Category Archives: Education

Politics and kids: Explaining a contentious election

The 2016 election season has come to a close, but the polarized attitudes surrounding the campaigns may still continue to impact our children. The amount of negative campaigning, especially in swing states like North Carolina, has been difficult to conceal from our youngest citizens, according to two child development experts at East Carolina University.

Amanda Blakley works with students at the Nancy Darden Child Development Center on campus. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Amanda Blakley works with students at the Nancy Darden Child Development Center on campus. (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

“Children in elementary schools were talking about the candidates and what they have heard on television or from parents. I’ve had to answer questions from my own school-age children about topics they discussed in school,” said Dr. Sheresa Blanchard, assistant professor of human development and family science at ECU.

Blanchard and her colleague, Melissa Nolan, director of the Nancy Darden Child Development Center at ECU, offers tips for discussing the outcome of the election with children.
 

Display good sportsmanship

Whether your candidate wins or loses, it’s an opportunity for adults to display good sportsmanship. Children mirror the emotions and attitudes of their parents, and the emotions this election year have run high.

“Remain calm. It’s a fact that children respond to how we react and will feed into it. If parents are frustrated, angry or happy about the outcome, it’s OK to identify those feelings and calmly put them into words,” said Blanchard.

 

Choose your words carefully

Try to remain as neutral as possible when talking about the outcome of the election.

“Children do not have the cognitive ability to rationalize exaggerated comments. If they overhear an adult say, ‘the world will end’ if their candidate loses, children believe the world will end,” said Blanchard.

These kinds of statements can lead to fear and uncertainty. Nolan encourages parents to reassure their children that they are still safe and will be taken care of no matter the outcome.
 

Be honest 

Blanchard and Nolan agree that it’s OK to be honest with your children and share what you are feeling. Give them the space and the opportunity to share their emotions too and ask questions. Ask them how they feel about what they’ve seen and heard.

“Don’t give children more information than what they want,” said Nolan. She suggests encouraging children to ask questions and for adults to stick with short honest answers.

“Adults tend to give too much information,” she added.

 

Recognize teachable moments

Use opportunities that arise to teach and model, tolerance.

“Parents can explain that even though they may not agree with the person in office, we should still respect them and find a way to move on,” said Nolan.

Blanchard said parents can try to find optimism in the situation.

 

Jessica Pate, Collier Taylor, Finley Charles, and Marai Blanchard play at ECU's Darden Center.

Jessica Pate, Collier Taylor, Finley Charles, and Marai Blanchard play at ECU’s Darden Center.


Meet our experts:

Dr. Sheresa Blanchard is an assistant professor of human development and family science at East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina. Her research interests include early childhood education, parenting and family-centered practices.

Melissa Nolan, M.S. is the director of East Carolina University’s Nancy Darden Child Development Center, part of the Department of Human Development and Family Science. Her expertise includes best practices in early childhood education and child care administration.

*Note to editors and reporters: If you’re interested in speaking to one of these two experts, contact ECU News Services at 252-328-6481. 

ECU College of Education honors scholarship recipients and donors

More than 100 students in East Carolina University’s College of Education have received a record amount of scholarship support for this academic year.

More than $550,000 in merit and need-based scholarships has been distributed to 106 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral education students. The awards range from $250 to $20,000. All education students are eligible to receive some of the awards while others are earmarked for specific education majors or programs.

“Attracting the best students and ensuring access to an East Carolina University education rank among our highest priorities at ECU—and scholarships help us accomplish both of these objectives,” said Chris Dyba, vice chancellor for advancement at ECU, who spoke Aug. 26 at the College of Education’s Scholarship Recipient and Donor Recognition Ceremony at Rock Springs Center.

At center, Dr. Paul Gemperline, dean of the ECU Graduate School, stands with graduate students (left to right) Lauren Master, Sarah Burke, Paula Howell, Idella Wilson and Matesha Jones who received Master in Teacher (MAT) Tuition grants-in-aid. The scholarships are awarded to students who show outstanding promise for significant contributions to the field of education. The funds support MAT students during their full-time internship semester and are funded by the ECU Graduate School.

At center, Dr. Paul Gemperline, dean of the ECU Graduate School, stands with graduate students (left to right) Lauren Master, Sarah Burke, Paula Howell, Idella Wilson and Matesha Jones who received Master in Teacher (MAT) Tuition grants-in-aid. The scholarships are awarded to students who show outstanding promise for significant contributions to the field of education. The funds support MAT students during their full-time internship semester and are funded by the ECU Graduate School.

At the event, Dr. Grant Hayes, dean of the College of Education, acknowledged the importance of student support.

“The college is committed to preparing talented education professionals in many fields, including counseling, adult education, educational leadership, and library science, to name a few,” said Hayes at the ceremony. “It is inspiring to see how our donors are making it possible for these exceptional individuals to pursue their passions and impact the lives of others in a positive way.”

Scholarships are often established with private funds to honor or remember influential educators and support the academic pursuits of future education professionals. 

“For many of our students, the importance of scholarships and financial aid cannot be overstated,” said Dyba. “Today’s shifting economy poses a significant challenge, but donors like you turn our students’ dreams into a reality.”

ECU’s College of Education is the largest producer of new teachers in the state and the oldest professional school on campus. The mission of the College of Education is the preparation of professional educators and allied practitioners, including teachers, counselors, media coordinators, special education professionals, and principals and administrators.

For more information, visit ECU’s university scholarships website at www.ecu.edu/universityscholarships.

ECU College of Education dean named to state board

Dr. Grant Hayes, dean of East Carolina University’s College of Education, has been elected to the board of directors of the Public School Forum of North Carolina. His two-year term began July 1. 

The organization’s mission is to “shape a world-class public school education that supports all children in reaching their full potential and drives a vibrant North Carolina economy,” according to the Forum’s website at www.ncforum.org.

Dr. Grant Hayes (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Dr. Grant Hayes (Photo by Cliff Hollis)

Established 30 years ago, the Forum has launched several programs including the Beginning Teacher Network, Education Policy Fellowship Program, Teaching Fellows Program and the NC Center for Afterschool Programs.

“The Forum is composed of an impressive and well-rounded group of individuals who are working hard to advance and improve North Carolina’s public schools through research, policy and advocacy,” said Hayes. “I’m grateful for the opportunity to contribute to this work.” 

Each year, the organization chooses 10 education issues to address; the 2016 list is below:

  • Direct adequate resources to public schools, teachers and leaders
  • Transform the profession to make North Carolina a teaching destination again
  • Emphasize quality, not quantity, in charter school growth
  • Elevate race as a focal point of public education
  • Fix the broken A-F grading system
  • Support the state’s struggling schools
  • Maintain high standards for North Carolina
  • Make evidence-based decisions on expansion of private school vouchers
  • Expand access to high quality early childhood education
  • Build bridges for students through expanded learning. 

To follow or join conversations, the Forum can be found on Twitter at #EdTalksNC, on Facebook and at www.edtalks.ncforum.org/.

–Jessica Nottingham

College of Education recruiting STEM tutors

East Carolina University’s College of Education is recruiting 54 paid tutoring positions in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM.

As part of a new AmeriCorps grant project titled STEM-Corps East, tutors have the potential to work with 1,000 elementary and middle school students in eastern North Carolina on improving and developing math and science skills.

Tutors will commit to 12 months of AmeriCorps service beginning in September. Positions are available in both public schools and afterschool programs, such as Cub Scouts, in Beaufort, Lenoir and Pitt counties.

Ideal candidates include ECU students, community college students, retired teachers and recent college graduates who have a background in or are pursuing a STEM- or education-related career.

Tutors will earn a yearly living stipend of $5,000 providing at least 900 service hours, and will receive an education award valued up to $2,887.50 to repay student loans, continue education or transfer to a family member (available for tutors age 55 and up).

Officials say many public school students in eastern North Carolina are scoring below levels 4 or 5 on statewide standardized tests that are indicators of having mastered prerequisite knowledge and skills to be successful in postsecondary education or a career. Only 25 percent of students in eighth-grade math classes scored at level 4 or 5, and 53 percent scored at level 4 or 5 in eighth-grade science classes.

For more information, visit www.ecu.edu/stem-corps or contact Betty Beacham at beachamb@ecu.edu or 252-328-4357. 

ECU STEM-Corps East is an initiative of N.C. Commission on Volunteerism and Community Service and the ECU College of Education in partnership with school districts, community colleges and community groups in Beaufort, Lenoir and Pitt counties.

–Crystal Baity

College of Education launches partnership with Panasonic Foundation, four rural school districts

East Carolina University’s College of Education is celebrating a new partnership with the Panasonic Foundation and four eastern North Carolina school districts.

The Panasonic Foundation works nationwide with schools to break the link between race, poverty and educational outcomes by improving the academic and social success of students.

Scott Thompson, assistant executive director of the Panasonic Foundation

Scott Thompson, assistant executive director of the Panasonic Foundation (Photos by Jessica Nottingham for ECU News Services)

In a ceremony March 7, the foundation signed a memorandum of understanding with ECU and Duplin, Jones, Pender and Sampson county school districts. It’s the first time Panasonic will work in a rural setting with a university.

“We are really excited about this opportunity,” said Scott Thompson, assistant executive director of the Panasonic Foundation. “Our work has been almost entirely urban, and we recognize that rural districts serving children in poverty much like our urban districts have incredibly important work to do. They can be a lot more isolated and neglected in a certain sense to the philanthropic resources that are out there. This is an opportunity to bring folks together and learn from each other.”

Superintendents and school board members from each school district and representatives from the College of Education attended the ceremony held at the East Carolina Heart Institute at ECU.

“To the educational leaders in the room, I would like to recognize your work— it is incredibly important work,” Thompson said. “Thousands of eastern North Carolina students are represented here tonight. Their lives are going to be deeply influenced by what happens in their K-12 experience.”

Panasonic will fund one national coach (who also will work in districts across the country) and the ECU College of Education will fund one full-time teaching faculty member to work with the national coach and eastern North Carolina school districts.

Pender County education superintendent Terri Cobb and administrators with ECU’s Matt Militello and Art Rouse, and Panasonic Foundation assistant executive director Scott Thompson

Pender County education superintendent Terri Cobb and administrators with ECU’s Matt Militello and Art Rouse, and Panasonic Foundation assistant executive director Scott Thompson

COE faculty also will provide professional development based on the needs of the teachers in the school districts.

Last year, ECU began talks with Panasonic to build and add a rural consortium to their network. College of Education faculty members sought districts that fit the criteria and qualified as possible partners. In April, Panasonic’s executive director visited with ECU and in the school districts that were picked. Representatives from the school districts have met with ECU officials over the past 10 months to develop a plan of action.

Matt Militello1 COE.jpg

Matt Militello, Wells Fargo Distinguished Professor in Educational Leadership (contributed photo)

“These types of partnerships (schools, universities, and business foundations) are unique,” said Matt Militello, program coordinator and Wells Fargo Endowed Chair of Educational Leadership at ECU. “We are happy to be on the cutting edge of changing the paradigms and models that will ultimately support district needs in order to improve student achievement.”

ECU College of Education hosts Margaret Blount Harvey Literacy Institute

East Carolina University’s College of Education hosted the spring 2016 Margaret Blount Harvey Literacy Institute on Jan. 30 for students and educators in the Latham Clinical Schools Network, a privately funded partnership that supports the enhancement of 39 school systems in eastern North Carolina.

Margaret Blount Harvey Literacy Leaders board members, who represent districts in the network, and undergraduate students in the ECU College of Education attended separate workshops and sessions throughout the day.

Board members examined literacy instruction in public schools and the issues and challenges that literacy leaders and teachers face. The workshop allowed board members to share strategies for addressing challenges.

students at institute 1 30 2016.jpg

ECU College of Education students reviewed the development and progression of literacy skills and instruction needed to pass the standard reading exam required for a teaching license in North Carolina.

The session for students included a review of the development and progression of literacy skills and instruction needed to be successful on the standard reading exam required for licensure in North Carolina.

“The institute truly helped our future teachers become more prepared to teach and reinforce literacy skills, particularly those early literacy skills and strategies focusing on word recognition and identification,” said Dr. Katherine Misulis, chair of the Department of Literacy Studies, English Education and History Education at ECU.

The Margaret Blount Harvey Institutes are planned by reading education faculty members in the ECU College of Education and sponsored by Margaret and the late Felix Harvey, and daughters Leigh McNairy and Sunny Burrows.

Margaret Blount Harvey Institute 1 30 2016

ECU literacy studies students gather following a working session at the 2016 Margaret Blount Harvey Literacy Institute held at the East Carolina Heart Institute in Greenville on Jan. 30.

Offered in the spring and fall, the institutes are named for Margaret Blount Harvey of Kinston, a former member of the State Board of Education, N.C. Education Research Council, N.C. School Improvement Panel and the Learning Disabilities Association of North Carolina.

College of Education inducts 21 in Educators Hall of Fame

Pictured from left to right are Jerry Shea (brother of the late Dr. Christine Shea); Dr. Linda Patriarca; Lou Anna Hardee; Dr. Jim Westmorland; Jananne Waller; Sarah Faucette; Dr. Elton Lee Newbern Jr.; Dr. Judith Joyner Smith; LuAnn Sullivan (niece of the late Grace C. Whitehurst); Dr. Patrick Miller; Dr. James H. Bearden (foreground); Beverly Watson Carroll; Martin Scott Hutchins; Joanne Bath, Dr. Scott Williams (sponsor of Myron Mooney Angell); Kathy Gibson Harrell; Dr. Sam Houston, Jr.; Nicole Garris Vinson and Frankie Lynn Taylor Tucker. (Contributed photo)

Pictured from left to right are Jerry Shea (brother of the late Dr. Christine Shea); Dr. Linda Patriarca; Lou Anna Hardee; Dr. Jim Westmorland; Jananne Waller; Sarah Faucette; Dr. Elton Lee Newbern Jr.; Dr. Judith Joyner Smith; LuAnn Sullivan (niece of the late Grace C. Whitehurst); Dr. Patrick Miller; Dr. James H. Bearden (foreground); Beverly Watson Carroll; Martin Scott Hutchins; Joanne Bath, Dr. Scott Williams (sponsor of Myron Mooney Angell); Kathy Gibson Harrell; Dr. Sam Houston, Jr.; Nicole Garris Vinson and Frankie Lynn Taylor Tucker. (Contributed photo)

Twenty-one educators and education advocates from across North Carolina were inducted Oct. 18 in the East Carolina University Educators Hall of Fame.

This year’s inductees are the late Myron Mooney Angell of Swansboro; Joanne Bath of Greenville; Dr. James H. Bearden of Greenville; Aaron J. Beaulieu of Wake Forest; Beverly Watson Carroll and the late Freddie Rayford Carroll of Goldsboro; Sarah Faucette of Chocowinity; Nicole Garris Vinson of Greenville; Lou Anna Hardee of Greenville; Kathy Gibson Harrell of Greenville; Dr. Sam H. Houston, Jr. of Raleigh; Martin Scott Hutchins of Gastonia; Dr. Patrick C. Miller of Snow Hill; Dr. Elton Lee Newbern, Jr., of Enfield; Dr. Linda Ann Patriarca of Greenville; the late Dr. Christine M. Shea of Greenville; Dr. Judith Joyner Smith of Snow Hill; Frankie Lynn Taylor Tucker of Raleigh; Jananne Ransdell Waller of Flowery Branch, Georgia; Dr. James R. Westmoreland of Greenville; and the late Grace C. Whitehurst of Conetoe.

The College of Education’s annual induction ceremony raised more than $40,000 for student scholarships.

Each inductee was sponsored with a monetary gift of $1,000 or more in support of the Educators Hall of Fame Scholarship endowment. Annual interest from the endowment is used to fund merit-based scholarships for ECU College of Education students.

Following the induction ceremony in A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall, a reception was held in Speight Building where inductees, family members and guests could view the Educators Hall of Fame wall.

Created in 1999, the Educators Hall of Fame has recognized the service and contributions of more than 443 individuals who have impacted the lives of others, the field of education and the College of Education at ECU. The annual event has raised more than $540,000 toward an endowment goal of $1 million for scholarships.

For more information, contact Terah Archie in the College of Education’s Office of Community Relations and Outreach, at Archiet15@ecu.edu or 252-737-1257.

College of Education awards more than $475,000 in scholarships

By Terah Archie, university program associate in the College of Education

East Carolina University’s College of Education has awarded $476,000 in scholarships to 78 outstanding students for the 2015-2016 school year.

A total of 95 scholarships and awards, ranging from $400 to $20,000, were presented. Several students received multiple scholarships.

Recipients were honored Aug. 28 at the ECU College of Education Scholarship Recipient and Donor Recognition Ceremony at Rock Springs Center.

The scholarships, funded through private donations, support students while honoring and memorializing educators and the profession.

ECU’s College of Education is the largest producer of new teachers in the state and the oldest professional school on campus. The college’s mission is the preparation of professional educators and allied practitioners in business information systems, counseling, electronic media and librarianship. This fall, more than 200 students are enrolled in education programs at ECU.

Following is a list of the scholarships and awards and student recipients:

College of Education Living-Learning Community Scholarships
Four-year scholarships awarded to first year students who plan pursue a career in education.

Betty S. Abernathy Memorial Scholarship – $20,000
Kali Bousquet
Winterville, NC

Pat and Lynn Lane Education Scholarship – $20,000
Kyndall Westerbeek
Warsaw, NC

Pat and Lynn Lane Education Scholarship – $14,000
Michaela Nobels
Vanceboro, NC

Pat and Lynn Lane Education Scholarship – $14,000
Jordan Lewis Outlaw
Washington, NC

James H. and Connie M. Maynard Scholarship – $20,000
Haylie Byanna Dockery
Burgaw, NC

James H. and Connie M. Maynard Scholarship – $20,000
Makenzie Evans
Clayton, NC

James H. and Connie M. Maynard Scholarship – $20,000
Raleigh Forrest
Lumberton, NC

James H. and Connie M. Maynard Scholarship – $20,000
Elizabeth Hawley
Lucama, NC

James H. and Connie M. Maynard Scholarship – $20,000
Mathew Joyner
Elm City, NC

James H. and Connie M. Maynard Scholarship – $20,000
Hannah Lewis
Jacksonville, NC

James H. and Connie M. Maynard Scholarship – $20,000
Hannah Parham
Wilmington, NC

James H. and Connie M. Maynard Scholarship – $20,000
Mollie Pittman
Richlands, NC

James H. and Connie M. Maynard Scholarship – $20,000
Megan Kristina Sealy
Franklinton, NC

James H. and Connie M. Maynard Scholarship – $20,000
Connor Mckinley Wilkins
Washington, NC

College of Education 2015-2016 Scholarships

The Helen Armfield Crowder Scholarship – $4,000
Ayla Allen
Roseboro, NC

The Eloise Faison Teacher Scholarship – $2,500
Ann Ballance
Fremont, NC

The Batton-Boyette Memorial Scholarship – $1,750
Taylor Barbour
Clayton, NC

The Frank G. Fuller Scholarship – $400
Jena Bogovich
Northumberland, PA

The Don and Linda Lassiter Scholarship (COE) – $3,000
Cheri Brown
Smithfield, NC

The Dianne and Chip Linville Doctoral Fellowship Endowment Fund – $1,000
Shannon Cecil
Greenville, NC

The Dr. Sunday Ajose Memorial Scholarship – $2,000
Brett Congleton
Winterville, NC

The Dr. Charles R. Coble Scholarship Fund – $2,500
Candice Corcoran
Eden, NC

The Carolyn C. Matthews Jones Scholarship – $4,500
Candice Corcoran
Eden, NC

The David and BJ Fisher Scholarship in Education – $1,500
Candice Corcoran
Eden, NC

The Dixie Wilson Duncan Science Education Scholarship – $1,000
Jessica Curasi
Mebane, NC

The Dr. Moses M. Sheppard Scholarship Fund – $1,000
Allison Cuthrell
New Bern, NC

The Hattie M. Strong Foundation Scholarship – $5,000
Allison Cuthrell
New Bern, NC

The Laughinghouse-Leary Scholarship – $500
Allison Cuthrell
New Bern, NC

The Craig W. and Ruth T. Joyner Family Scholarship – $1,000
Allison Cuthrell
New Bern, NC

The Alston W. Burke Scholarship – $6,500
Brittany Daniels
Rocky Mount, NC

The Ellen Boone Staton Memorial Scholarship – $1,500
Elizabeth Dupree
Holly Ridge, NC

The Alston W. Burke Scholarship – $6,500
Margaret Ellen Edwards
Kinston, NC

The Emily S. Boyce Fellowship – $2,500
Joy Edwards
Wilson, NC

The Sheltering Home Circle of the King’s Daughters and Sons Scholarship – $2,500
Katherine Freer
Wendell, NC

The Katie Earle Owen Morgan Scholarship Endowed Fund – $2,500
Katherine Freer
Wendell, NC

The Charles and Beth Ward Scholarship in Elementary Education – $1,400
Katherine Freer
Wendell, NC

The Kay Hall Chesson Scholarship – $1,500
Michelle Gianvito
North Brunswick, NJ

The H. Frances Daniels Scholarship – $5,000
Michelle Gianvito
North Brunswick, NJ

The Thadys J. Dewar Scholarship – $1,000
Michelle Gianvito
North Brunswick, NJ

The Sally Ruth Hinton Klingenschmitt Scholarship – $400
Melyssa Gomez
Fayetteville, NC

The Becky Keith Ledford Scholarship – $2,000
Karen Gurley
Burnsville, NC

The Gina Gaillard Locklear Scholarship – $2,000
Karen Gurley
Burnsville, NC

The Dr. Suzanne Wester, M.D. Scholarship – $4,500
Derek Hamm
Snow Hill, NC

The Helen Massey Harrell Memorial Scholarship – $1,500
Gabriele Harrell
Gates, NC

The Polly Mason Strickland Education Scholarship – $1,000
Gabriele Harrell
Gates, NC

The Mary Elizabeth Austin Yancey Scholarship Fund – $5,000
Lauren Holloway
Creedmoor, NC

The Hattie M. Strong Foundation Scholarship – $5,000
Mackinsay Howe
Smithfield, NC

The Alva Sawyer & Lee G. Williams Memorial Scholarship – $1,000
Takeiya Hudson
Robersonville, NC

The Dr. James W. Batten Research Fellow Scholarship – $2,500
Brianna Ingram
Virginia Beach, VA

The Kathy A. Taft Memorial Scholarship – $2,000
Maria Johnson
Kinston, NC

The Eloise Faison Teacher Scholarship – $2,500
Melanie Koerber
Elizabeth City, NC

The Osmond Mitchell Endowment Fund – $5,000
Anthony Lassetter
Vanceboro, NC

The Linda Haddock McRae Memorial Scholarship – $5,000
Sharon Lepore
Fayetteville, NC

The James Bryant Kirkland, Jr. and Evelyn Johnson Kirkland Middle Grades Scholarship – $5,000
Mary MacRae
Fayetteville, NC

The Alston W. Burke Scholarship – $6,500
Sarah Marsh
Newark, DE

The Hattie M. Strong Foundation Scholarship – $5,000
Corinne McClain
Kill Devil Hills, NC

The Edwin and Hazel Roberts Donnell Scholarship – $1,000
Rebecca McHugh
Southern Pines, NC

The Sharon Raynor Scholarship – $1,000
Danielle Mehling
Jamestown, NC

The Dr. John T. Richards Scholarship – $800
Danielle Mehling
Jamestown, NC

The Faye Marie Creegan Scholarship Endowment Fund – $1,500
Heather Modlin
Jamesville, NC

The Ralph Brimley Enrichment Fund – $3,000
Gregory Monroe
Winterville, NC

The Dr. Betty M. Long Memorial Scholarship – $2,000
Michelle Nendza
Plainview, NY

The Eloise Faison Teacher Scholarship – $2,500
Michelle Nendza
Plainview, NY

The Osmond Mitchell Endowment Fund – $5,000
Michaela Nobles
Vanceboro, NC

The Jane B. Reel Education Scholarship – $1,000
Olivia Oakley
Greenville, NC

The Katie Earle Owen Morgan Scholarship Endowed Fund – $1,250
Alyssa Overton
Wilmington, NC

The Eloise Faison Teacher Scholarship – $2,500
Alyssa Overton
Wilmington, NC

The Andy Roos Memorial Scholarship – $2,500
Kiana Owens
Cary, NC

The Gayle Morgan Shearer Endowment Fund – $1,000
Danielle Parrish
Middlesex, NC

The Alston W. Burke Scholarship – $6,500
Jessica Pinner
Winterville, NC

The Daisy Carson Latham Memorial Scholarship – $3,000
Mary-Ashley Pollard
Benson, NC

The Alston W. Burke Scholarship – $6,500
Rebecca Poole
Winterville, NC

The Teer-Mihalyi Academic Enrichment Endowed Fund – $2,500
Lillian Reinisch
Land O Lakes, FL

The Benjamin Scott Denton Scholarship in Special Education – $500
Lillian Reinisch
Land O Lakes, FL

The Kallam/Moore Scholarship – $1,500
Lillian Reinisch
Land O Lakes, FL

The Educators Hall of Fame Scholarship – $2,500
Meredith Sanderson
Kinston, NC

The Tom and Karen Bartik Scholarship in Science Education – $750
Hazelle Sandoval
Raleigh, NC

The Tom and Karen Bartik Scholarship in English Education – $750
Chandria Sharpe
Waxhaw, NC

The Russell-Smith Fellowship in Adult Education – $1,000
Tiffanie Simerson
Greenville, NC

The Angel Boberg-Webb Scholarship – $500
Chelsea Skurow
Charlotte, NC

The Callaree Jarvis Horton Elementary Education Scholarship – $1,000
Lanie Smith
Washington, NC

The James H. and Virginia J. Tucker Scholarship – $1,000
Haley Sparrow
Winterville, NC

The Doris Burnette Scholarship – $5,000
Avery Spey
Cary, NC

The James Bryant Kirkland, Jr. and Evelyn Johnson Kirkland Middle Grades Scholarship – $5,000
Lauren Stephens
Fayetteville, NC

The Alston W. Burke Scholarship – $6,500
Taunya Stevens-Johnson
Barberton, OH

The J. Worth Carter Scholarship – $900
Lauren Stone
Greenville, NC

The Mary Lois Staton Scholarship – $5,000
Chelsea Taylor
Gates, NC

The Miriam Perry Saunders Education Scholarship Fund – $5,000
Tiffany Taylor
Greenville, NC

The Alston W. Burke Scholarship – $6,500
Samaria Trimble
Greenville, NC

The Dr. Suzanne Wester, M.D. Scholarship – $4,500
Aleida Velasquez
Greenville, NC

The Mack and Margaret Coble Doctoral Fellowship – $2,500
Angela Wall
Mount Olive, NC

The Daisy Carson Latham Memorial Scholarship – $3,000
Jessea Waterfield
Buxton, NC

The Floyd and Pauline Mattheis Scholarship – $1,000
Kayla Watterson
Fayetteville, NC

The Catherine Jones Baggett Scholarship – $2,800
Kyndall Westerbeek
Warsaw, NC

Visit the university scholarships page for more information about each scholarship (http://www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/universityscholarships/scholarships.cfm#a5).

 

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Patriarca named among most influential deans

Former ECU College of Education Dean Dr. Linda A. Patriarca was named one of the 30 most influential deans of education in the United States by Mometrix Test Preparation.

Patriarca

Patriarca

According to the Mometrix web site (http://www.mometrix.com/blog/the-30-most-influential-deans-of-education-in-the-united-states/) the list was developed as a way to honor individuals dedicated to educating the future workforce.

The list was compiled through analysis of state and national awards and honors, education program rankings, degree program rankings and level of pay received by graduates of the teaching programs.
Patriarca stepped down from the dean position this summer. Dr. B. Grant Hayes assumed the role of dean on July 31.

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