and advocating for underserved populations.”

Finally, Walcott added, “We believe that graduate training is a privilege…thus participating in the community is a small way of symbolically and fundamentally giving back.”

The ECU chapter of SASP is formed under the auspices of the American Psychological Association’s Division 16. SASP is designed to keep graduate students apprised of issues pertaining to school psychology while offering activities that support their professional development and advocate for the field. For additional information about SASP, visit http://www.apadivisions.org/division-16/students/.

ECU hosts Peace.Love.Pirates.Cure event Oct. 7

East Carolina University’s Campus Recreation & Wellness will host the eighth annual Peace.Love.Pirates.Cure Cancer Awareness Fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Oct. 7 in the Student Recreation Center. The event is free and open to ECU students, faculty and staff.

This annual Wellness Passport event promotes cancer awareness and knowledge by providing information tailored to help participants live healthy, cancer-free lives. Included are educational tables and interactive activities designed to help participants avoid skin, breast, cervical, testicular, lung and prostate cancers.

“Peace.Love.Pirates.Cure has reached over 3,500 people since it was introduced in 2007 and we expect another large turnout this year,” said Georgia Childs, associate director for Wellness Programs. “Cancer has impacted every person on our campus in one way or another. It could be the loss of a loved one or someone personally battling cancer, this event brings people together for education, friendship and support.”

Healthy snacks will be available throughout the event, and participants may win T-shirts and other giveaways.

Peace.Love.Pirates.Cure is sponsored by Campus Recreation & Wellness, Student Health Services, Student Government Association, the ECU Department of Health Education and Promotion, ECU Physicians, Leo Jenkins Cancer Center, the American Cancer Society, Colleges Against Cancer, Vidant Health and the Healthy PIRATES student organization.

For more information, contact Georgia Childs at 252-328-5172 or visit www.ecu.edu/crw.

ECU Pirates urged to step outside in nationwide challenge

East Carolina University is asking all Pirates to step outside and get active through the 2015 Outdoor Nation Campus Challenge competition under way through Oct. 17. The university is competing against 58 other institutions representing 30 states.

Grants up to $1,500 will be applied toward outdoor activities on campus, and individual participant prizes are available. Grants are tied to the number of active participants who log their activities and identify ECU as their institution. For 500 participants, ECU will receive $500. If 1,000 Pirates join in, the grant increases to $1,000. For 1,500 active participants, the grant goes up to $1,500.

Participants may sign up and log in at www.oncampuschallenge.org (select East Carolina University).

Points may be earned for a wide variety of outdoor activities including walking, Frisbee golf, fishing and biking, enjoying a hammock, fishing, gardening, hunting, hiking, backpacking, running or jogging, water activities, outdoor yoga, horseshoes, bird watching and stargazing.

Organized team sports like basketball, soccer and football don’t count in the challenge. Activities must be for a minimum of 30 minutes and take place between Sept. 6 and Oct. 17.

For additional information, contact Mark Parker, assistant director for Intramural Sports and Youth & Family at (252) 328-1575 or parkerma@ecu.edu.

Higgs to lead new transportation plan for Atlanta

Clyde Higgs ‘99 of Charlotte, executive vice president of operations and business development for the N.C. Research Campus (NCRR) in Kannapolis, is resigning to be chief operating officer of a group implementing a new transportation plan for Atlanta.

Clyde Higgs

Clyde Higgs

Higgs has led economic development recruitment at NCRR for the past nine years.

In his new job Higgs will be vice president and chief operating officer of Atlanta Beltline, the entity overseeing redevelopment of 22 miles of abandoned railroad tracks running through the center of Atlanta. The old rail line will be transformed into 33 miles of trails, 1,300 acres of parks and 5,600 housing units. Its estimated completion date is 2030.

NCRR is a public-private venture aimed at redeveloping industrial property in Kannapolis, which once was the world’s largest producer of textiles. The state gives NCRR about $30 million a year to support its research programs. The funding is directed through the UNC system. Several UNC system campuses have a presence there.

Higgs is credited with recruiting 20 partners in NCRR, including major universities and international food companies such as General Mills. The center now employs about 1,000 people.

Before joining NCRR, Higgs was the executive director of the technology incubator program at the University of North Texas-Health Science Center. Before working in Texas, he was director of the Office of Technology Transfer & Commercialization at N.C. A&T State University.

Early in his career, Higgs was executive assistant to the president of the N.C. Community College System

Higgs is a graduate of the University of South Alabama who earned a graduate degree in public administration from East Carolina University in 1999.

Higgs recently was elected vice chair of the N.C. State Board of Community Colleges. He chairs the search committee seeking a new president of the state community college system.

— Steve Tuttle

In Memoriam – Clyde Thomas ‘Tom the Jazzman’ Mallison

'Tom the Jazzman' Mallison (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

‘Tom the Jazzman’ Mallison
(Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Clyde Thomas “Tom the Jazzman” Mallison of Greenville, a benefactor of Joyner Library who was widely known for his music program on Public Radio East, died Sept. 6. He succumbed from injuries suffered in a car wreck that occurred shortly after he had completed his show on WTEB New Bern. He was 75.

Mallison, who graduated from East Carolina University in 1966 and was SGA president that year, worked at the Du Pont plant in Kinston for 32 years before retiring in 1998. He hosted the Sunday night jazz program on WTEB for more than 30 years. Before he began his show with WTEB, he broadcast with WOOW AM in Greenville and WITN FM.

In 2009, Mallison donated thousands of jazz music albums from his personal collection to Joyner Library. The recordings span a variety of the sub-genres of jazz, including ragtime, Dixieland, bebop, free, and fusion. The collection now resides in the ECU Music Library.

The Alumni Association honored him with its Distinguished Alumni Service Award in 1998 and its Robert Wright Society Leadership Award. He was a former member of the ECU Board of Visitors, a member of the Chancellor’s Society, a member of the College of Education Advancement Council and a former president of the S. Rudolph Alexander Performing Arts Series.

He is survived by two children and his wife, Frances Mallison, an ECU graduate who is a retired librarian with the Pitt County Schools.

Memorial contributions may be made to Public Radio East, 800 College Court, New Bern, N.C., or First Presbyterian Church Youth Projects Fund, 1400 S. Elm St., Greenville, N.C.